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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

New electric technologies to reduce global warming impacts  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric technologies hold significant potential to reduce global warming impact through reduction of primary fuel needed to power end-use applications. These reductions can occur in two forms: (1) reduced kilowatt-hour usage and power plant emissions through efficiency improvements and technological enhancements of existing electrically-driven applications; (2) the development of new electric technologies to replace traditional fossil-fuel driven applications which can result in less overall primary energy consumption and lower overall emissions. Numerous new electric technologies are presently being developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. The technologies reviewed in this paper include: Microwave Fabric Dryer, Advanced Heat Pumps, Heat Pump Water Heater, Infrared Sand Reclaimer, Freeze Concentration, Membrane Water Recovery, Microwave Petrochemical Production, Infrared Drying, and Electric Vehicles. Full commercialization of these technologies can result in significant energy savings and CO[sub 2] reductions, in addition to improving the competitiveness of businesses using these technologies.

Courtright, H.A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Integrated Wind Energy/Desalination System; General Electric Global Research  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with General Electric Global Research to explore wind power as a desirable option for integration with desalination technologies.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

American Electric Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Technologies Inc Electric Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Technologies Inc Place Houston, Texas Zip TX 77087 Sector Services Product American Electric Technologies (formerly M&I Electric Industries) is a global supplier of power delivery products and services to the traditional and alternative energy industries. References American Electric Technologies Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Electric Technologies Inc is a company located in Houston, Texas . References ↑ "American Electric Technologies Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Electric_Technologies_Inc&oldid=342113"

8

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

10

Global forces shape the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Whatever scenario for electricity comes to pass - one that emphasizes richness in energy supply or productivity in demand - expect to see increased complexity in the industry and its structures. Technology will be a key subversive element of this process of Schumpeterian creation and destruction. There are powerful global forces at work that are transforming whole economies and industries. Today`s electricity industry, with a century of tradition behind it, is also likely to be transformed in terms of its structure, competitive nature and the fuels that it uses. The electricity demand-Gross Domestic Product (GDP) relationship also stems from the increased share of electricity in energy markets. Overall, energy demand is declining relative to GDP, driven by increased efficiency and economic restructuring. Eventually (as indeed is already discernible in OECD countries) electricity demand will show the same characteristics.

Rainbow, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Countries' Agriculture and Electric Power Sectors Jayant A.of scale in the U.S. electric power sector was a study byof Scale in U.S. Electric Power Generation", in Journal of

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor technologies, performance, low-cost materials, and thermal control systems that will yield...

13

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies ...  

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research ...

14

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

15

Global Technology Regulation and Potentially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000 Bill Joy proposed that the best way to prevent technological apocalypse was to "relinquish " emerging bio-, info- and nanotechnologies. His essay introduced many watchdog groups to the dangers that futurists had been warning of for decades. One such group, ETC, has called for a moratorium on all nanotechnological research until all safety issues can be investigated and social impacts ameliorated. In this essay I discuss the differences and similarities of regulating bio- and nanotechnological innovation to the efforts to regulate nuclear and biological weapons of mass destruction. I then suggest the creation of a global technology regulatory regime to ensure the safe and equitable diffusion of genetic, molecular and information technologies, and point out the principal political obstacles to implementing such a regime. Global Technology Regulation James J. Hughes 2

Fritz Allhoff; Patrick Lin; James Moor; John Weckert; J. Hughes Ph. D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Global Electric Motorcars | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Electric Motorcars Global Electric Motorcars Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Electric Motorcars Place Fargo, North Dakota Zip 58102 Sector Vehicles Product Global Electric Motorcars (GEM), a Chrysler Company, develops and manufactures electric vehicles. Coordinates 36.37617°, -99.622804° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.37617,"lon":-99.622804,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity Technology Deployment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity Technology Deployment Agency/Company /Organization: e8, UN-Energy, US Energy Association and World Energy Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: - Energy Access, Finance Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.globalelectricity.org/upload/File/Summit%20Meeting/NY%202011/e8-UN Cost: Free Language: English The focus of the initiative is to jointly identify the most effective and

19

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2009. It addresses relevant policies in the United States and internationally, technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to Revolutionize Electric Power in North America National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2008. It addresses technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by EPRI and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

NREL: Energy Analysis - Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools that can assist in learning more about the listed technologies and...

23

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

24

Economic benefits of decarbonising the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional economic analyses of stringent climate change mitigation have generally concluded that economic austerity would result from carbon austerity. These analyses however rely critically on the assumption of an economic equilibrium, which dismisses established notions on behavioural heterogeneity, path dependence and technology transitions. Here we show that on the contrary, the decarbonisation of the electricity sector globally can lead to improvements in economic performance. By modelling the process of innovation-diffusion and non-equilibrium dynamics, we establish how climate policy instruments for emissions reductions alter economic activity through energy prices, government spending, enhanced investment and tax revenues. While higher electricity prices reduce income and output, this is over-compensated by enhanced employment generated by investments in new technology. We stress that the current dialogue on the impacts of climate policies must be revisited to reflect the real complex dynamics invo...

Mercure, J F; Foley, A; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H; Holden, P B; Edwards, N R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Program on Technology Innovation: Electricity Use in the Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many utilities are encouraged by regulators to engage in end-use energy efficiency programs, few consider options to reduce energy losses along the electricity value chain, even though the electricity sector is the second largest electricity-consuming industry in the United States. Electricity used to facilitate power production, transmission, and distribution alone consumes approximately 11% of generated electricity. A number of technologies can be applied to reduce this electricity use. This repo...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Definition: Electricity Storage Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Electricity Storage Technologies Technologies that can store electricity to be used at a later time. These devices require a mechanism to convert alternating current (AC) electricity into another form for storage, and then back to AC electricity. Common forms of electricity storage include batteries, flywheels, and pumped hydro. Electricity storage can provide backup power, peaking power, and ancillary services, and can store excess electricity produced by renewable energy resources when available.[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/electricity_storage_technologies [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitionssmart grid,smart grid,

27

CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION & SOLUTIONS | GREENER VEHICLES Home There are currently no...

28

Geothermal Technologies Office: Electricity Generation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

29

Global Lithium Availability: A Constraint for Electric Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is disagreement on whether the supply of lithium is adequate to support a future global fleet of electric vehicles. We report a comprehensive analysis… (more)

Medina, Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Renewable energy shows strongest growth in global electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration's International Energy Outlook 2011 (IEO2011) projects that the amount of global hydroelectric and other renewable electric ...

31

PNNL Global Energy Technology Strategy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Strategy Program Technology Strategy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Name Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.pnl.gov/gtsp/ References Global Energy Technology Strategy Program [1] "Since its inception in 1998, the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program (GTSP) has been assessing the important roles that technology can play in effectively managing the long-term risks of climate change. This involves an integrated approach to fully exploring all aspects of climate change - including scientific, economic, regulatory, and social impacts - and then aligning new or existing technologies to mitigate negative consequences.[1]

32

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; ... For more information about these technologies, ... Marketing Summaries: TAG CLOUD:

34

Project Brief: General Electric, GE Global Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for rapidly routing electrical energy to customers from diverse sources such as wind and solar powered devices. RECIPIENT: General Electric, GE ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Nonproliferation Technology Nuclear Material Detection & Characterization Nuclear Security Advanced Technologies Safeguards & Security Technology Threat Reduction...

36

Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Global Warming Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy

37

Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National · Prospects for electricity development · Investment requirements · Key challenges · Final remarks #12 and the transport burden in Tanzania. Source: Modi, 2004 #12;2. Energy and Human Development Access to electricity

38

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Technology Transfer: Triggering New Global Markets and Job Growth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Transfer: Triggering New Global Markets and Job Growth Technology Transfer: Triggering New Global Markets and Job Growth Technology Transfer: Triggering New Global Markets and Job Growth September 20, 2011 - 11:33am Addthis The Global Positioning System (GPS) was initially a government technology developed to guide nuclear missiles, and is one of the many examples of the economic potential of successful technology transfer -- the now worldwide location technologies market is projected to grow to $75 billion by 2013. The Global Positioning System (GPS) was initially a government technology developed to guide nuclear missiles, and is one of the many examples of the economic potential of successful technology transfer -- the now worldwide location technologies market is projected to grow to $75 billion by 2013.

40

PNNL Global Energy Technology Strategy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Strategy Program Technology Strategy Program (Redirected from Global Energy Technology Strategy Program) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Name Global Energy Technology Strategy Program Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.pnl.gov/gtsp/ References Global Energy Technology Strategy Program [1] "Since its inception in 1998, the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program (GTSP) has been assessing the important roles that technology can play in effectively managing the long-term risks of climate change. This involves an integrated approach to fully exploring all aspects of climate change - including scientific, economic, regulatory, and social impacts - and then aligning new or existing technologies to mitigate negative consequences.[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New Electric Grid Technologies for Renewable Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and changing electric loads that are becoming part of the "orchestra" · Dealing with economic and public policy & Intelligent Agent (temporal power flow control) · Solar and Wind Forecasting Tools · Generator and LoadNew Electric Grid Technologies for Renewable Integration - The Need for Being Smarter - Presented

Islam, M. Saif

42

Electric Transportation Technology Update Newsletter, September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to Electric Transportation's first Technology Update Newsletter. The purpose of this newsletter is to provide high level information on EPRI research, highlight member projects, and discuss other relevant topics of interest in electric transportation. This first newsletter focuses on plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure, including interoperability for networked charging equipment, a status update on DC fast charging protocols, GIS modeling for statewide infrastructure deployment, and the ..

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Global Potential for Wind-Generated Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... free, non-urban areas and operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity, could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDE FRONT COVER 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABOR ATORIES 3 R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology For further information, contact: Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 ABOUT THE COVER: Representative images from the R&D100- winning technologies in this brochure, all with their roots in Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABOR ATORIES 5 R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology Contents More-sophisticated Silicon Br ains

45

Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

46

Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Place Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 214187...

47

Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

48

Pages that link to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd" Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to:...

49

Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

50

Changes related to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd" Wuxi Qiaolian Wind Electricity Technology Co Ltd Jump to:...

51

U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop...

52

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers8212including increased deployment of renewable generation, the high capital cost of managing grid peak demands, and large capital investments in grid infrastructure for reliability8212is creating new interest in electric energy storage systems. New EPRI research offers a current snapshot of the storage landscape and an analytical framework for estimating the benefits of applications and life-cycle costs of energy storage systems. This paper describes in detail 10 key appl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies  

SciTech Connect

We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Video Highlights Development of Lab Technologies to Combat Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Highlights Development of Lab Technologies to Combat Global Poverty See video Click here to view this video Date: February 5, 2013 Presenter(s): Ashok Gadgil, Shashi...

56

Developing and Transferring Technologies for a Global Low-Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office EETD Safety Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Developing and Transferring Technologies for a Global Low-Carbon Energy System Speaker(s):...

57

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Technology: TOPTEC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, growing awareness of environmental and energy issues associated with the automobile has resulted in renewed interest in the electric vehicle. In recognition of this, the Society of Automotive Engineers has added a TOPTEC on electric vehicles to the series of technical symposia focused on key issues currently facing industry and government. This workshop on the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle provides an opportunity to learn about recent progress in these rapidly changing technologies. Research and development of both the vehicle and battery system has accelerated sharply and in fact, the improved technologies of the powertrain system make the performance of today's electric vehicle quite comparable to the equivalent gasoline vehicle, with the exception of driving range between refueling'' stops. Also, since there is no tailpipe emission, the electric vehicle meets the definition of Zero Emission Vehicle: embodied in recent air quality regulations. The discussion forum will include a review of the advantages and limitations of electric vehicles, where the technologies are today and where they need to be in order to get to production level vehicles, and the service and maintenance requirements once they get to the road. There will be a major focus on the status of battery technologies, the various approaches to recharge of the battery systems and the activities currently underway for developing standards throughout the vehicle and infrastructure system. Intermingled in all of this technology discussion will be a view of the new relationships emerging between the auto industry, the utilities, and government. Since the electric vehicle and its support system will be the most radical change ever introduced into the private vehicle sector of the transportation system, success in the market requires an understanding of the role of all of the partners, as well as the new technologies involved.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Technology: TOPTEC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, growing awareness of environmental and energy issues associated with the automobile has resulted in renewed interest in the electric vehicle. In recognition of this, the Society of Automotive Engineers has added a TOPTEC on electric vehicles to the series of technical symposia focused on key issues currently facing industry and government. This workshop on the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle provides an opportunity to learn about recent progress in these rapidly changing technologies. Research and development of both the vehicle and battery system has accelerated sharply and in fact, the improved technologies of the powertrain system make the performance of today`s electric vehicle quite comparable to the equivalent gasoline vehicle, with the exception of driving range between ``refueling`` stops. Also, since there is no tailpipe emission, the electric vehicle meets the definition of ``Zero Emission Vehicle: embodied in recent air quality regulations. The discussion forum will include a review of the advantages and limitations of electric vehicles, where the technologies are today and where they need to be in order to get to production level vehicles, and the service and maintenance requirements once they get to the road. There will be a major focus on the status of battery technologies, the various approaches to recharge of the battery systems and the activities currently underway for developing standards throughout the vehicle and infrastructure system. Intermingled in all of this technology discussion will be a view of the new relationships emerging between the auto industry, the utilities, and government. Since the electric vehicle and its support system will be the most radical change ever introduced into the private vehicle sector of the transportation system, success in the market requires an understanding of the role of all of the partners, as well as the new technologies involved.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Global Grid-Connected Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Project: Year-End Summary Report, November 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes research conducted under the auspices of the Global Grid-Connected Hybrid Electric Vehicle Project, an EPRI initiative to promote the use of grid-connected electric technologies in heavy-duty applications. One study in the program evaluated the potential of converting a Ford E-350 or E-450 Super Duty chassis into a grid-connected hybrid electric vehicle airport shuttle bus and a Ford Explorer chassis into a dedicated electric vehicle delivery van. A second study analyzed ad...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Integrated Assessment of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

described in this paper coordinated by the Consortium of Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Global Climate Change Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-binding national targets have been set for the consumption of electricity from renewable sources and for biofuels - The United States - Developing nations · Biofuels targets · Biofuels policy overview by region - The European renewable fuels targets (gallons bn), 2006-2012 · Biofuels energy targets · Biofuel policy overview

Ford, Andrew

62

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solar Thermal Electric Technology in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in the solar thermal electric (STE) industry during 2004. It addresses noteworthy policy decisions, economic considerations, and technological advances. It also provides a status report for selected key demonstrations, as well as analysis and context from EPRI experts and consultants.

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

The specification and estimation of technological change in electricity production  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the rate of technological change in electricity production. The dominant role of fossil fuel-fired electricity production in the industry, coupled with the direct association with the emission of greenhouse gases, makes technology parameters particularly significant for several reasons. First, very long-run simulations of energy-economic paths at a global level require that technical progress occupy a place in the methodology for sound formulations that are vital in global emissions/energy policy analysis. Second, given the outlook for electricity generation being predominately coal-based, especially in developing economies around the world, the specification and measurement of technical change is essential for developing realistic long-run technology forecasts. Finally, industry or sector growth in productivity hinges partly on technical progress, and updated analysis will always be necessary to stay abreast of developments on this front, as well as for economic growth considerations in general. This study is based on empirical economic research on production functions in the electric utility industry. However, it advances a seldom used approach, called the {open_quotes}engineering-production function{close_quotes}, in contrast to the more common neoclassical approach used by economists. Combined with this approach is a major departure from the type of data used to conduct econometric estimations of production parameters. This research draws upon a consistent set of ex ante or {open_quotes}blueprint{close_quotes} data that better reflects planned, technical performance and cost data elements, in contrast to the more customary, expect type of data from actual firm/plant operations. The results from the examination of coal-fired technologies indicate the presence of technical change. Using data for the period from 1979 to 1989, we find technical change to be capital-augmenting at the rate of 1.8 percent per year.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Ashton, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Electric energy savings from new technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for ten technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all ten technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Thus, the savings projected here represent between 4% and 14% of total consumption projected for 2000. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference forecast, reducing projected electricity consumption from what it otherwise would have been, the savings estimated here should not be directly subtracted from the reference forecast.

Moe, R.J.; Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #795: September 2, 2013 Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: September 2, 2013 Electric Vehicle Charging Stations by State to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 795: September 2, 2013 Electric Vehicle Charging...

67

Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Electricity Workshop Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity Workshop Public release of the documents and presentations shared during the clean...

68

Linking Science and Technology for Global Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 15, 2007 ... trading scheme and the influence on energy prices, smelter ...... rate and the electricity conductivity of the sample containing additives are much.

69

Linking Science and Technology for Global Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 15, 2007 ... trading scheme and the influence on energy prices, smelter ...... or water, to provide electricity, to provide free heat or simply to improve the.

70

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Graphic of Global Superior Energy Performance working groups, including energy management led by the United States, power led by Japan, combined heat and power led by Finland, steel led by Japan, cool roofs led by the United states, and cement led by Japan. GSEP, a multi-country effort to create and coordinate nationally accredited energy performance certification programs, comprises a number of working groups. Credit: DOE The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program, which provides industrial facilities and commercial buildings a framework for achieving continual improvement in energy efficiency while maintaining market competitiveness. SEP aims to provide a transparent, globally accepted system for energy management and continuous energy performance improvement.

71

Operational Space Technology for Global Vegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of global agriculture and the grain sector is to feed 6 billion people. Frequent droughts causing grain shortages, economic disturbances, famine, and losses of life limit the ability to fulfill this goal. To mitigate drought ...

Felix N. Kogan

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development Speaker(s): Geoffrey J. Blanford Date: July 21, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Afzal Siddiqui John Stoops In this study we propose a novel formulation of a decision problem in R&D strategy. The problem is motivated by and applied to the context of technologies relevant to global climate change, but is characterized in general by an aggregate R&D decision-maker with a social welfare objective, technology diffusion markets subject to externalities in which private costs are minimized, and uncertainty in both technological and environmental factors. A technology strategy is defined as the allocation of R&D investment across several broad research programs, and the

73

Building Technologies Office: Global Cool Cities Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

74

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development Speaker(s): Geoffrey J. Blanford Date: July 21, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

75

Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT Jump to: navigation, search Name Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT) Place Finland Zip 4320 Product Offers large capacity electrical energy storage solutions using technology based on lithium-ion batteries and intelligent cell control systems. References Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT) is a company located in Finland . References ↑ "Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies (FEVT)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Finnish_Electric_Vehicle_Technologies_FEVT&oldid=345367"

76

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in...

77

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Measurement Measurement Science & Systems Engineering Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research...

78

Hybrid & electric vehicle technology and its market feasibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) technology and their sales forecasts are discussed. First, the current limitations and the future potential ...

Jeon, Sang Yeob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY Guy MEUNIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY MARKET Guy MEUNIER Cahier n° 2013-23 ECOLE:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00906944,version1-20Nov2013 #12;Risk aversion and technology mix in an electricity market Guy-aversion on the long-term equilibrium technology mix in an electricity market. It develops a model where firms can

Recanati, Catherine

80

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

David J. Hill

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Prebake Cell Technology: A Global Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alcan Aluminium developed three versions of end-to-end, side-work PB cell technologies that are still in use at various smelters and one side-by-side, point- feed ...

82

Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercialization of Electric Technologies Commercialization of Electric Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Place Austin, Texas Zip 78701 Product Texas-based research institution that promotes the development of the electrical system. References Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies is a company located in Austin, Texas . References ↑ "Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Center_for_the_Commercialization_of_Electric_Technologies&oldid=343363

83

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), drawing on the experience and expertise of both research organizations. The goal of this study was to assess selected hydrogen technologies for potential application to transportation and power generation. Specifically, this study evaluated scenarios for deploying hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. One study objective was to identify the most promising near-term and long-term hydrogen vehicle technologies based on performance, efficiency, and emissions profiles and compare them to traditional vehicle technologies. Hydrogen vehicle propulsion may take many forms, ranging from hydrogen or hythane fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) to fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. This study attempted to developed performance and emissions profiles for each type (assuming a light duty truck platform) so that effective deployment strategies can be developed. A second study objective was to perform similar cost, efficiency, and emissions analysis related to hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the Southeast. There will be many alternative approaches for the deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, ranging from distributed hydrogen production to centralized production, with a similar range of delivery options. This study attempted to assess the costs and potential emissions associated with each scenario. A third objective was to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen fuel cell technologies for stationary power generation and to identify the advantages and limits of different technologies. Specific attention was given to evaluating different fuel cell membrane types. A final objective was to promote the use and deployment of hydrogen technologies in the Southeast. This effort was to include establishing partnerships with industry as well promoting educational and outreach efforts to public service providers. To accomplish these goals and objectives a work plan was developed comprising 6 primary tasks: • Task 1 - Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light-Duty Vehicles – The PSAT powertrain simulation software was used to evaluate candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicle technologies for near-term and long-term deployment in the Southeastern U.S. • Task 2 - Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles - An investigation was conducted into the emissions and efficiency of light-duty internal combustion engines fueled with hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) blends. The different fuel blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. • Task 3 - Economic and Energy Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - Expertise in engineering cost estimation, hydrogen production and delivery analysis, and transportation infrastructure systems was used to develop regional estimates of resource requirements and costs for the infrastructure needed to deliver hydrogen fuels to advanced-technology vehicles. • Task 4 –Emissions Analysis for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - The hydrogen production and delivery scenarios developed in Task 3 were expanded to include analysis of energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with each specific case studies. • Task 5 – Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Power Generation - The purpose of this task was to assess the performance of different fuel cell types (specifically low-temperature and high temperature membranes) for use in stationary power generation. • Task 6 – Establishment of a Southeastern Hydrogen Consortium - The goal of this task was to establish a Southeastern Hydrogen Technology Consortium (SHTC) whose purpose would be to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Climate Focus Area: Geothermal Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/getem.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/geothermal-electricity-technology-eva Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model[1] Model the estimated performance and costs of available U.S. geothermal

85

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hybrid and for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

86

VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies VDE Association for Electrical Electronic Information Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies) Place Germany Sector Services, Solar Product VDE provides certification services for, amongst others, solar panels. References VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies) is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "VDE (Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=VDE_Association_for_Electrical_Electronic_Information_Technologies&oldid=352739

87

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2K-2854 RAB 4/01 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 Hydro 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Other 1% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy Annual 1999 (February 2001) 2020 data from International Energy Outlook 2001 (March 2001) + 6 0 % Oil 40% Hydro 7% Other 0.7% Nuclear 7% 1999 85% Fossil Energy 382 Qbtu / yr 2020 85% Fossil Energy 607 Qbtu / yr Oil 40% Nuclear 4% 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 0 2 4 6 8 12 2000 2050 2100 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) Population Projections: United Nations "Long-Range World Population Projections: Based on the 1998 Revision" Energy Projections: "Global Energy Perspectives" ITASA / WEC World Population Population of

88

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: September 30, 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 on

89

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: July 23, 2001 5: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #175: July 23, 2001 Electricity Chosen over Ethanol and Hydrogen on

90

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

91

MHK Technologies/Float Wave Electric Power Station | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Electric Power Station Wave Electric Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Float Wave Electric Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Applied Technologies Company Ltd Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The module of FWEPS is an oblong axisymmetrical capsule float which is located on the sea surface Inside the capsule there is a mechanical wave energy converter consisting of an oscillatory system and drive and an electric generator and energy accumulator Under the wave effect the capsule float and inner oscillatory system of the mechanical converter are in continuous oscillatory motion while the drive engaged with the system provides a continuous turn for the electric generator

92

Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

Anderson, Iver

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 11, 6: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #766:

94

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about...

95

Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan on Facebook Tweet about...

96

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #796: September 9, 2013 Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: September 9, 2013 Electric Vehicle and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales History to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 796: September 9, 2013...

97

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

98

Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd Place Beijing, China Zip 100022 Sector Services Product Accord Global Environmental Technology Co Ltd (AGET) is an independent consultancy providing a complete package of CDM consulting services,and specific technical assistance at different stages of CDM project development. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the use of integrated Smart Grid technologies, including household and community battery storage, smart meters and appliances, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and homes...

100

Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co Ang Li Tiansheng | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co (Ang Li Tiansheng) Place Zaozhuang, Shandong Province, China Product Chinese PV cell and module maker. References Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co (Ang Li Tiansheng)1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

U.S. - China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center, Argonne National Lab TCS Building and Conference Center United States Flag China flag U.S. - China Electric Vehicle Technology Workshop August 30 - September 1, 2010...

102

Education: The Effort Is Global - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Education: The Effort Is Global About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

103

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (services to a building microgrid produces technology neutral

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Comparative Analysis of Global Warming Policies for California's Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i A Comparative Analysis of Global Warming Policies for California's Electricity Sector Sara Kamins #12;ii A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL WARMING POLICIES FOR CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SECTOR By: Sara...................................................................................................................11 1.4. Literature Review on Comparisons of Carbon-Reducing Electricity Policies

Kammen, Daniel M.

105

Welcome - Energy Efficiency & Electricity Technologies Program - EESD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome ORNL delivers key support to DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs through three broad areas of research and development. Sustainable electricity is aligned under the Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program. ORNL's sustainable electricity program develops technologies to create a cleaner environment. This program addresses challenges in renewable generation, electricity distribution and end-use in buildings to ensure our nation's energy security through cost effective solutions while mitigating and reducing environmental impacts. Sustainable manufacturing is aligned under ORNL's Office of Energy Materials, which manages the EERE Industrial Technologies Program at ORNL. Sustainable manufacturing draws on the laboratory's world-class

106

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles between 1997 and 2000, the major automakers discontinued production of all-electric cars by the early 2000s. Still, the idea of an all-electric car was alive. A...

107

EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric 750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology to facilitate the development and demonstration of a multi-faceted, synergistic approach to managing fluctuations in wind power within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas transmission grid. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

108

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: October 22, 0: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012 Electric Vehicle Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #750: October 22, 2012

109

Technological development under global warning : roadmap of the coal generation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the measures for the Japanese electric power utilities to meet the Kyoto Target, and the technological development of the coal thermal power generation to meet the further abatement of the carbon dioxide ...

Furuyama, Yasushi, 1963-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Efficient Electric Technologies for Industrial Heating: Emerging Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial process heating is typically accomplished with fossil- and by-product fuels. However, new high-efficiency electric technologies for process heating applications are under development and commercially available, including three efficient electric process heating technologies covered in this Brief: Induction heating and melting Microwave (MW) heating, drying and curing Radio frequency (RF) heating, drying, and curing These technologies were selected for three reasons. First, in each case there a...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory - Leaking Electricity Web Site http://Effort to Reduce Leaking Electricity Alan MEIER* & Benoîtfraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Diurnal Variations of Global Thunderstorms and Electrified Shower Clouds and Their Contribution to the Global Electrical Circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-standing mainstay of support for C. T. R. Wilson’s global circuit hypothesis is the similarity between the diurnal variation of thunderstorm days in universal time and the Carnegie curve of electrical potential gradient. This rough ...

Chuntao Liu; Earle R. Williams; Edward J. Zipser; Gary Burns

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Report of the EMF 19 Study on Technology and Global Climate Change Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON TECHNOLOGY AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE POLICIES David J. Beecy (david.beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2786) Office of Environmental Systems Technology U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road GTN, FE-23, E-133 Germantown, MD 20545 Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov; 202-586-0883) Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, EI-80 Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy 100 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Richard G. Richels (rrichels@epri.com; 650-855-2602) Global Climate Change Program Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 John P. Weyant (weyant@stanford.edu; 650-723-3506) Department of Management Science & Engineering Terman Building: Room 406 Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-4026

114

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science & Technology Science Education Innovation Energy Sources Energy Usage Energy Efficiency...

115

GTI online - matching gas technologies with global gas markets  

SciTech Connect

The International Centre for Gas Technology Information (ICGTI) is a technology information centre of the International Energy Agency (IEA). Its members account for more than half the world`s natural gas production and consumption. ICGTI has established a web site, GTI Online (http://www.icgti.org). GTI Online is designed to cover all aspects of the gas industry from production to end-use as well as supporting technologies, including market assessment, national energy policies, environmental information and computing and modeling techniques. It si designed to use existing information sources whenever possible, so as not to duplicate public and/or commercial efforts. It is intended to fill the gap in providing useful international information to both the US and global market.

Lang, M., Manor, D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

68; W{A)-09-025; CH-1490 68; W{A)-09-025; CH-1490 General· Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent tights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to define, develop, and test new fuel nozzle technology concepts for gas turbine operation on a wide spectrum of opportunity fuels and/or fuel blends. Successful technology concepts will be developed and tested through full pressure, full temperature single nozzle component combustion testing. This waiver is for inventions of GE-GRC only. The work under this subcontract is expected to take place from October 1, 2008

117

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FC26-08NT01579; W(A)-09-036, CH-1501 The Petitioner, General Electric Global Research (GE), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled , "High-Efficiency Sold-State Downlight Luminaries with Novel Cooling". According to its response to question 2, G E states that this program will develop novel synthetic jet cooling technology for cooling LED luminaries. In addition to synthetic jet technology, driver electronics , light engine , optical design , and fixture will be designed and demonstrated. This waiver is only for inventions of GE made under the cooperative agreement. The total estimated cost of the contract is $2 ,886 ,040 with GE providing a 25% cost-share or $721 ,510. DOE is providing the remaining 75% share of $2,164,530. The period of

118

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70 70 W(A)-2011-068 ; CH-1640 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC) requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is the development of an online monitoring and supervisory control technology for treatment of food & beverage industrial wastewater th rough anaerobic digestion and/or aerobic bioprocess, to recover biogas and treated effl uent water. The developed monitoring and control technology will include implementation of online sensors, use of dynamic model of the bioprocess for model-based estimation of un-measured variables

119

FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The decarbonisation of the global power system depends first and foremost on the rate at which highly emitting technologies based on fossil fuels can be substituted for cleaner ones. While fossil fueled electricity generation technologies are mature and well... determine the 90% confidence level, and the blue curve corresponds to the most probable set of values. Uncertainty in the determination of natural resource avail- ability is notable in the case of fossil fuel reserves and re- sources. Rogner (1997) paints a...

Mercure, Jean-Francois

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.iea.org/papers/2011/EV_PHEV_Roadmap.pdf The primary role of this EV/PHEV Roadmap is to help establish a vision for technology deployment; set approximate, feasible targets; and identify steps required to get there. It also outlines the role for different stakeholders and how they can work together to reach common objectives, and the role for government policy to support the process. References

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NREL: Energy Analysis - Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Analysis NREL's energy analysis supports distribution and interconnection R&D, which is responsible for distributed resources' system integration. Industrial...

122

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29359 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for Joint Base...

123

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29360 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for NAS...

124

Solar Thermal Electric Technology Update: 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After more than a dozen years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is seeing pronounced activity and investment. This product is intended to update the reader on these recent world-wide activities.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

New Electricity Technologies for a Sustainable Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the twentieth century relied upon the combustion of fossil fuels – initially coal and oil and now increasingly natural gas. The Brundtland Commission definition of sustainability requires that a sustainable electricity system must be able to meet current... needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987). As such electricity systems based upon the depletion of finite fossil fuel reserves are fundamentally...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Nuttall, William J.; Pollitt, Michael G.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today February 14, 2011 - 6:15pm Addthis Jeff Chamberlain Speaks at Brookings Battery Forum | Photo Courtesy of Audra Capas, 5StarPR Jeff Chamberlain Speaks at Brookings Battery Forum | Photo Courtesy of Audra Capas, 5StarPR David Moore Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy The Department of Energy has been investing in vehicle electrification for more than a decade, with results that speak for themselves: The battery technologies in almost all of the electric vehicles and hybrids on the road today were developed with support from the Department. As you may have read

127

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power - Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways Industry Vision & Roadmaps The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader A Climate Contingency Roadmap for the U.S. Electricity Sector: Phase II (PDF 192 KB) This roadmap examines the role of the electric sector in climate change and the sectoral impacts of alternative climate policy designs. The document explores the capabilities and costs of emissions reduction options and the influence of company-specific circumstances on the design of cost-effective response strategies. It also investigates mechanisms to create incentives for support of advanced climate-related technology research, development, and demonstration. Electric Power Research Institute Roadmap The Electric Power Research Institute is initiating an effort to develop an

128

Technology Assessment of Li-Ion Energy Storage Technology for Stationary Electric Utility Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging Lithium-ion (Li-ion) energy storage technology, which is being developed and applied in the transportation sector, could have a profound impact in the electric sector by serving applications for distributed energy storage (DES). An earlier EPRI Report, Technology Review and Assessment of Distributed Energy Resources: Distributed Energy Storage (1012983, February 2006), identified Li-ion batteries as a potential disruptive technology for the electric power sector. EPRI undertook this project to a...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underwater Electric Kite Turbines Underwater Electric Kite Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Underwater Electric Kite Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization UEK Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II *MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project *MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project *MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project *MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration *MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project *MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/UEK Yukon River Project Technology Resource

130

Assessment of battery technologies for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This document, Part 2 of Volume 2, provides appendices to this report and includes the following technologies, zinc/air battery; lithium/molybdenum disulfide battery; sodium/sulfur battery; nickel/cadmium battery; nickel/iron battery; iron/oxygen battery and iron/air battery. (FI)

Ratner, E.Z. (Sheladia Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (USA)); Henriksen, G.L. (ed.) (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0672-1502) General Electric Global Research (GE) -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Department of Energy 'Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0672-1502) General Electric Global Research (GE) - Chilled Natural Gas for At-Home Refueling Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Niskayuna, NY; Troy, NY; Columbia, MO Proposed Action Description: Funding will support efforts to develop a compressor technology for at-home refueling of natural gas vehicles. Proposed work will consist of: (1) development, synthesis, and testing of small quantities of adsorbent material at a dedicated laboratory facility on the University of Missouri campus in Columbia, MO; (2) design, fabrication (or procurement), and testing of compressor system components, including a cryocooler and an accumulator, at Chart Industries, Inc.'s commercial development and assembly site in Troy, NY; and (3) assembly

132

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6560; W(A)-09-026; CH-1491 6560; W(A)-09-026; CH-1491 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "Clean and Efficient Diesel Engine." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop clean and efficient diesel engine technology. The program aims to enhance the efficiency of large displacement (>10 liters/cylinder), medium speed «1200 rev/min) diesel engines that are used in locomotive. marine, and power generation applications. This waiver is for inventions of GE-GRC only. The work under this subcontract is expected to take place from October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009, at a total cost of $1 ,230,000. GE-GRC will provide 20% cost share or

133

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

859; W(A)-2012-015 859; W(A)-2012-015 ; CH-1654 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC or GE), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled , "Modeling Creep Fatigue Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Coal Power Plants". Under this agreement, GE will model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbi ne rotor materials for adva nced ultra supercritical (A-USC) coal power plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions , and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The technology developed

134

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology Assessment Presentation on Li-Ion Energy Storage Technology for Stationary Electric Uti lity Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging Li-ion (Li-ion) energy storage technology, which is being developed and applied in the transportation sector, could have a profound impact to in the electric sector by serving applications for distributed energy storage (DES). An earlier EPRI Report, Technology Review and Assessment of Distributed Energy ResourcesDistributed Energy Storage (1012983), identified Li-ion batteries as a potential disruptive technology for the electric power sector. This project was undertaken to assess the potential...

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Improving mine safety technology and training: establishing US global leadership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the USA's record of mine safety was interrupted by fatalities that rocked the industry and caused the National Mining Association and its members to recommit to returning the US underground coal mining industry to a global mine safety leadership role. This report details a comprehensive approach to increase the odds of survival for miners in emergency situations and to create a culture of prevention of accidents. Among its 75 recommendations are a need to improve communications, mine rescue training, and escape and protection of miners. Section headings of the report are: Introduction; Review of mine emergency situations in the past 25 years: identifying and addressing the issues and complexities; Risk-based design and management; Communications technology; Escape and protection strategies; Emergency response and mine rescue procedures; Training for preparedness; Summary of recommendations; and Conclusions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 5 apps.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Creating ladders out of chains : China's technological development in a world of global production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of economic globalization, the terms of debate over the political and social conditions necessary to foster development in the Global South have shifted. Examining technological development, one important ...

Fuller, Douglas Brian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Xian Jieli Electric Technology Co Ltd Place Xian, Shaanxi Province, China Zip 710016 Sector Wind energy Product Xian based manufacturer of Wind turbine generator. Coordinates 34.27301°, 108.928009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.27301,"lon":108.928009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

138

Electric energy savings from new technologies. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for 10 technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all 10 technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference projection, only 25% of the savings estimated here should be subtracted from the reference projection for analysis purposes.

Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ningbo Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ningbo Zhonghuan Electrical Technology Co Ltd Place Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China Zip 315322 Sector Solar Product China-based firm focused on the research, development and production of solar PV module junction boxes and connectors. Coordinates 30.168501°, 121.235023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.168501,"lon":121.235023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Global Talent Program Explore High technology in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, , , , , . . , , `GE Nuclear Energy Global Outreach', , `Make, Believe', , `New Strategy, New Audience. , . . #12;20 2011 Global Talent Program 07 Nikko Cordial Securities Inc. Nikko Cordial Securities Inc. Citi

Bahk, Saewoong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LIGHTS: Laboratory for Information Globalization and Harmonization Technologies and Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three important trends - unrelenting globalization, growing worldwide electronic connectivity, and increasing knowledge intensity of economic activity - are creating new opportunities for global politics, with challenging ...

Choucri, Nazli

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

143

A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=1000821 References: A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry[1] CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key technology option for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation. Recent studies suggest that CCS would contribute 19% of the total global mitigation that is needed for halving global GHG emissions by 2050. Overview

144

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - PHEV Modeling - Component Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency One of the main objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) R&D Plan (2.2Mb pdf) is to "determine component development requirements" through simulation analysis. Overall fuel efficiency is affected by component technologies from a component sizing and efficiency aspect. To properly define component requirements, several technologies for each of the main components (energy storage, engine and electric machines) are being compared at Argonne using PSAT. Per the R&D plan, several Li-ion battery materials are being modeled to evaluate their impacts on fuel efficiency and vehicle mass. Different Power to Energy ratios are being considered to understand the relative impact of power and energy.

145

Technological and economic comparison of battery technologies for U.S.A electric grid stabilization applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy storage can provide many benefits to the electric grid of the United States of America. With recent pushes to stabilize renewable energy and implement a Smart Grid, battery technology can play a pivotal role in the ...

Fernandez, Ted (Ted A.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparative Global Warming Impacts of Electric Vapor-Compression and Direct-fired Absorption Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the global warming impacts of electric vapor-compression and gas-fired absorption-cycle equipment for commercial cooling applications. Absorption chillers do not use ozone depleting refrigerants but substitution of alternative refrigerants in electrically driven vapor-compression cycle equipment also offers radically reduced or eliminated potential for stratospheric ozone depletion. Therefore, when comparing absorption-cycle and vapor-compression equipment, net global warming impacts...

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Information Technology Requirements for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Advanced Information Technology Requirements for the Electric Power Industry workshop was held September 16–17, 2008, in Knoxville, Tennessee. It was attended by 15 senior information technology (IT) professionals representing various investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities, rural cooperatives, and regional transmission organizations (RTOs), as well as the Edison Electric Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy. The workshop provided a forum to identify needs and opportunities for indu...

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

MHK Technologies/Electric Buoy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buoy Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aqua Magnetics Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description AMI s Ocean Swell and Wave Energy Conversion OSWEC device uses a patented linear generator to directly convert the motion of ocean swells and waves into electric power In our initial designs the generator mounts underneath a floating buoy or on the surface of a platform with the buoy below however it is possible to fit the generator on other types of wave motion energy extracting mechanisms Housing moves up and down with the motion of the Buoy on the ocean s surface while the Damping Plates hold the Generator Coil in a stable position The relative motion between the magnetic field in the generator housing and Generator Coil creates an electric voltage in the Generator Coil After four design evolutions Aqua Magnetics Inc has created our patented reciprocating linear generator Scalable for a wide range of applications and able to operate in a wide range of sea states Generator prototype will produce approximately 10 watts of power in 15 cm 6 inch wind chop in the intraco

151

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar Power in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar the impact of RPS policies on solar growth 2 #12;Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity by: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program

152

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Comparison of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies: Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedures, and any tests which were specific to individual battery types were used in the evaluations. The batteries were evaluated by conducting performance tests, and by subjecting them to cyclical loading, using a computer controlled charge--discharge cycler, to simulate typical EV driving cycles. Criteria for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None of the batteries tested can fill every EV application.

Dickinson, B.E.; Lalk, T.R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Swan, D.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Comparison of various battery technologies for electric vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies; Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedures, and any tests which were specific to individual battery types were used in the evaluations. The batteries were evaluated by conducting performance tests, and by subjecting them to cyclical loading, using a computer controlled charge - discharge cycler, to simulate typical EV driving cycles. Criteria for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None of the batteries tested can fill every EV application.

Dickinson, Blake Edward

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget & Reporting Codes EE0501, EE0503 and EE0506 sponsored by the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program under the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To...

160

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

SciTech Connect

Many domestic appliances and commercial equipment consume some electric power when they are switched off or not performing their primary purpose. The typical loss per appliance is low (from 1 to 25 W) but, when multiplied by the billions of appliances in houses and in commercial buildings, standby losses represent a significant fraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to reduce standby losses have appeared in different parts of the world. One proposal, the 1-watt plan, seeks to harmonize these initiatives by establishing a single target for all appliances. This paper explains the background to the 1-watt plan, identifies some unresolved aspects, and gives some estimates of energy savings.

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Lignite Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control technologies for Mercury control technologies for electric utilities Burning lignite coal Background In partnership with a number of key stakeholders, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been carrying out a comprehensive research program since the mid-1990s focused on the development of advanced, cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Mercury is a poisonous metal found in coal, which can be harmful and even toxic when absorbed from the environment and concentrated in animal tissues. Mercury is present as an unwanted by-product of combustion in power plant flue gases, and is found in varying percentages in three basic chemical forms(known as speciation): particulate-bound mercury, oxidized

165

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Globalizing of technology module in contextualized language instruction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The module "Technology in Contextualized Language Instruction" provides models and insights into the ways in which teachers can use technology to connect their students and… (more)

Aglawe, Anjali A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Interpreting Technology and Policy Implications of Global Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliability Energy Analysis Appliance Energy Standards China Electricity Markets Energy Policy India Industrial Energy International Energy Studies Public Sector Energy...

168

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight August 19, 2013 Automakers have made steady progress reducing the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020. A recent Denver Post article highlights the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's contribution to the progress that automakers have made in getting their fuel cell electric vehicles ready for production. "When I started working on fuel cells in the '90s, people said it was a good field because a solution would always be five years away," said Brian Pivovar, who leads NREL's fuel cell research. "Not anymore." The article references a variety of NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell

169

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

170

Global warming implications of non-fluorocarbon technologies as CFC replacements  

SciTech Connect

Many technologies could be developed for use in place of conventional compression systems for refrigeration and air conditioning. Comparisons of the global warming impacts using TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) can be used to identify alternatives that have the potential for lower environmental impacts than electric-driven vapor compression systems using HCFCs and HFCs. Some options, such as secondary heat transfer loops in commercial refrigeration systems to reduce refrigerant charge and emission rates, could be useful in reducing the losses of refrigerants to the atmosphere. Use of ammonia instead of a fluorocarbon in a system with a secondary loop offers only a small potential for decreasing TEWI, and this may not warrant the increased complexity and risks of using ammonia in a retail sales environment. A few technologies, such as adsorption heat pumps, have efficiency levels that show reduced TEWI levels compared to conventional and state of the art compression systems, and further development could lead to an even more favorable comparison. Health and safety risks of the alternative technologies and the materials they employ must also be considered.

Fischer, S.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

Eto, Joseph

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

173

PRISM 2.0: Modeling Technology Learning for Electricity Supply Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) model, under the PRISM 2.0 Project. This model can assess the impact of various climate, energy, and environmental policies on the electric power sector, the energy system, and the overall U.S. economy.  This report compares the technology learning rates implied by the exogenous cost specifications used in the US-REGEN model to those found in a literature ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Program on Technology Innovation: Electric Efficiency Through Water Supply Technologies-- A Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity consumption associated with sourcing, treating, and transporting water is expected to increase significantly in the future as a result of a growing population and an increasing need for alternative water supplies. Furthermore, there is a concern that climate change may necessitate an increase in irrigation in some areas of the United States. Consequently, there is a critical need for technologies that can reduce the electricity consumption associated with water supply. This report identifies ...

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: A technology assessment based on a two-stage Delphi study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To address the uncertainty regarding future costs and operating attributes of electric and hybrid electric vehicles, a two stage, worldwide Delphi study was conducted. Expert opinions on vehicle attributes, current state of the technology, possible advancements, costs, and market penetration potential were sought for the years 2000, 2010, and 2020. Opinions related to such critical components as batteries, electric drive systems, and hybrid vehicle engines, as well as their respective technical and economic viabilities, were also obtained. This report contains descriptions of the survey methodology, analytical approach, and results of the analysis of survey data, together with a summary of other factors that will influence the degree of market success of electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Responses by industry participants, the largest fraction among all the participating groups, are compared with the overall responses. An evaluation of changes between the two Delphi stages is also summarized. An analysis of battery replacement costs for various types is summarized, and variable operating costs for electric and hybrid vehicles are compared with those of conventional vehicles. A market penetration analysis is summarized, in which projected market shares from the survey are compared with predictions of shares on the basis of two market share projection models that use the cost and physical attributes provided by the survey. Finally, projections of market shares beyond the year 2020 are developed by use of constrained logit models of market shares, statistically fitted to the survey data.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electric energy savings from new technologies. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of the report is to provide information about the electricity-saving potential of new technologies to OCEP that it can use in developing alternative long-term projections of US electricity consumption. Low-, base-, and high-case scenarios of the electricity savings for 10 technologies were prepared. The total projected annual savings for the year 2000 for all 10 technologies were 137 billion kilowatt hours (BkWh), 279 BkWh, and 470 BkWh, respectively, for the three cases. The magnitude of these savings projections can be gauged by comparing them to the Department's reference case projection for the 1985 National Energy Policy Plan. In the Department's reference case, total consumption in 2000 is projected to be 3319 BkWh. Because approximately 75% of the base-case estimate of savings are already incorporated into the reference projection, only 25% of the savings estimated here should be subtracted from the reference projection for analysis purposes.

Harrer, B.J.; Kellogg, M.A.; Lyke, A.J.; Imhoff, K.L.; Fisher, Z.J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electric energy supply systems: description of available technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When comparing coal transportation with electric transmission as a means of delivering electric power, it is desirable to compare entire energy systems rather than just the transportation/transmission components because the requirements of each option may affect the requirements of other energy system components. PNL's assessment consists of two parts. The first part, which is the subject of this document, is a detailed description of the technical, cost, resource and environmental characteristics of each system component and technologies available for these components. The second part is a computer-based model that PNL has developed to simulate construction and operation of alternative system configurations and to compare the performance of these systems under a variety of economic and technical conditions. This document consists of six chapters and two appendices. A more thorough description of coal-based electric energy systems is presented in the Introduction and Chapter 1. Each of the subsequent chapters describes technologies for five system components: Western coal resources (Chapter 2), coal transportation (Chapter 3), coal gasification and gas transmission (Chapter 4), and electric power transmission (Chapter 6).

Eisenhauer, J.L.; Rogers, E.A.; King, J.C.; Stegen, G.E.; Dowis, W.J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Program on Technology Innovation: Carbon Nanotube Technology for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A couple decades ago, a new molecular form of carbon exhibiting extraordinary properties was discovered. This resulted in a frenzy of basic and applied research, and tremendous strides have been made. The technology that ensued is still relatively immature, but there is the prospect that the technology may be used in the future for a wide range of applications in the electric power industry. In fact, the three new materials discussed in this report (fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene) have the potential...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology R&D Strategy for the Electric Power Industry: "Wild Cards"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address the many challenges facing the electric power industry during the next 20 years, an effective process of technology R&D planning is needed. To augment recently completed scenario-based planning, this report identifies the technology and R&D needs that result from 21 additional institutional, political, financial, technical, or social changes ("wild cards") not addressed in the prior scenarios project (see EPRI Report 1014385). This report also identifies key R&D priorities that occur in multip...

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Global Methodology to Integrate Innovative Models for Electric Motors in Complete Vehicle Simulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 66 (2011), No. 5878 ABBREVIATIONS EM Electric Motor FE Finite Element FEA Finite Element Analysis FEM: the Interior Magnet Synchronous Motor with V-shape mag- net, (V-IPMSM), technology used in the Toyota Prius II, the electro- magnetic parameters of the Toyota Prius II Electric Motor are estimated thanks to the presented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Global Model of Technological Utilization Based on Governmental, Business-Investment, Social, and Economic Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This exploratory paper presents a conceptual model of the factors of governmental support and openness, business and technology investment, and socioeconomic level that are posited to influence technological utilization. The conceptual model and conjectures ... Keywords: Global Digital Divide, Government Investment, Societal Openness, Socioeconomic Factors, Structural Equation Modeling, Technological Utilization

James Pick; Rasool Azari

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy Policy & Technology Analysis | Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Technologies Department Energy Policy and Technology Analysis The group's core focus is on long-term integrated energy, environmental, and economic analysis using the MARKAL family of models, a well-established tool for energy systems analysis. With 30 years of development under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, MARKAL has approximately 100 user institutions in more than 50 countries. A bottom-up analysis with explicit technology representation, the models include a physical description of energy technologies, and allow for "well-to-wheel" comparison of technologies and technological pathways. They study the impact of technological change/progress on energy markets, and provide a technology-rich basis for estimating energy dynamics over a multi-period

183

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

Steinberg, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CENTER CENTER (GEGRC) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC04-02AL68284, DOE WAIVER NO. W(A) 03-039. The Petitioner, GEGRC, has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions that may be conceived or first actually reduced to practice in the course of GEGR's work under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC04-02AL68284 entitled " 2 1 st Century Locomotive" with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The work to be done will be the design and development of fuel injectors, turbochargers and locomotive systems technologies to increase fuel efficiency and decrease exhaust gases in freight and passenger locomotives. Successful research and development under this agreement will lead to more energy efficient locomotives and reduced fuel

187

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland, Joint Global Change Research Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry, Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application

188

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

189

Renewable Energy Technology Opportunities: Responding to Global Energy Challenges (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation by Dr. Dan Arvizu of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to the Clean-Tech Investors Summit on January 23, 2007 overviews renewable energy technology opportunities.

Arvizu, D.

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

190

Globalization, citizenship and new information technologies: from the MAI to Seattle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter examines how information technologies have been used by nongovernmental organizations to contest economic globalization. The chapter uses as case studies the failed attempt to negotiate the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (1995-1998) ...

Peter J. Smith; Elizabeth Smythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ultracapacitors for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles - Performance Requirements, Status of the Technology, and R&D Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Burke, A.F. , Electric/Hybrid Vehicle Super Car Designsin Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, SAE Paper No. 951951,for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles - A Technology Update,

Burke, Andrew F

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Scaling up: global technology deployment to stabilize emissions  

SciTech Connect

Climate change is becoming a defining fact of economic development. Three areas need to coalesce into a coherent vision in order to achieve adequate levels of emissions reductions: The technologies involved, including the physical and capacity-related constraints to deploying them; The investment required: who will provide it, the mechanisms they will use, and its cost; The policies that will offer the most effective incentives to providers of both technology and capital to implement lower-emission solutions. A paper by two Princeton researchers Pacala and Socolow provided a mental framework to discuss these solutions by breaking the required emission reductions down into manageable (though still large) 'wedges,' each provided by a different technology or set of technologies. Owing to its solution-oriented framework, the wedges approach has captured the imagination of those eager to tackle climate change. These include among the 15 options: replacing coal baseload power plants with gas plants, capturing CO{sub 2} at coal and gas power plants, capturing CO{sub 2} at coal-to-synfuels plant and increasing use of renewables. This paper presents an overview, using the wedges framework, on how technology, investment and policy interact. It is intended to engage actors in the policy and investment communities as the key enables of clean technology deployment worldwide. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Fred Wellington; Rob Bradley; Britt Childs; Clay Rigdon; Jonathan Pershing

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moderate Hybrid-electric Vehicles. ESScap06, Switzerland,GH. SIMPLEV: A Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-Ultracapacitors in Hybrid- electric Vehicle Applications.

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #799: September 30, 2013Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact 799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity...

197

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of hybrid and electric vehicles Simulation ofand Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles Andrew Burkemarketing of hybrid and electric vehicles of various types

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Technology adoption and content consumption in Chinese television: Local city, national city, and global city  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in media technologies allow people to restructure their relations across a broad range of time and space. As a result, modern communities are organized on local, national, and global bases. These communities are sustained and developed by media ... Keywords: China, Community, New media technology, Programming, Space, Television, Time

Jia Lu, Ian Weber

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sequestration as natural gas prices rise. INTRODUCTION Heightened concerns about global climate change have were added to EPPA for 1) coal power generation with CCS (coal capture), 2) natural gas combined cycle pulverized coal technology and the 3 #12;advanced natural gas technology. Compared with the pulverized coal

200

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: March 14, 6: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #666: March 14, 2011 Survey says Electric Vehicle Prices are Key on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITS ITS SUBCONTRACT WITH DELPHI AUTOMTIVIE SYSTEMS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-07NT 43121; W(A)-09-012 ; CH-1475 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent tights for all subject inventions made under the above subcontract. Under the cooperative agreement, Delphi is leading a teaming arrangement that includes General Electric. Delphi has applied for an advance waiver for its own inventions (W(A)-07-030). The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop, test and demonstrate a cost- effective, compact, lightweight, and scalable high temperature propulsion inverter for Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV), and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCV). For this

202

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1) Search Relevant Literature - An extensive search of recent analyses that address the environmental impacts, market penetration rates, and oil displacement potential of various EV technologies was conducted; (2) Consolidate Studies - Upon completion of the literature search, a list of analyses that have sufficient data for comparison and that should be included in the study was compiled; (3) Identify Key Assumptions - Disparity in conclusions very likely originates from disparity in simple assumptions. In order to compare 'apples-to-apples,' key assumptions were identified in each study to provide the basis for comparing analyses; (4) Extract Information - Each selected report was reviewed, and information on key assumptions and data points was extracted; (5) Overlay Data Points - Visual representations of the comprehensive conclusions were prepared to identify general trends and outliers; and (6) Draw Final Conclusions - Once all comparisons are made to the greatest possible extent, the final conclusions were draw on what major factors lead to the variation in results among studies.

Ford, Jonathan [Sentech, Inc.; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Blackburn, Julia [Sentech, Inc.; Sikes, Karen [Sentech, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Country United States Headquarters Location Austin, Texas Recovery Act Funding $13,516,546.00 Total Project Value $27,419,424.00 Coordinates 30.267153°, -97.7430608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

205

Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Challenges of Thin and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies H.S. Ullal Presented at the World Renewable Energy Congress X and Exhibition 2008 Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom July 19-25, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-520-43355 December 2008 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

206

Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Anaerobic digesters · Electrogenesis ­ Generation of electricity ­ Exoelectrogens ­ Microbial fuel cells1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan · US electricity generation: 13 quad ·Electricity needed for H2 transportation: · Via water

Lee, Dongwon

207

Global warming: An energy technology R and D challenge  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that two major uncertainties cloud the picture of future energy technology needs: (1) growth of energy demand and (2) the seriousness and urgency of the Greenhouse effect. The outlook for research and development (R and D) projects to meet the problems resulting from these two uncertainties is great. Even if the problems do not exist, new and better energy sources that reduce CO{sub 2} emissions are very desirable. Funds to finance R and D in this field should come from a combination of effort from private and public sector. 16 refs., 2 figs.

Fulkerson, W.; Reister, D.B.; Auerbach, S.I.; Perry, A.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Crane, A.T. (Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (USA)); Kash, D.E. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (USA))

1989-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

Renewable technologies for energy security: institutions and investment in Fiji's electricity sector .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable energy technologies have been advocated in Fiji's electricity sector on the basis that they improve energy security and serve as a risk-mitigation measure against… (more)

Dornan, Matthew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006) : U.S. Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

: U.S. Electricity Generation The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies...

210

Assessment of Thermal Control Technologies for Cooling Electric Vehicle Power Electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL is assessing thermal control technologies to improve the thermal performance of power electronics devices for electric vehicles, while reducing the cost, weight, and volume of the system.

Kelly, K.; Abraham, T.; Bennion, K.; Bharathan, D.; Narumanchi, S.; O'Keefe, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

“Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System” Challenges in Integrating g Renewable Technologies into an Electric Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented by WIRES- a national coalition of investor- and publicly-owned transmission providers customers, renewable energy developers, and technology and service companies dedicated to promoting investment in strong, well-planned, and beneficial high voltage electric transmission infrastructure

Dennis Ray

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Technology and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment for Battery Electric Vehicles, Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of affordable advanced battery technology is a crucial challenge to the growth of the electric-drive vehicle (EDV) market. This study assesses the state of advanced battery technology for EDVs, which include battery electric vehicles (BEVs), power assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEV 0s -- hybrids without electric driving range), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and fuel cell vehicles. The first part of this study presents assessments of current battery performance and cycle life ca...

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming  

SciTech Connect

It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

Steinberg, M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), which include both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles, use electricity as either their primary fuel or to improve efficiency. Commonly Used PEV Terms All-electric vehicle (AEV) - A vehicle with plug-in capability; driving energy comes entirely from its battery. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) - A vehicle with plug-in capability; driving energy can come from either its battery or a liquid fuel like gasoline, diesel, or biofuels. Plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) - Any vehicle with plug-in capability. This includes AEVs and PHEVs. Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) - A vehicle that has an electric drive system and battery but does not have plug-in capability; driving energy comes only from liquid fuel.

216

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium. Mainly due to the growing demand for lightweight and powerful batteries, lithium has become such a metal. While supplies of lithium have historically been mined from pegmatites, brine extraction from salars

217

Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

03TB-45 Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck and vehicle test results for a medium-duty hybrid electric truck are reported in this paper. The design the benchmark vehicle. INTRODUCTION Hybrid powertrain is among the most visible transportation technology

Grizzle, Jessy W.

218

Program on Technology Innovation: Scenario-Based Technology R&D Strategy for the Electric Power Industry: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help address the many challenges facing the electric power industry in the next 20 years, an effective process of technology R&D planning is needed. Based on input from a broad range of stakeholders and using a proven scenario planning process, this report presents a comprehensive technology R&D strategy for the next two decades that spans the breadth and depth of challenges and opportunities facing the North American electric utility industry.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

NREL: Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Chapter 7. Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.2 Net Generation at Electricity-Only Plants (Excel 21 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.3 Electricity Generation at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants (Excel 18 KB) (PDF 204 KB) 7.4 Generation and...

220

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles by as much as 50%, while plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) extend these savings even further. For a general overview of electric drive vehicles, see the DOE's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop August 31, 2010 - 2:52pm Addthis DOE's Office of Policy and International Affairs and China's Ministry of Science and Technology convened a 3-day workshop at Argonne National Laboratory that brought together more than 100 U.S. and Chinese experts from government, industry, and academia to discuss progress made in the electric vehicle industry to date and opportunities for increased collaboration. The workshop was held in support of the U.S.-China Electric Vehicles Initiative announced by President Obama and China's President Hu Jintao in 2009. Participants engaged in three concurrent roundtables on battery technology roadmapping, battery test procedures, and vehicle

222

Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity Technology Deployment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Strengthening Public-Private...

223

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Innovation in Electric Vehicle Technology? Easy as A123 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Electric Vehicle Technology? Easy as A123 in Electric Vehicle Technology? Easy as A123 Innovation in Electric Vehicle Technology? Easy as A123 May 2, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis A123 battery in passenger vehicle application | Photo Courtesy of A123 Systems A123 battery in passenger vehicle application | Photo Courtesy of A123 Systems Connie Bezanson Education & Outreach Manager, Vehicle Technologies Program Two weeks ago, I had the pleasure of visiting the great state of Michigan to participate in a two-day workshop entitled, "Electrifying the Economy - Educating the Workforce: Taking Charge of the Electric Vehicle Industry's Educational Needs." In addition to an exciting exchange on promoting innovation in the electric vehicle industry, I had the opportunity to see this innovation first-hand when I visited A123 Systems Livonia, MI battery

225

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Dramatic improvements in plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) performance and cost will require a well-coordinated research and development effort between DOE...

226

U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and Battery Technology Workshop ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

held in support of the U.S.-China Electric Vehicles Initiative announced by President Obama and China's President Hu Jintao in 2009. Participants engaged in three concurrent...

227

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

228

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Homeostatic control: economic integration of solar technologies into electric power operations and planning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and technical interfaces between the electrical utility and the distributed, nondispatchable electric generation systems are only minimally understood at the present time. The economic issues associated with the interface of new energy technologies and the electric utility grid are discussed. Then the concept of Homeostatic Control is introduced and the use of such an economic concept applied to the introduction of nondispatchable technologies into the existing utility system is discussed. The transition and potential impact of a Homoeostatic Control system working with the existing electric utility system is discussed.

Tabors, R.D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Pressurized Oxy-Coal Technology for Steam-Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of pressurized oxy-combustion technology to support steam–electric power production has been proposed by several organizations as a potential low-cost way to enable a dramatic reduction in CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The pressurized oxy-coal technology realizes most of the benefits of atmospheric pressure oxy-coal technology and offers the prospect of additional efficiency and cost benefits. The technology is, however, in the early stages of development.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electric Springs A new Smart Grid Technology Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electronics system. · · It can be embedded in an electric appliance such as electric water heater-scale wind and solar power generation · . 7 #12;Future power systems adopt "distributed" power generation (Wind and Solar Power). · ( ). · Electric Springs do not need communication and, collectively

Leung, Ka-Cheong

232

Technology as a Strategic Lever in Competitive Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology exerts a profound influence on energy markets today, both in terms of boundaries and in terms of competitive forces. Companies that possess carefully crafted technology strategies, and successfully align those strategies with their business strategies, create value for themselves and their customers. This report describes why attention to technology strategy is so important in the emerging competitive market, and discusses critical principles for identifying, evaluating, and implementing techn...

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on the significant progress made worldwide by thin-film solar cells, namely, amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology status is also discussed in detail. In addition, R&D and technology challenges in all three areas are elucidated. The worldwide estimated projection for thin-film PV technology production capacity announcements are estimated at more than 5000 MW by 2010.

Ullal, H. S.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

New technology can improve electric power system efficiency and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The term "smart grid" covers a range of devices and systems that leverage recent advances in digital technology and communications to ... Developing methods for ...

235

Envelope & Lighting Technologies to Reduce Electric Demand in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of light shelf reflectors. Deploying Integrated Systems Realizing the full energy-saving potential of envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings means...

236

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Battery for Hybrid Vehicle Applications. ProceedingsAF. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Design and Performance.A, Thornton M. Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Analysis. NREL/MP-540-

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7514 7514 W(A)-2012-004; CH-1650 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "High Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion C0 2 Capture." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is the investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of developing novel thin film composite hollow fiber membranes for post combustion carbon capture. Key deliverables include developing C02 selective polymeric material , hollow fiber supports and coating processes to demonstrate a thin film composite HF membrane to achieve 90% C02 capture efficiency with less than 35% increase in the

238

Global stability of the normal state of superconductors in the presence of a strong electric current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model of superconductivity in the presence of an electric current flowing through a two-dimensional wire. We show that when the current is sufficiently strong the solution converges in the long-time limit to the normal state. We provide two types of upper bounds for the critical current where such global stability is achieved: by using the principal eigenvalue of the magnetic Laplacian associated with the normal magnetic field, and through the norm of the resolvent of the linearized steady-state operator. In the latter case we estimate the resolvent norm in large domains by the norms of approximate operators defined on the plane and the half-plane. We also obtain a lower bound, in large domains, for the above critical current by obtaining the current for which the normal state looses its local stability.

Yaniv Almog; Bernard Helffer

2013-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NT0005310; W(A)-09-048, CH-1511 The Petitioner, General Electric Global Research (GE) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost C02 Capture." According to its response to question 2, GE states that it will investigate the technical and economic feasibility of developing novel oligomeric silicone solvents for C02 capture. Key deliverable include identifying a group of solvents that have been demonstrated to have a C02 capacity of at least 25% greater than aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA), and are predicted to achieve 90% C 0 2 capture efficiency and less than a 50% increase in COE (with the potential to achieve less than a 35% increase in COE with further optimization.). Other

240

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 71 2; W(A)-2011-067 ; CH-1639 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC) requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring in an IGCC Plant". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop a systematic model-based approach for addressing the problem of optimal sensor placement (OSP) in a sensor network used for condition monitoring of key process equipment in an IGCC plant , namely, gasifier refractory lining and RSC fouling . This waiver is for inventions of GE-GRC on ly. The work under this cooperative agreement is expected to take place from August 20, 2010 through December 30, 2012, at a total cost of $1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Implementations of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of solar thermal technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To build an electric car plus renewable energy system for Singapore, solar thermal technologies were investigated in this report in the hope to find a suitable "green" energy source for this small island country. Among all ...

Liu, Xiaogang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Center for Democracy and Technology and the The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric Frontier Foundation: Implementing the Fips in the Smart Grid Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric Frontier Foundation: Implementing the Fips in the Smart Grid The Center for Democracy & Technology and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are pleased to file these comments in response to the September 17, 2010 Request for Information on "policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, as well as recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges." Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric Frontier Foundation: Implementing the Fips in the Smart Grid More Documents & Publications Re: NBP RFI: Data Access

245

Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market  

SciTech Connect

Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System Juan D of methodology and analysis of the energy sector, considering whether they are simulation models. Molina C. GSM Victor J. Martinez A. GSM Hugh Rudnick, Fellow Department of Electrical Engineering

Rudnick, Hugh

247

Monitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology Javier Ibáñez Vial Santiago, Chile jdixon@ing.puc.cl Abstract-- A monitoring system for a battery powered electric vehicle (EV of the 24 batteries. Besides, the system will also allow monitoring the energy delivered by a photovoltaic

Rudnick, Hugh

248

Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-45272 Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper under the emerging competitive electricity market structure.1 In so doing, the white papers build upon Commission (FERC) orders 888 and 889.2 The six white papers represent the final step prior to the preparation

249

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program T. J. King, Jr., Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program T. J. King, Jr., Director Renewables Smart. Jackson · Commercial Integration ­ N. Durfee FEMP J. S. Kelley · ESPC ­ J. A. Shonder Industrial. Hughes · Enhanced Geothermal ­ T. J. King Electricity Delivery Research and Development Infrastructure

250

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AF, Miller M. Emerging Lithium-ion Battery Technologies formodules of several lithium-ion battery chemistries have beenkg. Using a high power lithium-ion battery with an energy

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for overall levels of advanced metering in both the electricity and gas sectors (FERC, 2006). Comparing countries and regions is a difficult task, however, because there is no single definition of what it means for a meter or a metering system...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

252

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

253

Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and transforming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electric grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

Zipperer, A.; Aloise-Young, P. A.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Roche, R.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Bauleo, P.; Zimmerle. D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Benefits to the United States of Increasing Global Uptake of Clean Energy Technologies  

SciTech Connect

A previous report describes an opportunity for the United States to take leadership in efforts to transform the global energy system toward clean energy technologies (CET). An accompanying analysis to that report provides estimates of the economic benefits to the United States of such a global transformation on the order of several hundred billion dollars per year by 2050. This report describes the methods and assumptions used in developing those benefit estimates. It begins with a summary of the results of the analysis based on an updated and refined model completed since the publication of the previous report. The framework described can be used to estimate the economic benefits to the U.S. of coordinated global action to increase the uptake of CETs worldwide. Together with a Monte Carlo simulation engine, the framework can be used to develop plausible ranges for benefits, taking into account the large uncertainty in the driving variables and economic parameters. The resulting estimates illustrate that larger global clean energy markets offer significant opportunities to the United States economy.

Kline, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy utilization and environmental control technologies in the coal-electric cycle  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview and assessment of the currently commercial and possible future technologies in the United States that are a part of the coal-electric cycle. From coal production to residual emissions control at the power plant stack, this report includes a brief history, current status and future assessment of each technology. It also includes a discussion, helpful for policy making decisions, of the process operation, environmental emission characteristics, market constraints and detailed cost estimates for each of these technologies, with primary emphasis on coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissions control systems.

Ferrell, G.C.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

258

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

Program on Technology Innovation: The Galvin Electricity Initiative Microgrid Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI organized The Microgrid Workshop and Roundtable for the Galvin Electricity Initiative, held in Chicago, Illinois, June 27-28, 2006. The privately funded initiative's goal is to create the Perfect Power System, one that is trouble free for consumers and not susceptible to failure. The Microgrid Workshop and Roundtable supported that goal by featuring a combination of formal presentations and roundtable discussions in which participants exchanged experiences and collectively developed lists of issues ...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH, INC (GE) FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESEARCH, INC (GE) FOR AN RESEARCH, INC (GE) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005344; W(A) 2011-072 GE has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Module Embedded Microinverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System." The cooperative agreement was made under the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems - Advanced Concepts (SEGIS-AC) Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA-0000479). The objectives of SEGIS-AC are to support the development and demonstration of technologies in power electronics that reduce the overall PV system costs, allow high penetrations of solar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

J56: Electrical Discharge Consolidation with Stud Welding Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main characteristic of the EDC technology is its high speed, in the order of ... Two different configurations with discharge voltages of 200 and 800 V, and ... B3: Consolidation of Silica/Graphene Oxide Composite by Spark Plasma Sintering ..... J5: Phase Equilibria and Tie-line Compositions of the ? and (?, ?, ?) Phases in  ...

262

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006) : U.S. Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

: U.S. Electricity : U.S. Electricity Generation Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, electricity generation. The series of datasets included are: electricity net generation (1980 - 2030); generation and transmission/distribution losses (1980 - 2030); and electricity trade (e.g. gross domestic firm power trade, gross imports from Mexico and Canada). Source NREL Date Released March 06th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Generation NREL Data

263

Energy and global warming impacts of next generation refrigeration and air conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

Significant developments have occurred in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and the application of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerant working fluids since the original TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) report in 1991. System operating and performance data on alternative refrigerants and refrigeration technologies justify and updated evaluation of these new alternative refrigerants and competing technologies in well-characterized applications. Analytical and experimental results are used to show quantitative comparisons between HFCS, HFC blends, hydrocarbons, and ammonia, used as refrigerants. An objective evaluation is presented for commercial and near commercial non-CFC refrigerants/blowing agents and alternative refrigeration technologies. This information is needed for objective and quantitative decisions on policies addressing greenhouse gas emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The evaluation assesses the energy use and global warming impacts of refrigeration and air conditioning technologies that could be commercialized during the phase out of HCFCS. Quantitative comparison TEWI for two application areas are presented. Opportunities for significant reductions in TEWI are seen with currently known refrigerants through improved maintenance and servicing practices and improved product designs.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Advanced Technology Component Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, EPRI created four proposals jointly with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in response to Funding Opportunity DE-PS26-06NT43001, issued by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The teams for these proposals also included other partners such as DaimlerChrysler and Eaton, as appropriate. This Funding Opportunity offered a total of $16 million in funding with no upper or lower limit, with the anticipation of making awards of $3 $8 million to 2 6 teams. Each...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Impact of Plug-in Electric Vehicle Technology Diffusion on Electricity Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the evaluation of macro-level grid capacity impact of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) over the next two decades. The document covers both the EPRI PRISM base case of 30 PEVs in 2030 and a more realistic penetration scenario that results in about 6 PEVs in 2030, mimicking the growth rate of hybrid-electric vehicles in the last decade. Also evaluated is the impact of the smart grid on load shifting and economic benefits in terms of deferred capacity investment.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

HEMP emergency planning and operating procedures for electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of the impact of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems and electrical equipment have revealed that HEMP creates both misoperation and failures. These events result from both the early time E{sub 1} (steep-front pulse) component and the late time E{sub 3} (geomagnetic perturbations) component of HEMP. In this report a HEMP event is viewed in terms of its marginal impact over classical power system disturbances by considering the unique properties and consequences of HEMP. This report focuses on system-wide electrical component failures and their potential consequences from HEMP. In particular, the effectiveness of planning and operating procedures for electric systems is evaluated while under the influence of HEMP. This assessment relies on published data and characterizes utilities using the North American Electric Reliability Council`s regions and guidelines to model electric power system planning and operations. Key issues addressed by the report include how electric power systems are affected by HEMP and what actions electric utilities can initiate to reduce the consequences of HEMP. The report also reviews the salient features of earlier HEMP studies and projects, examines technology trends in the electric power industry which are affected by HEMP, characterizes the vulnerability of power systems to HEMP, and explores the capability of electric systems to recover from a HEMP event.

Reddoch, T.W.; Markel, L.C. [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hybrid electric vehicle technology assessment : methodology, analytical issues, and interim results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the first phase of Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) examination of the costs and energy impacts of light-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We call this research an HEV Technology Assessment, or HEVTA. HEVs are vehicles with drivetrains that combine electric drive components (electric motor, electricity storage) with a refuelable power plant (e.g., an internal combustion engine). The use of hybrid drivetrains is widely considered a key technology strategy in improving automotive fuel efficiency. Two hybrid vehicles--Toyota's Prius and Honda's Insight--have been introduced into the U.S. market, and all three auto industry participants in the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) have selected hybrid drivetrains for their prototype vehicles.

Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.; Anderson, J.; Wang, M.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

268

Feasibility of integrating other federal information systems into the Global Network of Environment and Technology, GNET{reg_sign}  

SciTech Connect

The Global Environment and Technology Enterprise (GETE) of the Global Environment and Technology Foundation (GETF) has been tasked by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to assist in reducing DOE`s cost for the Global Network of Environment and Technology (GNET{reg_sign}). As part of this task, GETE is seeking federal partners to invest in GNET{reg_sign}. The authors are also seeking FETC`s commitment to serve as GNET`s federal agency champion promoting the system to potential agency partners. This report assesses the benefits of partnering with GNET{reg_sign} and provides recommendations for identifying and integrating other federally funded (non-DOE) environmental information management systems into GNET{reg_sign}.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy and environmental policy and electric utilities' choice under uncertain global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper reviews and discusses uncertainty about global warming science, impact on society. It also discusses what assumptions have been made and how appropriate the assumptions in scenarios have been for estimating global ...

Takahashi, Masaki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced battery technology for electric two-wheelers in the people's Republic of China.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology applications for two- and possibly three-wheeled vehicles. The author of this report visited the People's Republic of China (PRC or China) to assess the status of Li-ion battery technology there and to analyze Chinese policies, regulations, and incentives for using this technology and for using two- and three-wheeled vehicles. Another objective was to determine if the Li-ion batteries produced in China were available for benchmarking in the United States. The United States continues to lead the world in Li-ion technology research and development (R&D). Its strong R&D program is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and other federal agencies, such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the U.S. Department of Defense. In Asia, too, developed countries like China, Korea, and Japan are commercializing and producing this technology. In China, more than 120 companies are involved in producing Li-ion batteries. There are more than 139 manufacturers of electric bicycles (also referred to as E-bicycles, electric bikes or E-bikes, and electric two-wheelers or ETWs in this report) and several hundred suppliers. Most E-bikes use lead acid batteries, but there is a push toward using Li-ion battery technology for two- and three-wheeled applications. Highlights and conclusions from this visit are provided in this report and summarized.

Patil, P. G.; Energy Systems

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity from Grid Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help address the many challenges facing the electric power industry in the next 20 years, an effective process of technology research and development (R&D) planning is needed. Based on input from a broad range of stakeholders and using a proven scenario planning process, this report represents an attempt to monitor one of three key drivers, namely, the demand for electricity from grid services, which may impact the industry in the future. Collectively, these drivers form the basis of a ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7 ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

A globally convergent algorithm for the frequency sounding and Slichter-Langer-Tikhonov problem of electrical prospecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents a globally convergent algorithm for solving coefficient inverse problems. Being rooted in the globally convergent numerical method (SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 31, No.1 (2008), pp. 478-509) for solving multidimensional coefficient inverse problems, it has two distinctive features: the new iterative and refinement procedures. These novelties enhance, sometimes significantly, both the spatial and contrast resolutions. The computational effectiveness of the proposed technique is demonstrated in numerical experiments with two applied coefficient inverse problems: electromagnetic or acoustic frequency sounding and electrical prospecting of layered media. The Slichter-Langer-Tikhonov formulation is exploited as a mathematical model of the latter.

Michael V. Klibanov; Alexandre Timonov

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluation of Power Line Carrier Technologies for Plug-In Electric Vehicle Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) efforts to develop standard means of communication with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), EPRI conducted an evaluation of several power line carrier (PLC) technologies. Evaluation of the technologies was based on a test plan developed in the SAE Hybrid Task Force. Direct PEV communication enables signaling of grid conditions to the PEV allowing for remote, intelligent management of vehicle charging. The interface can also support the use of ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

Emerging Technology and Architecture Approaches for Plug-in Electric Vehicles to Smart Grid Connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the latest advances in technologies evolving to facilitate plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) to Smart Grid integration. It reiterates applicable requirements based on fundamental principles as well as provides a status on the evolving relevant standards space. Multiple technological approaches are presented, compared, and contrasted; and an update on the status of each is provided. The document concludes with early recommendations for utility and automotive industry pra...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Global Energy Technology Strategy: Addressing Climate Change Phase 2 Findings from an international Public-Private Sponsored Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book examines the role of global energy technology in addressing climate change. The book considers the nature of the climate change challenge and the role of energy in the issue. It goes on to consider the implications for the evolution of the global energy system and the potential value of technology availability, development and deployment. Six technology systems are identified for special consideration: CO2 capture and storage, Biotechnology, Hydrogen systems, Nuclear energy, Wind and solar energy, and End-use energy technologies. In addition, consideration is given to the role of non-CO2 gases in climate change as well as the potential of technology development and deployment to reduce non-CO2 emissions. Present trends in energy R&D are examined and potentially fruitful avenues for research. The book concludes with a set of key findings.

Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Runci, Paul J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Stokes, Gerald M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Fusion Energy Options for Commercial Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion energy options were reviewed to assess technical readiness levels for commercial electricity production for the power industry. Magnetic and inertial confinement systems, in addition to nontraditional fusion concepts, were reviewed by a technical panel of experts, based on workshop presentations by the proponents of each technology. The results are summarized in this ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Can Advances in Science and Technology Prevent Global Warming? A Critical Review of Limitations and Challenges  

SciTech Connect

The most stringent emission scenarios published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would result in the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at concentrations of approximately 550 ppm which would produce a global temperature increase of at least 2 C by 2100. Given the large uncertainties regarding the potential risks associated with this degree of global warming, it would be more prudent to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at or below current levels which, in turn, would require a greater than 20-fold reduction (i.e., ?95%) in per capita carbon emissions in industrialized nations within the next 50 to 100 years. Using the Kaya equation as a conceptual framework, this paper examines whether CO2 mitigation approaches such as energy efficiency improvements, carbon sequestration, and the development of carbon-free energy sources would be sufficient to bring about the required reduction in per capita carbon emissions without creating unforeseen negative impacts elsewhere. In terms of energy efficiency, large improvements (?5-fold) are in principle possible given aggressive investments in R&D and if market imperfections such as corporate subsidies are removed. However, energy efficiency improvements per se will not result in a reduction in carbon emissions if, as predicted by the IPCC, the size of the global economy has expanded 12-26 fold by 2100. Terrestrial carbon sequestration via reforestation and improved agricultural soil management has many environmental advantages but has only limited CO2 mitigation potential because the global terrestrial carbon sink (ca. 200 Gt C) is small relative to the size of fossil fuel deposits (?4000 Gt C). By contrast, very large amounts of CO2 can potentially be removed from the atmosphere via sequestration in geologic formations and oceans, but carbon storage is not permanent and is likely to create many unpredictable environmental consequences. Renewable solar energy can in theory provide large amounts of carbon-free power. However, biomass and hydroelectric energy can only be marginally expanded and large-scale solar energy installations (i.e., wind, photovoltaics, and direct thermal) are likely to have significant negative environmental impacts. Expansion of nuclear energy is highly unlikely due to concerns over reactor safety, radioactive waste management, weapons proliferation, and cost. In view of the serious limitations and liabilities of many proposed CO2 mitigation approaches it appears that there remain only few no-regrets options such as drastic energy efficiency improvements, extensive terrestrial carbon sequestration, and cautious expansion of renewable energy generation. These promising CO2 mitigation technologies have the potential to bring about the required 20-fold reduction in per capita carbon emission only if population and economic growth are halted without delay. Thus, addressing the problem of global warming requires not only technological research and development but also a reexamination of core values that mistakenly equate material consumption and economic growth to happiness and well-being.

Huesemann, Michael H.

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

287

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black, Marija Ilic, IEEE Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black This survey contains a sample of the available technologies for implementing residential electricity services understanding of the potential for implementation of residential services. The estimation of the costs

Ilic, Marija D.

288

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

David Holloway

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport  

SciTech Connect

The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

CO2 capture, reuse, and sequestration technologies for mitigating global climate change  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently supply over 85% of the world`s energy needs. They will remain in abundant supply well into the 21st century. They have been a major contributor to the high standard of living enjoyed by the industrialized world. We have learned how to extract energy from fossil fuels in environmentally friendly ways, controlling the emissions of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates. Even with these added pollution controls, the cost of fossil energy generated power keeps falling. Despite this good news about fossil energy, its future is clouded because of the environmental and economic threat posed by possible climate change, commonly referred to as the `greenhouse effect`. The major greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the major source of anthropogenic C0{sub 2} is combustio of fossil fuels. The potential impacts of global climate change are many and varied, though there is much uncertainty as to the timing and magnitude (Watson et al., 1996). Because of the potential adverse impacts, the world community has adopted the Framework Convention on Climate Change (see Box 1). The urgency of their work was recently underscored when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued their Second Assessment Report which stated that `the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate`. The goal of stabilization of greenhouse gas emissions at their 1990 levels in the year 2000 will not be met by the vast majority of countries. Based on this experience, it is obvious that more aggressive technology responses are required if we want to control greenhouse gas emissions.

Herzog, H.J., MIT Energy Laboratory

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Global warming impacts of ozone-safe refrigerants and refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

International agreements mandate the phase-out of many chlorine containing compounds that are used as the working fluid in refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating equipment. Many of the chemical compounds that have been proposed, and are being used in place of the class of refrigerants eliminated by the Montreal Protocol are now being questioned because of their possible contributions to global warming. Natural refrigerants are put forth as inherently superior to manufactured refrigerants because they have very low or zero global warming potentials (GWPs). Questions are being raised about whether or not these manufactured refrigerants, primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), should be regulated and perhaps phased out in much the same manner as CFCs and HCFCs. Several of the major applications of refrigerants are examined in this paper and the results of an analysis of their contributions to greenhouse warming are presented. Supermarket refrigeration is shown to be an application where alternative technologies have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly with no clear advantage to either natural or HFC refrigerants. Mixed results are presented for automobile air conditioners with opportunities to reduce GHG emissions dependent on climate and comfort criteria. GHG emissions for hermetic and factory built systems (i.e. household refrigerators/freezers, unitary equipment, chillers) are shown to be dominated by energy use with much greater potential for reduction through efficiency improvements than by selection of refrigerant. The results for refrigerators also illustrate that hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide blown foam insulation have lower overall effects on GHG emissions than HFC blown foams at the cost of increased energy use.

Fischer, S.; Sand, J.; Baxter, V.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Program on Technology Innovation: An Assessment of the Future Potential for Biomass Electricity Generation in a Carbon-Constrained World  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed as part of EPRI's Program on Technology Innovation. It evaluates the potential role of biomass electric power generation technologies in a carbon-constrained world. Also, it provides detailed background on U.S. and international biomass use, supply issues, and technologies that can be used to convert biomass into electric power and transportation fuels. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) compatible database of U.S. biomass fuel supplies was also developed as part of this pro...

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies. The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun{center_dot}Lab (the cooperative Sandia National laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capability by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to: support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

Williams, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Burch, G. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies (DOE, 1996). The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun-Lab (the cooperative Sandia National Laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capacity by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

Williams, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Burch, G.D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

299

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

300

Single-shaft electric propulsion system technology development program -- ETX-II. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1981, discussions between Ford and General Electric (GE) evolved a concept for an advanced electric vehicle powertrain, which was subsequently presented to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as an unsolicited proposal. The concept involved a combination of technology from Ford and GE that would result in a unique powertrain based on a motor and transmission concentric with the drive wheel axis. Initial work suggested that the entire motor/transaxle combination could be expected to be smaller and lighter than the direct current (dc) motors that were in use in electric vehicles at that time and that the powertrain could be expected to be more efficient than other available powertrains. This program (ETX-I) was awarded to Ford Motor Company and it was established that the most likely first introduction of an electric vehicle would be in the form of a fleet of small commercial vans. The ETX-II propulsion system concept was aimed at advancing the technology through improving the size, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost characteristics of the ETX-I powertrain and by integrating advanced battery technologies compatible with the powertrain to form a complete propulsion system. Unique developments for the ETX-II program included the transaxle, a two-speed automatic transmission and three-phase interior permanent magnet alternating current (ac) motor on a common axis integrated with the rear axle of the test bed van; The traction battery selected for this propulsion system was the sodium-sulfur battery. This was the only advanced technology that had been developed to a point that would allow the test vehicle to have a range of over 160 kilometers (100 miles) without the battery exceeding 25% of the vehicle`s gross weight.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Single-shaft electric propulsion system technology development program -- ETX-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1981, discussions between Ford and General Electric (GE) evolved a concept for an advanced electric vehicle powertrain, which was subsequently presented to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as an unsolicited proposal. The concept involved a combination of technology from Ford and GE that would result in a unique powertrain based on a motor and transmission concentric with the drive wheel axis. Initial work suggested that the entire motor/transaxle combination could be expected to be smaller and lighter than the direct current (dc) motors that were in use in electric vehicles at that time and that the powertrain could be expected to be more efficient than other available powertrains. This program (ETX-I) was awarded to Ford Motor Company and it was established that the most likely first introduction of an electric vehicle would be in the form of a fleet of small commercial vans. The ETX-II propulsion system concept was aimed at advancing the technology through improving the size, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost characteristics of the ETX-I powertrain and by integrating advanced battery technologies compatible with the powertrain to form a complete propulsion system. Unique developments for the ETX-II program included the transaxle, a two-speed automatic transmission and three-phase interior permanent magnet alternating current (ac) motor on a common axis integrated with the rear axle of the test bed van; The traction battery selected for this propulsion system was the sodium-sulfur battery. This was the only advanced technology that had been developed to a point that would allow the test vehicle to have a range of over 160 kilometers (100 miles) without the battery exceeding 25% of the vehicle's gross weight.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technological analysis of options for generating electricity with solid waste fuel in the Bangkok metropolitan area  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of relatively current techniques for converting mixed municipal waste into electricity is presented. A brief review of the comparative capabilities of the relevant energy recovery systems is documented in this section. The discussion is focused on the principal system and technological strategies that would be best suited for the municipal solid waste recovery project in Thailand. Emphasis in the review was placed on mixed waste processing in a mass burning waterwalled system.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990’s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment, tooling, methods and skilled personnel. The final magnet system measured 14 feet in diameter, 10 feet in height, and weighed about 35 tons. The superconducting magnet and design technology was successfully implemented and demonstrated. The project was not successfully concluded however; as the critical planned final demonstration was not achieved. The utilities could not understand or clarify their future business needs and the regulatory requirements, because of the deregulation policies and practices of the country. Much uncertainty existed which prevented utilities from defining business plans, including asset allocation and cost recovery. Despite the technical successes and achievements, the commercial development could not be implemented and achieved. Thus, the demonstration of this enhancement to the utility’s transmission system and to the reliability of the nation’s electrical grid was not achieved. The factory was ultimately discontinued and the technology, equipment and product were placed in storage.

CHARLES M. WEBER

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

Program on Technology Innovation: Research Plan for Applying Visualization, Simulation, and Interactive Human System Interface Technologies to Sensor Information for Electric Power Industry Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a plan for a multi-year research program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate visualization, simulation, and interactive human system interface (HSI) technologies to support electric power industry needs. The research program will include demonstrations and produce guidelines. These guidelines will aid not only in identifying and selecting electric power industry applications that are the most likely to provide benefits to the electric power industry from applying advances in visua...

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

Sutherland, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Overview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1515 4. Supercapacitor storage technologies

Bahrami, Majid

309

Novel Direct Steelmaking by Combining Microwave, Electric Arc, and Exothermal Heating Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Steel is a basic material broadly used by perhaps every industry and individual. It is critical to our nation's economy and national security. Unfortunately, the American steel industry is losing competitiveness in the world steel production field. There is an urgent need to develop the next generation of steelmaking technology for the American steel industry. Direct steelmaking through the combination of microwave, electric arc, and exothermal heating is a revolutionary change from current steelmaking technology. This technology can produce molten steel directly from a shippable agglomerate, consisting of iron oxide fines, powdered coal, and ground limestone. This technology is projected to eliminate many current intermediate steelmaking steps including coking, pellet sintering, blast furnace (BF) ironmaking, and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. This technology has the potential to (a) save up to 45% of the energy consumed by conventional steelmaking; (b) dramatically reduce the emission of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, VOCs, fine particulates, and air toxics; (c) substantially reduce waste and emission control costs; (d) greatly lower capital cost; and (e) considerably reduce steel production costs. This technology is based on the unique capability of microwaves to rapidly heat steelmaking raw materials to elevated temperature, then rapidly reduce iron oxides to metal by volumetric heating. Microwave heating, augmented with electric arc and exothermal reactions, is capable of producing molten steel. This technology has the components necessary to establish the ''future'' domestic steel industry as a technology leader with a strong economically competitive position in world markets. The project goals were to assess the utilization of a new steelmaking technology for its potential to achieve better overall energy efficiency, minimize pollutants and wastes, lower capital and operating costs, and increase the competitiveness of the U.S. steel industry. The objectives associated with this goal were to (a) generate a solid base of technical, marketing, economic, and policy data, (b) develop energy, environmental, and economic targets, (c) more definitively assess opportunities and barriers, (d) accumulate knowledge and experience for defining direction for the next phase of development, and (e) promote learning and training of students.

Dr. Xiaodi Huang; Dr. J. Y. Hwang

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Battery technology for electric and hybrid vehicles: Expert viewsabout prospects for advancement. Under Review at Technological Forecasting and Social Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the results of an expert elicitation on the prospects for advances in battery technology for electric and hybrid vehicles. We find disagreement among the experts on a wide range of topics, including the need for government funding, the probability of getting batteries with Lithium Metal anodes to work, and the probability of building safe Lithium-ion batteries. Averaging across experts we find that U.S. government expenditures of $150M/yr lead to a 66 % chance of achieving a battery that costs less than $200/kWh, and a 20 % chance for a cost of $90/kWh or less. Reducing the cost of batteries from a baseline of $384 to $200 could lead to a savings in the cost of reducing greenhouse gases of about $100 Billion in 2050.

Erin Baker; Jeffrey Keisler

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Vehicle test report: South Coast Technology electric cconversion of a Volkswagen Rabbit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Coast Technology Volkswagen Rabbit, an electric vehicle manufactured by South Coast Technology of Santa Barbara, California was tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) dynamometer facility in Pasadena and at JPL's Edwards Test Station (ETS) located near Lancaster, California. The tests were conducted between April and July, 1979. These tests were performed to characterize certain parameters of the South Coast Rabbit and to provide baseline data that will be used for the comparison of near-term batteries that are to be incorporated into the vehicle. The vehicle tests were concentrated on the electrical drive system; i.e., the batteries, controller, and motor. The tests included coastdowns to characterize the road load, maximum effort acceleration, and range evaluation for both cyclic constant speed conditions. A qualitative evaluation of the vehicle was made by comparing its constant speed range performance with those vehicles described in the document State of the Art assessment of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles. The Rabbit performance was near to the best of the 1977 vehicles.

Price, T.W.; Shain, T.W.; Bryant, J.A.

1981-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Department Awards More Than $7 Million for Innovative Hydrogen Storage Technologies in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy today announced more than $7 million to fund four projects in California, Washington and Oregon to advance hydrogen storage technologies to be used in fuel cell electric vehicles.

313

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Program on Technology Innovation: Decision-Centered Guidelines for the Design of Human System Interfaces for Electric Power Industry Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision-centered guidelines support improved user decision making across a broad range of electric power industry application areas. The guidelines will aid in the design of user-centered human-system interfaces (HSIs), while increasing the beneficial uses of new technologies for electric power generation, transmission, and distribution (GTD) systems. Decision-centered guidelines are applicable to system designs involving new technology that will transform current user tasks, responsibilities, ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Program on Technology Innovation: Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program and focuses on a comparison of chemical and physical solvent-based CO2 capture systems i...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Does Liberalisation cause more Electricity Blackouts? Evidence from a Global Study of Newspaper Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n ma y lead to higher price s unles s there is more contes t a b l e marke t s , expan d e d trans mi s s i o n capac i t y and more investment in generation capacity. 2.2 Electricity liberalisation in developing countries - Overview of Latin... , well-organised markets and effect i v e networ k regula t i o n were undermi n e d by politic a l interfe r e n ce in the pricing of electr i c i t y. Clearl y the macroe c o n o mi c crisis of 2002 profound l y affected the Argentin e economy as a...

Yu, William; Pollitt, Michael G.

317

Hybrid Electric Power Train and Control Strategies Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) offer societal benefits through their ability to displace the use of petroleum fuels. Petroleum fuels represent a polluting and politically destabilizing energy carrier. PHEV technologies can move transportation away from petroleum fuel sources by enabling domestically generated electricity and liquids bio-fuels to serve as a carrier for transportation energy. Additionally, the All-Electric-Range (AER) offered by PHEVs can significantly reduce demand for expensive and polluting liquid fuels. The GATE funding received during the 1998 through 2004 funding cycle by the UC Davis Hybrid Electric Vehicle Center (HEVC) was used to advance and train researchers in PHEV technologies. GATE funding was used to construct a rigorous PHEV curriculum, provide financial support for HEVC researchers, and provide material support for research efforts. A rigorous curriculum was developed through the UC Davis Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Department to train HEVC researchers. Students' research benefited from this course work by advancing the graduate student researchers' understanding of key PHEV design considerations. GATE support assisted HEVC researchers in authoring technical articles and producing patents. By supporting HEVC researchers multiple Master's theses were written as well as journal articles and publications. The topics from these publications include Continuously Variable Transmission control strategies and PHEV cross platform controls software development. The GATE funding has been well used to advance PHEV systems. The UC Davis Hybrid Electric Vehicle Center is greatly appreciative for the opportunities GATE funding provided. The goals and objectives for the HEVC GATE funding were to nourish engineering research in PHEV technologies. The funding supplied equipment needed to allow researchers to investigate PHEV design sensitivities and to further optimize system components. Over a dozen PHEV researchers benefited from the GATE funding and produced journal articles and intellectual property as a result. The remainder of this document outlines the productivity resulting from GATE funds. The topics include the following: GATE Hybrid Vehicle Systems Related Courses; Students Supported; Publications; and Patents. A discussion regarding the HEVC accomplishments with respect to the GATE funding goals is provided in the conclusion.

Andrew Frank

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI?s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. Also, several installation activities were initiated this month for the testing of a new EPRI/ADA Technologies sorbent sampling system in December. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

None

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Dish/Stirling systems: Overview of an emerging commercial solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dish/Stirling is a solar thermal electric technology which couples parabolic, point-focusing solar collectors and heat engines which employ the Stirling thermodynamic cycle. Since the late 1970s, the development of Dish/Stirling systems intended for commercial use has been in progress in Germany, Japan, and the US. In the next several years it is expected that one or more commercial systems will enter the market place. This paper provides a general overview of this emerging technology, including: a description of the fundamental principles of operation of Dish/Stirling systems; a presentation of the major components of the systems (concentrator, receiver, engine/alternator, and controls); an overview of the actual systems under development around the world, with a discussion of some of the technical issues and challenges facing the Dish/Stirling developers. A brief discussion is also presented of potential applications for small Dish/Stirling systems in northern Mexico.

Strachan, J.W.; Diver, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Estrada, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Spain)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Electric Technologies for Light-duty Vehicles in the United States Abstract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the present status and future projections for emerging technologies that can be utilized in light-duty vehicles in the next five to ten years to significantly reduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologies considered are modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains using batteries and/or ultracapacitors for energy storage. Throughout the study, six classes of vehicles –compact passenger cars to large SUVs-were considered. For each vehicle class, computer simulations (Advisor 2002) and cost analyses were performed for conventional ICE and mild and full parallel hybrids using port-fuel injected and lean burn gasoline engines and direct-injection turbo-charged diesel engines to determine the fuel economy and differential costs for the various vehicle designs using the conventional gasoline PFI engine vehicle as the baseline. CO2 emissions (gmCO2/mi) for each driveline and vehicle case were calculated from the fuel economy values. On a percentage or ratio basis, the analyses indicated that the fuel economy gains, CO2 emissions reductions, and cost/price increases due to the use of the advanced engines and hybrid-electric drivelines were essentially independent of vehicle class. This means that a regulation specifying the same fractional

United States; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

International Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicles: Policies, Markets, and Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. (1995), Future Drive Electric Vehicles and Sustainable1996), "The Case for Electric Vehicles," Sclent~c American,Emissions Impacts of Electric Vehicles," Journal of the Alr

Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the US Electricity Industry,” October mimeo.deregulation” of the electricity industry in the U.S. hasreg- ulation in the electricity industry has attracted

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of battery technologies, driving patterns, and climate comfort control on the performance of electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A computer software package, EAGLES, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze electric vehicle (EV) performance. In this paper, we present EAGLES predictions of EV driving range, acceleration rate, and energy consumption under various driving patterns, with different battery technologies, and with assumptions concerning use of air conditioners and/or heaters for climate comfort control. The specifications of a baseline, four-passenger EV for given design performance requirements are established, assuming urban driving conditions represented by the Los Angeles 92 (LA-92) driving cycle and using battery characteristics similar to those of the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) midterm battery performance goals. To examine the impacts of driving patterns, energy consumption is simulated under three different driving cycles: the New York City Cycle, the Los Angeles 92 Cycle, and the ECE-15 Cycle. To test the impacts of battery technologies, performance attributes of an advanced lead-acid battery, the USABC midterm battery goals, and the USABC long-term battery goals are used. Finally, EV energy consumption from use of air conditioners and/or heaters under different climates is estimated and the associated driving range penalty for one European city (Paris) and two United States cities (Chicago and Los Angeles) is predicted. The results of this paper show the importance of considering various effects, such as battery technology, driving pattern, and climate comfort control, in the determination of EV performances. Electric vehicle energy consumption decreases more than 20% when a battery with characteristics similar to the USABC long-term goals is used instead of an advanced lead-acid battery.

Marr, W.W.; Wang, M.Q.; Santini, D.J.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

The ETK model| Emotional, technology, and knowledge competency effects on global soccer fan satisfaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study was designed to investigate emotional (E), technology (T), and knowledge (K) competencies of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA); specifically how… (more)

Cardenas Cano, Miguel Angel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- electric power plant Coal blending Nitrogen controlblending chemical methods resource requirements cost STEAM-ELECTRIC COAL- FIRED POWER PLANT

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Bus application of oxygen-enrichment technology and diesel-electric hybrid systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) mandate very strict limits on particulate, smoke, and other emissions from city buses. The use of alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or methanol, can help transit operators, such as the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), meet the mandated limits. However, the capital investment needed to convert the fueling infrastructure and buses is large, as is the expense of training personnel. If a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus can be implemented with the help of oxygen-enrichment technology or a diesel-electric hybrid system, this large investment could be postponed for many years. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) initiated this project to evaluate the possibility of applying these technologies to CTA buses. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a limited number of engine tests and computer analyses and concluded that both concepts are practical and will help in a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus that can meet the mandated limits of the CAA amendments. The oxygen enrichment of combustion air depends on the availability of a compact and economical membrane separator. Because the technology for this critical component is still under development, it is recommended that an actual bus demonstration be delayed until prototype membranes are available. The hybrid propulsion system is ready for the demonstration phase, and it is recommended that the CTA and RTA commence planning for a bus demonstration.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems, Annual Report for FY 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26--28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems: Annual Report for FY 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26-28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

Hawsey, R.A.

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

336

Remote sensing and GIS technology in the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is an international consortium established to acquire satellite images of the world's glaciers, analyze them for glacier extent and changes, and to assess these change data in terms of forcings. The consortium ... Keywords: Database, Glaciers, Open-source GIS, Remote sensing

Bruce Raup; Andreas Kääb; Jeffrey S. Kargel; Michael P. Bishop; Gordon Hamilton; Ella Lee; Frank Paul; Frank Rau; Deborah Soltesz; Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa; Matthew Beedle; Christopher Helm

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

338

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FutureGen FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production Office of Fossil Energy U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC June 2, 2003 Lowell Miller, Director, Office of Coal & Power Systems 24-Jun-03 Slide 2 Office of Fossil Energy Presentation Agenda * FE Hydrogen Program * FutureGen * Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 24-Jun-03 Slide 3 Office of Fossil Energy Key Drivers * Decreasing domestic supply will lead to increased imports from less stable regions * Conventional petroleum is finite; production will peak and irreversibly decline due to continually increasing demand * Improving environmental quality - Meeting air emission regulations - Greenhouse gas emissions 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

339

A technology transfer plan for the US Department of Energy's Electric Energy Systems Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objective of this study was to develop a technology transfer plan that would be both practical and effective in promoting the transfer of the products of DOE/EES research to appropriate target audiences. The study drew upon several major components of the marketing process in developing this plan: definition/charcterization of the products being produced by the DOE/EES program, identification/characterization of possible users of the products being produced by the program, and documentation/analysis of the methods currently being used to promote the adoption of DOE/EES products. Fields covered include HVDC, new materials, superconductors, electric field effects, EMP impacts, battery storage/load leveling, automation/processing concepts, normal/emergency operating concepts, Hawaii deep water cable, and failure mechanisms.

Harrer, B.J.; Hurwitch, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Battery technology for electric and hybrid vehicles: Expert views about prospects for advancement  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present the results of an expert elicitation on the prospects for advances in battery technology for electric and hybrid vehicles. We find disagreement among the experts on a wide range of topics, including the need for government funding, the probability of getting batteries with Lithium Metal anodes to work, and the probability of building safe Lithium-ion batteries. Averaging across experts we find that U.S. government expenditures of $150 M/year lead to a 66% chance of achieving a battery that costs less than $200/kWh, and a 20% chance for a cost of $90/kWh or less. Reducing the cost of batteries from a baseline of $384 to $200 could lead to a savings in the cost of reducing greenhouse gases of about $100 billion in 2050.

Baker, Erin D.; Chon, Haewon; Keisler, Jeffrey M.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

SO x-NO x-Rox Box TM Technology Review and Global Commercial Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SO x-NO x-Rox Box TM or SNRB TM process is a combined sulfur dioxide (SO x or SO 2), nitrogen oxides (NO x) and particulate (Rox) emissions control technology developed by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) in which high removal efficiencies for all three pollutants are achieved in a high-temperature baghouse. A 5 MW e equivalent demonstration of the technology co-sponsored by the U.S.

R. Martinelli; Babcock Wilcox; J. B. Doyle; Babcock Wilcox; K. E. Redinger; Babcock Wilcox

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Abstract--Electrical energy storage is a central element to any electric-drivetrain technology whether hybrid-electric, fuel-cell,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACC `04 1 Abstract-- Electrical energy storage is a central element to any electric on the remaining electrical system; however, the same ultra-capacitors have a very low energy density and therefore-mail: sbrennan@psu.edu). system model in the Department of Energy's Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT

Brennan, Sean

344

U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

Hsieh, B.C.B. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Wang Yingshi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Engineering Thermophysics

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity From Grid-Related Services – Preliminary Delphi Panel Resu lts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a robust research and development portfolio under a variety of future scenarios, EPRI's research has identified three critical drivers which can substantially influence the technologies needed to provide society with clean, reliable and affordable electricity in the decades ahead. These drivers include the price of natural gas, the demand for electricity from grid services, and the potential for change in environmental and energy policy.In its scenario planning ...

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57451 Clean Energy Technologies A Preliminary InventoryDepartment Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernestand renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and T. O’Brien. 2003. Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-plants and sites that need electricity and heat (i.e. steam)of the Potential for Electricity Generation Owen Bailey and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of Coal to Electric Power--A Dollar and CentsR. C. Carr, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto,Clean Fuels Today," Electric Power Research Institute,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalsince electric cooling loads can be offset by the absorptioncooling loads: utility purchases of electricity, on-site generation of electricity, absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heating andenergy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of2 emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam-Electric Units TypicalAnnual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam- Electric Units. * Btuare calculated for both baseload operation (65% capacity

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

355

2010 Solar Technologies Market Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

1756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 55, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Electric Motor Drive Selection Issues for HEV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- propulsion systems, namely the dc motor, the induction motor (IM), the permanent magnet synchronous motor, the induction motor (IM), the permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motor, and the switched reluctance motor (SRM1756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 55, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2006 Electric Motor Drive

358

Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. This new generation of vehicles, often called electric drive vehicles, can be divided into three cat- egories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum use. Hybrid Electric Vehicles HEVs are powered by an internal combus- tion engine or other propulsion source that runs on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The extra power provided by the electric motor allows for a smaller engine, resulting in better fuel

359

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the search for alternative energy solutions are two ongoingare in search of alternative energy solutions in industrialdoing research in alternative energy solutions, he found out

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the search for alternative energy solutions are twoare in search of alternative energy solutions in industrialtheir movements for alternative energy. While doing research

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

went further into piezoelectric energy-generating floors at4. REFERENCES [1] Piezoelectric energy-generating floors at

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An outdoor exposure testing program for optical materials used in solar thermal electric technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is important for making solar thermal energy. technologies viable for electricity production. The objectives of a new outdoor testing program recently initiated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are to determine the expected lifetimes of candidate reflector materials and demonstrate their optical durability in real-world service conditions. NREL is working with both utilities and industry in a collaborative effort to achieve these objectives. To date, simulated/accelerated exposure testing of these materials has not been correlated with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering results. This outdoor testing program will allow outdoor exposure data to be obtained for realistic environments and will establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data. In this program, candidate reflector materials are subjected to various outdoor exposure conditions in a network of sites across the southwestern United States. Important meteorological data are continuously recorded at these sites; these data will be analyzed for possible correlations with material optical performance. Weathered samples are characterized on a regular basis using a series of optical tests. These tests provide the basis for tracking material performance and durability with exposure time in the various outdoor environments. This paper describes the outdoor testing program in more detail including meteorological monitoring capabilities and the optical tests that are performed on these materials.

Wendelin, T.; Jorgensen, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Monthly Diurnal Global Atmospheric Circuit Estimates Derived from Vostok Electric Field Measurements Adjusted for Local Meteorological and Solar Wind Influences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local temperature, wind speed, pressure, and solar wind–imposed influences on the vertical electric field observed at Vostok, Antarctica, are evaluated by multivariate analysis. Local meteorology can influence electric field measurements via local ...

G. B. Burns; B. A. Tinsley; A. V. Frank-Kamenetsky; O. A. Troshichev; W. J. R. French; A. R. Klekociuk

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Homeostatic control : economic integration of solar technologies into electric power operations and planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic and technical interfaces between the electrical utility and the distributed, nondispatchable electric generation systems are only minimally understood at the present time. This paper will discuss the economic ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters, i.e. , the electricity tariff structure. Due toenergy loads, 2 electricity and natural gas tariff structureelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed ($/day) Sources: PG&E commercial tariffs,

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

International Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicles: Policies, Markets, and Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric-Drive Vehicles In the very early years of the automotive industry,electric-drive vehicles, especially battery-powered EVs The programs are almost aU in countries with major automotive manufacturing industries.

Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidized-Bed Steam-Electric Steam-Electric Combined-CycleCombined-Cycle Current (1974) Future Future a Source:steam plants. The combined-cycle versions of advanced

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (demand via utility purchases and burns natural gas to meet

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Regional Economic Impacts of Electric Drive Vehicles and Technologies: Case Study of the Greater Cleveland Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), which combine desirable aspects of battery electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles, offer owners the advantages of increased fuel efficiency and lower annual fuel bills without concern for dead batteries, long recharge time, or limited range. This study examines the potential regional economic impacts due to increasing electric transportation in the Greater Cleveland Area (GCA). By applying regional input-output (RIO) analysis, the study determines the imp...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Converting Steam Generators Back to Coal Firing,Conditions on Steam-Electric Generator Emissions," McKnight,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Graduate Research Assistant Program for Professional Development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southeast is a highly suitable environment for establishing a series of nuclear safety, security and safeguards 'professional development' courses. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides expertise in the research component of these subjects while the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex handles safeguards/security and safety applications. Several universities (i.e., University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), North Carolina State University, University of Michigan, and Georgia Technology Institute) in the region, which offer nuclear engineering and public policy administration programs, and the Howard Baker Center for Public Policy make this an ideal environment for learning. More recently, the Institute for Nuclear Security (INS) was established between ORNL, Y-12, UTK and Oak Ridge Associate Universities (ORAU), with a focus on five principal areas. These areas include policy, law, and diplomacy; education and training; science and technology; operational and intelligence capability building; and real-world missions and applications. This is a new approach that includes professional development within the graduate research assistant program addressing global needs in nuclear security, safety and safeguards.

Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Shelander Jr, Bruce R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program is actively evaluating plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology and researching the most critical technical barriers to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for use in hybrid vehicles as well as electric-only vehicles · Hardware-in-the-loop evaluation of advanced is actively evaluating plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology and researching the most critical and capacitor scaling, thermal management, capacity, and power fade · Using hybrid electric vehicles in fleets

Kemner, Ken

374

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

375

Financing End-Use Solar Technologies in a Restructured Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, Office of Energy Management Division

376

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies. The production of renewable energy creates noand thermal energy production from all renewable resources,

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Will Progress in Science and Technology Avert or Accelerate Global Collapse? A Critical Analysis and Policy Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial society will move towards collapse if its total environmental impact (I), expressed either in terms of energy and materials use or in terms of pollution, increases with time, i.e., dI/dt > 0. The traditional interpretation of the I=PAT equation reflects the optimistic belief that technological innovation, particularly improvements in eco-efficiency, will significantly reduce the technology (T) factor, and thereby result in a corresponding decline in impact (I). Unfortunately, this interpretation of the I=PAT equation ignores the effects of technical change on the other two factors: population (P) and per capita affluence (A). A more heuristic formulation of this equation is I=P(T)?A(T)?T in which the dependence of P and A on T is apparent. From historical evidence, it is clear that technological revolutions (tool-making, agricultural, and industrial) have been the primary driving forces behind successive population explosions, and that modern communication and transportation technologies have been employed to transform a large proportion of the world’s inhabitants into consumers of material- and energy-intensive products and services. In addition, factor analysis from neoclassical growth theory and the rebound effect provide evidence that science and technology have played a key role in contributing to rising living standards. While technological change has thus contributed to significant increases in both P and A, it has at the same time brought about considerable eco-efficiency improvements. Unfortunately, reductions in the T-factor have generally not been sufficiently rapid to compensate for the simultaneous increases in both P and A. As a result, total impact, in terms of energy production, mineral extraction, land-use and CO2 emissions, has in most cases increased with time, indicating that industrial society is nevertheless moving towards collapse. The belief that continued and even accelerated scientific research and technological innovation will automatically result in sustainability and avert collapse is at best mistaken. Innovations in science and technology will be necessary but alone will be insufficient for sustainability. Consequently, what is most needed are specific policies designed to decrease total impact, such as (a) halting population growth via effective population stabilization plans and better access to birth control methods, (b) reducing total matter-energy throughput and pollution by removing perverse subsidies, imposing regulations that limit waste discharges and the depletion of non-renewable resources, and implementing ecological tax reform, and (c) moving towards a steady-state economy in which per-capita affluence is stabilized at lower levels by replacing wasteful conspicuous material consumption with social alternatives known to enhance subjective well-being. While science and technology must play an important role in the implementation of these policies, none will be enacted without a fundamental change in society’s dominant values of growth and exploitation. Thus, value change is the most important prerequisite for avoiding global collapse.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Huesemann, Joyce A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sustainable Electricity | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Electricity SHARE Sustainable Electricity Outdoor power line accelerated testing. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program...

379

Performance and life evaluation of nickel/iron battery technology for dual shaft electric propulsion vehicle  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cost-shared contract between the US Department of Energy (Office of Transportation Systems) and Eaton Corp. to develop an advanced dual shaft electric propulsion (DSEP) vehicle, several nickel/iron (Ni/Fe) batteries were designed and procured from Eagle-Picher Industries (EPI) for evaluation and vehicle use. In March 1986, two individual 5-cell Ni/Fe modules and a 140-cell (28-module) battery pack were delivered to Argonne for evaluation. Performance characterization tests were conducted on the two modules and life testing performed on the battery pack. Module performance testing was completed in early 1987 after about 215 cycles of operation. Each module still retained {approximately}90% of its initial 180-Ah capacity at the end of testing ({approximately}163 Ah/970 Wh). Life evaluation of the 168-V, 28-kWh battery pack was conducted with driving profile discharges. A 1377-s power profile that represented the battery load in a DSEP vehicle undergoing a Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) was used. Testing was temporarily suspended in October 1987 after the battery pack had accumulated 502 cycles (209 cycles in 1986). After a three-month trickle charge ({approximately}3 A), testing was resumed (January 1988) with driving profile discharges. In March 1988, battery performance was being limited by three modules. After 545 cycles, the three modules were removed from the pack. Battery performance, however, continued to decline and another four modules were removed in September 1988 (645 cycles). Several remaining modules started to exhibit a high self-discharge loss and a capacity of only 119 Ah (15.1 kWh) could be achieved. The life evaluation was halted in October 1988 after 661 cycles had been accumulated. This report outlines the test activities and presents the performance results of the individual modules and the battery pack involved in this technology evaluation. 18 figs., 4 tabs.

DeLuca, W. (ed.)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies has been conducted. The alternative technologies are coal-gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Fusion was not included in this preliminary work but will be a part of the final evaluation based on available research, to identify a suitable assessment methodology, and to identify data deficiencies. The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts at comparative or single-technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research. (WHK)

Newsom, D.E.; Wolsko, T.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

383

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

499, [OECD 2003] OECD. Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants:maintenance, and ultimate decommissioning of electric poweremissions during the decommissioning of hydroelectric power

Horvath, Arpad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment plants release biogas through the decomposition oforganic matter. The biogas (mostly methane) can be capturedgenerate electricity from biogas and they have the same rate

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A regional event analysis of electric vehicle technology development in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the past 20 years battery electric transportation has frequently been assessed as the most desirable alternative for internal combustion driven cars. However widespread adoption… (more)

Vries, M.J. de

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NO x (63). ~ Control and Power Plant Thermal Efficiency.ELECTRIC COAL- FIRED POWER PLANT thermal efficiency (heatthe overall thermal efficiency of the power plant. Fuel-Gas

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-scale back-pressure steam turbine. Several manufactures2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-level2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics3. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impacts of Cooling Technology on Solder Fatigue for Power Modules in Electric Traction Drive Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Describes three power module cooling topologies for electric traction drive vehicles: two advanced options using jet impingement cooling and one option using pin-fin liquid cooling.

O' Keefe, M.; Vlahinos, A.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

392

Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The U.S. Department of Energy`s role in commercialization of solar thermal electric technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the development of solar thermal electric (STE) technology since the early 1970s. From its inception, the program has held a long-term goal of nurturing STE technologies from the research and development (R&D) stage through technology development, ultimately leading to commercialization. Within the last few years, the focus of this work -has shifted from R&D to cost-shared cooperative projects with industry. These projects are targeted not just at component development, but at complete systems, marketing approaches, and commercialization plans. This changing emphasis has brought new industry into the program and is significantly accelerating solar thermal`s entry into the marketplace. Projects such as Solar Two in the power tower area, a number of dish/Stirling joint ventures in the modular power area, and operations and maintenance (O&M) cost reduction studies will be discussed as examples of this new focus.

Burch, G.D. [United States Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rd International Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exposition (Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications, Sandiaand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options EPRI, Palo

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles was the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Act of 1976.for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications,and Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options EPRI, Palo

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cyclefarms to large integrated gasifiers at petroleum refineries.BLGCC). The black liquor gasifier technology will produce a

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Argonne Lab’s Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Jeff Chamberlain, who leads Argonne's Energy Storage Initiative, explains what goes into taking advanced battery technologies from the lab to the marketplace.

400

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for$/kWh References EPA. 2002. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MCFC) and solid oxide (SOFC). Proton exchange membrane (PEM)technology. Hence, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potentialfuel cell system, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potential.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Smart Grid Technologies for Efficiency Improvement of Integrated Industrial Electric System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this research is to identify the need of Smart Grid Technologies in communication between industrial plants with co-generation capability and the… (more)

Balani, Spandana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Global Time-Dependent Model of Thunderstorm Electricity. Part I: Mathematical Properties of the Physical and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent model that simulates the interaction of a thunderstorm with its electrical environment is introduced. The model solves the continuity equation of the Maxwell current density that includes conduction, displacement, and source ...

G. L. Browning; I. Tzur; R. G. Roble

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment; 3. a low storage and PV price run; 4. to assessFigure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIA) long-term crude oil price forecast makes net mit-with electricity prices doubled and oil prices at $100 perflows away from foreign oil imports toward domestic pur-

Williams, J.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

408

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

409

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Lithium-Ion Battery Cost and Advanced Battery Technologies Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batteries are a critical cost factor for plug-in electric vehicles, and the current high cost of lithium ion batteries poses a serious challenge for the competitiveness of Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEVs). Because the market penetration of PEVs will depend heavily on future battery costs, determining the direction of battery costs is very important. This report examines the cost drivers for lithium-ion PEV batteries and also presents an assessment of recent advancements in the growing attempts to ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses (Fact Sheet).  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Web site and in print publications. Web site and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION â—† DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES Indianapolis Public Transportation DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES NREL/PIX 13504, 13505, 13583 THE INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CORPORATION (INDYGO) provides transit service in the Indianapolis Metropolitan area, using 226 vehicles to serve 28 fixed and demand response routes. IndyGo vehicles

411

Technology Optimization Process for Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle Systems Using Computational Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a computer-based technology optimization process to define vehicle systems that meet specified goals and constraints using a minimum amount of resources. In this paper, we describe the technology optimization process, with a focus on technical target setting, and illustrate its use with a simple example.

OKeefe, M.; Walkowicz, K.; Hendricks, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2a: Feasibility Of Implementing Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle Technology In El Monte Busway: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle System," PresentedEncourage the Use of Electric Vehicles," Third InternationalRoadway-Powered Electric Vehicles," Transportation Research

Chira-Chavala, Ted; Lechner, Edward H.; Empey, Dan M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

On the Use of Energy Storage Technologies for Regulation Services in Electric Power Systems with Significant Penetration of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy produced by intermittent renewable resources is sharply increasing in the United States. At high penetration levels, volatility of wind power production could cause additional problems for the power system balancing functions such as regulation. This paper reports some partial results of a project work, recently conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project proposes to mitigate additional intermittency with the help of Wide Area Energy Management System (WAEMS) that would provide a two-way simultaneous regulation service for the BPA and California ISO systems by using a large energy storage facility. The paper evaluates several utility-scale energy storage technology options for their usage as regulation resources. The regulation service requires a participating resource to quickly vary its power output following the rapidly and frequently changing regulation signal. Several energy storage options have been analyzed based on thirteen selection criteria. The evaluation process resulted in the selection of flywheels, pumped hydro electric power (or conventional hydro electric power) plant and sodium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries as candidate technologies for the WAEMS project. A cost benefit analysis should be conducted to narrow the choice to one technology.

Yang, Bo; Makarov, Yuri V.; DeSteese, John G.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Nyeng, Preben; McManus, Bart; Pease, John

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

How Internet Concepts and Technologies Can Help Green and Smarten the Electrical Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale, heterogeneous, and widely-deployed system that is globally viewed as crit- ical infrastructure. Unfortunately, this century-old system suffers from at least four major problems. · First, a substantial fraction transmission losses. More- over, these sources tend to be renewable (e.g., solar and wind), and have

Rosenberg, Catherine P.

415

Use of the NII to study impacts of new technologies and policies on supply and demand of electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a proposal to use an implementation of client-server technology on the Internet for simulating a number of aspects of electric power production, distribution, and consumption within a wholly new regulatory, financing, operating, and control environment. This approach would use a large number of people to generate strategies and decisions, in a real-time context, needed to drive the simulation. A World Wide Web server would provide background information about the simulation for those who chose to participate as actors in one of supported roles. Roles would be based on activities associated with different business areas and would include utility manager, independent power producer (entrepreneur), electric power futures trader, electric power futures investor, electric power wheeler, industrial customer, commercial customer, and residential customer. The simulation program would run on a system of high-performance computers (parallel computer system) that communicate between each other on a high speed communications bus. These computers would also be the server systems for the client programs used by the actors. People who want to be actors would be required to register before being given a client program, as a way to have some control over the simulation results. Each role will have its corresponding client program with graphical user interface. Each client program will support a common view of the simulation results and a role specific view.

Munro, J.K. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

2001-01-1334 Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2001-01-1334 Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle Simulation in SIMULINK and its Use of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT A hybrid electric vehicle simulation tool (HE-VESIM) has been developed global crude oil supplies stimulate research aimed at new, fuel-efficient vehicle technologies. Hybrid-electric

Peng, Huei

417

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Reducing Cost of Energy Through Rotor Aerodynamics Control; Global Energy Concepts, LLC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Global Energy Concepts to evaluate a wide range of wind turbine configurations and their impact on overall cost of energy (COE).

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

GENERAL ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since last year’s GTC Conference, a considerable number of significant events have occurred in the gasification technology marketplace. New IGCC projects have come on stream with commercial operation, other new IGCC projects have been announced and started in development, environmental issues have gained emphasis, and energy prices, notably natural gas, have escalated dramatically. Directionally, all of these events appear to have created a more favorable atmosphere for IGCC projects. Related to an ongoing IGCC project currently in development, a joint analysis has been performed by Global Energy, General Electric Power Systems, and Praxair to evaluate technical and economic elements for the performance of BGL Gasification Technology based on solid hydrocarbon fuel feed to an IGCC for power generation. Results of the analysis provide a picture of the relative economics in today’s environment for electrical power generation by conventional natural gas fired combined cycle power systems compared to using BGL Gasification Technology in an IGCC configuration. 2

Igcc Power Generation; Richard A. Olliver; John M. Wainwright; Raymond F. Drnevich Abstract

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A cost allocation model for assessing the impact of energy storage technologies upon electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assist the Division of Energy Storage Systems in the U.S. Department of Energy in prioritizing, developing, and commercializing storage technologies a computer simulation code has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to assess the ...

R. Giese; L. Holt; R. Scheithauer

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of natural gas and the enactment of the Power Plant &Power Plant & Industrial Fuel Use Act and the natural gaspower plant emissions, created a premium for “clean-burning” technologies. With natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

General Purpose Technologies and Economic Growth: Electricity Diffusion in the Manufacturing Sector Before WWII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 8 Abramovitz and David (2000, pp. 50-53) stress the fundamental importance of natural resource abundance in shaping the form, rate, and underlying technologies of US growth up to the first quarter of the twentieth century. They also maintain... , NBER Working Paper 11528. Jovanovic, B., Rousseau, P. (2005), „General Purpose Technologies?, in P. Aghion, and S. N. Durlauf, (eds.), Handbook of Economic Growth, Volume 1B, Amsterdam and Oxford: Elsevier B.V. 2005, pp. 1181 – 1224. Kendrick, J. W...

Ristuccia, Cristiano Andrea; Solomou, Solomos

423

Assessment of a Novel Direct Coal Conversion - Fuel Cell Technology for Electric Utility Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Technology Road Map identified a key technical challenge is "maintaining and strengthening a robust generation portfolio". Using our abundant coal resources in the most efficient way and in a way that limits CO2 emissions is among the toughest challenges facing the power industry. There are few new options or new technologies in the R&D pipeline that address this issue. Coal options available and being considered include: combustion systems such as pulverized coal (PC) and super critical systems w...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

How internet concepts and technologies can help green and smarten the electrical grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several powerful forces are gathering to make fundamental and irrevocable changes to the century-old grid. The next-generation grid, often called the 'smart grid,' will feature distributed energy production, vastly more storage, tens of millions of stochastic ... Keywords: electrical grid, green networking

Srinivasan Keshav; Catherine Rosenberg

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

How internet concepts and technologies can help green and smarten the electrical grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several powerful forces are gathering to make fundamental and irrevocable changes to the century-old grid. The next-generation grid, often called the 'smart grid,' will feature distributed energy production, vastly more storage, tens of millions of stochastic ... Keywords: electrical grid, green networking

Srinivasan Keshav; Catherine Rosenberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Synthesis of energy technology medium-term projections Alternative fuels for transport and low carbon electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learning. The costs cited also reflect engineering cost estimates of biomass gasification electricity of time permits increasing scrutiny of earlier estimates, it is important to take stock of existing estimates. MIT and PIU rather higher nos. Low historical learning rate. 4 Biomass (1112 ) Co

427

Program on Technology Innovation: Nanotechnology Opportunities for the Electric Utility Enterprise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology promises to enable critical applications for the electric power industry. This report assesses the possibilities and relative importance of nanotechnology in the areas of photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, structural materials, sensors and networks, fuel cells, and catalysts and begins the discussion of the role that EPRI should play in the development and implementation of nanotechnology applications.

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry  

SciTech Connect

This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal  

SciTech Connect

The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Toyota Prius Plug-In HEV: A Plug-In Hybrid Electric Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet highlights the Toyota Prius plug-in HEV, a plug-in hybrid electric car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In partnership with the University of Colorado, NREL uses the vehicle for grid-integration studies and for testing new hardware and charge-management algorithms. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

New York City Transit Drives Hybrid Electric Buses into the Future; Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HYBRID DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HYBRID ELECTRIC TRANSIT BUS EVALUATIONS The role of AVTA is to bridge the gap between R&D and commercial availability of advanced vehicle technologies that reduce U.S. petroleum use while improving air quality. AVTA supports the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program in moving these technologies from R&D to market deployment by examining market factors

432

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biogas-Fueled Electric Power: An Assessment of Systems and Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the practice of generating electric power from biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide with trace contaminants, produced as a byproduct of biological treatment of organic waste under anaerobic (no oxygen) conditions. Biogas is commonly produced during treatment of municipal solid waste in sealed landfills and anaerobic digestion of wastewater treatment plant sludge, animal manure, and organic industrial waste. Power generation from biogas is distributed generation as it is ...

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Assessment of Electric Motor Technology: Present Status, Future Trends, and R&D Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past few years, the market demand has increased dramatically for advanced motor/electronic systems that are more efficient, more rugged, and result in products that more closely meet manufacturing and quality tolerances. This study reviews the operating principles and characteristics of existing electric motors as well as advanced motors and drives; and it details their use in six major user sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, utility, and military.

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Transportation and Electrical Efficiency Potential in the State of Hawaii Using Existing Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study on Hawaii's transportation and electrical efficiency options is to provide policy makers with a clearly defined set of options to capture the energy efficiency prize. Neoclassical prescriptions for implementation of energy policies using prices, taxes, regulation, and deregulation are well known but politically fraught, though authentic competition in the context of a least-cost strategy can be effective. Yet unknown to many analysts and policymakers is a powerful new portfolio ...

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnology Research and Development Opportunities in the Electricity Enterprise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances over the past 20 years in biotechnology have led to important contributions in health care, production of food and fiber, industrial and manufacturing performance, ecosystem service enhancements, and pollution prevention, control, and remediation. While the electricity enterprise is currently underrepresented in the biotechnology sector in terms of research, there is a current move to apply plant and industrial biotechnologies to the energy sector because of the enormous market potential in spec...

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Program on Technology Innovation: Automated Association of Smart Appliances with Electric Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of a study of how in-premise communication networks might be used to enable appliances to automatically identify the electric meter through which they are powered. The investigation addresses the scenario where in-premise networks overlap and multiple candidate meters exist. The ability for end-devices to determine their own power-consumption characteristics by communicating with their source meter was also studied.

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Flicker Reduction Technology for Electric Heat Pumps and Central Air Conditioners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric heat pumps and air conditioners move thermal energy into and/or out of conditioned spaces. During startup, the compressor motor temporarily draws high current (inrush) from the power distribution system to accelerate the compressor from standstill to its nominal operating speed. The inrush current causes a voltage drop in the power distribution system between the compressor motor and the utility service transformer. Although very brief in durationjust fractions of a secondthe voltage drop can ca...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electrical Resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu Splices Produced by Electromagnetic Pulse Technology and Soft Soldering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrical interconnection of Nb3Sn/Cu strands is a key issue for the construction of Nb3Sn based damping ring wigglers and insertion devices for third generation light sources. We compare the electrical resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu splices manufactured by solid state welding using Electromagnetic Pulse Technology (EMPT) with that of splices produced by soft soldering with two different solders. The resistance of splices produced by soft soldering depends strongly on the resistivity of the solder alloy at the operating temperature. By solid state welding splice resistances below 10 nOhm can be achieved with 1 cm strand overlap length only, which is about 4 times lower than the resistance of Sn96Ag4 soldered splices with the same overlap length. The comparison of experimental results with Finite Element simulations shows that the electrical resistance of EMPT welded splices is determined by the resistance of the stabilizing copper between the superconducting filaments and confirms that welding of the strand matr...

Schoerling, D; Scheuerlein, C; Atieh, S; Schaefer, R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global electricity technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program. SAE Hybrida regular gasoline hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), while theIn the global hybrid electric vehicle market, no automakers

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Program on Technology Innovation: Electric Field-Based Phasor Measurement Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The popularity of phasor measurement units (PMUs) comes from their ability to synchronize the voltage and current phasor measurements in interconnected power systems. Those synchronized phasor measurements are critical for wide area power system monitoring and control. However, the prevailing PMU technology was developed more than 20 years ago and is usually accompanied by high installation and maintenance costs.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Research Program for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a research plan, based on business and economic as well as technical considerations, that would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric generation resulting from limited freshwater availability. The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

444

College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Vision OE recognizes that our Nation's sustained economic prosperity, quality of life, and global competitiveness depend on access to an abundance of secure, reliable, and affordable energy resources. Through a mix of technology and policy solutions, we will address the changing dynamics and uncertainties in which the electric system will operate. We will leverage effective partnerships, solid research, and best practices to address diverse interests in achieving economic, societal, and environmental objectives. Resources Explore the following topics at OE's College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability:

445

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of an Operations and Maintenance Cost Model for LWST; Global Energy Concepts  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Global Energy Concepts to evaluate real-world data on O&M costs and to develop a working model to describe these costs for low wind speed sites.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that feature one or more advanced technologies, including: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technologies Extended range electric vehicle technologies Hybrid electric, pure...

447

Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Reporting, and Analysis Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Electricity...

448

Ultracapacitors for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles - Performance Requirements, Status of the Technology, and R&D Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Burke, A.F. , Hybrid/Electric Vehicle Design Options andRequirements for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles, EG&G Reporton Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles NUTEK therefore has

Burke, Andrew F

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

450

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

451

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

452

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

453

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

454

Rethinking the scale of coal-fired electric generation: technological and institutional considerations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic and social implications of an electric-utility system based on medium-scale (50 to 200 MWe) coal-fired plants dispersed near load centers. The historical trend in US electric generation has been a sustained effort to capture the economies of large scale. Technical and institutional conditions within the industry, as well as the historical perception of universal electrification as a desirable social goal, have brought about this trend. Large fossil and nuclear plants, often representing joint ventures of several utilities, dominate the plans of utilities over the next 20 years. Despite these trends, this review was unable to conclude that clear advantages must inherently accrue to either small- or large-scale electrical generation. Transportation and construction do offer demonstrable economies of scale, but the other terms in the cost equation (such as reliability and transmission) are sufficiently uncertain or site-specific to prevent firm conclusions concerning the effect of scale. Biases believed to exist in the regulatory process would dilute the utilities' perception of any advantages accruing to small generators; rate-of-return regulation favors overcapitalization as embodied in the construction of large plants and extensive transmission networks. It is not clear that the current regulatory structure is capable of weighing the institutional values of accountability and local control against dollar savings generally supposed to accrue to large plants. The Midwest and East North Central states may be singularly fit for a decentralized, medium-scale system for historical, geographical, and institutional reasons, as well as for their location near the coal fields.

Gilmer, R.W.; Meunier, R.E.; Whittle, C.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Electric’s (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energy’s cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

County-average hydrogen values are calculated for the part 2, 1999 Information Collection Request (ICR) coal-quality data, published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These data are used together with estimated, county-average moisture values to calculate average net heating values for coal produced in U.S. counties. Finally, 10 draft maps of the contiguous U.S. showing the potential uncontrolled sulfur, chlorine and mercury emissions of coal by U.S. county-of-origin, as well as expected mercury emissions calculated for existing emission control technologies, are presented and discussed.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.

Barnes, P.R.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States); Vance, E.F. [Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Neural Network Technology as a Pollution Prevention Tool in the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents efforts by the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) to pilot test the use of neural network technology as a pollution prevention tool for reducing stack emissions from a natural gas-fired power generating facility. The project was funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VI. Combustion control is quickly becoming an emerging alternative for reducing utility plant emissions without installing costly "end of pipe" controls. The LCRA estimates that the technology has the potential to improve the thermal efficiency of a large utility boiler by more than 1 percent. Preliminary pilot test results indicate that a 0.5 percent improvement in thermal efficiency at the 430 MW gas-fired utility boiler will result in an estimated energy savings of 76,000 mmBtus and carbon dioxide (CO2) reductions of 4,079 tons per year. This paper describes the processes that were undertaken to identify and implement the pilot project at LCRA's Thomas C. Ferguson Power Plant, located in Marble Falls, Texas. Activities performed and documented include lessons learned, equipment selection, data acquisition, model evaluation and projected emission reductions.

Johnson, M. L.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

460

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

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461

The design, construction, and operation of long-distance high-voltage electricity transmission technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on transmission lines, which operate at voltages of 115 kV and higher. Currently, the highest voltage lines comprising the North American power grid are at 765 kV. The grid is the network of transmission lines that interconnect most large power plants on the North American continent. One transmission line at this high voltage was built near Chicago as part of the interconnection for three large nuclear power plants southwest of the city. Lines at this voltage also serve markets in New York and New England, also very high demand regions. The large power transfers along the West Coast are generally at 230 or 500 kV. Just as there are practical limits to centralization of power production, there are practical limits to increasing line voltage. As voltage increases, the height of the supporting towers, the size of the insulators, the distance between conductors on a tower, and even the width of the right-of-way (ROW) required increase. These design features safely isolate the electric power, which has an increasing tendency to arc to ground as the voltage (or electrical potential) increases. In addition, very high voltages (345 kV and above) are subject to corona losses. These losses are a result of ionization of the atmosphere, and can amount to several megawatts of wasted power. Furthermore, they are a local nuisance to radio transmission and can produce a noticeable hum. Centralized power production has advantages of economies of scale and special resource availability (for instance, hydro resources), but centralized power requires long-distance transfers of power both to reach customers and to provide interconnections for reliability. Long distances are most economically served at high voltages, which require large-scale equipment and impose a substantial footprint on the corridors through which power passes. The most visible components of the transmission system are the conductors that provide paths for the power and the towers that keep these conductors at a safe distance from each other and from the ground and the natural and built environment. Common elements that are generally less visible (or at least more easily overlooked) include the maintained ROW along the path of the towers, access roads needed for maintenance, and staging areas used for initial construction that may be restored after construction is complete. Also visible but less common elements along the corridor may include switching stations or substations, where lines of similar or different voltages meet to transfer power.

Molburg, J. C.; Kavicky, J. A.; Picel, K. C.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

462

Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors with rare-earth (RE) magnets are almost universally used for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) because of their superior properties, particularly power density. However, there is now a distinct possibility of limited supply or very high cost of RE magnets that could make IPM motors unavailable or too expensive. Because development of electric motors is a critical part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Power Electronics and Motors activity, DOE needs to determine which options should be investigated and what barriers should be addressed. Therefore, in order to provide a basis for deciding which research topics should be pursued, an assessment of various motor technologies was conducted to determine which, if any, is potentially capable of meeting FreedomCAR 2015 and 2020 targets. Highest priority was given to IPM, surface mounted permanent magnet (SPM), induction, and switched reluctance (SR) motors. Also of interest, but with lesser emphasis, were wheel motors, multiple-rotor motors, motors with external excitation, and several others that emerged from the assessment. Cost and power density (from a design perspective, the power density criterion translates to torque density) are emerging as the two most important properties of motors for traction drives in hybrid and EVs, although efficiency and specific power also are very important. The primary approach for this assessment involved interviews with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), their suppliers, and other technical experts. For each technology, the following issues were discussed: (1) The current state-of-the-art performance and cost; (2) Recent trends in the technology; (3) Inherent characteristics of the motor - which ones limit the ability of the technology to meet the targets and which ones aid in meeting the target; (4) What research and development (R&D) would be needed to meet the targets; and (5) The potential for the technology to meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

Fezzler, Raymond [BIZTEK Consulting, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Dawn of the Electronic Age: Electrical Technologies in the Shaping of the Modern World, 1914 to 1945  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical power is supplied to virtually every home and workplace in our industrialized world. Providing a much-needed comprehensive overview of electrical and electronics history, Dawn of the Electric Age takes an international perspective within a ...

Frederik Nebeker

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ultracapacitors for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles - Performance Requirements, Status of the Technology, and R&D Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulse Power Devices in Electric Vehicle Propulsion Systems,the Tenth International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-10),4. Burke, A.F. , Hybrid/Electric Vehicle Design Options and

Burke, Andrew F

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Markets for Hybrid Electric Vehicles," University ofof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview  

SciTech Connect

Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468