National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for global electricity technology

  1. The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

  2. Global Information Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications Felix B. Tan in the United States of America by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden London WC2E 8LU Tel: 44 20 7240 0856 Fax

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The...

  4. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  5. The dynamics of technology di?usion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J.-F.; Pollitt, H.; Chewpreecha, U.; Salas, P.; Foley, A. M.; Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.

    2014-07-16

    20 30?9% 0 10 20 30 40 Subsidies + FiT 0 10 20 30+276% Nuclear Oil Coal Coal+CCS Gas Gas+CCS Biomass Biomass+CCS Hydro Wind Solar Geothermal Ocean 20201980 2000 2040 1980 2000 2020 20402020 a f b g c h d i e j Fig. 2. Electricity generation... Mercure and Salas (2012). In FTT:Power, this model is used to determine fuel costs for fossil fuel and nuclear based power technologies in global markets. 2.6. Modelling the global economy: E3MG E3MG (and variant E3ME11) is an out-of-equilibrium macro...

  6. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce...

  8. Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE) Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE) 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  9. Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;3. Prospects for Electricity Development Electricity Access Projected Electrification Rates by Region globalElectricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National · Prospects for electricity development · Investment requirements · Key challenges · Final remarks #12

  10. HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION? bridges vol. 18, July 2008 / Pielke makers would benefit from an authoritative, independent perspective on technology assessment of renewable energy technologies; and the US Congress is considering implementing laws to regulate speculation

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in efficiency, cost, weight, and volume for competitive future electric vehicles. Tesla Motors, a U.S. electric vehicle manufacturer, uses induction motor technology....

  12. GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    guide to providing input to GETEM, the Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model. GETEM is designed to help the Geothermal Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of...

  13. CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION & SOLUTIONS | GREENER VEHICLES Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate...

  14. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model (GETEM) Development Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Project objective: Provide a tool for estimating the performance and...

  15. Roadmap: Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Electrical Engineering Technology (General) Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology ­ Electrical Engineering Technology (General Updated: 27-Sept-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major Major GPA Overall GPA 73 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology

  16. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    Storage -Energy can be stored in a capacitor to be released when desired Example: Defibrillator used1 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Instructor: Albert Lozano. electrolytic - Non-electrolytic: smaller values: nF, pF - Electrolytic: Chemical process to increase

  17. ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

  18. EA-1678: Nissan North America, Inc., Advanced Technology Electric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: Nissan North America, Inc., Advanced Technology Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Plant in Smyrna, TN EA-1678: Nissan North America, Inc., Advanced Technology Electric Vehicle...

  19. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking This factsheet...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) is working to lower the cost...

  1. Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  2. Electric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , central plant solar and distributed solar resources. This IntElectric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-06NT42847

  3. An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-02-01

    Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

  4. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  5. Exploratory Research for New Solar Electric Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

    2005-01-01

    We will review highlights of exploratory research for new PV technologies funded by the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program through NREL and its Photovoltaic Exploratory Research Project. The goal for this effort is highlighted in the beginning of the Solar Program Multi-Year Technical Plan by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham's challenge to leapfrog the status quo by pursuing research having the potential to create breakthroughs. The ultimate goal is to create solar electric technologies for achieving electricity costs below 5 cents/kWh. Exploratory research includes work on advanced photovoltaic technologies (organic and ultra-high efficiency solar cells for solar concentrators) as well as innovative approaches to emerging and mature technologies (e.g., crystalline silicon).

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-390 Global...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Global Pure Energy to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. EA-390 Global Pure Energy (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric...

  7. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Doherty, M.P.; Peecook, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed. 19 refs.

  9. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Doherty, M.P.; Peecook, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric Vehicles:...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric USPS Long Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USPS Long Life Vehicle Conversions Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric USPS Long Life Vehicle Conversions The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tractor Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a...

  14. Hybrid & electric vehicle technology and its market feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Sang Yeob

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) technology and their sales forecasts are discussed. First, the current limitations and the future potential ...

  15. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Sovey, J.S. (NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities. 33 refs.

  16. RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY Guy MEUNIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY MARKET Guy MEUNIER Cahier n° 2013-23 ECOLE:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00906944,version1-20Nov2013 #12;Risk aversion and technology mix in an electricity market Guy-aversion on the long-term equilibrium technology mix in an electricity market. It develops a model where firms can

  17. EIC Climate Change Technology Conference 2013 Electric Trolleybus System Proposed for Downtown St. John's for Private Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    , specifically an electric trolleybus system for controlling both on-road vehicle volumes and emissions fuel, air pollution, climate change, global warming, external costs, vehicle population, electricEIC Climate Change Technology Conference 2013 1 Electric Trolleybus System Proposed for Downtown St

  18. New Electricity Technologies for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Nuttall, William J.; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2006-03-14

    . The role of wind speed and wind resource intermittency is discussed in the context of wind power technologies and the economics of this form of electricity generation. The paper stresses the recent emphasis on offshore wind farms with anticipated power... costs for a 3MW offshore turbine predicted to be 4.2 c€/kWh. This will be somewhat higher than the equivalent cost for onshore wind power production of 2.4 –3.0 c€/kWh. In such circumstances it is argued that onshore wind power will certainly...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community and Fleet Readiness Data and Reports Making plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs, also known as electric cars) as affordable and convenient as...

  20. SETS, March 2006Institute of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    SETS, March 2006Institute of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Alg. & Tools" in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (Master program or main study period for Diploma) · 30 min of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Overview ATPG Fault-models & BIST for interconnections Test

  1. Appication to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-390 Global...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appication to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-390 Global Pure Energy, LLC Appication to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-390 Global Pure Energy, LLC Application from...

  2. Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

  3. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01

    -sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies. This paper evaluates the physical requirements and costs of preemptively installing these new building- sited electric generation technologies to insure reliable long-term power for critical... source of emergency power available with new building-sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies (see US Department of Energy, 2000 and 2002 for descriptions of these technologies). Instead of traditional emergency...

  4. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  5. Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iver

    2011-01-14

    As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

  6. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies Michaelwith Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies 1 Michael2006). Electrical and thermal storage is added as an option

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Grid Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  8. Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    move through the system, and the use of integrated Smart Grid technologies, including household and community battery storage, smart meters and appliances, plug-in hybrid electric...

  9. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  10. Game Changing Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclear PhysicsGE GlobalGetting&Tools »GambitI

  11. Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brophy Haney, A.; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

    in the context of investing in demand-side participation. Innovative forms of metering allow for more detailed information to be collected on electricity consumption; communications technology facilitates greater interaction between the end-user and the rest... of the electricity supply chain; and both information and interaction allow for end-users to become more actively involved in the electricity market by, for example, responding to price signals and information on consumption patterns. 2 Smaller electricity users...

  12. Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    therefore solving the main drawbacks limiting this field of technology: High cost and poor reliability. Kadoor technology enables simple implementation within the CMOS process at low fabrication cost dueTechnion-Israel Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering Department The Sara and Moshe

  13. Thermal Imaging Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name:Departmentand in complexADTSCAdvanced

  14. Advanced Lighting Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act RecoveryTechnologies |Appliances & Lighting

  15. Advanced Water Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act RecoveryTechnologies |AppliancesWater We're

  16. Innovative Ideas and Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doeINNOVATION Our technology

  17. National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act Blog Leadership Budget Our Organization Strategic Plan Our History Offices This Roadmap provides a framework for all of the stakeholders that comprise the electric industry...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fast Charge - November 2012 WirelessInductive Charging Inductive charging, also known as wireless charging, uses an electromagnetic field to transfer electricity to a PEV without...

  19. HIWI-Stelle On Oxy-Fuel Combustion Coal combustion accounts for over 40% of the global electricity supply and is likely to continue to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    HIWI-Stelle On Oxy-Fuel Combustion Coal combustion accounts for over 40% of the global electricity-effective technologies to capture CO2 is becoming increasingly important, particularly for the coal combustion processes for carbon capture while producing electricity is oxy-combustion of coal. In the process of oxy

  20. FY2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce system cost and improve their efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The R&D is also aimed at better understanding and improving how various components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  1. Energy and Global Warming Impacts of CFC Alternative Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Energy and Global Warming Impacts of CFC Alternative Technologies S. K. Fischer P. J. Hughes P Arthur D. Little, Inc. Sponsored by the Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) December 1991 #12;This report was printed as two

  2. Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    .twomey@econ.cam.ac.uk, karsten.neuhoff@econ.cam.ac.uk. 1 1 Introduction Renewable energy technologies are playing an increasingly important role in the portfolio mix of electricity generation. However, the intermittent nature of output from wind turbines and solar panels... . This intermittency discount is not a market failure but simply reflects the value of electricity provided by different technologies. Building on this base case the paper assesses the impact of monopolist and strategic behaviour of conventional generation companies...

  3. Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    occur? What was going on in the world of electric vehicles at the time? JC: This invention stems from sustained Department of Energy support that dates back to the late 1990s,...

  4. BULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / De-cember 1999Byrne, Yun / EFFICIENT GLOBAL WARMING Efficient Global Warming: Contradictions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    BULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / De-cember 1999Byrne, Yun / EFFICIENT GLOBAL WARMING Efficient Global Warming: Contradictions in Liberal Democratic Responses to Global Environmental Problems democracies can be ex- pected to pursue a policy regime of "efficient global warming." Key words

  5. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Frank G.

    2001-08-05

    This cooperative program between the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology and Caterpillar, Inc. is aimed at demonstrating electric turbocompound technology on a Class 8 truck engine. This is a lab demonstration program, with no provision for on-truck testing of the system. The goal is to demonstrate the level of fuel efficiency improvement attainable with the electric turbocompound system. Also, electric turbocompounding adds an additional level of control to the air supply which could be a component in an emissions control strategy.

  6. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office- AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following set of reports describes data collected from testing on FedEx Express and UPS hybrid-electric delivery trucks. This research was conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  8. Global biosurveillance: enabling science and technology. Workshop background and motivation: international scientific engagement for global security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Helen H

    2011-01-18

    Through discussion the conference aims to: (1) Identify core components of a comprehensive global biosurveillance capability; (2) Determine the scientific and technical bases to support such a program; (3) Explore the improvement in biosurveillance to enhance regional and global disease outbreak prediction; (4) Recommend an engagement approach to establishing an effective international community and regional or global network; (5) Propose implementation strategies and the measures of effectiveness; and (6) Identify the challenges that must be overcome in the next 3-5 years in order to establish an initial global biosurveillance capability that will have significant positive impact on BioNP as well as public health and/or agriculture. There is also a look back at the First Biothreat Nonproliferation Conference from December 2007. Whereas the first conference was an opportunity for problem solving to enhance and identify new paradigms for biothreat nonproliferation, this conference is moving towards integrated comprehensive global biosurveillance. Main reasons for global biosurveillance are: (1) Rapid assessment of unusual disease outbreak; (2) Early warning of emerging, re-emerging and engineered biothreat enabling reduced morbidity and mortality; (3) Enhanced crop and livestock management; (4) Increase understanding of host-pathogen interactions and epidemiology; (5) Enhanced international transparency for infectious disease research supporting BWC goals; and (6) Greater sharing of technology and knowledge to improve global health.

  9. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  10. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References:SequestrationElectric Plant Planned in

  11. Technologies for Production of Heat and Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Kara G. Cafferty

    2014-04-01

    Biomass is a desirable source of energy because it is renewable, sustainable, widely available throughout the world, and amenable to conversion. Biomass is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components. Cellulose is generally the dominant fraction, representing about 40 to 50% of the material by weight, with hemicellulose representing 20 to 50% of the material, and lignin making up the remaining portion [4,5,6]. Although the outward appearance of the various forms of cellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, municipal solid waste (MSW), or agricultural residues, is different, all of these materials have a similar cellulosic composition. Elementally, however, biomass varies considerably, thereby presenting technical challenges at virtually every phase of its conversion to useful energy forms and products. Despite the variances among cellulosic sources, there are a variety of technologies for converting biomass into energy. These technologies are generally divided into two groups: biochemical (biological-based) and thermochemical (heat-based) conversion processes. This chapter reviews the specific technologies that can be used to convert biomass to energy. Each technology review includes the description of the process, and the positive and negative aspects.

  12. Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies Available for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what youSummer InternshipPower ElectricLicensing - Energy

  13. Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel findings and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized are the findings and recommendations of a triagency (NASA/DOE/DOD) panel on Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) Technology. NEP has been identified as a candidate nuclear propulsion technology for exploration of the Moon and Mars as part of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The findings are stated in areas of system and subsystem considerations, technology readiness, and ground test facilities. Recommendations made by the panel are summarized concerning: (1) existing space nuclear power and propulsion programs, and (2) the proposed multiagency NEP technology development program.

  14. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

    2005-07-05

    Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

  15. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Hydropower Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon Dioxide

  16. American Electric Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to: navigation,OpenTechnologies Inc Jump to:

  17. Technological and economic comparison of battery technologies for U.S.A electric grid stabilization applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Ted (Ted A.)

    2010-01-01

    Energy storage can provide many benefits to the electric grid of the United States of America. With recent pushes to stabilize renewable energy and implement a Smart Grid, battery technology can play a pivotal role in the ...

  18. Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, Luis M A; Kaur, Jasleen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the factors driving innovation in energy technologies is of critical importance to mitigating climate change and addressing other energy-related global challenges. Low levels of innovation, measured in terms of energy patent filings, were noted in the 1980s and 90s as an issue of concern and were attributed to low investment in public and private research and development (R&D). Here we build a comprehensive global database of energy patents covering the period 1970-2009 which is unique in its temporal and geographical scope. Analysis of the data reveals a recent, marked departure from historical trends. A sharp increase in rates of patenting has occurred over the last decade, particularly in renewable technologies, despite continued low levels of R&D funding. To solve the puzzle of fast innovation despite modest R&D increases we develop a model that explains the nonlinear response observed in the empirical data of technological innovation to various types of investment. The model rev...

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  1. Research and Technology in Wave Energy for Electric Mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research and Technology in Wave Energy for Electric Mobility Reza Ghorbani Assistant Professor marine energy resources that are available for our utilization. These include wave energy, energy generated by ocean current and energy extraction through ocean thermal conversion (OTEC). For wave energy

  2. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-03-29

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

  3. R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDE FRONT COVER 2 SANDIA NATIONAL

  4. Electric-magnetic duality implies (global) conformal invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Pil Moon; Sang-Jin Lee; Ji-Hye Lee; Jae-Hyuk Oh

    2014-05-30

    We have examined quantum theories of electric magnetic duality invariant vector fields enjoying classical conformal invariance in 4-dimensional flat spacetime. We extend Dirac's argument about "the conditions for a quantum field theory to be relativistic" to "those for a quantum theory to be conformal". We realize that electric magnetic duality invariant vector theories together with classical conformal invariance defined in 4-$d$ flat spacetime are still conformally invariant theories when they are quantized in a way that electric magnetic duality is manifest.

  5. Comparison of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.E.; Lalk, T.R.; Swan, D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies: Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedures, and any tests which were specific to individual battery types were used in the evaluations. The batteries were evaluated by conducting performance tests, and by subjecting them to cyclical loading, using a computer controlled charge--discharge cycler, to simulate typical EV driving cycles. Criteria for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None of the batteries tested can fill every EV application.

  6. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric...

  8. Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  9. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  10. EMSP Final Report: Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, D.W.

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electrically driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume. There was anecdotal evidence in the literature that acoustic agglomeration and electrical coalescence could be used together to change the size distribution of aerosol particles in such a way as to promote easier filtration and less frequent maintenance of filtration systems. As such, those electrically driven technologies could potentially be used as remote technologies for improved treatment; however, existing theoretical models are not suitable for prediction and design. To investigate the physics of such systems, and also to prototype a system for such processes, a collaborative project was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Texas at Austin (UT). ORNL was responsible for the larger-scale prototyping portion of the project, while UT was primarily responsible for the detailed physics in smaller scale unit reactors. It was found that both electrical coalescence and acoustic agglomeration do in fact increase the rate of aggregation of aerosols. Electrical coalescence requires significantly less input power than acoustic agglomeration, but it is much less effective in its ability to aggregate/coalesce aerosols. The larger-scale prototype showed qualitatively similar results as the unit reactor tests, but presented more difficulty in interpretation of the results because of the complex multi-physics coupling that necessarily occur in all larger-scale system tests. An additional finding from this work is that low-amplitude oscillation may provide an alternative, non-invasive, non-contact means of controlling settling and/or suspension of solids. Further investigation would be necessary to evaluate its utility for radioactive waste treatment applications. This project did not uncover a new technology for radioactive waste treatment. While it may be possible that an efficient electrically driven technology for aerosol treatment could be developed, it appears that other technologies, such as steel and ceramic HEPA filters, can suitably solve this problem. If further studies are to be undertaken, additional fundamental experimentation and modeling is necessary to fully capture the physics; in addition, larger-scale tests are needed to demonstrate the treatment of flowing gas streams through the coupling of acoustic agglomeration with electrocoalescence.

  11. Does Liberalisation cause more Electricity Blackouts? Evidence from a Global Study of Newspaper Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, William; Pollitt, Michael G.

    K IN G P A P E R Abstract Does Liberalisation cause more electricity blackouts? Evidence from a global study of newspaper reports EPRG Working Paper 0827 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 0911 William Yu and Michael G... .Pollitt There is a public perception that electricity liberalisation is the major cause of recent electricity blackouts. This is reflected in the newspaper reporting of blackouts. By contrast, it was not listed as a cause in any official investigation reports...

  12. Driving Research in Electric Machines |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Driving Research in Electric Machines Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to...

  13. Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

    2010-01-01

    Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

  14. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  15. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: A technology assessment based on a two-stage Delphi study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    To address the uncertainty regarding future costs and operating attributes of electric and hybrid electric vehicles, a two stage, worldwide Delphi study was conducted. Expert opinions on vehicle attributes, current state of the technology, possible advancements, costs, and market penetration potential were sought for the years 2000, 2010, and 2020. Opinions related to such critical components as batteries, electric drive systems, and hybrid vehicle engines, as well as their respective technical and economic viabilities, were also obtained. This report contains descriptions of the survey methodology, analytical approach, and results of the analysis of survey data, together with a summary of other factors that will influence the degree of market success of electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Responses by industry participants, the largest fraction among all the participating groups, are compared with the overall responses. An evaluation of changes between the two Delphi stages is also summarized. An analysis of battery replacement costs for various types is summarized, and variable operating costs for electric and hybrid vehicles are compared with those of conventional vehicles. A market penetration analysis is summarized, in which projected market shares from the survey are compared with predictions of shares on the basis of two market share projection models that use the cost and physical attributes provided by the survey. Finally, projections of market shares beyond the year 2020 are developed by use of constrained logit models of market shares, statistically fitted to the survey data.

  16. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to achieve readiness of Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies of significant maturity: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nulcear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented herein for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities.

  17. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to develop those Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies with significant development heritage: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nuclear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities.

  18. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND GLOBALIZATION bridges vol. 16, December 2007 / Pielke's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    of the worthless fish, or if they were lucky, sell it for about five cents per pound to be processed into pet food1 of 3 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND GLOBALIZATION bridges vol. 16, December 2007 / Pielke of technology in globalization and the role of technology assessment in our efforts to manage the effects

  19. Creating ladders out of chains : China's technological development in a world of global production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Douglas Brian

    2005-01-01

    With the advent of economic globalization, the terms of debate over the political and social conditions necessary to foster development in the Global South have shifted. Examining technological development, one important ...

  20. Global City Teams Challenge National Institute of Standards and Technology, Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recreation, Mobile Communication, Smart Neighborhoods, etc. #12;Global City Teams Challenge TECH JAMGlobal City Teams Challenge National Institute of Standards and Technology, Administration Building ......................................................................................................................... 7 Global City Team Action Cluster Project Abstracts

  1. CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph

    2003-07-30

    Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

  2. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  3. Electric energy supply systems: description of available technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenhauer, J.L.; Rogers, E.A.; King, J.C.; Stegen, G.E.; Dowis, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    When comparing coal transportation with electric transmission as a means of delivering electric power, it is desirable to compare entire energy systems rather than just the transportation/transmission components because the requirements of each option may affect the requirements of other energy system components. PNL's assessment consists of two parts. The first part, which is the subject of this document, is a detailed description of the technical, cost, resource and environmental characteristics of each system component and technologies available for these components. The second part is a computer-based model that PNL has developed to simulate construction and operation of alternative system configurations and to compare the performance of these systems under a variety of economic and technical conditions. This document consists of six chapters and two appendices. A more thorough description of coal-based electric energy systems is presented in the Introduction and Chapter 1. Each of the subsequent chapters describes technologies for five system components: Western coal resources (Chapter 2), coal transportation (Chapter 3), coal gasification and gas transmission (Chapter 4), and electric power transmission (Chapter 6).

  4. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  5. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

    2006-10-01

    Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

  6. Learning Outcomes in Electrical Technology Diploma in Electrical Technology (fyrst cycle, level 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    and higher level technical staff. Upon completion of the programme, the following criteria shall be fulfilled: Disciplinaryskills Work with design software such as AutoCad. Make technical drawings according to standards lighting and electric installations systems, and select spare parts. Install digital equipment, work

  7. Learning Outcomes in Electrical Technology Diploma in Electrical Technology (fyrst cycle, level 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    and higher level technical staff. Upon completion of the programme, the following criteria shall be fulfilled: Disciplinaryskills · Work with design software such as AutoCad. · Make technical drawings according to standards lighting and electric installations systems, and select spare parts. · Install digital equipment, work

  8. Electric Vehicle Technology and Batteries | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science NetworkMediator EffectsDepartment of2015A Recipe for

  9. Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

    2004-01-01

    USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

  10. Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

    2004-01-01

    USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

  11. Improving the Power Grid with Superconducting Technology New superconducting technology will help America reduce the demand for additional electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    will help America reduce the demand for additional electric power generation and increased delivery because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric@ornl.gov #12;Working with Industry to Develop Electric Power Applications Superconducting technologies

  12. NECESIDAD RECURSOS HDRICOS DE CALIDAD Figura 1: Global Trends in Population, Energy Demand and Water Use. (http://electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    #12;NECESIDAD RECURSOS HÍDRICOS DE CALIDAD Figura 1: Global Trends in Population, Energy Demand and Water Use. (http://electrical engineeringportal.com/technologyinnovationiseverybodysbusiness) #12

  13. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    1975, p. 48. "Clean Energy from Coal Technology," Office ofClean Ways to Burn Coal Estimated Busbar Power Costs for Coal-Electric TechnologiesClean Fuels from Coal," Cochran, N. P. , Office of Science and Technology,

  14. Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-03-01

    In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

  15. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DST) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assess the health risks and environmental effects associated with air toxic emissions (primarily mercury) from fossil-fuel fired utility boilers. EPRI has sponsored research on environmental mercury since 1983 to determine the factors that may influence human health, and to determine the role of electric power generating stations in contributing to those factors. Over the last four years, EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) has conducted EPRI and DOE sponsored testing to develop and demonstrate appropriate measurement methods and control technologies for power plant atmospheric mercury emissions. Building upon the experience and expertise of the EPRI ECTC, a test program was initiated at the Center in July to further evaluate dry sorbent-based injection technologies upstream of a cold-side ESP for mercury control, and to determine the effects of such sorbents on ESP performance. The results from this program will be compared to the results from previous DOE/EPRI demonstrations, and to other ongoing programs. The primary objectives of this test program are to: (1) Determine the levels of mercury removal achievable by dry sorbent injection upstream of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The process parameters to be investigated include sorbent residence time, sorbent type, sorbent size, sorbent loading, and flue gas temperature. (2) Determine the impact of sorbent injection on ESP performance.

  16. Global warming implications of non-fluorocarbon technologies as CFC replacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    Many technologies could be developed for use in place of conventional compression systems for refrigeration and air conditioning. Comparisons of the global warming impacts using TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) can be used to identify alternatives that have the potential for lower environmental impacts than electric-driven vapor compression systems using HCFCs and HFCs. Some options, such as secondary heat transfer loops in commercial refrigeration systems to reduce refrigerant charge and emission rates, could be useful in reducing the losses of refrigerants to the atmosphere. Use of ammonia instead of a fluorocarbon in a system with a secondary loop offers only a small potential for decreasing TEWI, and this may not warrant the increased complexity and risks of using ammonia in a retail sales environment. A few technologies, such as adsorption heat pumps, have efficiency levels that show reduced TEWI levels compared to conventional and state of the art compression systems, and further development could lead to an even more favorable comparison. Health and safety risks of the alternative technologies and the materials they employ must also be considered.

  17. Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Moderate Hybrid-electric Vehicles. ESScap06, Switzerland,GH. SIMPLEV: A Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-Ultracapacitors in Hybrid- electric Vehicle Applications.

  18. Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Moderate Hybrid-electric Vehicles. ESScap06, Switzerland,GH. SIMPLEV: A Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-20 th International Electric Vehicle Symposium, Long Beach,

  19. Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsroom > Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in...

  20. GE Develops High Water Recovery Technology in China | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    purification industry SHANGHAI, September. 17, 2015 - A team of scientists led by the Coating and Membrane Technology Laboratory at GE's China Technology Center have successfully...

  1. To continue the development of WISER's globally recognized program in Clean Coal Technology at Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Vision To continue the development of WISER's globally recognized program in Clean Coal Technology renewable energy. Goal The goals of the WISER Clean Coal Technology Program are to: · Obtain the optimum stream Strengths The strengths of the WISER Clean Coal Technology program include a strong

  2. A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Jonathan; Khowailed, Gannate; Blackburn, Julia; Sikes, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1) Search Relevant Literature - An extensive search of recent analyses that address the environmental impacts, market penetration rates, and oil displacement potential of various EV technologies was conducted; (2) Consolidate Studies - Upon completion of the literature search, a list of analyses that have sufficient data for comparison and that should be included in the study was compiled; (3) Identify Key Assumptions - Disparity in conclusions very likely originates from disparity in simple assumptions. In order to compare 'apples-to-apples,' key assumptions were identified in each study to provide the basis for comparing analyses; (4) Extract Information - Each selected report was reviewed, and information on key assumptions and data points was extracted; (5) Overlay Data Points - Visual representations of the comprehensive conclusions were prepared to identify general trends and outliers; and (6) Draw Final Conclusions - Once all comparisons are made to the greatest possible extent, the final conclusions were draw on what major factors lead to the variation in results among studies.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric PCM assisted...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Motor Thermal Management R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric Drive Vehicle Climate Control Load Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Drive Vehicle Climate Control Load Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  7. Critical technologies for reactors used in nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear electric Propulsion (NEP) systems are expected to play a significant role in the exploration and exploitation of space. Unlike nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems in which the hot reactor coolant is directly discharged from nozzles to provide the required thrust, NEP systems include electric power generation and conditioning units that in turn are used to drive electric thrusters. These thrusters accelerate sub atomic particles to produce thrust. The major advantage of NEP systems is the ability to provide very high specific impulses ([approximately]5000 s) that minimize the requirement for propellants. In addition, the power systems used in NEP could pro vide the dual purpose of also providing power for the missions at the destination. This synergism can be exploited in shared development costs. The NEP systems produce significantly lower thrust that NTP systems and are generally more massive. Both systems have their appropriate roles in a balanced space program. The technology development needs of NEP systems differ in many important ways from the development needs for NTP systems because of the significant differences in the operating conditions of the systems. The NEP systems require long-life reactor power systems operating at power levels that are considerably lower than those for NTP systems. In contrast, the operational lifetime of an NEP system (years) is orders of magnitude longer than the operational lifetime of NTP systems (thousands of second). Thus, the critical issue of NEP is survivability and reliable operability for very long times at temperatures that are considerably more modest than the temperatures required for effective NTP operations but generally much higher than those experienced in terrestrial reactors.

  8. Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-02-01

    It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

  9. Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    operation of the engine and electric drive system. In thefor a wide variety of engines, electric, and lithium-ionstrategy of the electric motor and engine when the vehicle

  10. Technology investment decisions under uncertainty : a new modeling framework for the electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santen, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Effectively balancing existing technology adoption and new technology development is critical for successfully managing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the fossil-dominated electric power generation sector. The long ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Plug-in Electric Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nation's vehicle fleet. VTO invested 400 million in 18 projects to demonstrate plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs, also known as electric cars) and infrastructure, including 10...

  12. Environmental Impact on Applied Technology- Global Warming CFCs & VOCs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Hardly a day goes by that the threats to our environment are not brought to our attention. Whether you are following oil spills, groundwater contamination, global warming, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), you must...

  13. Building a Global Low-Carbon Technology Pathway | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the sidelines to collaborate on what more can be done now to achieve a global low-carbon economy. The U.S. Department of Energy is not directly involved in international...

  14. The Importance of Photonics Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Global Research. I would like to further highlight the importance of Photonics and Optics by pointing to a recent report written by the US National Academies with the help of...

  15. CMC technology revolutionary for aviation, power | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in new window) Novel CMC technology revolutionizes aircraft engines, turbines CMCs - Ceramic Matrix Composites - are a revolutionary material invented by GE scientists that offer...

  16. Renewable Energy Technology Opportunities: Responding to Global Energy Challenges (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvizu, D.

    2007-01-23

    Presentation by Dr. Dan Arvizu of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to the Clean-Tech Investors Summit on January 23, 2007 overviews renewable energy technology opportunities.

  17. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Wind Power Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1CarbonTechnology

  18. General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement Institute of Technology, USA a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 25 February 2011: C61 C68 D58 Q43 Keywords: Carbon policy Energy modeling Electric power sector Bottom-up Top

  19. Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan/mol? ? #12;8 Energy Production using MFC technologies · Electricity production using microbial fuel cells · H to renewable energy #12;9 Demonstration of a Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) MFC webcam (live video of an MFC running

  20. Synthesis of energy technology medium-term projections Alternative fuels for transport and low carbon electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbon electricity generation: A technical note Robert Gross Ausilio Bauen ICEPT October 2005 #12;Alternative fuels for transport and electricity generation: A technical note on costs and cost projections ................................................................................................................. 3 Current and projected medium-term costs of electricity generating technologies....... 4 Biofuels

  1. A novel technique that creates electricity using the sun and generation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    unlimited, if the electricity is transported from the world's solar belts to areas of high demand. DiamondA novel technique that creates electricity using the sun and generation technology from space solar heat to produce electricity in devices called thermionic energy converters (TECs) for which

  2. Overview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Overview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications Ioannis September 2008 Keywords: Power generation Distributed generation Energy storage Electricity storage A B energy sources (RES). The extensive use of such energy sources in today's electricity networks can

  3. Global Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology "STATUS OF WTE WORLDWIDE"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    : The Earth Engineering Center of Columbia University, New York Members of the Thermodynamics and TransportGlobal Waste-to-Energy Research & Technology Council "STATUS OF WTE WORLDWIDE" Dr. Efstratios #12;WTERT-Greece, SYNERGIA www.wtert.gr 2 Mission of the Waste to Energy Research and Technology

  4. Abstract--Electrical energy storage is a central element to any electric-drivetrain technology whether hybrid-electric, fuel-cell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    -drivetrain technology ­ whether hybrid-electric, fuel-cell, or all-electric. A particularly cost-sensitive issue burden on batteries and fuel cells is to use ultra-capacitors as load-leveling devices. The high power that additional focus on this energy management controller is required in order to achieve optimization of both

  5. Driving Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newest APS Fellow Driving Groundbreaking Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to...

  6. LNG Technology Is in the News | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LNG Technology Is in the News Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on...

  7. Wind Turbine Inspection Technology Reaches New Heights | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Edison's Desk > Wind Turbine Inspection Technology Reaches New Heights Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to...

  8. Technology Relay Race in Cancer Prevention Research | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Relay Race in Cancer Prevention Research Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  9. EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology to facilitate the development and demonstration of a multi-faceted, synergistic approach to managing fluctuations in wind power within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas transmission grid.

  10. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Evaluating Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Through the AVTA, Idaho National Laboratory also does fleet and other analysis to evaluate readiness for plug-in electric vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles. The following reports describe analysis studies Idaho National Laboratory conducted for the military to evaluate readiness for plug-in electric vehicles.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    spreadsheet model developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program to assess power generation costs and the potential for technology improvements to impact those generation...

  13. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural...

  14. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage...

  15. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  16. Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strengthening Public-Private Partnerships to Accelerate Global Electricity Technology Deployment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Strengthening...

  17. Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry: A Systematic Prioritization of Research Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry: A Systematic and Policy Program #12;- 2 - #12;Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry in Technology and Policy Abstract Coal is widely relied upon as a fuel for electric power generation

  18. Electric amateurs: literary encounters with computing technologies 1987-2001 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butchard, Dorothy Keziah

    2015-07-02

    This thesis considers the portrayal of uncertain or amateur encounters with new technologies in the late twentieth century. Focusing on fictional responses to the incipient technological and cultural changes wrought by ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the following vehicles is available in downloadable form: 2013 BRP Commander Electric, 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega, 2009 Vantage Pickup EVX1000, and 2009 Vantage Van EVC1000.

  20. Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. Advanced Technology & Discovery at Bangalore | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegisterLithium-basedNuclear5 Science ofTechnology

  2. Advanced Technology & Discovery at Niskayuna | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegisterLithium-basedNuclear5 ScienceTechnology

  3. Silicon Carbide (SiC) Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific Impact SinceServiceShippingTechnologies

  4. The MEMS Technology Revolution Is Beginning | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(activeInforum LIFTMEMS Technology Revolution Is

  5. Cost trajectories of low carbon electricity generation technologies: A study of cost uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Peter; Pollitt, Michael

    2015-08-03

    for three important electricity generation technologies for the UK; nuclear, offshore wind and coal with carbon capture and storage. The first analysis composes LCOE estimate trajectories from previous years' DECC estimates and presents them alongside...

  6. Implementations of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of solar thermal technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaogang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    To build an electric car plus renewable energy system for Singapore, solar thermal technologies were investigated in this report in the hope to find a suitable "green" energy source for this small island country. Among all ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ePATHS- electrical PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ePATHS - electrical PCM...

  8. Delft University of Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    conditions and the equation for dissipation of wave energy due to bottom friction and wave breaking. ChapterDelft University of Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science

  9. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive and...

  11. Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.

    2012-06-01

    This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

  12. British electricity policy in flux : paradigm ambivalence and technological tension 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emamian, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh

    2014-07-01

    Drastic changes have taken place in UK electricity policy over recent years as government has sought to address the challenges associated with energy security, affordability and commitments to reduce carbon emissions. ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office- AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following set of reports describes performance data collected from hybrid-electric heavy-duty tractor vehicles in the Coca-Cola fleet. This research was conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric Delivery Trucks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of reports (part of the medium and heavy-duty truck data) describes data collected from Smith Newton all-electric delivery trucks in a variety of fleets. This research was...

  15. Monitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    of 55 Ah. Under normal conditions the batteries have near 5 degrees Celsius over ambient temperatureMonitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology Javier Ibáñez Vial Santiago, Chile jdixon@ing.puc.cl Abstract-- A monitoring system for a battery powered electric vehicle (EV

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 62, NO. 7, SEPTEMBER 2013 2919 Optimizing Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Jian "Neil"

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 62, NO. 7, SEPTEMBER 2013 2919 Optimizing Electric Vehicle Charging: A Customer's Perspective Chenrui Jin, Student Member, IEEE, Jian Tang, Member, IEEE, and Prasanta Ghosh, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Electric vehicles (EVs) are considered to be a promis- ing

  17. Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullal, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the significant progress made worldwide by thin-film solar cells, namely, amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology status is also discussed in detail. In addition, R&D and technology challenges in all three areas are elucidated. The worldwide estimated projection for thin-film PV technology production capacity announcements are estimated at more than 5000 MW by 2010.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Reliability of Electrical Interconnects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  19. Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools...

  20. CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change A White Paper Gas R&D Programme; Jefferson Tester, MIT Energy Laboratory; and Edward Winter, Burns and Roe. Helpful production), Klaus Lackner of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (carbonate storage) and Meyer Steinberg

  1. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    She is working on Natural Gas vehicle powertrain modellingSandeep Munshi, Natural Gas Vehicle Technology forum,and alternative fuelled vehicles (natural gas, electricity,

  2. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-09-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  3. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-07-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRB and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  4. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-04-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming process, mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  5. Delft University of Technology Master's Thesis in Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wireless Power Transfer Networks Michal Goli´nski #12;#12;Designing Efficient Wireless Power Transfer.Golinski@student.tudelft.nl) Title Designing Efficient Wireless Power Transfer Networks MSc presentation 28th May 2015 Graduation of Technology dr. Martijn Warnier Delft University of Technology #12;Abstract The techniques of wireless power

  6. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipperer, A.; Aloise-Young, P. A.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Roche, R.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Bauleo, P.; Zimmerle. D.

    2013-08-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and transforming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electric grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  7. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipperer, A.; Aloise-Young, P. A.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Zimmerle, D.; Roche, R.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Bauleo, P.

    2013-08-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and trans-forming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electricity grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Drive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inverter R&D Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  9. Comparison of various battery technologies for electric vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Blake Edward

    1993-01-01

    for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None...

  10. Global Solar Free Magnetic Energy and Electric Current Density Distribution of Carrington Rotation 2124

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadesse, Tilaye; Alexei, Pevtsov A; Macneice, P; Gosain, S

    2013-01-01

    Solar eruptive phenomena, like flares and coronal mass ejections(CMEs) are governed by magnetic fields. To describe the structure of these phenomena one needs information on the magnetic flux density and the electric current density vector components in three dimensions throughout the atmosphere. However, current spectro-polarimetric measurements typically limit the determination of the vector magnetic field only to the photosphere. Therefore, there is considerable interest in accurate modeling of the solar coronal magnetic field using photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary data. In this work, we model the coronal magnetic field for global solar atmosphere using a nonlinear force-free field(NLFFF) extrapolation codes implemented to a synoptic maps of photospheric vector magnetic field synthesized from Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) as boundary condition. Using the resulting three dimensional magnetic field, we calculate the three dimensio...

  11. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-07-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume includes chapters discussing biopower, geothermal, hydropower, ocean, solar, wind, and storage technologies. Each chapter includes a resource availability estimate, technology cost and performance characterization, discussions of output characteristics and grid service possibilities, large-scale production and deployment issues, and barriers to high penetration along with possible responses to them. Only technologies that are currently commercially available—biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar PV, CSP, and wind-powered systems—are included in the modeling analysis. Some of these renewable technologies—such as run-of-river hydropower, onshore wind, hydrothermal geothermal, dedicated and co-fired-with-coal biomass—are relatively mature and well-characterized. Other renewable technologies—such as fixed-bottom offshore wind, solar PV, and solar CSP—are at earlier stages of deployment with greater potential for future technology advancements over the next 40 years.

  13. HEMP emergency planning and operating procedures for electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddoch, T.W.; Markel, L.C. [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Investigations of the impact of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems and electrical equipment have revealed that HEMP creates both misoperation and failures. These events result from both the early time E{sub 1} (steep-front pulse) component and the late time E{sub 3} (geomagnetic perturbations) component of HEMP. In this report a HEMP event is viewed in terms of its marginal impact over classical power system disturbances by considering the unique properties and consequences of HEMP. This report focuses on system-wide electrical component failures and their potential consequences from HEMP. In particular, the effectiveness of planning and operating procedures for electric systems is evaluated while under the influence of HEMP. This assessment relies on published data and characterizes utilities using the North American Electric Reliability Council`s regions and guidelines to model electric power system planning and operations. Key issues addressed by the report include how electric power systems are affected by HEMP and what actions electric utilities can initiate to reduce the consequences of HEMP. The report also reviews the salient features of earlier HEMP studies and projects, examines technology trends in the electric power industry which are affected by HEMP, characterizes the vulnerability of power systems to HEMP, and explores the capability of electric systems to recover from a HEMP event.

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Electric Utility Assistance and Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTS - SimpleProject: Galena,Electric Utility

  15. MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSloughAquantis < MHKAS 400FlowElectric

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: Electric Motors Research and Development |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnable Low TemperaturePlug-in ElectricResearchDepartment

  17. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation,

  18. MHK Technologies/Float Wave Electric Power Station | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar < MHK Technologies Jump

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 TimelineUtility-ScaleTechnology| Department ofReport

  20. Advanced battery technology for electric two-wheelers in the people's Republic of China.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patil, P. G.; Energy Systems

    2009-07-22

    This report focuses on lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology applications for two- and possibly three-wheeled vehicles. The author of this report visited the People's Republic of China (PRC or China) to assess the status of Li-ion battery technology there and to analyze Chinese policies, regulations, and incentives for using this technology and for using two- and three-wheeled vehicles. Another objective was to determine if the Li-ion batteries produced in China were available for benchmarking in the United States. The United States continues to lead the world in Li-ion technology research and development (R&D). Its strong R&D program is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and other federal agencies, such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the U.S. Department of Defense. In Asia, too, developed countries like China, Korea, and Japan are commercializing and producing this technology. In China, more than 120 companies are involved in producing Li-ion batteries. There are more than 139 manufacturers of electric bicycles (also referred to as E-bicycles, electric bikes or E-bikes, and electric two-wheelers or ETWs in this report) and several hundred suppliers. Most E-bikes use lead acid batteries, but there is a push toward using Li-ion battery technology for two- and three-wheeled applications. Highlights and conclusions from this visit are provided in this report and summarized.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: North American Electric Traction Drive Supply Chain Analysis: Focus on Motors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Synthesis Partners at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about North American electric...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Mile Traveled (eVMT): On-road Results and Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about Electric Vehicle...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by University of Colorado Colorado Springs at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of Colorado at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Innovative Drivetrains...

  5. DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science TEST NUMERICAL METHODS FOR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (WI3 097 TU) Wednesday 21 January 2004, 14:00-17:00 1. A heavy object of unknown origin comes down vertically. By chance a passer-by has recorded the last 15

  6. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  7. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request of Senators James M. Jeffords and Joseph I. Lieberman. This report describes the impacts of technology improvements and other market-based opportunities on the costs of emissions reductions from electricity generators, including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, mercury, and carbon dioxide.

  8. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Electric Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3 ofEnergy

  9. The Emerging Interdependence of the Electric Power Grid & Information and Communication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the implications of emerging interdependencies between the electric power grid and Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Over the past two decades, electricity and ICT infrastructure have become increasingly interdependent, driven by a combination of factors including advances in sensor, network and software technologies and progress in their deployment, the need to provide increasing levels of wide-area situational awareness regarding grid conditions, and the promise of enhanced operational efficiencies. Grid operators’ ability to utilize new and closer-to-real-time data generated by sensors throughout the system is providing early returns, particularly with respect to management of the transmission system for purposes of reliability, coordination, congestion management, and integration of variable electricity resources such as wind generation.

  10. Benefits to the United States of Increasing Global Uptake of Clean Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.

    2010-07-01

    A previous report describes an opportunity for the United States to take leadership in efforts to transform the global energy system toward clean energy technologies (CET). An accompanying analysis to that report provides estimates of the economic benefits to the United States of such a global transformation on the order of several hundred billion dollars per year by 2050. This report describes the methods and assumptions used in developing those benefit estimates. It begins with a summary of the results of the analysis based on an updated and refined model completed since the publication of the previous report. The framework described can be used to estimate the economic benefits to the U.S. of coordinated global action to increase the uptake of CETs worldwide. Together with a Monte Carlo simulation engine, the framework can be used to develop plausible ranges for benefits, taking into account the large uncertainty in the driving variables and economic parameters. The resulting estimates illustrate that larger global clean energy markets offer significant opportunities to the United States economy.

  11. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  12. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  13. Energy and environmental policy and electric utilities' choice under uncertain global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Masaki

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews and discusses uncertainty about global warming science, impact on society. It also discusses what assumptions have been made and how appropriate the assumptions in scenarios have been for estimating global ...

  14. Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

    1997-06-01

    The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

  15. Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Neufville Professor of Engineering Systems Chair, ESD Education Committee #12;2 #12;3 Electricity DemandElectricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options: ______________________________________________________________ : Stephen R. Connors Director, Analysis Group for Regional Electricity Alternatives Thesis Supervisor

  16. Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power and Propulsion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power OF HIGH POWER NUCLEAR ELECTRIC POWER AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS by Daniel B. White Jr. Submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Aeronautics and Astronautics ABSTRACT High power nuclear electric

  17. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of the TO Electric Drive Technologies Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about overview of the TO...

  19. A global analysis and market strategy in the electric vehicle battery industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Hee, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    As use of electric vehicles has been expected to grow, the batteries for the electric vehicles have become critical because the batteries are a key part of the paradigm shift in the automotive industry. However, the demand ...

  20. International potential of IGCC technology for use in reducing global warming and climate change emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    High efficiency advanced coal-based technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) that can assist in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions which contribute to Global Warming and Climate Change are becoming commercially available. U-GAS is an advanced gasification technology that can be used in many applications to convert coal in a high efficiency manner that will reduce the total amount of CO{sub 2} produced by requiring less coal-based fuel per unit of energy output. This paper will focus on the status of the installation and performance of the IGT U-GAS gasifiers which were installed at the Shanghai Cooking and Chemical Plant General located in Shanghai, China. Its use in future IGCC project for the production of power and the benefits of IGCC in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through its high efficiency operation will be discussed.

  1. Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

    2013-07-01

    The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

  2. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  3. Summary and recommendations on nuclear electric propulsion technology for the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.; Holcomb, R.S.

    1993-04-01

    A project in Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology is being established to develop the NEP technologies needed for advanced propulsion systems. A paced approach has been suggested which calls for progressive development of NEP component and subsystem level technologies. This approach will lead to major facility testing to achieve TRL-5 for megawatt NEP for SEI mission applications. This approach is designed to validate NEP power and propulsion technologies from kilowatt class to megawatt class ratings. Such a paced approach would have the benefit of achieving the development, testing, and flight of NEP systems in an evolutionary manner. This approach may also have the additional benefit of synergistic application with SEI extraterrestrial surface nuclear power applications.

  4. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03

    The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

  5. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Geothermal Power Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon Dioxide Capture

  6. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon DioxideHydrokinetic

  7. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Solar Power Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon

  8. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Fast-Spectrum Reactors Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy Headquarters Categorical| Department of Energy Cha-Ching!Chapter 4Technologies

  9. Coupling Electric Vehicles and Power Grid through Charging-In-Motion and Connected Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jan-Mou; Jones, Perry T; Onar, Omer C; Starke, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    A traffic-assignment-based framework is proposed to model the coupling of transportation network and power grid for analyzing impacts of energy demand from electric vehicles on the operation of power distribution. Although the reverse can be investigated with the proposed framework as well, electricity flowing from a power grid to electric vehicles is the focus of this paper. Major variables in transportation network (including link flows) and power grid (including electricity transmitted) are introduced for the coupling. Roles of charging-in-motion technology and connected vehicle technology have been identified in the framework of supernetwork. A linkage (i.e. individual energy demand) between the two networks is defined to construct the supernetwork. To determine equilibrium of the supernetwork can also answer how many drivers are going to use the charging-in-motion services, in which locations, and at what time frame. An optimal operation plan of power distribution will be decided along the determination simultaneously by which we have a picture about what level of power demand from the grid is expected in locations during an analyzed period. Caveat of the framework and possible applications have also been discussed.

  10. Comparing a spherical harmonic model of the global electric field distribution with Astrid-2 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, Stefan

    of not measuring the global instantaneous two-dimensional potential distribution, which is important in studying in the past to provide analytical tools for the global potential distri- bution, such as those by Heppner potential distribution. The coefficients are assumed to depend on the IMF, the solar wind velocity

  11. COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARLES M. WEBER

    2008-06-24

    As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990’s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment, tooling, methods and skilled personnel. The final magnet system measured 14 feet in diameter, 10 feet in height, and weighed about 35 tons. The superconducting magnet and design technology was successfully implemented and demonstrated. The project was not successfully concluded however; as the critical planned final demonstration was not achieved. The utilities could not understand or clarify their future business needs and the regulatory requirements, because of the deregulation policies and practices of the country. Much uncertainty existed which prevented utilities from defining business plans, including asset allocation and cost recovery. Despite the technical successes and achievements, the commercial development could not be implemented and achieved. Thus, the demonstration of this enhancement to the utility’s transmission system and to the reliability of the nation’s electrical grid was not achieved. The factory was ultimately discontinued and the technology, equipment and product were placed in storage.

  12. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  13. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    those described by the Electricity Storage Association (see also Electricity Storage Association). The installationtechnologies. References Electricity Storage Association,

  14. Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

  15. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

  16. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2013-06-04

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  17. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  18. Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

    2014-07-01

    Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

  19. Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

  20. DOE FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies program advanced power electronic and electrical machines annual review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitch

    2006-10-11

    This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006.

  1. Novel Direct Steelmaking by Combining Microwave, Electric Arc, and Exothermal Heating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Xiaodi Huang; Dr. J. Y. Hwang

    2005-03-28

    Steel is a basic material broadly used by perhaps every industry and individual. It is critical to our nation's economy and national security. Unfortunately, the American steel industry is losing competitiveness in the world steel production field. There is an urgent need to develop the next generation of steelmaking technology for the American steel industry. Direct steelmaking through the combination of microwave, electric arc, and exothermal heating is a revolutionary change from current steelmaking technology. This technology can produce molten steel directly from a shippable agglomerate, consisting of iron oxide fines, powdered coal, and ground limestone. This technology is projected to eliminate many current intermediate steelmaking steps including coking, pellet sintering, blast furnace (BF) ironmaking, and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. This technology has the potential to (a) save up to 45% of the energy consumed by conventional steelmaking; (b) dramatically reduce the emission of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, VOCs, fine particulates, and air toxics; (c) substantially reduce waste and emission control costs; (d) greatly lower capital cost; and (e) considerably reduce steel production costs. This technology is based on the unique capability of microwaves to rapidly heat steelmaking raw materials to elevated temperature, then rapidly reduce iron oxides to metal by volumetric heating. Microwave heating, augmented with electric arc and exothermal reactions, is capable of producing molten steel. This technology has the components necessary to establish the ''future'' domestic steel industry as a technology leader with a strong economically competitive position in world markets. The project goals were to assess the utilization of a new steelmaking technology for its potential to achieve better overall energy efficiency, minimize pollutants and wastes, lower capital and operating costs, and increase the competitiveness of the U.S. steel industry. The objectives associated with this goal were to (a) generate a solid base of technical, marketing, economic, and policy data, (b) develop energy, environmental, and economic targets, (c) more definitively assess opportunities and barriers, (d) accumulate knowledge and experience for defining direction for the next phase of development, and (e) promote learning and training of students.

  2. Can Advances in Science and Technology Prevent Global Warming? A Critical Review of Limitations and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2006-07-03

    The most stringent emission scenarios published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would result in the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at concentrations of approximately 550 ppm which would produce a global temperature increase of at least 2 C by 2100. Given the large uncertainties regarding the potential risks associated with this degree of global warming, it would be more prudent to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at or below current levels which, in turn, would require a greater than 20-fold reduction (i.e., ?95%) in per capita carbon emissions in industrialized nations within the next 50 to 100 years. Using the Kaya equation as a conceptual framework, this paper examines whether CO2 mitigation approaches such as energy efficiency improvements, carbon sequestration, and the development of carbon-free energy sources would be sufficient to bring about the required reduction in per capita carbon emissions without creating unforeseen negative impacts elsewhere. In terms of energy efficiency, large improvements (?5-fold) are in principle possible given aggressive investments in R&D and if market imperfections such as corporate subsidies are removed. However, energy efficiency improvements per se will not result in a reduction in carbon emissions if, as predicted by the IPCC, the size of the global economy has expanded 12-26 fold by 2100. Terrestrial carbon sequestration via reforestation and improved agricultural soil management has many environmental advantages but has only limited CO2 mitigation potential because the global terrestrial carbon sink (ca. 200 Gt C) is small relative to the size of fossil fuel deposits (?4000 Gt C). By contrast, very large amounts of CO2 can potentially be removed from the atmosphere via sequestration in geologic formations and oceans, but carbon storage is not permanent and is likely to create many unpredictable environmental consequences. Renewable solar energy can in theory provide large amounts of carbon-free power. However, biomass and hydroelectric energy can only be marginally expanded and large-scale solar energy installations (i.e., wind, photovoltaics, and direct thermal) are likely to have significant negative environmental impacts. Expansion of nuclear energy is highly unlikely due to concerns over reactor safety, radioactive waste management, weapons proliferation, and cost. In view of the serious limitations and liabilities of many proposed CO2 mitigation approaches it appears that there remain only few no-regrets options such as drastic energy efficiency improvements, extensive terrestrial carbon sequestration, and cautious expansion of renewable energy generation. These promising CO2 mitigation technologies have the potential to bring about the required 20-fold reduction in per capita carbon emission only if population and economic growth are halted without delay. Thus, addressing the problem of global warming requires not only technological research and development but also a reexamination of core values that mistakenly equate material consumption and economic growth to happiness and well-being.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by General Electric Global at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about alternative high...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Electric Global at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about alternative high...

  5. Dish/Stirling systems: Overview of an emerging commercial solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, J.W.; Diver, R.B.; Estrada, C.

    1995-11-01

    Dish/Stirling is a solar thermal electric technology which couples parabolic, point-focusing solar collectors and heat engines which employ the Stirling thermodynamic cycle. Since the late 1970s, the development of Dish/Stirling systems intended for commercial use has been in progress in Germany, Japan, and the US. In the next several years it is expected that one or more commercial systems will enter the market place. This paper provides a general overview of this emerging technology, including: a description of the fundamental principles of operation of Dish/Stirling systems; a presentation of the major components of the systems (concentrator, receiver, engine/alternator, and controls); an overview of the actual systems under development around the world, with a discussion of some of the technical issues and challenges facing the Dish/Stirling developers. A brief discussion is also presented of potential applications for small Dish/Stirling systems in northern Mexico.

  6. Global warming impacts of ozone-safe refrigerants and refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.; Sand, J.; Baxter, V.

    1997-12-01

    International agreements mandate the phase-out of many chlorine containing compounds that are used as the working fluid in refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating equipment. Many of the chemical compounds that have been proposed, and are being used in place of the class of refrigerants eliminated by the Montreal Protocol are now being questioned because of their possible contributions to global warming. Natural refrigerants are put forth as inherently superior to manufactured refrigerants because they have very low or zero global warming potentials (GWPs). Questions are being raised about whether or not these manufactured refrigerants, primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), should be regulated and perhaps phased out in much the same manner as CFCs and HCFCs. Several of the major applications of refrigerants are examined in this paper and the results of an analysis of their contributions to greenhouse warming are presented. Supermarket refrigeration is shown to be an application where alternative technologies have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly with no clear advantage to either natural or HFC refrigerants. Mixed results are presented for automobile air conditioners with opportunities to reduce GHG emissions dependent on climate and comfort criteria. GHG emissions for hermetic and factory built systems (i.e. household refrigerators/freezers, unitary equipment, chillers) are shown to be dominated by energy use with much greater potential for reduction through efficiency improvements than by selection of refrigerant. The results for refrigerators also illustrate that hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide blown foam insulation have lower overall effects on GHG emissions than HFC blown foams at the cost of increased energy use.

  7. Regional versus global? -- Will strategies for reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions from electric utilities increase carbon dioxide emissions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, J.C.; Dolsak, N.

    1996-12-31

    Electric utilities, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal are expected to reduce their SO{sub 2} emissions. The strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions may result in increased CO{sub 2} emissions. Thereby decrease of regional pollution may cause increase of global pollution. Environmental, political, moral, and economic consequences of the two types of pollution differ significantly. Midwestern electric utilities, USA, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal, are analyzed in the paper. However, the same problem is relevant for some European coal fueled power plants. Strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, employed by Midwestern electric utilities to comply with the clean Air Act amendments (CAAA) of 1990 and their possible affects on CO{sub 2} emissions, are presented. The paper focuses on two general strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions. First is coal-switching or blending with a low-sulfur coal. Second is construction and use of flue-gas desulfurization devices (scrubbers). A combination of both strategies is also a viable option. Switching to low-sulfur coal may result in larger CO{sub 2} emissions because that coal has different characteristics and has to be transported much greater distances. Scrubbers require significant amounts of energy for their operation which requires burning more coal. This increases the level of CO{sub 2} emissions.

  8. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  9. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

  10. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

  11. International Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicles: Policies, Markets, and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    D. (1995), Future Drive Electric Vehicles and Sustainable1996), "The Case for Electric Vehicles," Sclent~c American,Emissions Impacts of Electric Vehicles," Journal of the Alr

  12. Integrating renewable energy technologies in the electric supply industry: A risk management approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Regulatory and technical forces are causing electric utilities to move from a natural monopoly to a more competitive environment. Associated with this movement is an increasing concern about how to manage the risks associated with the electric supply business. One approach to managing risks is to purchase financial instruments such as options and futures contracts. Another approach is to own physical assets that have low risk attributes or characteristics. This research evaluates how investments in renewable energy technologies can mitigate risks in the electric supply industry. It identifies risks that are known to be of concern to utilities and other power producers. These risks include uncertainty in fuel prices, demand, environmental regulations, capital cost, supply, and market structure. The research then determines how investments in renewables can mitigate these risks. Methods are developed to calculate the value of renewables in terms of their attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead-time, modularity, availability, initial capital costs, and investment reversibility. Examples illustrate how to apply the methods.

  13. Assistant Director for Social Innovation, Global Women's Health Technologies Center The Global Women's Health Technologies Center is seeking a self-motivated individual with a strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    design and/or renewable energy is a plus. Duties include: Supervising and mentoring 6-10 undergraduate Women's Health Technologies Center is seeking a self-motivated individual with a strong interest

  14. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  15. Q&A About Electric Vehicle Flow Battery Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal natural gasPurchase,PyFEHM PyFEHM

  16. A technology transfer plan for the US Department of Energy's Electric Energy Systems Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrer, B.J.; Hurwitch, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

    1986-11-01

    The major objective of this study was to develop a technology transfer plan that would be both practical and effective in promoting the transfer of the products of DOE/EES research to appropriate target audiences. The study drew upon several major components of the marketing process in developing this plan: definition/charcterization of the products being produced by the DOE/EES program, identification/characterization of possible users of the products being produced by the program, and documentation/analysis of the methods currently being used to promote the adoption of DOE/EES products. Fields covered include HVDC, new materials, superconductors, electric field effects, EMP impacts, battery storage/load leveling, automation/processing concepts, normal/emergency operating concepts, Hawaii deep water cable, and failure mechanisms.

  17. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

  18. Building Work: Allocation of Contract for the Electric Sub-Station 18 kV, NPA Building, Technological Workshop and Lab. 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1963-01-01

    Building Work: Allocation of Contract for the Electric Sub-Station 18 kV, NPA Building, Technological Workshop and Lab. 13

  19. Electric Market and Utility Operation Terminology (Fact Sheet), Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet is a list of electric market and utility operation terminology for a series of three electricity fact sheets.

  20. SP.772 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Paul E.

    The MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI) organization is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program ...

  1. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01

    electricity from biogas and they have the same rate of electrical generationbiogas can be used as a supplemental energy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of electricity.generation of electricity. Anaerobic digestion destroys pathogens and this method is used to generate biogas

  2. Technologies for Energy Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 8.4 Deliverable By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York.4.2.3 Total electrical energy consumption 33 3.4.2.4 Consumer alert messages 33 3.5 Laboratory TestingTechnologies for Energy Efficient Buildings Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  3. 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

  4. "Green Technology: Think Globally, Act Locally" Remarks at the Green Innovation Forum in Tokyo, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    and leads the world in installed wind power. I power. The term "think globally and act locally" has many authors, including, advocated striking a balance between staying connected with both civilization

  5. Maui Electrical System Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deliverable ­ Report on System Model Development By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York And University of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847 Task 8 of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology July 2008 #12

  6. Superior Energy Performance at Schneider Electric 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willhite, E.

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency | Sustain Results ISO50001/SEP Superior Energy Performance at Schneider Electric ESL-IE-14-05-15 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Schneider Electric – Sustainability Services... – 2014 2 Schneider Electric – the global specialist in energy management billion € sales (last twelve months) of sales in new economies (last twelve months) people in 100+ countries of sales devoted to R&D Residential 9% Utilities & Infrastructure...

  7. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  8. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  9. Homeostatic control : economic integration of solar technologies into electric power operations and planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabors, Richard D.

    1981-01-01

    The economic and technical interfaces between the electrical utility and the distributed, nondispatchable electric generation systems are only minimally understood at the present time. This paper will discuss the economic ...

  10. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    gas, and hydro- electricity, plus high storage capacity toelectricity supply: generating capacity, energy storage, andand storage (CCS)—each have the potential to become the principal long-term electricity

  11. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Fluidized-Bed Steam-Electric Steam-Electric Combined-CycleCombined-Cycle Current (1974) Future Future a Source:steam plants. The combined-cycle versions of advanced

  12. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

  13. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    generation, on-grid energy storage, transmission capacity,biofuels, CCS, on-grid energy storage, electric vehicle bat-

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel...

  16. The not so new electric car -- Step child of Detroit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lough, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    In the first decade of the 20th century, gas and electric vehicles were in a head to head battle. Actually until after 1915, electric trucks dominated the urban scene. At this time it was not only commercial concerns who preferred electric`s but women too, for they were clean, easy to start and drive, and you know something--they still are! In lacking the foresight to develop electric car technology the US has created a global monster. Urban sprawl, suburbs, malls, pollution on a global scale, and an infrastructure which is not going to give up market share without a fight.

  17. 2005 IEEE ElectricShip Technologies Symposium Parallel Operation of Shunt Active Power Filters for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    for Damping of Harmonic Propagation in Electric Shipboard Power Systems Ting Qian', Brad Lehman', Anindita, and there is a significant deterioration of power quality in the electrical plants of modern warships. Severa1problems can power system, such as in an electric ship. Thus, an alternative approach is to use a Shunt Active Power

  18. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEPE.ELECTRIC

  19. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    in the generation of human power, where energy is gained byparticipant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "by muscle-power and chemical processes of human bodies. For

  20. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    and the search for alternative energy solutions are twoare in search of alternative energy solutions in industrialtheir movements for alternative energy. While doing research

  1. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    shaft as the electric motor and the transmission. The clutchFuel Cell Electric Powertrain Configuration Pre-transmissionusing one electric motor in the pre-transmission position,

  2. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    Protection Agency Electric Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Gas toHybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium Reference: [aspects of battery electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles,

  3. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    1969. "Scrubber Survey: a Lime/Limestone Trend," ElectricalMills/Kwh Process Limestone Lime Magnesia Cat-Ox Sodium Tonsto Unsaturated Operation of Lime and Limestone Scrubbers,"

  4. Impacts of Cooling Technology on Solder Fatigue for Power Modules in Electric Traction Drive Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, M.; Vlahinos, A.

    2009-08-01

    Describes three power module cooling topologies for electric traction drive vehicles: two advanced options using jet impingement cooling and one option using pin-fin liquid cooling.

  5. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01

    biogas digester systems can generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heatingbiogas (mostly methane) can be captured and used to provide energy services either by direct heating

  6. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electricelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  7. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

  8. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    lost per hour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not alland energy ratings of a flow battery are independent of eacha) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar

  9. How Internet Concepts and Technologies Can Help Green and Smarten the Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Catherine P.

    Canada keshav@uwaterloo.ca Catherine Rosenberg Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada cath@ecemail.uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Several powerful forces] (also see Figure 1). · Second, a substantial fraction of electrical energy pro- duced is from coal

  10. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric options is an important step in formulating a cohesive strategy to abate U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG

  11. Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors (Agreement ID:23726)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01

    potential contribution of this “new” generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States.

  13. Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01

    rd International Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exposition (Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications, Sandiaand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options EPRI, Palo

  14. ``White Land``...new Russian closed-cycle nuclear technology for global deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-07-01

    A Russian technology called ``White Land`` is being pursued which is based on their heavy-metal-cooled fast spectrum reactor technology developed to power their super-fast Alpha Class submarines. These reactors have important safety advantages over the more conventional sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors but preserve some of the attractive operational features of the fast spectrum systems. Perhaps chief among these advantages in the current political milieu is their ability to generate energy from any nuclide heavier than thorium including HEU, weapons plutonium, commercial plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium. While there are several scenarios for deployment of these systems, the most attractive perhaps is containment in submarine-like enclosures to be placed underwater near a coastal population center. A Russian organization named the Alphabet Company would build the reactors and maintain title to them. The company would be paid on the basis of kilowatt-hours delivered. The reactors would not require refueling for 10--15 years and no maintenance violating the radiation containment would be required or would be carried out at the deployment site. The host country need not develop any nuclear technology or accept any nuclear waste. When the fuel load has been burned, the entire unit would be towed to Archangel, Russia for refueling. The fission product would be removed from the fuel by ``dry`` molten salt technology to minimize the waste stream and the fissile material would be returned to the reactor for further burning. The fission product waste would be stored at New Land Island, their current nuclear test site in the Arctic. If concerns over fission product justify it, the long-lived species will be transmuted in an accelerator-driven system. Apparently this project is backed at the highest levels of MINATOM and the Alphabet Company has the funding to proceed.

  15. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide and Storage Value-Added Options Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon Dioxide Capture and

  16. General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

    Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

  17. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

  18. Technology evaluation for automobile transportation : electric vehicle energy requirements under real-world use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Needell, Zachary Adam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of electric vehicles (EVs) have become available for purchase to nieet personally operated vehicle (POV) travel needs for a certain subset of drivers. Many in the climate change ...

  19. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    4 to 7 percent of the plants ' generating capacity (17,20).Boiler Baghouse, Nucla Generating Plant," Bradway, R. M. andof Electrical Generating Plants Effect of Load Factor on

  20. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    a conventional gas-fired power plant to produce electricity.primarily on gas- and oil-fired power plant data made byfrom Coal Burning Power Plant Flue Gases," ASME, Pub. 66-WA/

  1. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interaction with electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1984-08-01

    A high altitude nuclear burst, detonated at a height of 50 km or more, causes two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) - high altitude EMP (HEMP) and magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD-EMP). This high altitude EMP scenario is of principal concern when assessing the effects of EMP on electric power systems, because the total United States can be simultaneously illuminated by HEMP and MHD-EMP can cover a large area of up to several hundred kilometers in diameter. The purpose of this project was first to define typical electrical power system characteristics for EMP analysis, and second, to determine reasonable worst case EMP induced surges on overhead electric power system transmission and distribution lines for reasonable assumptions, using unclassified HEMP and MHD-EMP electric field waveforms.

  2. Novel Direct Steelmaking by Combining Microwave, Electric Arc, and Exothermal Heating Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a project to develop direct steelmaking through the combination of microwave, electric arc, and exothermal heating, a process which is meant to eliminate traditional, intermediate steelmaking steps.

  3. The Brazil Technology Center Speeds the Pace of Innovation | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel:Test1The AmesBenefits of

  4. Oil and Gas Technology at Rio de Janeiro | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 -Workers'OfficialSan MiguelTechnology &

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- All-Electric Vehicle (Car) Performance Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Downloadable performance and testing data on the all-electric versions of the following vehicles is available: 2014 Smart Electric Drive Coupe, 2013 Ford Focus, 2013 Nissan Leaf, 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV, 2012 Nissan Leaf, 2011 Nissan Leaf, 2010 USPS eLLV Conversions, and 2009 BMW Mini-E.

  6. Technological options of Taiwan to mitigate global warming: Perspectives of a newly industrialized economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, R.T.; Fang, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    While there is no shortage of studies on whether and how OECD countries can stabilize their CO{sub 2} emissions, the situation in developing countries has been subjected to much less scrutiny. Although current emission levels in developing countries are low, they can vastly increase in the future due to higher economic growth rates. Of particular interest are newly industrializing economies; they are positioned to be the first group of countries to catch up with OECD emission levels. In this paper, the authors examine the CO{sub 2} emission scenarios in Taiwan, whose economy is still growing at more than 6% after years of impressive performance. A dynamic, multi-period optimization model was constructed to evaluate various energy system development paths. Both currently utilized technologies and advanced technologies that may become available are considered. The model meets externally specified final energy sectoral demands while keeping the objective function minimal. For devising a practical program to control greenhouse gases emissions, relative advantages of the conventional regulation approach with incentive-based approaches are compared. The comparison is made by running the model using different objective functions.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about wireless...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and Electrochemical Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupled hierarchical models...

  9. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Technology Conventional Coal-Fired Power Plants AdvancedOperating Characteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Powerfor a summary. "Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants: a

  10. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    fired reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines,engines are the most dominant technologies. Investigations show that no fuel cell or micro turbine

  11. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01

    of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cyclefarms to large integrated gasifiers at petroleum refineries.BLGCC). The black liquor gasifier technology will produce a

  12. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-01-08

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  13. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  14. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  16. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    be propelled by the engine, the electric machine, or both atwith SI and CI engines, battery electric trucks, and fuelCI combustion engines, hybrid-electric vehicles with diesel

  17. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    diesel engine truck, diesel hybrid-electric, conventionalfor conventional diesel and diesel hybrid trucks; dual 150The economics of the hybrid-electric diesel and LNG Class 8

  18. Toyota Prius Plug-In HEV: A Plug-In Hybrid Electric Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Toyota Prius plug-in HEV, a plug-in hybrid electric car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In partnership with the University of Colorado, NREL uses the vehicle for grid-integration studies and for testing new hardware and charge-management algorithms. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Multi-Speed Range Electric Motor R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-speed...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: GATE Center for Electric Drive Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Regents University of Michigan at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about GATE Center...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Seeo, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-voltage solid polymer...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Envia Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Disruptive Approach to Electric Vehicle Power Electronics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by U of Colorado at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a disruptive approach to...

  4. General Purpose Technologies and Economic Growth: Electricity Diffusion in the Manufacturing Sector Before WWII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ristuccia, Cristiano Andrea; Solomou, Solomos

    of spillovers, etc.); magnitude of its economic benefits (the size of social savings, and efficiency gains it affords, and the extent of each individual spillover); and speed of the diffusion process as, however pervasive and large the technological changes...

  5. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

  6. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office- AVTA: All Electric USPS Long Life Vehicle Conversions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The following set of reports (part of the medium and heavy-duty truck data) describes performance data collected from all-electric conversions of U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Long-Life Vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory, which has several additional reports available.

  8. The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laing, T.; Grubb, Michael

    opportunities for wider deployment of the technology, and may be externally funded, at least partially, through government support. CCS is an immature technology, in comparison with biomass for power, with greater uncertainty over costs and performance... K IN G P A P E R Abstract The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity EPRG Working Paper 1004 Cambridge Working Paper...

  9. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)to added vehicle electricity demand in the Mixed technology

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program: Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2014-09-01

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office. It is based on technical targets for commercial viability established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, future revisions including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures are expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices. The DOE-United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) supported the development of the manual. Technical Team points of contact responsible for its development and revision are Renata M. Arsenault of Ford Motor Company and Jon P. Christophersen of the Idaho National Laboratory. The development of this manual was funded by the Unites States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Technical direction from DOE was provided by David Howell, Energy Storage R&D Manager and Hybrid Electric Systems Team Leader. Comments and questions regarding the manual should be directed to Jon P. Christophersen at the Idaho National Laboratory (jon.christophersen@inl.gov).

  11. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. This page provides data on the hybrid electric versions of the Volkswagen Jetta, Ford C-Max, Chevrolet Malibu, Honda Civic, Hyundai Sonata, Honda CRZ, Honda Civic with Advanced Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery, Mercedes Benz, Toyota Prius Gen III, Ford Fusion, Honda Insight and Honda CR-Z.

  13. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  14. Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2005-01-01

    by hydroelectric power plants in California is 11.17% [CECCalifornia in 2003. Because the location of coal and natural gas power plantsCalifornia is diversified: 22.35% of the energy is imported, and 9.84% of the electricity is produced in coal fired power plants

  15. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobalTechnologytemperature,OpenEnergy

  16. Table 8.2. Cost and performance characteristics of new central station electricity generating technologies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global Crude Oil Prices Brent396,0138. U.S.7. U.S.8.

  17. TECHNOLOGY FORUM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brittmore Group LLC T Cascade Engineering and Patriot Solar U Enabling High-Penetration PV with Smart Inverters N General Electric Global Research Center C National Renewable...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the plug-in hybrid electric version of the following vehicles is available: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi, 2012 Chevrolet Volt, 2012 Toyota Prius, 2013 Toyota Prius, 2013 Chevrolet Volt, 2011 Chrysler Town & Country, 2010 Quantum Escape, and 2010 Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle.

  19. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    the defUlition given above. It can be a corporate strategic tool in the newly competitive electric business. It can be part of an offensive strategy to capture new retail markets. It can be used to optimize support of a capacity-stretched distribution... system. It can be used defensively to retain existing customers. Example strategies include: Meet existing customers' growing local peak demands without adding long-payback T&D upgrades and/or new central station generation investments. Serve new...

  20. Can general purpose technology theory explain economic growth? Electrical power as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ristuccia, Cristiano Andrea; Solomou, Solomos

    2014-06-03

    was due to the relative cheapness of thermal generation in the US, owing to the low price of the natural resources (oil and coal) employed. This hypothesis can be evaluated using census data for Britain and the US. In 1935 the British manufacturing... in the early 1930s. The UK Census of Production for 1935 is one of the few historical sources outside the US that provide extensive disaggregated data on output, labour input and electricity consumption by industry. On the basis of this data we observe...

  1. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Cyber and Physical Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3 of thePhysical

  2. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Designs, Architectures, and Concepts

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3 of

  3. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Flexible and Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3

  4. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Measurements, Communications, and Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3Controls

  5. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Transmission and Distribution Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1 -Chapter 3ControlsControls

  6. Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June 22, 2015 | DepartmentSupporting theFrontier

  7. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrical Machines Technologies 4. Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies 5. Fuels and Lubricants Technologies 6. Materials Technologies 7. Materials Technologies:...

  8. 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Electrical Machines Technologies 4. Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies 5. Fuels and Lubricants Technologies 6. Materials Technologies 7. Materials Technologies:...

  9. 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Electrical Machines Technologies 4. Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies 5. Fuels and Lubricants Technologies 6. Materials Technologies 7. Materials Technologies:...

  10. 2011 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrical Machines Technologies 4. Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies 5. Fuels and Lubricants Technologies 6. Materials Technologies 7. Materials Technologies:...

  11. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    Electric Drivetrain Electric Drivetrain Conv. DieselDiesel Hyb. Conv. LNG-SI LNG-SI Hyb. Conv. LNG-CI LNG-CICompression Ignition Carbon Dioxide Diesel Gallon Equivalent

  12. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  13. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  14. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States); Vance, E.F. [Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.

  15. Ultracapacitors for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles - Performance Requirements, Status of the Technology, and R&D Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andrew F

    1995-01-01

    Pulse Power Devices in Electric Vehicle Propulsion Systems,the Tenth International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-10),4. Burke, A.F. , Hybrid/Electric Vehicle Design Options and

  16. The design, construction, and operation of long-distance high-voltage electricity transmission technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J. C.; Kavicky, J. A.; Picel, K. C.

    2008-03-03

    This report focuses on transmission lines, which operate at voltages of 115 kV and higher. Currently, the highest voltage lines comprising the North American power grid are at 765 kV. The grid is the network of transmission lines that interconnect most large power plants on the North American continent. One transmission line at this high voltage was built near Chicago as part of the interconnection for three large nuclear power plants southwest of the city. Lines at this voltage also serve markets in New York and New England, also very high demand regions. The large power transfers along the West Coast are generally at 230 or 500 kV. Just as there are practical limits to centralization of power production, there are practical limits to increasing line voltage. As voltage increases, the height of the supporting towers, the size of the insulators, the distance between conductors on a tower, and even the width of the right-of-way (ROW) required increase. These design features safely isolate the electric power, which has an increasing tendency to arc to ground as the voltage (or electrical potential) increases. In addition, very high voltages (345 kV and above) are subject to corona losses. These losses are a result of ionization of the atmosphere, and can amount to several megawatts of wasted power. Furthermore, they are a local nuisance to radio transmission and can produce a noticeable hum. Centralized power production has advantages of economies of scale and special resource availability (for instance, hydro resources), but centralized power requires long-distance transfers of power both to reach customers and to provide interconnections for reliability. Long distances are most economically served at high voltages, which require large-scale equipment and impose a substantial footprint on the corridors through which power passes. The most visible components of the transmission system are the conductors that provide paths for the power and the towers that keep these conductors at a safe distance from each other and from the ground and the natural and built environment. Common elements that are generally less visible (or at least more easily overlooked) include the maintained ROW along the path of the towers, access roads needed for maintenance, and staging areas used for initial construction that may be restored after construction is complete. Also visible but less common elements along the corridor may include switching stations or substations, where lines of similar or different voltages meet to transfer power.

  17. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    car recharging, the availability of adequate electricalcars to support the complex operation of the electrical gridcars requiring at-home recharging. Although the electrical

  18. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricitytechnologies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    of electric and natural gas vehicles: draft report for yeardevice to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) Theof electric and natural gas vehicles” report for year one.

  19. Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fezzler, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    Currently, interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors with rare-earth (RE) magnets are almost universally used for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) because of their superior properties, particularly power density. However, there is now a distinct possibility of limited supply or very high cost of RE magnets that could make IPM motors unavailable or too expensive. Because development of electric motors is a critical part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Power Electronics and Motors activity, DOE needs to determine which options should be investigated and what barriers should be addressed. Therefore, in order to provide a basis for deciding which research topics should be pursued, an assessment of various motor technologies was conducted to determine which, if any, is potentially capable of meeting FreedomCAR 2015 and 2020 targets. Highest priority was given to IPM, surface mounted permanent magnet (SPM), induction, and switched reluctance (SR) motors. Also of interest, but with lesser emphasis, were wheel motors, multiple-rotor motors, motors with external excitation, and several others that emerged from the assessment. Cost and power density (from a design perspective, the power density criterion translates to torque density) are emerging as the two most important properties of motors for traction drives in hybrid and EVs, although efficiency and specific power also are very important. The primary approach for this assessment involved interviews with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), their suppliers, and other technical experts. For each technology, the following issues were discussed: (1) The current state-of-the-art performance and cost; (2) Recent trends in the technology; (3) Inherent characteristics of the motor - which ones limit the ability of the technology to meet the targets and which ones aid in meeting the target; (4) What research and development (R&D) would be needed to meet the targets; and (5) The potential for the technology to meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

  20. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  1. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

    2009-07-31

    General Electric’s (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energy’s cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

  2. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  3. Fossils in an era of globalization, technology and climate change: what has changed and what has to be changed? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shikanai, Mitsuru

    This dissertation considers why inaction of people and governments against global and intergenerational injustice prompted by climate change and other environmental issues persists, and provides some theoretical and actual solutions for the problem...

  4. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses on multi-scale, multiphysics approaches to understanding natural systems, "engineering the earth" with sensing and drilling technologies and characterizing geomaterials...

  5. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    Electric Drivetrain Conv. Diesel Diesel Hyb. Conv. LNG-SI LNG-SI Hyb.Conv. LNG-CI LNG-CI Hyb. Battery EV Fuel Cell Short Haul

  6. Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Daniel B., Jr

    2011-01-01

    High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

  7. Deployment of CCS Technologies across the Load Curve for a Competitive Electricity Market as a Function of CO2 Emissions Permit Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

    2011-04-18

    Consistent with other published studies, the modelling presented here reveals that baseload power plants are the first aspects of the electricity sector to decarbonize and are essentially decarbonized once CO2 permit prices exceed a certain threshold ($90/ton CO2 in this study). The decarbonization of baseload electricity is met by significant expansions of nuclear power and renewable energy generation technologies as well as the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies applied to both coal and natural gas fired power plants. Relatively little attention has been paid thus far to whether intermediate and peaking units would respond the same way to a climate policy given the very different operational and economic context that these kinds of electricity generation units operate under. In this paper, the authors discuss key aspects of the load segmentation methodology used to imbed a varying electricity demand within the GCAM (a state-of-the-art Integrated Assessment Model) energy and economic modelling framework and present key results on the role CCS technologies could play in decarbonizng subpeak and peak generation (encompassing only the top 10% of the load) and under what conditions. To do this, the authors have modelled two hypothetical climate policies that require 50% and 80% reductions in US emissions from business as usual by the middle of this century. Intermediate electricity generation is virtually decarbonized once carbon prices exceed approximately $150/tonCO2. When CO2 permit prices exceed $160/tonCO2, natural gas power plants with CCS have roughly the same marketshare as conventional gas plants in serving subpeak loads. The penetration of CCS into peak load (upper 6% here) is minimal under the scenarios modeled here suggesting that CO2 emissions from this aspect of the U.S. electricity sector would persist well into the future even with stringent CO2 emission control policies in place.

  8. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment-emission electricity within one or two decades. Renewable generation is also planned to increase over similar time, it is therefore possible that large (~45%) reductions in CO2 emissions from UK electricity generation could

  9. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01

    which uses solar energy to generate electricity." Like otherwhich uses solar energy to generate electricity” qualifiesenergy technologies, solar PV creates the most jobs per unit of electricity

  10. Power Electonics & Electric Machinery | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Electronics and Electric Machinery SHARE Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Power Electronics and Electric Machinery research has dramatically advanced the technology...

  11. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  12. Climbing Up the Technology Ladder? High-Technology Exports in China and Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Kevin P.; Porzecanski, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    the Technology Ladder? High- Technology Exports in China andthe Technology Ladder? High-Technology Exports in China andin the global market for high technology products? How does

  13. Homeowners Guide to Financing a Grid-Connected Solar Electric System (Brochure), Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide provides an overview of the financing options that may be available to homeowners who are considering installing a solar electric system on their house.

  14. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008Technologies Technologies

  15. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology

  16. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    . This applies both to gas extracted bythe petrochemical industries and to the methane which is naturallyreleased, and methane naturallyleaking from the seabed, could in future be detected using changes in acoustic signals from the seabed." Natural leaks of methane gas can be damaging to the environment because

  17. Chun Zhang, Wei Wu, Hantao Huang and Hao Yu* School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    sources: main energy resource from electrical power-grid and renewable energy resource from solar by assessing existing electricity from external power-grid, commissioning new renewable solar energy and extensibility. Secondly, the traditional EMS has poor control over renewable energy such as solar energy due

  18. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Projections (UEP) [1] show a decrease over the next two decades, but at a reduced rate compared to the 1990's represent electricity supplies with no (historically) or low (UEP projections) UK CO2 reduction targets of alternative options to deliver at a lower price. Additional costs for the 'decarbonised electricity' options

  19. EV Community Readiness projects: Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies (TX); City of Austin, Austin Energy (TX)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139. b MIT Energy Initiative, Massachusetts Institute: 617-253-6609, Fax: 617-253-9845. Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, Vol. 1, No. 1. Copyright 2012 by the IAEE. All rights reserved. The Influence of Shale Gas on U.S. Energy and Environmental

  1. Abstract. The problem of controlled nuclear fusion (CNF) is a colossal scientific and technological challenge on a global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. The problem of controlled nuclear fusion (CNF) is a colossal scientific and technological044n08ABEH001068 The initial period in the history of nuclear fusion research at the Kurchatov Institute1 V D Shafranov 1. Introduction The first period of research into controlled nuclear fusion (CNF

  2. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  3. Carbon dioxide capture technology for the coal-powered electricity industry : a systematic prioritization of research needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esber, George Salem, III

    2006-01-01

    Coal is widely relied upon as a fuel for electric power generation, and pressure is increasing to limit emissions of the CO2 produced during its combustion because of concerns over climate change. In order to continue the ...

  4. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexico IndependentMatter and Technologies R&D

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management – Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Nanofluids for Cooling Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermal control...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermal control...

  9. Hybrid vehicle design using global optimisation Wenzhong Gao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    electronics, hybrid electric vehicles, electric machines, and renewable energy systems. HeHybrid vehicle design using global optimisation algorithms Wenzhong Gao Department of Electrical of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Michigan, 4901 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI 48128 USA Fax

  10. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use...

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  12. ELECTRIFIED VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY TRENDS, INFRASTRUCTURE IMPLICATIONS, AND COST COMPARISONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    The motivations for developing alternative energy sources and associated vehicle powertrains1 is to reduce-market-viable plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) alternative. In this paper, the various PEV architectures are described/powertrain technologies critical for success in global vehicle markets. These alternative powertrains may, in the end

  13. Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    Anli Chen Dept. of Electrical Engineering Wireless Security Lakshmana Prasanth Nittala Venkata Dept #12;· Introduction · Overview of Wireless Technology · Wireless LANs · Security of 802.11 Wireless LANs · Insecurities of WLAN · Possible Solutions #12;I. Introduction II. Wireless Technology III

  14. Advanced Propulsion Technology Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GM is also developing new classes of electrically driven vehicles, leveraging technology first used in their hybrids.

  15. Abstract--This paper reports on work the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the New York Public Servic Reliability Technology Solutions on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's Transmission Reliability program. The work was funded by the Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Power

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Electric Hybrid Truck & Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Houston-Galvelston Area Council at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about hydrogen fuel...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: GATE Center for Electric Drive Transportation at the University of Michigan- Dearborn

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Regents University of Michigan at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about GATE Center...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: SCAQMD: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium-Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by South Coast Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  19. c Copyright 2009. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    c° Copyright 2009. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School. If the MOSFET is in the pinch-off region, the following equations for ID hold: ID = K (VGS - VT H)2 (5) 2 #12

  20. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile ElectricityTechnologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01

    and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

  1. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Recharging and Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Near-

  2. A Feasibility Study of Sustainable Distributed Generation Technologies to Improve the electrical System on the Duck Valley Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman Atkins, Shoshone-Paiute; Mark Hannifan, New West Technologies

    2005-06-30

    A range of sustainable energy options were assessed for feasibility in addressing chronic electric grid reliability problems at Duck Valley IR. Wind power and building energy efficiency were determined to have the most merit, with the Duck Valley Tribes now well positioned to pursue large scale wind power development for on- and off-reservation sales.

  3. Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    commitment to Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). The overarching goal of this program is the accelerated development of commercially viable energy technologies that can substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a...

  4. Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.; Eto, J.

    1997-09-01

    Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

  5. The path to clean energy: direct coupling of nuclear and renewable technologies for thermal and electrical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can significantly reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both clean energy generation sources and hydrocarbon resources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean nuclear and renewable energy generation sources. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing energy (thermal or electrical) where it is needed, when it is needed. For the purposes of this work, the hybrid system would integrate two or more energy resources to generate two or more products, one of which must be an energy commodity, such as electricity or transportation fuel. This definition requires coupling of subsystems ‘‘behind’’ the electrical transmission bus, where energy flows are dynamically apportioned as necessary to meet demand and the system has a single connection to the grid that provides dispatchable electricity as required while capital intensive generation assets operate at full capacity. Development of integrated energy systems for an “energy park” must carefully consider the intended location and the associated regional resources, traditional industrial processes, energy delivery infrastructure, and markets to identify viable region-specific system configurations. This paper will provide an overview of the current status of regional hybrid energy system design, development and application of dynamic analysis tools to assess technical and economic performance, and roadmap development to identify and prioritize component, subsystem and system testing that will lead to prototype demonstration.

  6. Transmission Enhancement Technology Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a recommendation of the most cost-effective methods and technologies to enhance electricity transmission from a review of methods and technologies with potential to enhance electricity transmission capability-traditional methods and technologies to increase the capacity of the high voltage electric power transmission system

  7. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  8. CO2 Reduction by Dry Methane Reforming Over Hexaluminates: A Promising Technology for Decreasing Global Warming in a Cost Effective Manner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar-Villalpando, M.D.; Gardner, T.H.

    2008-03-01

    Efficient utilization of CO2 can help to decrease global warming. Methane reforming using carbon dioxide has been of interest for many years, but recently that interest has experienced a rapid increase for both environmental and commercial reasons. The use of CO2 provides a source of clean oxygen, which eliminates the need for costly oxygen separation plants. The product of dry reforming is useful syn-gas, which can be used to generate electrical power in a SOFC or in the production of synthetic fuels (hydrocarbons and alcohols). Hexaaluminate catalysts prepared at NETL may represent a product that can be utilized for the conversion of CO2 to syn-gas. In this work, transition metals dispersed in barium hexaaluminate have shown to be promising new catalysts for dry methane reforming. In this investigation, a series of BaNixAl12-yO19-? catalysts with varying Ni content were prepared by co-precipitation followed by calcination at 1400°C. CO2 reduction by dry methane reforming was carried out to determine catalyst performance as a function of temperature and carbon formation was also quantified after the reforming tests. Results of catalysts characterization, dispersion and surface area, were correlated to catalytic performance.

  9. Incentives to Accelerate the Penetration of Electricity in the Industrial Sector by Promoting New Technologies: A French Experiment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, J.; Froehlich, R.

    1983-01-01

    A major problem encountered when trying to speed up electrification of French industry has been 'hot to finance, at end-user's level, investments related to such a change of technology'. Government incentives, the aims of which are to help saving...

  10. McGraw-Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology The McGraw-Hill Companies "Solitons in Electrical Networks"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricketts, David S.

    of wave energy within the pulse shape without dispersion and exhibit remarkable nonlinear dynamics dispersion of energy, the light-wave solitons can carry a large amount of digital information in longMcGraw-Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology © The McGraw-Hill Companies "Solitons

  11. c Copywright 2008. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    c° Copywright 2008. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School mode or the saturation region when vDS vGS - VTO, where VTO is the threshold or pinch-off voltage parameter which accounts for the change in with drain-source voltage. Because iG ' 0 in the pinch

  12. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility...

  13. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  14. Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical & Computer Engineering 2014-2015StudentHandbook For students entering the Masters of Science in Electrical & Computer Engineering: Pittsburgh, Silicon Valley, Rwanda, or Technology Enhanced, 2014 #12;This document is for the internal use of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  15. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  16. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  17. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  18. Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.Nasar S. A. (1982) electric vehicle technology. John Wiley &batteries fornia. for electric vehicles. Argonne National

  19. Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, C.; Pless, J.; Logan, J.; Zhou, E.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business solutions that are transforming electricity sectors around the world. Renewable deployment is expected to continue due to: increasingly competitive economics; favorable environmental characteristics such as low water use, and minimal local air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; complementary risk profiles when paired with natural gas generators; strong support from stakeholders. Despite this positive outlook for renewables, the collapse in global oil prices since mid-2014 and continued growth in natural gas supply in the United States--due to the development of low-cost shale gas--raise questions about the potential impacts of fossil fuel prices on RE. Today, oil plays a very minor role in the electricity sectors of most countries, so direct impacts on RE are likely to be minimal (except where natural gas prices are indexed on oil). Natural gas and RE generating options appear to be more serious competitors than oil and renewables. Low gas prices raise the hurdle for RE to be cost competitive. Additionally, although RE emits far less GHG than natural gas, both natural gas and RE offer the benefits of reducing carbon relative to coal and oil (see Section 4.1 for more detail on the GHG intensity of electricity technologies). However, many investors and decision makers are becoming aware of the complementary benefits of pairing natural gas and renewables to minimize risk of unstable fuel prices and maintain the reliability of electricity to the grid.

  20. An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe bene®ts of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

  1. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity -- Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Morrow; Donald Darner; James Francfort

    2008-11-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are under evaluation by various stake holders to better understand their capability and potential benefits. PHEVs could allow users to significantly improve fuel economy over a standard HEV and in some cases, depending on daily driving requirements and vehicle design, have the ability to eliminate fuel consumption entirely for daily vehicle trips. The cost associated with providing charge infrastructure for PHEVs, along with the additional costs for the on-board power electronics and added battery requirements associated with PHEV technology will be a key factor in the success of PHEVs. This report analyzes the infrastructure requirements for PHEVs in single family residential, multi-family residential and commercial situations. Costs associated with this infrastructure are tabulated, providing an estimate of the infrastructure costs associated with PHEV deployment.

  3. Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    response, and smart grid technologies aimed at helping meet the nation's rapidly growing demand for electricity," Kevin M. Kolevar, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Electricity...

  4. Azita Emami: Department of Electrical Engineering, California...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Azita Emami: Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Dec 4, 2013 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Azita Emami Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering,...

  5. Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on Review of Recent Reliability Issues and Systems Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    1999-12-01

    This report is one of six reports developed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program in Power System Integration and Reliability (PSIR). The objective of this report is to review, analyze, and evaluate critical reliability issues demonstrated by recent disturbance events in the North America power system. Eleven major disturbances are examined, most occurring in this decade. The strategic challenge is that the pattern of technical need has persisted for a long period of time. For more than a decade, anticipation of market deregulation has been a major disincentive to new investments in system capacity. It has also inspired reduced maintenance of existing assets. A massive infusion of better technology is emerging as the final option to continue reliable electrical services. If an investment in better technology will not be made in a timely manner, then North America should plan its adjustments to a very different level of electrical service. It is apparent that technical operations staff among the utilities can be very effective at marshaling their forces in the immediate aftermath of a system emergency, and that serious disturbances often lead to improved mechanisms for coordinated operation. It is not at all apparent that such efforts can be sustained through voluntary reliability organizations in which utility personnel external to those organizations do most of the technical work. The eastern interconnection shows several situations in which much of the technical support has migrated from the utilities to the Independent System Operator (ISO), and the ISO staffs or shares staff with the regional reliability council. This process may be a natural and very positive consequence of utility restructuring. If so, the process should be expedited in regions where it is less advanced.

  6. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  7. Diagnostic Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |DesignCommunitiesYu &Diagnosis of

  8. Aviation Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections Audits &drivers to see big savingsManagement

  9. Aviation Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools to someoneAstrophysics

  10. Grid Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— We wantInvestigations Committee onVehiclesGrid

  11. Healthcare Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions for AccidentalHealth, Safety, &Integrating

  12. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile ElectricityTechnologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01

    car recharging, the availability of adequate electricalcars to support the complex operation of the electrical gridcars requiring at-home recharging. Although the electrical

  13. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    car recharging, the availability of adequate electricalcars to support the complex operation of the electrical gridcars requiring at-home recharging. Although the electrical

  14. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    of electric and natural gas vehicles: draft report for yeardevice to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) Theof electric and natural gas vehicles” report for year one.

  15. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile ElectricityTechnologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01

    of electric and natural gas vehicles: draft report for yeardevice to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) Theof electric and natural gas vehicles” report for year one.

  16. Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2004-01-01

    modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrainsare advanced, clean diesel engines and hybrid-electricmarkets for diesel powered and hybrid-electric vehicles in

  17. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile ElectricityTechnologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01

    goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

  18. Introduction The electric power grid and electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction The electric power grid and electric power industry are undergoing a dramatic transforma- tion. By linking information technologies with the electric power grid--to provide "electricity the standards process that will allow the many pieces of "the world's largest and most complex machine" to work

  19. Adam Merkling Major: Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    #12;Adam Merkling Major: Information Technology Position: Student System Administrator Employed Technology Position: User Technology Services Student Technician Employed Since: February 2011 #12;Gabi Mosquera Major: Electrical/Computer Engineering Position: User Technology Services Student Technician

  20. Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabakken, J.

    2006-08-01

    This report, prepared by NREL's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

  1. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  2. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-29

    The focus of this report is the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. Chapter 2 presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. Chapter 3 presents cost, price, and performance trends. Chapter 4 discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. Chapter 5 provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts.

  3. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for...

  4. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Lead Performer: National Institute of Standards and Technology -...

  5. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  6. Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O'Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

    2012-09-01

    Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

  7. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-381 E...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    81 E-T Global Energy Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-381 E-T Global Energy Application from E-T Global Energy to export electric energy to Mexico....

  8. COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION and Anitha Rednam, Comparative Costs of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 1: Summary of Technology Costs

  9. 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technologies 2. Energy Storage Technologies 3. Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 4. Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies 5. Fuels and Lubricants...

  10. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01

    energy conservation and distributed generation from elimination of electricof intermittent electric generation technologies. Energyof intermittent electric generation technologies. Energy

  11. SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ELENA YUDOVINA AND GEORGE MICHAILIDIS Abstract. Electric vehicles represent a promising technology for reducing emissions and dependence. This pa- per studies decentralized policies that assign electric vehicles to a network of charging

  12. Electric Energy Application of the New Superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, T.

    1988-01-01

    Electricity has been the major energy form enabling many of the significant technological breakthroughs of this century. While radical changes have occurred in how electricity is used, the underlying materials used in electrical apparatus have been...

  13. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  14. EESRD | Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Division...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting Organizations Biosciences Division Energy and Transportation Science Division Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Division Building Technologies Program...

  15. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confidential, 4222013 2013 DOE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM REVIEW PRESENTATION Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification...

  16. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  17. technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    of biomethane and renewable electricity storage. The technology is especially suited for all bioprocesses

  18. Singing the Brain Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, Grace (Grace W. J.)

    2008-01-01

    Singing the Brain Electric Brain pacemakers, scientists have found, can treat depression by correcting neural circuitry gone haywire. This thesis examines how such technology - a technique known as deep-brain stimulation, ...

  19. Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding...A Technology Who's Time Has Come Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck...

  20. Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric...

  1. Integration Technology for PHEV-Grid-Connectivity, with Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology for PHEV-Grid-Connectivity, with Support for SAE Electrical Standards Integration Technology for PHEV-Grid-Connectivity, with Support for SAE Electrical Standards 2010...

  2. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  3. MEng & BEng Programmes Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    MEng & BEng Programmes Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Computer Systems Engineering Electrical Power Engineering Electronic Engineering with Space Science & Technology Electronic & Communication Engineering Integrated Mechanical & Electrical Engineering

  4. Overview of biomass technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The biomass overview of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  5. Renewable energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1997-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describe the technical and economic status of the major emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  6. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In Unprecedented Detail Posted on of implantable device for measuring the heart's electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over allows for measuring electrical activity with greater resolution in time and space. The new device can

  7. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies...

  8. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

  9. UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    electricity networks and distribution systems, through to using smart grid technologies for more effective of dynamic collaborations delivering productive outcomes. #12;#12;LOW CARBON POWER AND ENERGY FUTURE CITIES Advanced Manufacturing Future Cities Health Technologies Working collaboratively, programmes within

  10. Gaguk Zakaria received his Stratum One (Bachelor of Science) degree in Electrical Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his Master of Science degree

  11. LEADERSHIP AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: "THE GREAT POTENTIALS AND NEEDS ARE NOT FOR TOMORROW, BUT FOR YESTERDAY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    revolution in the 21st century in many areas, the way steam power or electricity made industrial revolution are in the beginning of the information revolution, it is hard to comprehend that new technology will make another global changes and challenges, which are occurring in every-day life, industry and services mainly due

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles The Vehicle...

  16. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."Transition: Designing a Fuel- Cell Hypercar. ” 8th Annual

  17. Electrochemical Capacitors as Energy Storage in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles: Present Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    batteries and ultracapacitors for electric vehicles. EVS24Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposiumpublications on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  19. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  20. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.; Margolis, R.; Barbose, G.; Bartlett, J.; Cory, K.; Couture, T.; DeCesaro, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Frickel, M.; Hemmeline, C.; Mendelsohn, T.; Ong, S.; Pak, A.; Poole, L.; Peterman, C.; Schwabe, P.; Soni, A.; Speer, B.; Wiser, R.; Zuboy, J.; James, T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this report is the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. Chapter 2 presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. Chapter 3 presents cost, price, and performance trends. Chapter 4 discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. Chapter 5 provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts. Highlights of this report include: (1) The global PV industry has seen impressive growth rates in cell/module production during the past decade, with a 10-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 46% and a 5-year CAGR of 56% through 2008. (2) Thin-film PV technologies have grown faster than crystalline silicon over the past 5 years, with a 10-year CAGR of 47% and a 5-year CAGR of 87% for thin-film shipments through 2008. (3) Global installed PV capacity increased by 6.0 GW in 2008, a 152% increase over 2.4 GW installed in 2007. (4) The United States installed 0.34 GW of PV capacity in 2008, a 63% increase over 0.21 GW in 2007. (5) Global average PV module prices dropped 23% from $4.75/W in 1998 to $3.65/W in 2008. (6) Federal legislation, including the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA, October 2008) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, February 2009), is providing unprecedented levels of support for the U.S. solar industry. (7) In 2008, global private-sector investment in solar energy technology topped $16 billion, including almost $4 billion invested in the United States. (8) Solar PV market forecasts made in early 2009 anticipate global PV production and demand to increase fourfold between 2008 and 2012, reaching roughly 20 GW of production and demand by 2012. (9) Globally, about 13 GW of CSP was announced or proposed through 2015, based on forecasts made in mid-2009. Regional market shares for the 13 GW are about 51% in the United States, 33% in Spain, 8% in the Middle East and North Africa, and 8% in Australasia, Europe, and South Africa. Of the 6.5-GW project pipeline in the United States, 4.3 GW have power purchase agreements (PPAs). The PPAs comprise 41% parabolic trough, 40% power tower, and 19% dish-engine systems.

  1. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice...

  2. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies...

  3. Energy Department/Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    response, and smart grid technologies aimed at helping meet the nation's rapidly growing demand for electricity," Kevin M. Kolevar, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Electricity...

  4. Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will...

  5. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  6. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vss033carlson2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric...

  7. Technological Opportunities to Increase the Proliferation Resistance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities to Increase the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) Technological Opportunities to Increase the Proliferation...

  8. Electricity market module: Electricity capacity planning submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Capacity Planning Submodule (ECP) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996. It describes revisions to enhance the representation of planned maintenance, incorporate technological improvements in operating efficiencies, revise the algorithm for determining international firm power imports, and include risk premiums for new plant construction.

  9. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  10. EA-341 Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-341 Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC EA-341 Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC Order authorizing Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico EA- 341...

  11. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Power...

  12. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Ford, Justin R.; Spires, Shannon V.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-10-27

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  13. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L; Ford, Justin R; Spires, Shannon V; Goldsmith, Steven Y

    2015-11-05

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  14. New information technologies such as distributed computing systems and the National Information Infrastructure have brought the integration for global enterprises closer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng

    efforts to define standards which will enable data exchange between systems from different vendors. These technologies and standards alone, however, are not sufficient to effect scalability, adaptability manufacturing enterprises. The problem, the model and an application solution are described for this domain. #12

  15. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report: January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    This report focuses on the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. It also presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. It also presents cost, price, and performance trends; and discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. The final chapter provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts.

  16. Accessing Big (Commercial) Data across a Global Research Infrastructure - Modelling Consumer Behaviour in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Ashley D.; Antonioletti, Mario A.; Sloan, Terence M.

    2014-08-26

    The use of globally distributed computing systems and globally distributed data to understand and manage global organisations is a well-established vision. It can be found in patents awarded for electrical communications systems that are integrated...

  17. 1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy. Background: Potential of Fuel Cell Technology 60%+ efficiency possible 15 ­ 40% efficiency Fuel Cell TypicalElectricalEfficiency(HHV) Source: EPA, Catalog of CHP Technologies, December 2008 Electrical Efficiency Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy, bypassing

  18. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep

    2014-10-24

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  19. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  20. Global Climate Change Electric Power Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    , and the European nations have launched the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), a three-year mandatory market