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1

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project 1991 ­ 1992 November 1992 #12; 1 INTRODUCTION (O. Thual) The goals of the Climate Modelling & Global Change project of climate experiments with this general circulation model. The Climate Modelling & Global Change project has

2

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project 1992 ­ 1993 October 25 th. The ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' project has played a key role in this achievement, after two years­of­the art climate model. Based on these actual and potential achievements, the Global Change CERFACS project

3

Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

4

Global climate models: Past, present, and future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere-ocean models, but common forcing scenarios (compiled by Cubasch and Fischer-Bruns,). Recently, Earth system models are an attempt to integrate even more components of the climate system, such as the biosphere and cryosphere (9...

Martin Stute; Amy Clement; Gerrit Lohmann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

7

Global climate change model natural climate variation: Paleoclimate data base, probabilities and astronomic predictors  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University at Palisades, New York, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory it is a part of a larger project of global climate studies which supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and forms part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work under the PASS Program is currently focusing on the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and is under the overall direction of the Yucca Mountain Project Office US Department of Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada. The final results of the PNL project will provide input to global atmospheric models designed to test specific climate scenarios which will be used in the site specific modeling work of others. The primary purpose of the data bases compiled and of the astronomic predictive models is to aid in the estimation of the probabilities of future climate states. The results will be used by two other teams working on the global climate study under contract to PNL. They are located at and the University of Maine in Orono, Maine, and the Applied Research Corporation in College Station, Texas. This report presents the results of the third year`s work on the global climate change models and the data bases describing past climates.

Kukla, G.; Gavin, J. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

9

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

10

California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

Caldwell, P M

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI Name: Venkatramani Balaji PI Email: balaji@princeton.edu Institution: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science We expect our understanding of the role of clouds in climate to undergo a qualitative change as the resolutions of global models begin to encompass clouds. At these resolutions, non-hydrostatic dynamics become significant and deep convective processes are resolved. We are poised at the threshold of being able to run global scale simulations that include direct, non-parameterized, simulations of deep convective clouds. The goal of this

13

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Dec 16 2013 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Chris A. Fischer Speaker(s) Title: National Center for Atmospheric Research The Community Earth System Model (CESM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) are community models involving several different developers. With so many different developers it becomes imperative to carry out continuous testing during development. I'll provide a brief introduction to CESM and CAM then cover the testing that is being carried out on both. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a global climate model used to predict past, present and future climates. CESM is a fully couple model,

14

On the Contribution of Longwave Radiation to Global Climate Model Biases in Arctic Lower Tropospheric Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous research has found that global climate models (GCMs) usually simulate greater lower tropospheric stabilities compared to reanalysis data. To understand the origins of this bias, the authors examine hindcast simulations initialized with ...

Neil P. Barton; Stephen A. Klein; James S. Boyle

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

16

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections is a challenging problem. While climate models capture many processes governing short-term climate fluctuations, they are not expected to simulate the specific timing of these somewhat random phenomena - the occurrence of which may impact the realized trend. Therefore, to assess model performance, we develop distributions of projected temperature trends from a collection of climate models running the IPCC A1B emissions scenario. We evaluate where observed trends of length 5 to 15 years fall within the distribution of model trends of the same length. We find that current trends lie near the lower limits of the model distributions, with cumulative probability-of-occurrence values typically between 5 percent and 20 percent, and probabilities below 5 percent not uncommon. Our results indicate cause for concern regarding the consistency between climate model projections and observed climate behavior...

Michaels, Patrick J; Christy, John R; Herman, Chad S; Liljegren, Lucia M; Annan, James D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

18

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorbed by the polar regions. Second, sea ice has a strong insulating effect on the under- lying oceanSensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model Jiping Liu,1 coupled model is used to investigate the sensitivity of sea ice to each of the following parameterizations

20

Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Tropical cyclones in the UPSCALE ensemble of high resolution global climate models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The UPSCALE (UK on PRACE: weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk) project, using PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe) resources, constructed and ran an ensemble of atmosphere-only global climate ...

Malcolm J. Roberts; Pier Luigi Vidale; Matthew S. Mizielinski; Marie-Estelle Demory; Reinhard Schiemann; Jane Strachan; Kevin Hodges; Ray Bell; Joanne Camp

23

Response of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in summer, in part because of the reductions in ice cover and thickness that insulate the winter atmosphereResponse of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model Larissa warming of about 4³C for doubled CO2. Enhanced warming is found at higher latitudes near sea-ice margins

24

Leveraging The Open Provenance Model as a Multi-Tier Model for Global Climate Research  

SciTech Connect

Global climate researchers rely upon many forms of sensor data and analytical methods to help profile subtle changes in climate conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program provides researchers with curated Value Added Products (VAPs) resulting from continuous sensor data streams, data fusion, and modeling. The ARM operations staff and software development teams (data producers) rely upon a number of techniques to ensure strict quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) standards are maintained. Climate researchers (data consumers) are highly interested in obtaining as much provenance (data quality, data pedigree) as possible to establish data trustworthiness. Currently all the provenance is not easily attainable or identifiable without significant efforts to extract and piece together information from configuration files, log files, codes, and status information from ARM databases. The need for a formalized approach to managing provenance became paramount with the planned addition of 120 new instruments, new data products, and data collection scaling to half a terabyte daily. Last year our research identified the need for a multi-tier provenance model to enable the data consumer easy access to the provenance for their data. This year we are leveraging the Open Provenance Model as a foundational construct that serves the needs of both the VAP producers and consumers, we are organizing the provenance in different tiers of granularity to model VAP lineage, causality at the component level within a VAP, and the causality for each time step as samples are being assembled within the VAP. This paper shares our implementation strategy and how the ARM operations staff and the climate research community can greatly benefit from this approach to more effectively assess and quantify VAP provenance.

Stephan, Eric G.; Halter, Todd D.; Ermold, Brian D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling  

SciTech Connect

Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

Johannesson, G

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

27

GFDLs ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical climate formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbonclimate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate similar climate fidelity as the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Alistair J. Adcroft; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Matthew J. Harrison; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Peter J. Phillipps; Lori T. Sentman; Bonita L. Samuels; Michael J. Spelman; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Niki Zadeh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effects of Global Climate on Infectious Disease: the Cholera Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...impossible to predict precisely the...building predictive models for disease...events and cholera outbreaks have been increasing...Bangladesh, cholera outbreaks are related to...the nonlinear models, and interannual...variability of cholera outbreaks (124). Because...to use ENSO to predict variability in...

Erin K. Lipp; Anwar Huq; Rita R. Colwell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

30

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistryclimate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Voronoi Tessellations and Their Application to Climate and Global Modeling  

SciTech Connect

We review the use of Voronoi tessellations for grid generation, especially on the whole sphere or in regions on the sphere. Voronoi tessellations and the corresponding Delaunay tessellations in regions and surfaces on Euclidean space are defined and properties they possess that make them well-suited for grid generation purposes are discussed, as are algorithms for their construction. This is followed by a more detailed look at one very special type of Voronoi tessellation, the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT). After defining them, discussing some of their properties, and presenting algorithms for their construction, we illustrate the use of CVTs for producing both quasi-uniform and variable resolution meshes in the plane and on the sphere. Finally, we briefly discuss the computational solution of model equations based on CVTs on the sphere.

Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

An animal model for genetic/evolutionary responses to global climate change. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A multi-level attack was made on a molecular-genetics-based vulnerability of thermally sensitive organisms to global climate change.

Ward B. Watt

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

34

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

35

Bringing Clouds into Focus: A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bringing Clouds into Bringing Clouds into Focus Bringing Clouds into Focus A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the Uncertainty of Climate Forecasting May 11, 2010 | Tags: Lattice QCD Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 Randall-fig4.png The large data sets generated by the GCRM require new analysis and visualization capabilities. This 3D plot of vorticity isosurfaces was developed using VisIt, a 3D visualization tool with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used by the GCRM. (Image Courtesy of the NERSC Analytics Team) Clouds exert two competing effects on the Earth's temperature: they cool the planet by reflecting solar radiation back to space, but they also warm the planet by trapping heat near the surface. These two effects coexist in

36

A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, andEdwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, ClimateEdwards, Paul N. 2004. "A vast machine: standards as social

Maret, Susan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

Polz, Martin

38

Thinking about global climate change  

SciTech Connect

Opinions regarding issues related to global climate change are presented. The focus is on socioeconomic and historical aspects. World War II is discussed as an intellectual and emotional turning point in global issues, and global climate change is identified as a possible turning point of similar significance. Political, scientific, and public points of view regarding the issue are discussed.

Russell, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations  

SciTech Connect

Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling the Recent Evolution of Global Drought and Projections for the Twenty-First Century with the Hadley Centre Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Meteorological drought in the Hadley Centre global climate model is assessed using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), a commonly used drought index. At interannual time scales, for the majority of the land surface, the model captures the ...

Eleanor J. Burke; Simon J. Brown; Nikolaos Christidis

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

42

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

43

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

44

Projected climate regime shift under future global warming from multi-model, multi-scenario CMIP5 simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study examined shifts in climate regimes over the global land area using the KppenTrewartha (KT) climate classification by analyzing observations during 19002010, and simulations during 19002100 from twenty global climate models participating in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5). Under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario, the models projected a 310C warming in annual temperature over the global land area by the end of the twenty-first century, with strong (moderate) warming in the high (middle) latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and weaker warming in the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere. The projected changes in precipitation vary considerably in space and present greater uncertainties among the models. Overall, the models are consistent in projecting increasing precipitation over the high-latitude of the Northern Hemisphere, and reduced precipitation in the Mediterranean, southwestern North America, northern and southern Africa and Australia. Based on the projected changes in temperature and precipitation, the KT climate types would shift toward warmer and drier climate types from the current climate distribution. Regions of temperate, tropical and dry climate types are projected to expand, while regions of polar, sub-polar and subtropical climate types are projected to contract. The magnitudes of the projected changes are stronger in the RCP8.5 scenario than the low emission scenario RCP4.5. On average, the climate types in 31.4% and 46.3% of the global land area are projected to change by the end of the twenty-first century under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Further analysis suggests that changes in precipitation played a slightly more important role in causing shifts of climate type during the twentieth century. However, the projected changes in temperature play an increasingly important role and dominate shifts in climate type when the warming becomes more pronounced in the twenty-first century.

Song Feng; Qi Hu; Wei Huang; Chang-Hoi Ho; Ruopu Li; Zhenghong Tang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sciences Enhancing the Capability of Computational Earth System Models and Using NASA Data for Operation and Assessment...Science, Decadal and Regional Climate Prediction using Earth System Models program (M.W. and S.J.G.). PNNL is operated...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CRITICAL REVIEW Global air quality and climatewz Arlene M.determine regional air quality and can alter climate.to-continental scale air quality. Reducing the O 3 precursor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Photosynthesis-dependent isoprene emission from leaf to planet in a global carbon-chemistry-climate model  

SciTech Connect

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar/Ball- Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance that is embedded within a global chemistry-climate simulation framework. The isoprene production is calculated as a function of electron transport-limited photosynthesis, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and canopy temperature. The vegetation biophysics module computes the photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide coupled with the transpiration of water vapor and the isoprene emission rate at the 30 min physical integration time step of the global chemistry-climate model. In the model, the rate of carbon assimilation provides the dominant control on isoprene emission variability over canopy temperature. A control simulation representative of the present day climatic state that uses plant functional types (PFTs), prescribed phenology and generic PFT-specific isoprene emission potentials (fraction of electrons available for isoprene synthesis) reproduces 50% of the variability across different ecosystems and seasons in a global database of measured campaign-average fluxes. Compared to time-varying isoprene flux measurements at select sites, the model authentically captures the observed variability in the 30 min average diurnal cycle (R2 = 64-96 %) and simulates the flux magnitude to within a factor of 2. The control run yields a global isoprene source strength of 451 TgCyr?1 that increases by 30% in the artificial absence of plant water stress and by 55% for potential natural vegetation.

Unger, N.; Harper, K.; Zheng, Y.; Kiang, N. Y.; Aleinov, I.; Arneth, Almut; Schurgers, G.; Amelynck, C.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Heinesch, B.; Hewitt, C. N.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Langford, B.; McKinney, Karena A.; Misztal, P.; Potosnak, M.; Rinne, J.; Pressley, S.; Schoon, N.; Serca, D.

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Deep Convective Transition Characteristics in the Community Climate System Model and Changes under Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical deep convective transition characteristics, including precipitation pickup, occurrence probability, and distribution tails related to extreme events, are analyzed using uncoupled and coupled versions of the Community Climate System Model (...

Sandeep Sahany; J. David Neelin; Katrina Hales; Richard B. Neale

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Global Interactive Chemistry and Climate Model Chien Wang, Ronald G. Prinn and Andrei P. Sokolov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with calculated or estimated trace gas emissions from both anthropogenic and natural sources, it is designed to the chemistry sub-model. Model predictions of the surface trends of several key species are close, if the current increasing trends of anthropogenic emissions of climate-relevant gases are continued over the next

52

Modern Global Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of data and information among observing systems, Earth system models, socioeconomic models, and models that address...of data and information among observing systems, Earth system models, socioeconomic models, and models that address...

Thomas R. Karl; Kevin E. Trenberth

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

GFDLs ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbonclimate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Descriptive Analysis of the Global Climate System and Predictive Modeling for Uncertainty Reduction in Climate Projections using Complex Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Climate Projections using Complex Networks Karsten Steinhaeuser (ksteinha@nd.edu) Department of Computer focuses mainly on the second of these objectives, namely, projections of changes in regional climate and their impacts on natural and man-made systems. Traditionally, projections of future climate are based primarily

Chawla, Nitesh V.

55

Hot Topics: Globalization and Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global sense of the world, is bound up in both its analysis and its policy proposals with the same issues that confront globalization theorists. The proliferation of theories and analyses in globalization and climate change reflects the emerging nature...

Malone, Elizabeth L.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on Mainstreaming Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) Sector: Climate Topics: Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: www.gcca.eu/pages/75_2-OCT-Workshop.html Cost: Free References: GCCA Countries Training Workshop[1] A GCCA workshop for OCT countries took place 27-28 January 2012 immediately following the OCT-EU Forum meeting in Brussels, Belgium. The workshop aimed at sharing views, knowledge, tools and experiences on climate change mitigation and adaptation and at raising awareness on the benefits and

57

Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

58

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

59

Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?  

SciTech Connect

The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global Warming vs. Climate Change 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global

Haller, Gary L.

62

Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Notes on global climate and ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problems related to the role of both natural and anthropogenic factors in global climate change are considered. The role of ocean circulation in the Earths global thermodynamic processes is qualitatively ...

R. I. Nigmatulin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Shifting Global Invasive Potential of European Plants with Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change and invasions by nonnative species rank among the top concerns for agents of biological loss in coming decades. Although each of these themes has seen considerable attention in the modeling and ...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Stewart, Aimee; Mohamed, Kamal I.; Araú jo, Miguel B.

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Local and Seasonal Effects in the U.S. of Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though the facts of global climate change are beyond doubt, there has been relatively limited information about its local consequences. Global climate models and their derivatives have provided often differing and unspecific ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

67

Advancing Climate Science with Global Research Facilities | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Advancing Climate Science with Global Research Facilities Advancing Climate Science with Global Research Facilities April 24, 2014 - 3:23pm Addthis This Gulfstream-1 research plane...

68

Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

Pritchard, Michael Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

An examination of urban heat island characteristics in a global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and urban properties devel- oped by Jackson et al. (2010). Urban extent, defined for four classes [tall building district (TBD), and high, medium and low density (HD, MD, LD)], was derived from LandScan 2004 [Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) 2005, Land...Scan? Global Population Database, Oak Ridge, TN (http://www.ornl.gov/landscan/)], a pop- ulation density dataset derived from census data, night- time lights satellite observations, road proximity and slope (Dobson et al., 2000). The urban extent data...

Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Jackson, Trisha L.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Global Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5/16/2014 1 Global Climate Change and National Security RADM Jon White Oceanographer and Navigator months. · Oil, gas, and mineral resource exploitation expected to continue · Production/transportatio n

Howat, Ian M.

71

Analysis of Precipitation Using Satellite Observations and Comparisons with Global Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is investigated by comparisons with satellite observa- iv tions. Speci cally, six-year long (2000-2005) simulations are performed using a high- resolution (36-km) Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) at T85 spatial... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 B. Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 1. Satellite data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2. Weather research and forecast model simulations . . . 34 3. Community atmosphere model simulations...

Murthi, Aditya

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

72

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

73

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

74

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The first MMF model was built at the Colorado State University, replacing the cloud...microphysics of clouds. As an extension to the Colorado State University MMF, an aerosol version...715 737 . 4 Rosenfeld D ( 2008 ) Flood or drought: How do aerosols affect precipitation...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Forests, carbon and global climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...including shifting to renewable energy sources, increasing...energy use, and energy supply, the only...of forests for mitigation of greenhouse gas...Climate Change 2001: mitigation, pp. 302{343...US Department of Energy. Lloyd, J...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Stabilization and Global Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic and political debates over long-run climate policy often invoke stabilization of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), but only rarely are non-CO2 greenhouse gases addressed explicitly. Even ...

Sarofim, Marcus C.

77

Global Climate Data, Sept. 18, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Data Climate Data The ORNL DAAC announces the addition of "Global Monthly Climatology for the Twentieth Century (New et al.)" to its collection of climate data. The newest addition contains gridded data related to monthly surface climate over global land areas at 0.5-degree resolution. Precipitation, mean temperature, and diurnal temperature range are interpolated directly from station time-series. Wet-day frequency, vapor pressure, cloud cover, and ground-frost frequency are interpolated where data are available and estimated for regions with no data. Data can be accessed through an on-line interface that allows users to select the data by parameter and years. By agreement with the data provider, users who wish to request the complete 400-megabyte data set on a

78

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

79

An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling  

SciTech Connect

One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regional Implications of Global Climate Change for the Great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliable are they? Future projections of climate change due to global warming What about regional climateRegional Implications of Global Climate Change for the Great Plains Robert J. Oglesby Department Concepts What is climate? What is the difference between weather and climate? What is the difference

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

82

Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector 2002 DEER...

83

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

84

Global Climate Change, Developing Countries and Transport Sector Options in South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transport

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Issued March 2004 Global Climate & Energy Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issued March 2004 Global Climate & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Nanomaterials Engineering University Objective The objective of this project is to develop optimized nanocomposite materials for high of the project Design of Nanotube-Metal Nanocluster Complex Meeting the Hydrogen Storage Material Requirements

Prinz, Friedrich B.

86

Global Climate Change Impacts & Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Andre de Fontaine Pew Center on Global Climate Change DOE ITP Webinar April 1, 2010 Andre de Fontaine Pew Center on Global Climate Change DOE ITP Webinar April 1, 2010 Introduction to Pew Center Introduction to Pew Center * Established in 1998 as an independent, non- partisan climate organization * Three-fold structure - a "do" tank: - Research - 100+ reports over 10 years - Actively advise on policy - state, federal, international - Business Environmental Leadership Council (BELC) o 46 companies o $2 trillion in revenues o Nearly 4 million employees Introduction to BELC Introduction to BELC 3 Efficiency Project Overview

87

Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on...

88

UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

Saldin, Dilano

89

Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect

Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

Levermann, Anders

91

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)???¢????????s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9???????°????????2.5???????° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1???????° x 1???????°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 ???????µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4???????º by 5???????º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ???¢????????clean marine???¢??????? aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Refining climate models  

SciTech Connect

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Refining climate models  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans 2008 Nebraska Rural Poll that they understand the issue of global climate change either fairly or very well. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe climate change is already happening. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe that our actions contribute

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

96

Projecting global marine biodiversity impacts under climate change scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projecting global marine biodiversity impacts under climate change scenarios William W.L. Cheung1 References 248 Abstract Climate change can impact the pattern of marine biodiversity through changes. Pauly. 2009. Projecting global marine biodiversity impacts under climate change scenarios. Fish

Pauly, Daniel

97

Ultra High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation Project PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James J. Hack  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme events. This project is developing the scientific a terrestrial carbon modeling capabil- ity. #12;Ultra High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation Project elersUltra High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation Project PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James J. Hack

98

Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_framework.pdf Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Screenshot References: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure[1] Summary "A group of leading institutional investors from around the world released the Global Framework for Climate Risk Disclosure-a new statement on disclosure that investors expect from companies-in October 2006. Investors require this information in order to analyze a company's business risks and opportunities resulting from climate change, as well as

99

Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_climate_change_risk.pdf Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Screenshot References: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans[1] Summary "The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of climate change related risks on bank borrowers, utilizing as much data and analysis as possible. The first section of this report reviews the current climate change policies in place in Canada, Europe, and the US, in order to provide

100

Global CO/sub 2/ buildup and possible climate modification  

SciTech Connect

The non-local effects of fossil fuel power production due to the release of trace gases to the atmosphere are likely to be on a global scale. The eventual social and economic impacts of such global effects can be understood only after we have developed a detailed understanding of how the release of these gases influences the natural system. For CO/sub 2/, the impacts will likely be large if the resulting climatic changes seriously modify the amount of water contained in continental ice sheets. While there is considerable attention currently focussed on the CO/sub 2/ problem, the release of other trace gases, such as CO, may also have global consequences. The key to understanding these global changes and how and when they might occur, may well rest on our ability to characterize the history of the chemical composition of the atmosphere and successfully model those changes.

Stokes, G.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

102

White House Conference on Global Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

104

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland, Joint Global Change Research Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry, Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application

105

Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/FinancingGlobalDeal.pdf References: Financing a Global Deal for Climate Change [1] Summary "This Green Paper builds on this experience and focuses on the priorities identified by UNEP FI to mobilise the skills and resources of the banking, investment and insurance sectors behind an effective, efficient and equitable global deal on climate change at COP15 in Copenhagen. The Paper addresses the types of decisions that governments could take in Copenhagen

106

Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

Restrepo, Juan M.

107

16Implications of Global Climate Change for Violence Developed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16Implications of Global Climate Change for Violence Developed and Developing Countries CraIG a. an change for violence in developed and developing countries. Chapter in J. Forgas, A. Kruglanski, & KDerson and Matt DeLIsI Iowa State University R apid global climate change, taking place over decades rather than

Debinski, Diane M.

108

Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters Ellen MosleyPolar/ByrdPolarhttp://bprc.osu.edu/ Understanding Climate Change Risks and Identifying Opportunities for Mitigation & Adaptation in Ohio Ohio State University, May 15, 2014 #12;Key Points Earth's climate is changing - the world is warming ­ that debate

Howat, Ian M.

109

SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL WARMING Mxolisi Excellent Shongwe #12;ISBN : 978-90-902-5046-5 #12;SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY;. . . Dedicated to my late father John Mabhensa Shongwe #12;ABSTRACT Climate extremes are rarely occurring natural

Haak, Hein

110

Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio.

111

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR, AND MARK A. CANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate equatorial Indian Ocean warm more than the SSTs in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean under global warming

112

Global Climate Change Earth system science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Climatic regions are areas with similar weather statistics. Climate influences ecosystems. On land, tundra, and desert). Climate #12;Climates of the world #12;Atmospheric circulation #12;Structure). The Greenhouse effect #12;Annual energy flow to Earth from the Sun #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45

Pan, Feifei

113

An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

Monier, Erwan

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Computer modeling of the global warming effect  

SciTech Connect

The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Testing Climate Models: An Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scientific merit of decadal climate projections can only be established by means of comparisons with observations. Testing of models that are used to predict climate change is of such importance that no single approach will provide the ...

Richard Goody; James Anderson; Gerald North

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

117

Consistent global responses of marine ecosystems to future climate change across the IPCC AR5 earth system models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze for the first time all 16 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models with explicit marine ecological modules to identify the common mechanisms involved in projected phytoplankton biomass, ...

Anna Cabr; Irina Marinov; Shirley Leung

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Global climate evolution during the last deglaciation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309; m National Oceanic...891 894 . 80 Marlon JR ( 2009 ) Wildfire responses to abrupt climate change in North...Younger Dryas climate oscillation in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA . Geology 28...

Peter U. Clark; Jeremy D. Shakun; Paul A. Baker; Patrick J. Bartlein; Simon Brewer; Ed Brook; Anders E. Carlson; Hai Cheng; Darrell S. Kaufman; Zhengyu Liu; Thomas M. Marchitto; Alan C. Mix; Carrie Morrill; Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Katharina Pahnke; James M. Russell; Cathy Whitlock; Jess F. Adkins; Jessica L. Blois; Jorie Clark; Steven M. Colman; William B. Curry; Ben P. Flower; Feng He; Thomas C. Johnson; Jean Lynch-Stieglitz; Vera Markgraf; Jerry McManus; Jerry X. Mitrovica; Patricio I. Moreno; John W. Williams

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unece.org/energy/se/pdfs/gee21/gee21_pub/GEE21_GlobalClimateChange UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

120

Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(107) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 14:49 The latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Name Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Constraining Transient Climate Sensitivity Using Coupled Climate Model Simulations of Volcanic Eruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupled climate model simulations of volcanic eruptions and abrupt changes in CO2 concentration are compared in multiple realizations of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model, version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The change in global-mean ...

Timothy M. Merlis; Isaac M. Held; Georgiy L. Stenchikov; Fanrong Zeng; Larry W. Horowitz

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers March 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - In recent discussions with a broad range of world energy ministers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed the need for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. Over the past several weeks, Secretary Chu's dialogue with representatives of both energy producing and consuming nations has reinforced the Obama Administration's commitment to energy independence and stressed the shared opportunities to create jobs and boost the global economy through energy

124

Globally Gridded Satellite Observations for Climate Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the first U.S. weather satellite, questions on how toon operational weather satellites that were not designed forweather and short-term climate applications whereas satellite

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science This SciDAC project will transform an existing, state-of-the-science, third-generation global climate model, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3), into a first-generation Earth system model that fully simulates the relationships between the physical, chemical, and bio-geochemical processes in the climate system. The model will incorporate new processes necessary to predict future climates based on the specification of greenhouse gas emissions rather than specification of atmospheric concentrations, as is done in present models, which make assumptions about the carbon cycle that are likely not valid. This project will include comprehensive treatments of the processes

126

THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE  

SciTech Connect

Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

Phelan, Patrick [Arizona State University; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Otanicar, Todd [University of Tulsa; Phelan, Bernadette [Phelan Research Solutions, Inc.; Prasher, Ravi [Arizona State University; Taylor, Robert [University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Tyagi, Himanshu [Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, India

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Climate Change Impacts on Global Food Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...America's Climate Choices; National Research Council, Americas Climate Choices (National Academies Press, Washington...Food security: The challenge of feeding 9 billion people . Science 327...of biofuels or other renewable fuels for transport...66 U.S. Congress, Energy Policy Act of 2005...

Tim Wheeler; Joachim von Braun

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of Sandia's Geoscience, Climate, and Consequence Effects Center, spoke on "Hydraulic Fracturing: The Role of Government-Sponsored R&D" as part of a session on "The...

129

Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

Strzepek, K.

130

Amazon Deforestation and Climate Change in a Coupled Model Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of Amazon deforestation on climate change are investigated using twin numerical experiments of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed global sea surface temperature and the same AGCM coupled to an ocean GCM (...

Paulo Nobre; Marta Malagutti; Domingos F. Urbano; Roberto A. F. de Almeida; Emanuel Giarolla

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Global Climate Change Earth, 1972, Apollo 17,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Projected Future Temperature · 2-11.5 deg F projected increase in global average · more intense, more frequent, and longer-lasting heat waves. #12;Projected Future Precipitation · Increase in global average infrared energy as a radiatively active constituent in Earth's atmosphere. Svante Arrhenius, a Swedish

Hansen, Andrew J.

132

The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the world economy is growing? The research teams identified three main pillars for deep decarbonisation avoid dangerous climate change and achieve sustainable development. The report, produced by the Deep Decarbonisation Pathways Project which is overseen by the UN Sustainable Development Network, describes the joint

134

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development Speaker(s): Geoffrey J. Blanford Date: July 21, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Afzal Siddiqui John Stoops In this study we propose a novel formulation of a decision problem in R&D strategy. The problem is motivated by and applied to the context of technologies relevant to global climate change, but is characterized in general by an aggregate R&D decision-maker with a social welfare objective, technology diffusion markets subject to externalities in which private costs are minimized, and uncertainty in both technological and environmental factors. A technology strategy is defined as the allocation of R&D investment across several broad research programs, and the

135

Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

136

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications A sampling of what CDIAC staff members have been following: Extreme summer weather in northern mid-latitudes linked to a vanishing cryosphere. Tang, Q., X. Zhang, and J.A. Francis, 2013, Nature Climate Change DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2065. Uncertainty in annual aankings from NOAA's global temperature time series. Arguez A., T.R. Karl, M.F. Squires, and R.S. Vose, 2013, Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2013GL057999. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle. Reichstein, M., et al.., 2013, Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature12350. Anatomy of an extreme event. Hoerling, M., et al., 2013, J. Climate DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00270.1. Australia's unique influence on global sea level in 2010-2011. Fasullo, J.T., C. Boening, F.W. Landerer, and R.S. Nerem, 2013, Geophysical

137

The value of air pollution co-benefits of climate policies: Analysis with a global sector-trade CGE model called WorldScan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses the computable general equilibrium model WorldScan to analyze the co-benefits of reduced emissions of air pollutants as a by-product of climate policies. WorldScan covers the entire world in five regions (two in the EU) and simulates economic growth in a multi-sector neo-classical recursive dynamic framework. It includes emissions and abatement of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O, CH4) and air pollutants (SO2, NOx, NH3, PM2.5). Abatement includes end-of-pipe controls removing pollutants without affecting the emission-producing activity itself. This paper shows that climate mitigation will significantly reduce the emissions of air pollutants. It estimates the economic value of the avoided air pollution damages by the costs of the air policy that generates the reductions of air pollutant emissions resulting from climate policies. Although the estimates of the co-benefits are uncertain, trade may have a significant impact on the avoided costs of air policies. This also has consequences on the value of the co-benefits of climate policies. The paper also shows that the regional value of co-benefits can be substantial, and may provide an incentive to reduce GHG emissions.

Johannes Bollen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...globalchange/www/Publications/ , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Joint Program...Global Change, Room E40-428, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139. Bayes...greenhouse gas-plus-aerosol and solar forced climate change. Clim. Dyn...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Climate Change Impacts on Global Food Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pressures on food prices, economic...will have many effects on the global...recent data are averages for the period...burning of fossil fuels, with smaller...Goldberg R. , The effect of changes in...other renewable fuels for transport...surging food prices . Agric. Econ...osterdal, Effects of food price...

Tim Wheeler; Joachim von Braun

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

140

Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 12071226, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies 1207(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Accounting for global-mean warming from a few regional climate model runs are scaled, based on different global-mean warming projections

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Chapter 15. BIOLOGICALPHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

605 Chapter 15. BIOLOGICAL­PHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME LESSONS FROM EARTH, absorb- ing long-wave radiation emitted from the planet surface and warming Earth's surface temperature combined. The idea that burning a relatively small amount of coal, oil, and gas can affect such a large

Schrag, Daniel

143

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

Barron-Gafford, Greg

144

Global Priority Conservation Areas in the Face of 21st Century Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an era when global biodiversity is increasingly impacted by rapidly changing climate, efforts to conserve global biodiversity may be compromised if we do not consider the uneven distribution of climate-induced threats. Here, via a novel...

Li, Junsheng; Lin, Xin; Chen, Anping; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ma, Keping; Bertzky, Monika; Ciais, Philippe; Kapos, Valerie; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate June 2013. [1] Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21

146

Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the ...

Mark Z. Jacobson; John E. Ten Hoeve

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Erratum to: Students conceptions about the greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our first study appeared in Climatic Change...(Students conceptions about the greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change Shepardson et al,...Climatic Change (2011) 104:481507 DOI 1...

D. P. Shepardson; S. Choi; D. Niyogi; U. Charusombat

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Pew Center on Global Climate Change | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pew Center on Global Climate Change Pew Center on Global Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Pew Center on Global Climate Change Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22201 Product Established in 1998 as a non-profit, non-partisan and independent organisation aiming to provide unbiased information and solutions in the efforts to tackle climate change. Coordinates 43.337585°, -89.379449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.337585,"lon":-89.379449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Analysis of Permafrost Thermal Dynamics and Response to Climate Change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze global climate model predictions of soil temperature [from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) database] to assess the models representation of current-climate soil thermal dynamics and their predictions ...

Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Alex Stern

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

151

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2K-2854 RAB 4/01 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 Hydro 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Other 1% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy Annual 1999 (February 2001) 2020 data from International Energy Outlook 2001 (March 2001) + 6 0 % Oil 40% Hydro 7% Other 0.7% Nuclear 7% 1999 85% Fossil Energy 382 Qbtu / yr 2020 85% Fossil Energy 607 Qbtu / yr Oil 40% Nuclear 4% 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 0 2 4 6 8 12 2000 2050 2100 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) Population Projections: United Nations "Long-Range World Population Projections: Based on the 1998 Revision" Energy Projections: "Global Energy Perspectives" ITASA / WEC World Population Population of

152

Global Climate Change Adaptation Priorities for Biodiversity and Food Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Change Adaptation Priorities for Biodiversity and Food Security Lee Hannah 1,2* , Makihiko Ikegami 3 , David G. Hole 1,4 , Changwan Seo 5 , Stuart H. M. Butchart 6 , A. Townsend Peterson 7 , Patrick R. Roehrdanz 2 1 The Betty...72590. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072590 Editor: Alex J Cannon, Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, Canada Received November 13, 2012; Accepted July 14, 2013; Published August 21, 2013 Copyright: 2013 Hannah et al. This is an open-access article...

Hannah, Lee; Ikegami, Makihiko; Hole, David G.; Seo, Changwan; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Roehrdanz, Patrick

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

153

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Climate and Energy Project Name Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega, Suite 324 Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Number of employees 201-500 Year founded 2002 Phone number (650) 725-3230 Coordinates 37.428392°, -122.175919° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.428392,"lon":-122.175919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Implications of global warming for the climate of African rainforests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Amazonia, but not in the Congo Basin. The newest generation of global model experiments (CMIP5) includes several Earth System Models with dynamic vegetation, and existing research has largely found projections from CMIP5 to be similar to CMIP3...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a Mini Nuclear Winter'' as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a ``Mini Nuclear Winter`` as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Amazon Basin climate under global warming: the role of the sea surface temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Amazon Basin climate under global warming: the role of the sea surface...temperature|carbon cycle|global warming| 1. Introduction First-generation...further into two components: a global mean warming (MW) and gridbox local anomalies...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) project major changes in anthro- pogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precur- sors over the 2Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy; published 27 September 2008. [1] We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) driven by a general

Mickley, Loretta J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structural Design Feasibility Study for the Global Climate Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Neon, Inc. is proposing to establish a Global Change Experiment (GCE) Facility to increase our understanding of how ecological systems differ in their vulnerability to changes in climate and other relevant global change drivers, as well as provide the mechanistic basis for forecasting ecological change in the future. The experimental design was initially envisioned to consist of two complementary components; (A) a multi-factor experiment manipulating CO{sub 2}, temperature and water availability and (B) a water balance experiment. As the design analysis and cost estimates progressed, it became clear that (1) the technical difficulties of obtaining tight temperature control and maintaining elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels within an enclosure were greater than had been expected and (2) the envisioned study would not fit into the expected budget envelope if this was done in a partially or completely enclosed structure. After discussions between NEON management, the GCE science team, and Keith Lewin, NEON, Inc. requested Keith Lewin to expand the scope of this design study to include open-field exposure systems. In order to develop the GCE design to the point where it can be presented within a proposal for funding, a feasibility study of climate manipulation structures must be conducted to determine design approaches and rough cost estimates, and to identify advantages and disadvantages of these approaches including the associated experimental artifacts. NEON, Inc requested this design study in order to develop concepts for the climate manipulation structures to support the NEON Global Climate Experiment. This study summarizes the design concepts considered for constructing and operating the GCE Facility and their associated construction, maintenance and operations costs. Comparisons and comments about experimental artifacts, construction challenges and operational uncertainties are provided to assist in selecting the final facility design. The overall goal of this report is to provide a cost and technological basis for selection of the appropriate GCE Facility design.

Lewin,K.F.; Nagy, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Validation of Climate Model Ice Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models are used for understanding the past, present, and future climate. To be able to project future climate it is important that models provide a realistic depiction of the...

163

U.S. Global Climate Change program | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Climate Change program U.S. Global Climate Change program Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures

164

NASA's Global Climate Change Education Sneha Rao Mark Becker Amy Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's Global Climate Change Education Sneha Rao Mark Becker Amy Work Center for International of NASA's Global Climate Change Education (GCCE) project is to provide educators the tools and resources health across the globe at secondary, and post-secondary school level, by using NASA climate information

Columbia University

165

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

SciTech Connect

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

167

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming Michael E. Dillon and projected climate warming2,13,14 . Global warming is probably having profound and diverse effects phenology3,4 , community interactions5 , genetics3,6 and extinctions7 have been attributed to recent global

Huey, Raymond B.

168

Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Purdue University Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/models/current.asp Cost: Free References: GTAP[1] Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste ICCT Roadmap Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model

170

Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

Kreinovich, Vladik

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative global climate Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: alternative global climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 WHAT IS CLIMATE CHANGE? Roger A. Pielke, Jr., 6 January 2004 Summary: report used the FCCC...

172

Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

A prairie perspective on global warming and climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Great Plains blankets eight states. It is dotted with oil patches, public utilities, farms, ranches, feed lots, meat-packing plants, medium size cities, military bases and tiny towns feeding on agricultural activity. The question is: what can leaders do for a desperate and aging population in a global warming environment to bring full employment to the region. This paper explores opportunities to capitalise upon environmentally friendly farming practices and agricultural waste to produce jobs, money, commercial opportunities, marketable sod, fertilisers, methane, electricity and securities (from the Chicago Climate Exchange) as answers for this question. The paper recounts the use of man made wetlands to sequester CO2; by-products from coal fired power plants; landfill methane; methane digesters and soil carbon projects to arrest heat and contribute to the campaign against global warming.

Ronald Griffin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Developing fast and efficient climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report from Tyndall research project IT 1.31 Planning and Prototyping a Climate Module for the Tyndall The aim of this project was to develop a fast and efficient climate model, as a vital componentDeveloping fast and efficient climate models John Shepherd, Peter Challenor, Bob Marsh, Mark

Williamson, Mark

175

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nation??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committee??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nation??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

176

Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hydrological monitoring stations, and improving the projections on future climate change. Climate change. This project continues the state's climate monitoring and analysis program. Project Description in climate projections for the 21st century. · Provide analyses and interpretation of regional climate

177

Extreme events in solutions of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the assumptions made in applying them to operational numerical weather prediction (NWP), climate modelling-hydrostatic (NPE) primitive equations that have been used extensively in numerical weather prediction and climate weather, climate and global ocean circulation predictions for many decades. The HPE govern incompressible

Gibbon, J. D.

178

Testing Climate Models Using Thermal Infrared Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to test climate models with observations is presented. In this approach, it is possible to directly observe the longwave feedbacks of the climate system in time series of annual average outgoing longwave spectra. Tropospheric ...

Stephen Leroy; James Anderson; John Dykema; Richard Goody

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Climate Change Convention and Developing Countries: Fromand Climate Change: Perspectives from Developing Countries.developing countries by shift- ing the governance of climate change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Superlakes, Megafloods, and Abrupt Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...climate changes. The Center for Climatic Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison develops and uses coupled earth system models to study past, present, and future climate. The Global Change and Climate Modelling Team, Paris, develops models...

Garry Clarke; David Leverington; James Teller; Arthur Dyke

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The China-in-Global Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors including five ...

Qi, T.

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - adopting global climate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about global warming... - a secondary concern? H. von Storch GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht, Germany Abstract. The climate problem has... many facets. Whether or not humans are...

183

Application of Scale-Selective Data Assimilation to Regional Climate Modeling and Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method referred to as scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA) is designed to inject the large-scale components of the atmospheric circulation from a global model into a regional model to improve regional climate simulations and predictions. ...

Shiqiu Peng; Lian Xie; Bin Liu; Fredrick Semazzi

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrated Global System Modeling Framework | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Agency/Company /Organization: MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: globalchange.mit.edu/research/IGSM Cost: Free Related Tools Transport Co-benefits Calculator General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK)

185

Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forward on climate change, he said the data produced by models used to project weather changes risks beingScientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit climate ­ with dangerous results. Related Articles Second biggest wind farm to be built off UK (/earth

Stevenson, Paul

186

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures

187

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

188

A Simple Analytical Model for Understanding the Formation of Sea Surface Temperature Patterns under Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How sea surface temperature (SST) changes under global warming is critical for future climate projection because SST change affects atmospheric circulation and rainfall. Robust features derived from 17 models of phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

Lei Zhang; Tim Li

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Central Africa: Global climate change and development. Overview. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary study focuses on the six countries of central Africa which contain the largest remaining contiguous block of closed forests in sub-Saharan Africa: Cameroon, Central African Republic, the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Zaire. The carbon in the vegetation and soils in these moist tropical forests and surrounding seasonal woodlands constitute the greatest potential source of future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from sub-Saharan Africa. This study also considers the importance of savanna burning, although in less depth since the small savanna area in central Africa precludes this activity from being a large regional source of emissions. Analysis of biogeophysical and socioeconomic issues relevant to global climate change, and research containing both space-based and ground-based components, were undertaken.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Credit: Alan Scott and Mark Taylor, Sandia National Laboratories Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy PI Name: Mark Taylor PI Email: mataylo@sandia.gov Institution: Sandia...

192

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

Limpasuvan, Varavut

193

THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY of the global climate system and those of turbulent fluid systems are reviewed from a thermodynamic viewpoint production, energetics Citation: Ozawa, H., A. Ohmura, R. D. Lorenz, and T. Pujol, The second law

Lorenz, Ralph D.

194

Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD Director of Research scientists. As scientists, our job is to present the data on climate change and to propose plausible recreate the Earth's climate in a laboratory bottle and change its composition to see what happens. Instead

Watson, Craig A.

195

Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis of how, Andrew J. Dougill and Piers M. Forster August 2010 Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 29 #12;2 The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) was established

Rambaut, Andrew

196

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

197

Modelling the local climate in island environments: water balance applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In small volcanic islands the local scale climate is influenced by the regional scale climate and by the orography and orientation of air masses movement over the islands. A model was developed in a GIS environment to generate local scale climate variables from those observed at the synoptic scale, from coastal weather stations. An advective submodel, based on the Foehn effect and assuming the conservation of mass and energy, computes local scale air temperature, relative humidity, clouds occurrence and precipitation. A radiative submodel, using information generated by the advective submodel, computes local scale global radiation. A rotational terrain model allows that computations be performed according to the direction of wind. Because the model works within a GIS, results concern the spatial distribution of all climatic variables on the island territory. Results of the validation of temperature, relative humidity, global radiation and rainfall are presented. For agro-meteorological purposes, an application of generated data to perform the sequential water balance is also analysed by comparing results from computations using simulated and observed data at a control weather station located at medium altitude. Results support assumptions utilised in the model and the further use of generated local climate fields for water management and environmental studies in small island environments.

Eduardo Brito de Azevedo; Lu??s Santos Pereira; Bernard Itier

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

199

Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

Yu, Winston

200

Seasonal Climate Extremes : Mechanism, Predictability and Responses to Global Warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate extremes are rarely occurring natural phenomena in the climate system. They often pose one of the greatest environmental threats to human and natural systems. (more)

Shongwe, M.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

Mirin, A A

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

SciTech Connect

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Testing an astronomically-based decadal-scale empirical harmonic climate model versus the IPCC (2007) general circulation climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the performance of a recently proposed empirical climate model based on astronomical harmonics against all available general circulation climate models (GCM) used by the IPCC (2007) to interpret the 20th century global surface temperature. The proposed model assumes that the climate is resonating with, or synchronized to a set of natural harmonics that have been associated to the solar system planetary motion, mostly determined by Jupiter and Saturn. We show that the GCMs fail to reproduce the major decadal and multidecadal oscillations found in the global surface temperature record from 1850 to 2011. On the contrary, the proposed harmonic model is found to well reconstruct the observed climate oscillations from 1850 to 2011, and it is able to forecast the climate oscillations from 1950 to 2011 using the data covering the period 1850-1950, and vice versa. The 9.1-year cycle is shown to be likely related to a decadal Soli/Lunar tidal oscillation, while the 10-10.5, 20-21 and 60-62 year cycles are sy...

Scafetta, Nicola

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

205

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Surface-Pressure Signature of Atmospheric Tides in Modern Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although atmospheric tides driven by solar heating are readily detectable at the earths surface as variations in air pressure, their simulations in current coupled global climate models have not been fully examined. This ...

Covey, Curt

207

The Influence of Hadley Circulation Intensity Changes on Extratropical Climate in an Idealized Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments have been performed using a simple global model with idealized physics and zonally symmertrical forcings to investigate the influence of Hadley circulation intensity changes on extratropical climate. The heating within the Tropics is ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Agency/Company /Organization: Australia Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry (ABARES) Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.daff.gov.au/abares/publications_remote_content/publication_topics/ Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Intertemporal Computable Equilibrium System (ICES) Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model ... further results Captures the impact of policy changes on large numbers of economic

209

Modelling the climate response to orbital forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...next few years there will be a tremendous expansion in models that include several additional components. Such Earth system models will at last allow us to fully tackle the link between orbital forcing, climate variability, and the sediment...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

IAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comprehensive source of data for evaluating the modern global isotope field generated by atmospheric generalIAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT T Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, AUSTRIA Abstract ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

211

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

212

Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

Katich, Kristina Noel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Fourth National Communication on Climate Change. A Reportclimate change can be assessed using data from national communicationscommunication were also reflected in the working drafts of the Spanish Climate Change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Subtask 2.4 - Integration and Synthesis in Climate Change Predictive Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a brief evaluation of the existing status of predictive modeling to assess options for integration of our previous paleohydrologic reconstructions and their synthesis with current global climate scenarios. Results of our research indicate that short-term data series available from modern instrumental records are not sufficient to reconstruct past hydrologic events or predict future ones. On the contrary, reconstruction of paleoclimate phenomena provided credible information on past climate cycles and confirmed their integration in the context of regional climate history is possible. Similarly to ice cores and other paleo proxies, acquired data represent an objective, credible tool for model calibration and validation of currently observed trends. It remains a subject of future research whether further refinement of our results and synthesis with regional and global climate observations could contribute to improvement and credibility of climate predictions on a regional and global scale.

Jaroslav Solc

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on 2012/09/03 "Co-organized by Viet Nam and the Netherlands, in close collaboration with other partners, including FAO and the World Bank, the conference will allow global leaders, practitioners, scientists, civil society and the private sector to share experiences and demonstrate how early action on how Climate-Smart Agriculture can act as a driver of green growth." Event Details Name Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Date 2012/09/03 Location Hanoi, Vietnam Tags LEDS, training, CLEAN Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

217

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY G. Marland' Ahsiract.--It is widcly agrccd that thc concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphcrc is increasing, that this increase is a consequence of man's activities, and that there is signilicant risk that this will lead to changes in the earth's climate. T h c qucstion is now k i n g discusscd what, if anything, we should be doing to minimize and/or adapt to changes in climate. Virtually evcry statcmcnt on this matter; from the G.S. Oflice of Tcchnology Assessment. to the National Acadcmy of Science, to the Nairobi Declaration on Climatic Change. includes some recommendation for planting and protecting forests. In fact, forestry is intimately involved in the climate change

218

The Community Climate System Model Version 4  

SciTech Connect

The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all the CCSM components, and documents fully coupled pre-industrial control runs compared to the previous version, CCSM3. Using the standard atmosphere and land resolution of 1{sup o} results in the sea surface temperature biases in the major upwelling regions being comparable to the 1.4{sup o} resolution CCSM3. Two changes to the deep convection scheme in the atmosphere component result in the CCSM4 producing El Nino/Southern Oscillation variability with a much more realistic frequency distribution than the CCSM3, although the amplitude is too large compared to observations. They also improve the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the frequency distribution of tropical precipitation. A new overflow parameterization in the ocean component leads to an improved simulation of the deep ocean density structure, especially in the North Atlantic. Changes to the CCSM4 land component lead to a much improved annual cycle of water storage, especially in the tropics. The CCSM4 sea ice component uses much more realistic albedos than the CCSM3, and the Arctic sea ice concentration is improved in the CCSM4. An ensemble of 20th century simulations runs produce an excellent match to the observed September Arctic sea ice extent from 1979 to 2005. The CCSM4 ensemble mean increase in globally-averaged surface temperature between 1850 and 2005 is larger than the observed increase by about 0.4 C. This is consistent with the fact that the CCSM4 does not include a representation of the indirect effects of aerosols, although other factors may come into play. The CCSM4 still has significant biases, such as the mean precipitation distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean, too much low cloud in the Arctic, and the latitudinal distributions of short-wave and long-wave cloud forcings.

Gent, Peter R.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Donner, Leo J.; Holland, Marika M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Jayne, Steve R.; Lawrence, David M.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhang, Minghua

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ROLE OF US AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST ACTIVITIES IN GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION A Dissertation by EN ZHU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE ROLE OF US AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST ACTIVITIES IN GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION A Dissertation...

Zhu, En

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nonlinear Ensemble Parameter Perturbation for Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model parameters can introduce significant uncertainties in climate simulations. Sensitivity analysis provides a way to quantify such uncertainties. Existing sensitivity analysis methods, however, cannot estimate the maximum sensitivity of the ...

Xudong Yin; Juanjuan Liu; Bin Wang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new "low carbon" and "climate resilient" energy system. It will emphasize putting ideas into action - moving forward on policy and practice.

225

Recent oppositely directed trends in solar climate forcings and the global mean surface air temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...102 and 108 years. Recently, solar effects on climate on time scales...becoming feasible to detect genuine solar forcing in climate records (Haigh 2003). The thermal capacity of the Earth's oceans is large...decadal-scale (and hence solar cycle) variations in global...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Return of Dr Strangelove The politics of climate engineering as a response to global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Return of Dr Strangelove The politics of climate engineering as a response to global warming volcanic eruptions to counter the warming effects of carbon pollution. Engineering the planet's climate the air, where its concentration is 0.04 per cent, than from the exhaust of a coal-fired power plant. Sun

Green, Donna

227

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

228

Global impact of smoke aerosols from landscape fires on climate and the Hadley circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate sensitivity in the Hadley Centre climate model, J.and Clement, A. : Has the Hadley cell been strength- eningA. J. : On the link between Hadley circulation changes and

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model September 2006) ABSTRACT Temperature and precipitation extremes and their potential future changes on Climate Change (IPCC) diagnostic exercise for the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Climate extremes

230

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change  

SciTech Connect

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change  

SciTech Connect

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A look at the ocean in the EC-Earth climate model Andreas Sterl Richard Bintanja Laurent Brodeau Emily Gleeson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the special issue on EC-Earth, a global climate and earth system model based on the seasonal forecast system-011-1239-2 #12;phytoplankton) processes are involved. To study such complex interactions, Earth System Models

Haak, Hein

233

Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2014 Questions: Describe climate models: how do they help us understand the past and project. slide 8) Experts in climate modelling are careful to say they are "projecting" long-term future climateClimate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction

Pedersen, Tom

234

Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected. 2. Very likely (>90% certainty), humans are causing most of the warming. 3. No single technology are very likely to impose net annual costs, which will increase over time as global temperatures increase

Minnesota, University of

235

Global health and climate change: moving from denial and catastrophic fatalism to positive action  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Howard and Martyn Chamberlain Global health and climate change: moving from denial...ucl.ac.uk ). 1 Institute for Global Health, University College London, , Gower...London WC1E 6BT, UK 3 Institute for Human Health and Performance, University College London...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Community Climate System Model: CCSM3  

SciTech Connect

A new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a flux coupler. CCSM3 is designed to produce realistic simulations over a wide range of spatial resolutions, enabling inexpensive simulations lasting several millennia or detailed studies of continental-scale climate change. This paper will show results from the configuration used for climate-change simulations with a T85 grid for atmosphere and land and a 1-degree grid for ocean and sea-ice. The new system incorporates several significant improvements in the scientific formulation. The enhancements in the model physics are designed to reduce or eliminate several systematic biases in the mean climate produced by previous editions of CCSM. These include new treatments of cloud processes, aerosol radiative forcing, land-atmosphere fluxes, ocean mixed-layer processes, and sea-ice dynamics. There are significant improvements in the sea-ice thickness, polar radiation budgets, equatorial sea-surface temperatures, ocean currents, cloud radiative effects, and ENSO teleconnections. CCSM3 can produce stable climate simulations of millenial duration without ad hoc adjustments to the fluxes exchanged among the component models. Nonetheless, there are still systematic biases in the ocean-atmosphere fluxes in western coastal regions, the spectrum of ENSO variability, the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the continental precipitation and surface air temperatures. We conclude with the prospects for extending CCSM to a more comprehensive model of the Earth's climate system.

Collins, W D; Blackmon, M; Bitz, C; Bonan, G; Bretherton, C S; Carton, J A; Chang, P; Doney, S; Hack, J J; Kiehl, J T; Henderson, T; Large, W G; McKenna, D; Santer, B D; Smith, R D

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

238

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data By Brian Grabowski * September 13, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint While the idea of a cruise to Hawaii may sound like paradise, making that same journey 25 times back and forth in a year might start to lose its appeal. But for a climate data-gathering machine called AMF2, perched aboard the ship, every trip is a chance to gather more data that is critical to understanding the Pacific Ocean's role in the global climate. The machine is the Department of Energy's second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility, operated and managed by Argonne scientists. It carries a suite of instruments to measure properties of clouds, the ocean, precipitation, aerosols, and radiation. Over the summer of 2013, the AMF2 traveled back and forth between Hawaii and Los Angeles,

239

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

240

Constraining Climate Model Parameters from Observed 20th Century Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present revised probability density functions for climate model parameters (effective climate sensitivity, the rate of deep-ocean heat uptake, and the strength of the net aerosol forcing) that are based on climate change ...

Forest, Chris Eliot

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ...

Ridley, David Andrew

242

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

243

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

T.P. Ackerman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

Ackerman, TP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Short-term improvements in public health from global-climate policies on fossil-fuel combustion: an interim report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground Most public-health assessments of climate-control policies have focused on long-term impacts of global change. Our interdisciplinary working group assesses likely short-term impacts on public health. Methods We combined models of energy consumption, carbon emissions, and associated atmospheric particulate-matter (PM) concentration under two different forecasts: business-as-usual (BAU); and a hypothetical climate-policy scenario, where developed and developing countries undertake significant reductions in carbon emissions. Findings We predict that by 2020, 700?000 avoidable deaths (90% CI 3850001034000) will occur annually as a result of additional PM exposure under the BAU forecasts when compared with the climate-policy scenario. From 2000 to 2020, the cumulative impact on public health related to the difference in PM exposure could total 8 million deaths globally (90% CI 4.411.9 million). In the USA alone, the avoidable number of annual deaths from PM exposure in 2020 (without climate-change-control policy) would equal in magnitude deaths associated with human immunodeficiency diseases or all liver diseases in 1995. Interpretation The mortality estimates are indicative of the magnitude of the likely health benefits of the climate-policy scenario examined and are not precise predictions of avoidable death. While characterised by considerable uncertainty, the short-term public-health impacts of reduced PM exposures associated with greenhouse-gas reductions are likely to be substantial even under the most conservative set of assumptions.

Devra Lee Davis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward a global response to climate change. To this end, the Program brings together an interdisciplinary: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA) Location-intensive sectors ­ to analyze global energy demand, CO2 emissions, and economic activity. The C-GEM model supplies

247

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on International Emissions Trading. Global Envi- ronmentalTask Group on Emissions Trading. Final Report: Introductionand Crawshaw, David. 2006. Emissions Trading Inquiry a Joke:

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

What Are Climate Models Missing?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...models miss most. From GCMs to Earth System Models Smagorinsky's GCM was designed...important chemical nutrients, Earth System Models (4, 5). Wide variation...as they are in comprehensive Earth System Models (10). Differences among...

Bjorn Stevens; Sandrine Bony

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Global Warming Potential and Global Warming Commitment Concepts in the Assessment of Climate Radiative Forcing Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Radiative Forcing (RF ... CS) and Individual (IS) schemes. The Global Warming Commitment (GWC) is calculated by the...

Igor L. Karol; Victor A. Frolkis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Local Implications of Globally Restricted Mobility: A study of Queenstowns vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis employs a case study approach to investigate local implications of globally restricted mobility by examining Queenstowns vulnerability to peak oil and climate change. (more)

Walsh, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Climate change, global food supply and risk of hunger  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the number of people at risk of hunger. (a) Climate...the number of people at risk from hunger (Rosenzweig...of world population at risk from hunger (defined...with no major changes in political or economic context of...increased agricultural investment, reallocation of agricultural...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the worlds energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

S11JUNE 2006STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2005 | 2. GLOBAL CLIMATE--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dently at institutions in the United Kingdom (Hadley Centre of the Met Office and the Climate Research analyses and second highest, behind 1998, according to the Met Office's Hadley Centre/University of East estimates are shown (black error bars). [Sources: NOAA/NCDC; The Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction

255

Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science  

SciTech Connect

This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

Drake, John B [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jones, Phil [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Mtorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frdric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hierarchical Modeling of Variability in Regional Climate Models Using Markov Random Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ensembles, are used to explore the uncertainties associated with projections of climate change (ANOVA), climate model ensembles, un- certainty quantification. 1 Geophysical Statistics Project the Earth's climate and producing projections of climate change. They encapsulate an entire field

Kaufman, Cari

258

Tropical Cyclone Simulation and Response to CO2 Doubling in the GFDL CM2.5 High-Resolution Coupled Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global tropical cyclone (TC) activity is simulated by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Climate Model, version 2.5 (CM2.5), which is a fully coupled global climate model with a horizontal resolution of about 50 km for the atmosphere ...

Hyeong-Seog Kim; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Thomas R. Knutson; Whit G. Anderson; Thomas L. Delworth; Anthony Rosati; Fanrong Zeng; Ming Zhao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Introduction. Stochastic physics and climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

become a backbone of numerical weather prediction and is used not only by weather forecasters but also. Stochastic physics schemes within weather and climate models have the potential to represent the dynamical history, the present era, whereby predictions are made from numerical solutions of the underlying dynamic

Williams, Paul

260

Modelling the impacts of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 11151126, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling the impacts of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England H.J. Fowler1 , C.G. Kilsby1 and J (Fowler and Kilsby, 2002) and future projections from Global Climate Models (GCMs) suggest that winters

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The MAGS Regional Climate Modeling System: CRCM-MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mackenzie GEWEX Study (MAGS) regional climate modeling system (denoted CRCM-MAGS) is a developmental version of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) tailored for use over North America. It is compose...

Murray MacKay; Paul Bartlett; Ed Chan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

What Influences the Skill of Climate Models over the Continents?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate modeling groups from four continents have submitted simulations as part of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). With climate impact assessment in mind, we test the accuracy of the seasonal averages of temperature, ...

I. G. Watterson; J. Bathols; C. Heady

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of historical and future climate states simulated by six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) global energy of the subcloud layer. On time scales larger than that characterizing the thermal equilibration of greater intensity. Calculations with a single-column model (4) confirm that increasing greenhouse gas

Rothman, Daniel

264

Towards a Fine-Resolution Global Coupled Climate System for Prediction on Decadal/Centennial Scales  

SciTech Connect

The over-arching goal of this project was to contribute to the realization of a fully coupled fine resolution Earth System Model simulation in which a weather-scale atmosphere is coupled to an ocean in which mesoscale eddies are largely resolved. Both a prototype fine-resolution fully coupled ESM simulation and a first-ever multi-decadal forced fine-resolution global coupled ocean/ice simulation were configured, tested, run, and analyzed as part of this grant. Science questions focused on the gains from the use of high horizontal resolution, particularly in the ocean and sea-ice, with respect to climatically important processes. Both these fine resolution coupled ocean/sea ice and fully-coupled simulations and precedent stand-alone eddy-resolving ocean and eddy-permitting coupled ocean/ice simulations were used to explore the high resolution regime. Overall, these studies showed that the presence of mesoscale eddies significantly impacted mixing processes and the global meridional overturning circulation in the ocean simulations. Fourteen refereed publications and a Ph.D. dissertation resulted from this grant.

McClean, Julie L. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography] [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Climate Change: Global growth of carbon dioxide emissions continues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After declining 1.5% in 2009, global carbon dioxide emissions rose 5.8% in 2010, the largest yearly jump in two decades, according to a Worldwatch Institute report released on April 28. Worldwatch is a Washington, D.C.-based, environmental think tank. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

PAGES 111112 Climate and Earth system models are the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only tools used to make predictions of future climate change. Such predictions are subject to considerable uncertainties, and understanding these uncertainties has clear and important policy implications. This Forum highlights the concepts of reductionism and emergence, and past climate variability, to illuminate some of the uncertainties faced by those wishing to model the future evolution of global climate. General circulation models (GCMs) of the atmosphere-ocean system are scientists principal tools for providing information about future climate. GCMs consequently have considerable influence on climate changerelated policy questions. Over the past decade, there have been significant attempts, mainly by statisticians and mathematicians, to explore the uncertainties in model simulations of possible futures, accompanied by growing debate about the interpretation of these simulations as aids in societal decisions. In this Forum, we discuss atmosphere-ocean GCMs in the context of reductionist and emergent approaches to scientific study.

unknown authors

267

Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

Wu, Shiliang

268

Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

269

Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon impacts of climate change on the sectors. We find that less cropland is projected to be converted climate change on the two sectors vary over the 100-year projection period. The forest sector is found

McCarl, Bruce A.

270

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a MetaAnalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a Meta­Analysis Talk given on biodiversity main- tenance in regional ecosystems. Based on works by Hans van Houwelingen and colleagues, we. The effect of this change on biodiversity has been widely discussed where peer-review publications have

Breuer, Florian

271

Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Team: R Ananthakrishnan1 , D E Bernholdt7,9 , S Bharathi8 , D Brown5 , M Chen7 , A L Chervenak8 , L Cinquini5 , R Drach3

Chervenak, Ann

272

POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON THE PHENOLOGY AND YIELD OF MAIZE IN VENEZUELA *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON THE PHENOLOGY AND YIELD OF MAIZE IN VENEZUELA de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mdrida 5101, Venezuela 21nstitute of Applied Sciences, Venezuela 4Centro de Estudios Avanzados del Clima Tropical (CEACT), Ministerio deI Ambiente y de los

Robock, Alan

273

Vol. 16, No. 2 May 2006Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment World Climate Research Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEWSNEWS Vol. 16, No. 2 May 2006Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment World Climate Research by the exchanges of energy and water. Although some statistics of these varia- tions may be static, the energy Programme (A Programme of WMO, ICSU and IOC) GEWEX ADDRESSES WATER AND ENERGY BUDGETS USING SATELLITES

274

It's too late to seal a global climate deal. But we need action, not Kyoto II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economic development, with development based on cleaner, sustainable technologies for power, transport, buildings and industry. The rich world will benefit as the poor world goes green, and will have to pay much wait It's too late to seal a global climate deal. But we need action, not Kyoto II |... http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cif-green

275

RISNEWS DECEMBER2007NO Global climate and energy challenges can be solved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory for sustainable energy, Risø DTU is ready to contribute to solving the problems ­ which also ...........................................................11 Magnetic cooling provides energy savings and environmental improvements .............12 Solar cellRIS?NEWSNO 22007PAGE1 RIS?NEWS DECEMBER2007NO 2 Global climate and energy challenges can be solved

276

Influence of Modes of Climate Variability on Global Temperature Extremes JESSE KENYON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of Modes of Climate Variability on Global Temperature Extremes JESSE KENYON Nicholas variability on worldwide summer and winter temperature extremes has been analyzed, namely, that of the El Niño for temperature extremes from world- wide land areas are used describe moderate extremes, such as the number

277

The influence of large-scale wind power on global climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of primary energy (1). The...role in global energy supply when...power is a renewable resource...of kinetic energy at the ?100-m...developed at the National Center for...for 50 yr of integration, {delta...horizontal grid) (7). Experiments...climate; the challenge is to relate...

David W. Keith; Joseph F. DeCarolis; David C. Denkenberger; Donald H. Lenschow; Sergey L. Malyshev; Stephen Pacala; Philip J. Rasch

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Indicators on Economic Risk from Global Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indicators of economic risk for emissions-intensive investments are presented and used to illustrate shutdown risks for coal-fired power plants compared with emerging utility-scale photovoltaics plants. ... Historically, during the last century the global economy has grown at an average of 3.2% y?1 and emissions of GHGs have increased sublinearly with economic growth, due to improvements in resource productivity. ...

Wolf D. Grossmann; Karl Steininger; Iris Grossmann; Lorenz Magaard

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Valuing Climate Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models: The MIT IGSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a strategy for investigating the impacts of climate change on Earths physical, biological and human resources and links to their socio-economic consequences. The features of the integrated global system framework ...

Reilly, John

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.db1003 data Data Investigators R. S. Bradley, L. G. Ahern, and F. T. Keimig Color-shaded and contoured images of global, gridded instrumental data have been produced as a computer-based atlas. Each image simultaneously depicts anomaly maps of surface temperature, sea-level pressure, 500-mbar geopotential heights, and percentages of reference-period precipitation. Monthly, seasonal, and annual composites are available in either cylindrical equidistant or northern and southern hemisphere polar projections. Temperature maps are available from 1854 to 1991, precipitation from 1851 to 1989, sea-level pressure from 1899 to 1991, and 500-mbar heights from 1946 to 1991. The source of data for the temperature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

U.K. HiGEM: The New U.K. High-Resolution Global Environment Model--Model Description and Basic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Earth Simulator Centre, Yokohama, Japan @ Met Office Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research Unified Model, known as the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 1 (HadGEM1). In Hi Office Hadley Centre. Its aim is to extend the latest climate configuration of the Met Office Hadley

Stevens, David

283

Influence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of northern Europe is more profound in the wind extremes than in the central tendency. The domain are of similar magnitude to the climate change signal in extreme wind events derived in prior research and mayInfluence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates S. C. Pryor,1 G

Pryor, Sara C.

284

Modelling the global coastal ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the present generation of Earth system models, both in terms of resolution...Friedlingstein et al. 2001). These Earth system models invariably give a very poor...the current generation of Earth system models is a long way from resolving...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Cost: Paid Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Screenshot

286

The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

COLLOQUIUM: Ensemble Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. NOAA-GFDL developed two coupled climate-carbon cycle models - or Earth System Models (ESMs) - that are able to simulate these interactions. While the major...

288

A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

Monier, Erwan

289

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections" Xuming He Department of Statistics University is a useful technique to localize global or regional climate model projections to assess the potential impact of climate changes. It requires quantifying a relationship between climate model output and local

Wang, Lily

290

The Persistently Variable Background Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Global Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in global radiative forcing (Fig. 3) over the past decade. The model has been extensively compared to other Earth system models of intermediate complexity as well as to Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models [AOGCMs, see (28...

S. Solomon; J. S. Daniel; R. R. Neely III; J.-P. Vernier; E. G. Dutton; L. W. Thomason

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chapter Thirty-Six - The Implications of Global Warming andClimate Change on Waterborne Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The distribution of pathogens and the incidence of waterborne disease outbreaks are closely linked to environmental and climatic conditions. Global climate change will affect the hydrological cycle in many different ways that will influence waterborne pathogen survival, infectivity and distribution. These changes include frequency and intensity of heavy rainfall events leading to higher surface runoff and flooding, droughts, increased temperatures and sea level rise. Indirectly, this will impact on the effectiveness of traditional infrastructural and the barrier approach to pathogen control on which water industry has evolved and now relies. Climate change will also result in an alteration in the behaviour of populations and test their ability to cope with changes in risk from infection and possible failures in the barriers that protect them from pathogens. The effect of climate change on the risk from waterborne diseases will differ between tropical and temperate areas, and developed and developing countries. Those countries with a well-developed water and wastewater treatment infrastructure will be least affected. The key to overcoming these problems is an awareness of the potential risks to pathogen distribution and infectivity caused by global warming and the implementation of an integrated approach to pathogen safety through the implementation of water security and water safety plans. The United Nations Millennium Development Goal to halve the number of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015 is unlikely to be achieved. Global warming is increasing the number of people falling into this category each year, as well as making it far more difficult to achieve the vital goal. Disinfection will remain the major technique of ensuring drinking water is free from waterborne microorganisms, but it must be seen as part of a larger integrated approach to water resource protection which will become increasingly difficult as global warming continues to create uncertainties in our climate.

Nicholas F. Gray

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modeling the prospects for climatic change: current state-of-the-art and implications  

SciTech Connect

It has been increasingly suggested that the world's climate is going to change in the next several decades, primarily as a result of anthropogenic perturbations to the global carbon cycle brought about by fossil fuel burning and large-scale deforestation. In order to cope with these future climatic changes, it is necessary that tools be developed to predict how complex systems respond to a given change of conditions. This report summarizes the status of our ability to model the planetary system that determines the climate. (ACR)

Kellogg, W.M.

1980-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Climate Feedback Analysis of the GFDL IPCC AR4 Global Warming Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Both observed and modeled global warming pattern shows a large surface polar warming and a large upper atmospheric warming in the tropics. This pattern (more)

Castet, Christelle Clemence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

295

Uncertainty in Climate Modelling; Projected climate changes and low flow discharge in Elverdams .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project uses the Danish stream Elversdam as a case study to analyse uncertainty in climate modelling, with particular focus on the low flow (more)

Dam, Peter Rosendahl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Downscaling of Global Climate Change Estimates to Regional Scales: An Application to Iberian Rainfall in Wintertime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A statistical strategy to deduct regional-scale features from climate general circulation model (GCM) simulations has been designed and tested. The main idea is to interrelate the characteristic patterns of observed simultaneous variations of ...

Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita; Ulrich Cubasch

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

New Climate Research Centers Forecast Changes and Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two new observation stations - in Alaska and the Azore islands - should reduce uncertainties and improve global climate models.

298

The potential distribution of the Vulnerable African lion Panthera leo in the face of changing global climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential distributions were predicted by projecting ecological niche models onto three climate scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions based on eight climate models for the years 20402070. The prediction was of relative range stability into the future...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Radocy, Thomas

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

299

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Report of the EMF 19 Study on Technology and Global Climate Change Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON TECHNOLOGY AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE POLICIES David J. Beecy (david.beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2786) Office of Environmental Systems Technology U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road GTN, FE-23, E-133 Germantown, MD 20545 Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov; 202-586-0883) Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, EI-80 Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy 100 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Richard G. Richels (rrichels@epri.com; 650-855-2602) Global Climate Change Program Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 John P. Weyant (weyant@stanford.edu; 650-723-3506) Department of Management Science & Engineering Terman Building: Room 406 Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-4026

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

How Do We Know that Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?  

SciTech Connect

Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. 'Fingerprint' methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

Santer, Benjamin D.

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Looking at Earth as a System Chapter 11 UnderstandingGlobalClimateChange 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Looking at Earth as a System Chapter 11 #12;UnderstandingGlobalClimateChange 2 A Systems Approach to Look at Earth 1.1 AdifferentwayofunderstandingEarth Notes1.1.1 If we are going to look at Earth and the house would end up either being too hot or too cold. #12;Looking at Earth as a System Chapter 13 Notes1

Howat, Ian M.

303

Should we believe model predictions of future climate change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equations are derived from first principles (e.g. equations of motion, and conservation of energy, mass deficiencies in the attempt to provide useful information to the public and policy-makers. Keywords: climate to communicate what we know and what is uncertain about future climate change? Why are climate model projections

Fischlin, Andreas

304

Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

Pouyanne, Nicolas

306

Estimating the Contribution of Sea Ice Response to Climate Sensitivity in a Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of sea ice to climate change affects Earths radiative properties in ways that contribute to yet more climate change. Here, a configuration of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.0.4 (CESM 1.0.4), with a slab ocean model and a ...

Ken Caldeira; Ivana Cvijanovic

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marshall and Brian Rose Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts June 17th, 2010 Submitted to Journal of Climate Corresponding author by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe

Marshall, John

308

15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

309

15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

310

Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new ...

311

The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an analysis of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology diffusion perspective. Energy markets are driven by innovation, path-dependent technology choices and diffusion. However, conventional optimisation models lack detail on these aspects and have limited ability to address the effectiveness of policy interventions because they do not represent decision-making. As a result, known effects of technology lock-ins are liable to be underestimated. In contrast, our approach places investor decision-making at the core of the analysis and investigates how it drives the diffusion of low-carbon technology in a highly disaggregated, hybrid, global macroeconometric model, FTT:Power-E3MG. Ten scenarios to 2050 of the electricity sector in 21 regions exploring combinations of electricity policy instruments are analysed, including their climate impacts. We show that in a diffusion and path-dependent perspective, the impact of combinations of policies does not correspond to the sum of impacts of individual instruments: synergies exist between policy tools. We argue that the carbon price required to break the current fossil technology lock-in can be much lower when combined with other policies, and that a 90% decarbonisation of the electricity sector by 2050 is affordable without early scrapping.

J.-F. Mercure; H. Pollitt; U. Chewpreecha; P. Salas; A.M. Foley; P.B. Holden; N.R. Edwards

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 775 vidence is clear that Earth's global average climate has warmed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 775 E vidence anthropogenic climate change on timescales of a few decades and spatial scales smaller than continen- tal2 in climate change projections are due to model shortcomings, and it is sometimes confidently asserted

Fischlin, Andreas

313

Global nuclear material flow/control model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modelling the effects of climate change on the energy systemA case study of Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work is to identify the effects of climate change on the Norwegian energy system towards 2050. Changes in the future wind- and hydro-power resource potential, and changes in the heating and cooling demand are analysed to map the effects of climate change. The impact of climate change is evaluated with an energy system model, the MARKAL Norway model, to analyse the future cost optimal energy system. Ten climate experiments, based on five different global models and six emission scenarios, are used to cover the range of possible future climate scenarios and of these three experiments are used for detailed analyses. This study indicate that in Norway, climate change will reduce the heating demand, increase the cooling demand, have a limited impact on the wind power potential, and increase the hydro-power potential. The reduction of heating demand will be significantly higher than the increase of cooling demand, and thus the possible total direct consequence of climate change will be reduced energy system costs and lower electricity production costs. The investments in offshore wind and tidal power will be reduced and electric based vehicles will be profitable earlier.

Pernille Seljom; Eva Rosenberg; Audun Fidje; Jan Erik Haugen; Michaela Meir; John Rekstad; Thore Jarlset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): overviewand Biogeosciences Climate Model Intercomparison Project (and Climate Model Intercompari- son Project (ACCMIP), Atmos.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models ... Keywords: Climate modelling, History of NWP, Numerical weather prediction

Peter Lynch

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and uncertain scaling relationship Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10971114, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming of probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and an uncertain/precipitation per degree global mean warming. Each scaling variable is assumed to be normally distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Category: Modeling Statistical cloud schemes (or assumed probability distribution function cloud schemes) are attractive because they provide a way to implement horizontal sub-grid scale cloud heterogeneity in a self-consistent way between physical parameterizations of the a climate model, such as radiation and cloud microphysics. In this work, we will present results dealing with two aspects of our ongoing work towards the implementation of statistical cloud scheme ideas in the climate model of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. First, we will address the representation of cloud

319

Climate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-duration nrp (National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change) project on climateClimate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and diagnosis of the climate and its variability on the basis of observations and models. The objective of this research

Haak, Hein

320

Cooperative global security programs modeling & simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The national laboratories global security programs implement sustainable technical solutions for cooperative nonproliferation, arms control, and physical security systems worldwide. To help in the development and execution of these programs, a wide range of analytical tools are used to model, for example, synthetic tactical environments for assessing infrastructure protection initiatives and tactics, systematic approaches for prioritizing nuclear and biological threat reduction opportunities worldwide, and nuclear fuel cycle enrichment and spent fuel management for nuclear power countries. This presentation will describe how these models are used in analyses to support the Obama Administration's agenda and bilateral/multinational treaties, and ultimately, to reduce weapons of mass destruction and terrorism threats through international technical cooperation.

Briand, Daniel

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands  

SciTech Connect

Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Earth system models of intermediate complexity: closing the gap in the spectrum of climate system models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...We propose a new perspective on the hierarchy of climate models which goes beyond the "classical" climate modeling pyramid that is restricted mainly to atmospheric processes. Most notably, we introduce a new i...

M. Claussen; L. Mysak; A. Weaver; M. Crucifix; T. Fichefet

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

324

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

325

An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO, BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regionalof lakes in numerical weather prediction and climate models:

Subin, Z.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the models characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

327

with the NCAR Climate System Model Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results from transient simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in climate re- constructions, and if part of the previously estimated large range of past solar irradiancewith the NCAR Climate System Model Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results from

Fortunat, Joos

328

Global variation in thermal tolerances and vulnerability of endotherms to climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...precipitation and radiation) within a year (variables...precipitation seasonality or radiation seasonality (all climatic...single model (mammals, radiation seasonality), we did...as implemented in the software spatial analysis in...mismatch, whereas thermal safety was recorded when maximum...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

330

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Global Climate Change and the Unique Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector  

SciTech Connect

Addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and consumers on the planet. To date, however, most efforts to address climate change have focused on only a few sectors of the economy (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) and a handful of large industrialized nations. While useful as a starting point, these efforts must be expanded to include other sectors of the economy and other nations. The transportation sector presents some unique challenges, with its nearly exclusive dependence on petroleum based products as a fuel source coupled with internal combustion engines as the prime mover. Reducing carbon emissions from transportation systems is unlikely to be solely accomplished by traditional climate mitigation policies that place a price on carbon. Our research shows that price signals alone are unlikely to fundamentally alter the demand for energy services or to transform the way energy services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

Dooley, J.J.; Geffen, C.A.; Edmonds, J.A.

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

333

A Simple Empirical Model for Decadal Climate Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decadal climate prediction is a challenging aspect of climate research. It has been and will be tackled by various modeling groups. This study proposes a simple empirical forecasting system for the near-surface temperature that can be used as a ...

Oliver Krueger; Jin-Song Von Storch

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Effects of Externally-Through-Internally-Mixed Soot Inclusions within Clouds and Precipitation on Global Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The model used and modified for this study was GATOR-GCMOM, a parallelized and one-way-nested global-through-urban scale gas, aerosol, transport, radiation, general circulation, mesoscale, and ocean model. ... The GATOR-GCMOM model was modified to treat absorption and scattering of aerosol inclusions within individual hydrometeor particles. ... GATOR-GCMOM = gas, aerosol, transport, radiation, general circulation, mesoscale, and ocean model ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently developed technique for simulating large [O(10[superscript 4])] numbers of tropical cyclones in climate states described by global gridded data is applied to simulations of historical and future climate states ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

337

Climate Impacts of Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes in Tropical Islands under Conditions of Global Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes have significant climate impacts in tropical coastal regions with the added complexity of occurring within the context of a warming climate. The individual and combined effects of these two factors in ...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. Gonzlez; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Robert D. Bornstein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Climate models: challenges for Fortran development tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate simulation and weather forecasting codes are among the most complex examples of scientific software. Moreover, many of them are written in Fortran, making them some of the largest and most complex Fortran codes ever developed. For companies and ...

Mariano Mndez, Fernando G. Tinetti, Jeffrey L. Overbey

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Land Processes in a High Resolution Community Climate Model with Sub-Grid Scale Parameterizations Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of land important for climate are very heterogeneous, as are the key atmospheric inputs to land, i.e. precipitation and radiation. To adequately represent this heterogeneity, state-of-the-art climate models should represent atmospheric inputs to land, land properties, and the dynamical changes of land at the highest resolution accessible by climate models. The research funded under this project focused on the development of an alternative approach to this problem in which a sub-mesh is imposed on each atmospheric model grid square. This allows representation of the land climate dynamics at a higher resolution than that achievable in the global atmospheric models. The high spatial detail of the fine-mesh treatment provides not only a more accurate representation of land processes to the atmospheric model, but also the opportunity for direct downscaling of the surface climate. The proposed project continued the development and refinement of a high-resolution land surface model that is compatible for inclusion into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM), a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that is used for climate simulation and prediction.

R. E. Dickinson; Andrea N. Hahmann

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

342

Causal Discovery for Climate Research Using Graphical Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Causal discovery seeks to recover causeeffect relationships from statistical data using graphical models. One goal of this paper is to provide an accessible introduction to causal discovery methods for climate scientists, with a focus on ...

Imme Ebert-Uphoff; Yi Deng

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Automobile technology, hydrogen and climate change: a long term modelling analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transitions in the global automobile sector in the 21st century are uncertain both in terms of technologies and energy carriers. A key driving force of technological change in the long term could be the need to mitigate GHG emissions. This paper examines the role of the passenger car sector in a GHG mitigation strategy and presents a scenario of the automobile technology choices when a price on greenhouse gas emissions is imposed on the global energy system. The analysis has been conducted with ERIS, a multiregional energy systems, 'bottom up' optimisation model that endogenises technology learning and allows a detailed technology representation, in addition to capturing competing demands for transportation fuels, including hydrogen. Our results provide some policy insights by illustrating the potential for hydrogen to contribute to climate change mitigation, but show that fuel cell cars are an option for climate policy only over the very long term.

Hal Turton; Leonardo Barreto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BETR Global - A geographically explicit global-scale multimedia contaminant fate model  

SciTech Connect

We present two new software implementations of the BETR Global multimedia contaminant fate model. The model uses steady-state or non-steady-state mass-balance calculations to describe the fate and transport of persistent organic pollutants using a desktop computer. The global environment is described using a database of long-term average monthly conditions on a 15{sup o} x 15{sup o} grid. We demonstrate BETR Global by modeling the global sources, transport, and removal of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5).

Macleod, M.; Waldow, H. von; Tay, P.; Armitage, J. M.; Wohrnschimmel, H.; Riley, W.; McKone, T. E.; Hungerbuhler, K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climate change and beyond: models and uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface currents head polewards from the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, cooling all the while. Having lost 2 / 29 #12;Thermohaline circulation 2 / 29 · Global ocean circulation is driven by winds and the exchange of heat and water vapour at the sea surface. #12;Thermohaline circulation 2 / 29 · Global ocean

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

347

Developing the next-generation climate system models: challenges and achievements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...need to evolve further into Earth system models. This is also immensely challenging...physical climate models to full Earth system models, through the incorporation...living organisms into climate (Earth) system models. Theoretical bases for modelling...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced Technology Paths to Global Climate Stability: Energy for a Greenhouse Planet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IC-electric hybrid (higher efficiency...existing fossil fuel infrastructures, including CO...Historical CO 2 data and models imply a temperate...Balance-of-system infrastructures could evolve from natural...Advanced electrical grids would also foster...fission-fusion hybrids, and fossil...global electric grids, and...

Martin I. Hoffert; Ken Caldeira; Gregory Benford; David R. Criswell; Christopher Green; Howard Herzog; Atul K. Jain; Haroon S. Kheshgi; Klaus S. Lackner; John S. Lewis; H. Douglas Lightfoot; Wallace Manheimer; John C. Mankins; Michael E. Mauel; L. John Perkins; Michael E. Schlesinger; Tyler Volk; Tom M. L. Wigley

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment (IMAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency Focus Area: Biomass Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: themasites.pbl.nl/en/themasites/image/index.html Cost: Paid Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integrated-model-access-global-enviro Related Tools ENV-Linkages-KEI Model World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model ... further results IMAGE is an ecological-environmental framework that simulates the

350

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Intention to change activities that reduce carbon dioxide emissions related to worry about global climate change consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Mitigating the global climate change requires actions at different levels including that lay people change their consumption patterns, which cause emissions of greenhouse gases. Recent research suggests that inducing affects such as fear and worry may have positive effects. Objective To investigate whether worry in addition to personalized information about emissions of carbon dioxide would influence lay people's intentions to change consumption-related personal activities causing carbon-dioxide emissions. Method A municipality-provided tool to calculate their annual carbon dioxide emissions was used by 135 university students who after being informed about negative consequences of global climate change stated their intentions to change a number of personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during the following 12 months. They also rated how worried they were about eight global climate change consequences. Results Intentions to change travel, energy use at home, food consumption, involvement in environmental organizations, and support of environmental policies increased with worry. An interaction was also observed such that high-emitters intentions to invest in energy-efficient infrastructure increased more with worry than did low- and medium-emitters intentions. Conclusions In line with recent research positing that affect increases preventive actions, the hypothesis was supported that intentions to change personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions increased with participants worry about the consequences of global climate change.

E.-L. Sundblad; A. Biel; T. Grling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

Lynch, Peter [Meteorology and Climate Centre, School of Mathematical Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield (Ireland)], E-mail: Peter.Lynch@ucd.ie

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble Project: A Community Resource for Studying Climate Change in the Presence of Internal Climate Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While internal climate variability is known to affect climate projections, its influence is often underappreciated and confused with model error. Why? In general, modeling centers contribute a small number of realizations to international climate ...

J. E. Kay; C. Deser; A. Phillips; A. Mai; C. Hannay; G. Strand; J. M. Arblaster; S. C. Bates; G. Danabasoglu; J. Edwards; M. Holland; P. Kushner; J.-F. Lamarque; D. Lawrence; K. Lindsay; A. Middleton; E. Munoz; R. Neale; K. Oleson; L. Polvani; M. Vertenstein

355

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, earth systems model. This model incorporates the most-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well. Our collaborators in climate research include the National Center

356

The New Hadley Centre Climate Model (HadGEM1): Evaluation of Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new coupled general circulation climate model developed at the Met Office's Hadley Centre is presented, and aspects of its performance in climate simulations run for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC ...

T. C. Johns; C. F. Durman; H. T. Banks; M. J. Roberts; A. J. McLaren; J. K. Ridley; C. A. Senior; K. D. Williams; A. Jones; G. J. Rickard; S. Cusack; W. J. Ingram; M. Crucifix; D. M. H. Sexton; M. M. Joshi; B.-W. Dong; H. Spencer; R. S. R. Hill; J. M. Gregory; A. B. Keen; A. K. Pardaens; J. A. Lowe; A. Bodas-Salcedo; S. Stark; Y. Searl

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 10851096, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data for five European case regions (CSRs) of the EC-funded project SWURVE, estimates of uncertainty in climate model data need

Boyer, Edmond

358

Why does the climate change? The Earth's climate has changed throughout history and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is projected to be at the higher end of the range. Global Climate Change Climate Change on the Prairie: A Basic than maximum temperatures. Climate models are projecting that temperatures will continue to increase range from 7°F-11°F (USGCRP). Climate Change in the United States Historical trends and projections

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

359

Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and (more)

Herbertsson, Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Circular Retribution: The Effects of Climate Change on U .S. and Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of global oil supply, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the Unitedof global oil supply, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the United

Prescher, Hannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Moving Toward Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

363

4 - Modeling the Relationship Between Global Warming, Violence, and Crime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the challenges of global warming research to the social sciences is that physical science research modalities are different. Consequently, efforts to tie it to the social sciences, particularly those related to violence and crime, are difficult to develop. This chapter looks at two models to assess the linkages between global warming and crime. The first, the Homer-Dixon model, uses a resource scarcity model to look at these linkages. According to the Homer-Dixon model, many aspects of global warming produce scarcities such as food shortages, ranch and farmland loss, and clean-water shortages. By tracing the indirect effects of scarcities through intervening variables of migration and state hardening, the model allows us to see various kinds of crime and violence that might happen under global warming conditions. The second model is the Agnew model, developed to assess theoretical linkages between crime and global warming, primarily focusing on social disorganization and strain perspectives. The second model fills a critical shortcoming in the first model; it provides a nuanced notion of crime and crime theory. Hence, it provides a needed back end of crime outcomes to tie into the Homer-Dixon model. Also, we discuss the way in which many dimensions of global warming can be modeled relatively straightforwardly into a routine activities perspective, where the social and economic disruptions caused by global warming give rise to new patterns of human activity and, consequently, new patterns of criminal and predatory activities.

John P. Crank; Linda S. Jacoby

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Efficient data IO for a Parallel Global Cloud Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Execution of a Global Cloud Resolving Model (GCRM) at target resolutions of 2-4 km will generate, at a minimum, 10s of Gigabytes of data per variable per snapshot. Writing this data to disk, without creating a serious bottleneck in the execution of the ... Keywords: Data formatting, Geodesic grid, Global Cloud Resolving Model, Grid Specifications, High performance IO, Parallel IO libraries

Bruce Palmer; Annette Koontz; Karen Schuchardt; Ross Heikes; David Randall

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Why Do Global Long-term Scenarios for Agriculture Differ? An overview of the AgMIP Global Economic Model Intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies assessing plausible futures for agricultural markets and global food security have had contradictory outcomes. Ten global economic models that produce long-term scenarios were asked to compare a reference scenario with alternate socio-economic, climate change and bioenergy scenarios using a common set of key drivers. Results suggest that, once general assumptions are harmonized, the variability in general trends across models declines, and that several common conclusions are possible. Nonetheless, differences in basic model parameters, sometimes hidden in the way market behavior is modeled, result in significant differences in the details. This holds for both the common reference scenario and for the various shocks applied. We conclude that agro-economic modelers aiming to inform the agricultural and development policy debate require better data and analysis on both economic behavior and biophysical drivers. More interdisciplinary modeling efforts are required to cross-fertilize analyses at different scales.

von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Cai, Yongxia; Calvin, Katherine V.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Nelson, Gerald; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; van Meijl, Hans

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Global warming description using Daisyworld model with greenhouse gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Daisyworld is an archetypal model of the earth that is able to describe the global regulation that can emerge from the interaction between life and environment. This article proposes a model based on the original Daisyworld considering greenhouse gases emission and absorption, allowing the description of the global warming phenomenon. Global and local analyses are discussed evaluating the influence of greenhouse gases in the planet dynamics. Numerical simulations are carried out showing the general qualitative behavior of the Daisyworld for different scenarios that includes solar luminosity variations and greenhouse gases effect. Nonlinear dynamics perspective is of concern discussing a way that helps the comprehension of the global warming phenomenon.

Susana L.D. Paiva; Marcelo A. Savi; Flavio M. Viola; Albino J.K. Leiroz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Research - Programs - Climate &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences research > programs > climate_carbon_sciences Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Research Areas The Carbon Cycle Better Models for Robust Climate Projection Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Projects Contacts Facilities & Centers Publications Climate & Carbon Sciences Program Climate & Carbon Sciences Program The global carbon cycle strongly regulates earth's climate, while anthropogenic disturbance of the carbon cycle is the main cause of current and predicted climate change. At the same time, humans depend on the terrestrial carbon cycle for food, fiber, energy, and pharmaceuticals. The Climate and Carbon Sciences Program of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory encompasses both atmospheric and

368

Local action for the global environment : municipal government participation in a voluntary climate protection program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cities for Climate ProtectionTM (CCP) campaign is a voluntary environmental program for municipalities, which is increasingly being applied around the world by local governments taking action on climate change. This ...

Ravin, Amelia L., 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The near future availability of photovoltaic energy in Europe and Africa in climate-aerosol modeling experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The near future change in productivity of photovoltaic energy (PVE) in Europe and Africa is assessed by using the climate variables simulated by the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, and a model for the performance of photovoltaic systems. The climate simulations are forced by green-house gases emissions from the IPCC SRES B2 scenario. In addition, different scenarios for future anthropogenic aerosols emissions are applied. Thus, the sensitivity of the future PVE productivity to changes in aerosol atmospheric burdens between 2000 and 2030 is analyzed. The analysis indicates that reductions in aerosols emissions in the near future result in an increase of global warming, and a significant response in surface solar radiation and associated PVE productivity. A statistically significant reduction in PVE productivity up to 7% is observed in eastern Europe and northern Africa, while a significant increase up to 10% is observed in western Europe and eastern Mediterranean. The changes in surface solar radiation and PVE productivity are related to global effects of aerosols reduction on the large scale circulation and associated cloud cover pattern, rather than to local effects on the atmospheric optical properties. PVE assessment is then discussed in the frame of the present situation and next decades evolution of the photovoltaic market, highlighting that the effects on productivity induced by industrial and public policies, and technological development are comparable to climate related effects. The presented results encourage the improvement and further use of climate models in assessment of future renewable energies availability.

Marco Gaetani; Thomas Huld; Elisabetta Vignati; Fabio Monforti-Ferrario; Alessandro Dosio; Frank Raes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

371

Global warming from chlorofluorocarbons and their alternatives: Time scales of chemistry and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their replacements on global warming. Nature Hansen J. ,gas emissions to global warming. Nature London Amendment toNature 315, 649-652, Global warming time scales WMO (World

Ko, Malcolm K.W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Molnar, Gyula; Prather, Michael J

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of WritingMcKibben, Bill, ed. The Global Warming Reader: A Century ofrecord of no action on global warming. Those who have done

Anderson, Byron P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, Drew; Josse, B.; Young, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Eyring, Veronika; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Plummer, David; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Zeng, G.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

A multi-resolution method for climate system modeling: application of spherical centroidal Voronoi tessellations  

SciTech Connect

During the next decade and beyond, climate system models will be challenged to resolve scales and processes that are far beyond their current scope. Each climate system component has its prototypical example of an unresolved process that may strongly influence the global climate system, ranging from eddy activity within ocean models, to ice streams within ice sheet models, to surface hydrological processes within land system models, to cloud processes within atmosphere models. These new demands will almost certainly result in the develop of multiresolution schemes that are able, at least regionally, to faithfully simulate these fine-scale processes. Spherical centroidal Voronoi tessellations (SCVTs) offer one potential path toward the development of a robust, multiresolution climate system model components. SCVTs allow for the generation of high quality Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay triangulations through the use of an intuitive, user-defined density function. In each of the examples provided, this method results in high-quality meshes where the quality measures are guaranteed to improve as the number of nodes is increased. Real-world examples are developed for the Greenland ice sheet and the North Atlantic ocean. Idealized examples are developed for oceanice shelf interaction and for regional atmospheric modeling. In addition to defining, developing, and exhibiting SCVTs, we pair this mesh generation technique with a previously developed finite-volume method. Our numerical example is based on the nonlinear, shallow water equations spanning the entire surface of the sphere. This example is used to elucidate both the potential benefits of this multiresolution method and the challenges ahead.

Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

opportunity announcements are posted on the DOE Office of Science Grants and Contracts Web Site and at grants.gov External link . Information about preparing and submitting...

376

A near real-time satellite-based global drought climate data record  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global precipitation climatology project (GPCP) combined8th Conf. of Applied Climatology (Jan. 1993) (Anaheim, CA:the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) one are

AghaKouchak, Amir; Nakhjiri, Navid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional models, intermediate complexity models, general circulation models, and Earth system models. 2 www

Hulme, Mike

378

A simple model of multiple climate regimes Kerry Emanuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Climate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Received 28 June 2001 to a roughly 30% increase in solar insolation over the life of the planet. To this enigma may be added to produce multiple equilibrium states for the same solar forcing. Here we present a simple model

Emanuel, Kerry A.

379

Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe the climate models?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Asare, Simon Lewis and Philippe Mayaux Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe...rainforests: past, present and future . The Congo Basin is one of three key convective regions...rainfall products and climate models. Congo rainfall|climatology|moisture flux...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR CANADA-US CLIMATE POLICY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts how energy trade between Canada and the US might change due to the policies. The results gas emissions; carbon tax; energy consumption; energy supply; energy trade Subject Terms: Climatic policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Canada and the US. A model of the combined energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Numerica: a Modeling Language for Global Optimization Pascal Van Hentenryck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equilibrium problems, and design problems (e.g., nu­ clear reactor design). The field of global optimizationNumerica: a Modeling Language for Global Optimization Pascal Van Hentenryck Brown University Box or to optimize a nonlinear function subject to nonlinear constraints. This includes appli­ cations

Neumaier, Arnold

382

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

383

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

384

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

385

Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors  

SciTech Connect

Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten peoples awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

Maurakis, Eugene G

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MODELING THE GLOBAL PEAKS AND COOLING SY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of assessed building energy consumption and indoor air temperature peaks. At last, the coupling of the urban energy consumption. Building uses are an important part of the global energy use thus a good conception until the year 2100 highlight a regular increase building energy consumption and indoor At last

Boyer, Edmond

387

GLOBAL COMPREHENSIVE MODELS IN POLITICS AND POLICYMAKING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this editorial, I reflect on the role of comprehensive models, such as IAMs and earth system models (ESMs

Edwards, Paul N.

388

A Gaussian graphical model approach to climate networks  

SciTech Connect

Distinguishing between direct and indirect connections is essential when interpreting network structures in terms of dynamical interactions and stability. When constructing networks from climate data the nodes are usually defined on a spatial grid. The edges are usually derived from a bivariate dependency measure, such as Pearson correlation coefficients or mutual information. Thus, the edges indistinguishably represent direct and indirect dependencies. Interpreting climate data fields as realizations of Gaussian Random Fields (GRFs), we have constructed networks according to the Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM) approach. In contrast to the widely used method, the edges of GGM networks are based on partial correlations denoting direct dependencies. Furthermore, GRFs can be represented not only on points in space, but also by expansion coefficients of orthogonal basis functions, such as spherical harmonics. This leads to a modified definition of network nodes and edges in spectral space, which is motivated from an atmospheric dynamics perspective. We construct and analyze networks from climate data in grid point space as well as in spectral space, and derive the edges from both Pearson and partial correlations. Network characteristics, such as mean degree, average shortest path length, and clustering coefficient, reveal that the networks posses an ordered and strongly locally interconnected structure rather than small-world properties. Despite this, the network structures differ strongly depending on the construction method. Straightforward approaches to infer networks from climate data while not regarding any physical processes may contain too strong simplifications to describe the dynamics of the climate system appropriately.

Zerenner, Tanja, E-mail: tanjaz@uni-bonn.de [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Friederichs, Petra; Hense, Andreas [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany) [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brhler Strae 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany); Lehnertz, Klaus [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strae 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany) [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strae 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brhler Strae 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modeling the Impacts of Future Climate Change on Irrigation over China: Sensitivity to Adjusted Projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the limitations of coarse-resolution general circulation models (GCMs), delta change (DC) methods are generally used to derive scenarios of future climate as inputs into impact models. In this paper, the impact of future climate change ...

Guoyong Leng; Qiuhong Tang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Parameter Optimization in an Intermediate Coupled Climate Model with Biased Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imperfect physical parameterization schemes in a coupled climate model are an important source of model biases that adversely impact climate prediction. However, how observational information should be used to optimize physical parameterizations ...

Xuefeng Zhang; Shaoqing Zhang; Zhengyu Liu; Xinrong Wu; Guijun Han

391

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence K. Sham Bhat, Murali Haran, Adam Terando, and Klaus Keller. Abstract Projections of future climatic changes are a key input to the design of climate change mitiga- tion and adaptation strategies. Current climate change projections

Haran, Murali

392

Who remembers a hot summer or a cold winter? The asymmetric effect of beliefs about global warming on perceptions of local climate conditions in the U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores the phenomenon of local climate perception and the extent to which public perceptions match climate conditions as recorded in instrumental climate data. We further examine whether perceptions of changes in local climates are influenced by prior beliefs about global warming, through the process of motivated reasoning. Using national survey data collected in the United States in 2011, we find that subjective experiences of seasonal average temperature and precipitation during the previous winter and summer were related to recorded conditions during each season. Beliefs about global warming also had significant effects on subjective experiences with above-normal temperatures, particularly among those who believed that global warming is not happening. When asked about the summer of 2010, those who believed that global warming is not happening were significantly less likely to report that they had experienced a warmer-than-normal summer, even when controlling for demographics and local climate conditions. These results suggest that the subjective experience of local climate change is dependent not only on external climate conditions, but also on individual beliefs, with perceptions apparently biased by prior beliefs about global warming.

Peter D. Howe; Anthony Leiserowitz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Empirical correction of a toy climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the accuracy of forecast models for physical systems such as the atmosphere is a crucial ongoing effort. The primary focus of recent research on these highly nonlinear systems has been errors in state estimation, but as that error has been successfully diminished, the role of model error in forecast uncertainty has duly increased. The present study is an investigation of an empirical model correction procedure involving the comparison of short forecasts with a reference truth system during a training period, in order to calculate systematic (1) state-independent model bias and (2) state-dependent error patterns. An estimate of the likelihood of the latter error component is computed from the current state at every time step of model integration. The effectiveness of this technique is explored in a realistic scenario, in which the model is structurally different (in dynamics, dimension, and parametrization) from the target system. Results suggest that the correction procedure is more effective for reducing error and prolonging forecast usefulness than parameter tuning. However, the cost of this increase in average forecast accuracy is the creation of substantial qualitative differences between the dynamics of the corrected model and the true system. A method to mitigate dynamical ramifications and further increase forecast accuracy is presented.

Nicholas A. Allgaier; Kameron D. Harris; Christopher M. Danforth

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Global manufacturing model and case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chain network. 3. 7 Level of firm's global manufacturing competitiveness. . . . 3. 8 A typical unit-cost curve. . 3. 9 Ford Fiesta production network in Western Europe. . . . . . . 35 38 39 42 3. 10 Integrated information system, 51 3. 11 World..., Japan, and Europe. 4. 1 Hofstede's scores of USA and Mexico. 91 4. 2 Average daily wage plus benefits and taxes by occupation. . . . 94 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Black & Decker, a $5 billion U. S. -based manufacturer of hand tools, provides an example...

Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Coupled Climate and Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are all familiar with weather forecasts that predict the local weather for the next few days. These are made using a high-resolution numerical model of the atmosphere, and sometimes extend out as far as 10 ...

Peter R. Gent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Conceptual stochastic climate models Peter Imkeller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be thoroughly inve- stigated but too simple to be treated as quantitatively accurate, through Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) which represent some clima- te subsystems (e.g. the ocean

Monahan, Adam Hugh

397

A size-structured food-web model for the global ocean*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR of global environment and energy challenges, thereby contributing to informed debate about climate change reproduces global distributions of nutrients, biomass, and primary productivity, and captures the power

398

Toward a high performance distributed memory climate model  

SciTech Connect

As part of a long range plan to develop a comprehensive climate systems modeling capability, the authors have taken the Atmospheric General Circulation Model originally developed by Arakawa and collaborators at UCLA and have recast it in a portable, parallel form. The code uses an explicit time-advance procedure on a staggered three-dimensional Eulerian mesh. The authors have implemented a two-dimensional latitude/longitude domain decomposition message passing strategy. Both dynamic memory management and interprocessor communication are handled with macro constructs that are preprocessed prior to compilation. The code can be moved about a variety of platforms, including massively parallel processors, workstation clusters, and vector processors, with a mere change of three parameters. Performance on the various platforms as well as issues associated with coupling different models for major components of the climate system are discussed.

Wehner, M.F.; Ambrosiano, J.J.; Brown, J.C.; Dannevik, W.P.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Mirin, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Farrara, J.D.; Ma, C.C.; Mechoso, C.R.; Spahr, J.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Global registration of dynamic range scans for articulated model reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the articulated global registration algorithm to reconstruct articulated 3D models from dynamic range scan sequences. This new algorithm aligns multiple range scans simultaneously to reconstruct a full 3D model from the geometry of these scans. ... Keywords: Range scanning, animation reconstruction, articulated model, nonrigid registration

Will Chang; Matthias Zwicker

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Research Note Impacts of climate change on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Note Impacts of climate change on forestry in Scotland ­ a synopsis of spatial modelling research Duncan Ray January 2008 Climate change is now one of the greatest global challenges, and research by climate change. This Research Note provides an initial synopsis of the likely impacts, with preliminary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

402

CLOUD MODELING CHALLENGES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE DIURNAL TRANSITION FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP CONVECTION Tony Del Genio and Jingbo Wu NASA/GISS ARM Science Team Meeting, 3/31/09 Continental rainfall rates tend to peak in mid-late afternoon or evening Time of peak rainfall, TRMM PR Hirose et al. (2008) But not in GCMs, which like to rain near noon ___ TRMM 3B42 - - - gauge colors = models IPCC AR4 models (Dai, 2006) Some recent studies * Derbyshire et al. (2004): SCMs insensitive to tropospheric humidity * Grabowski et al. (2006): Need entrainment rate to decrease with time of day * Kuang and Bretherton (2006): Weaker entrainment rates for deep than for shallow convection - increasing parcel size as cold pools form? * Khairoutdinov and Randall (2006): Demonstration of downdraft/cold pool role in transition from shallow to deep

403

Is There Still Time to Avoid `Dangerous Anthropogenic Interference' with Global Climate?*#  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth of greenhouse gas emissions is slowed in the first quarter of this century, primarily via, and then reduced via advanced energy technologies that yield a cleaner atmosphere as well as a stable climate of the Holocene, a period of relatively stable climate that has existed for more than 10,000 years. Further

Hansen, James E.

404

MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) Version 2: Model Description and Baseline Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) is designed for analyzing the global environmental changes that may result from anthropogenic causes, quantifying the uncertainties associated with the projected changes, and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

405

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 1025% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE APPLICATION OF A STATISTICAL DOWNSCALING PROCESS TO DERIVE 21{sup ST} CENTURY RIVER FLOW PREDICTIONS USING A GLOBAL CLIMATE SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in coming decades depends, in part, on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to alter river flows from their current values, possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. Reliable climate projections are therefore critical to predicting the future water supply for the United States. These projections cannot be provided solely by global climate models (GCMs), however, as their resolution is too coarse to resolve the small-scale climate changes that can affect hydrology, and hence water supply, at regional to local scales. A process is needed to downscale the GCM results to the smaller scales and feed this into a surface hydrology model to help determine the ability of rivers to provide adequate flow to meet future needs. We apply a statistical downscaling to GCM projections of precipitation and temperature through the use of a scaling method. This technique involves the correction of the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the GCM-derived temperature and precipitation results for the 20{sup th} century, and the application of the same correction to 21{sup st} century GCM projections. This is done for three meteorological stations located within the Coosa River basin in northern Georgia, and is used to calculate future river flow statistics for the upper Coosa River. Results are compared to the historical Coosa River flow upstream from Georgia Power Companys Hammond coal-fired power plant and to flows calculated with the original, unscaled GCM results to determine the impact of potential changes in meteorology on future flows.

Werth, D.; Chen, K. F.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

Duke, R. D. and Kammen, D. M. (2003) "Energy for Development: Solar Home Systems in Africa and Global Carbon Emissions", Climate Change for Africa: Science,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duke, R. D. and Kammen, D. M. (2003) "Energy for Development: Solar Home Systems in Africa and Global Carbon Emissions", Climate Change for Africa: Science, Technology, Policy and Capacity Building: Solar Home Systems in Africa and Global Carbon Emissions Richard D. Duke* and Daniel M. Kammen

Kammen, Daniel M.

408

Advanced Technology Paths to Global Climate Stability: Energy for a Greenhouse Planet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solar and wind energy, solar power...fission-fusion hybrids, and fossil...global electric grids, and geoengineering...solar and wind energy, solar power...fission-fusion hybrids, and fossil...global electric grids, and geoengineering...solar and wind energy, solar power...fission-fusion hybrids, and fossil...global electric grids, and...

Martin I. Hoffert; Ken Caldeira; Gregory Benford; David R. Criswell; Christopher Green; Howard Herzog; Atul K. Jain; Haroon S. Kheshgi; Klaus S. Lackner; John S. Lewis; H. Douglas Lightfoot; Wallace Manheimer; John C. Mankins; Michael E. Mauel; L. John Perkins; Michael E. Schlesinger; Tyler Volk; Tom M. L. Wigley

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/mosaicc/66705/en/ FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Screenshot References: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)[1] "FAO-MOSAICC (for MOdelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change) is a system of models designed to carry out each step of the impact

410

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

411

The contribution of Utility-Scale Solar Energy to the global climate regulation and its effects on local ecosystem services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One solution to mitigate climate change can be the production of renewable energy. In this context, the aims of this paper are: (1) the identification of local unsuitable areas for the installation of Utility-Scale Solar Energy (USSE) in a municipality in southern Italy; (2) the assessment of the effects of their installation on local natural CO2 sequestration and on avoided CO2; and (3) the evaluation of their contribution to the global climate regulation through scenario analysis. Since 2007, 82 authorizations have been obtained for the installation of USSE in the municipality and 42 over 64 already completed have been installed in unsuitable areas. For what concerns the remaining USSE, two short-term scenarios are analysed in order to take into account their contribution in terms of climate regulation service. The first scenario is called Business As Usual with new planned USSE installed by 2014 also in unsuitable areas, and the second one with the new USSE installed only in suitable areas identified in this study. Surprisingly, Scenario 2 is characterized by a reduced natural capacity to sequester CO2 emissions and by a lower contribution of vegetation in providing the ecosystem service climate regulation in comparison with Scenario 1.

Antonella De Marco; Irene Petrosillo; Teodoro Semeraro; Maria Rita Pasimeni; Roberta Aretano; Giovanni Zurlini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Statistical representation of clouds in climate models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel approach for representing novel approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g., precipitation, interactions with dynamics, radiation, etc. However, it is complicated by: Pristine ice crystals, grown by diffusion of water vapor Snowflakes, grown by aggregation Pruppacher and Klett Rimed ice crystals (accretion of supercooled cloud water) Graupel (heavily

413

Does the Danube exist? Versions of reality given by various regional climate models and climatological datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of several regional climate models (RCMs) nested into the same run of the same Atmospheric Global Circulation Model (AGCM) regarding their representation of the statistical properties of the hydrological balance of the Danube river basin for 1961-1990. We also consider the datasets produced by the driving AGCM, from the ECMWF and NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. The hydrological balance is computed by integrating the precipitation and evaporation fields over the area of interest. Large discrepancies exist among RCMs for the monthly climatology as well as for the mean and variability of the annual balances, and only few datasets are consistent with the observed discharge values of the Danube at its Delta, even if the driving AGCM provides itself an excellent estimate. Since the considered approach relies on the mass conservation principle and bypasses the details of the air-land interface modeling, we propose that the atmospheric components of RCMs still face diffic...

Lucarini, V; Kriegerova, I; Speranza, A; Danihlik, Robert; Kriegerova, Ida; Lucarini, Valerio; Speranza, Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Global and Convex Optimization in Modeling Environments ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 12, 2002 ... In this study, a bipolar transistor is modeled by an electrical circuit. .... power, delivered to the radiation resistance Rr, to input electric power.

Administrator

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the realm of solar radiation forecasting. In this work, two forecasting models: Autoregressive Moving1 A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION. The very first results show an improvement brought by this approach. 1. INTRODUCTION Solar radiation

Boyer, Edmond

417

Coupling climate models with the Earth System Modeling Framework and the Common Component Architecture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System ... Keywords: climate model, framework, model coupling

S. J. Zhou

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Climate model dependence and the Ensemble Dependence Transformation of CMIP projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Obtaining multiple estimates of future climate for a given emissions scenario is key to understanding the likelihood and uncertainty associated with climate-related impacts. This is typically done by collating model estimates from different ...

Abramowitz; G.Bishop; C. H.

419

Impacts on ocean heat from transient mesoscale eddies in a hierarchy of climate models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We characterize impacts on heat in the ocean climate system from transient ocean mesoscale eddies. Our tool is a suite of centennial-scale 1990 radiatively forced numerical climate simulations from three GFDL coupled models comprising the CM2-O ...

Stephen M. Griffies; Michael Winton; Whit G. Anderson; Rusty Benson; Thomas L. Delworth; Carolina O. Dufour; John P. Dunne; Paul Goddard; Adele k. Morrison; Anthony Rosati; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Jianjun Yin; Rong Zhang

420

A snowball Earth versus a slushball Earth: Results from Neoproterozoic climate modeling sensitivity experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Goosse, H., Lohmann, G., Lunkeit, F., Mokhov, I., Petoukhov, V., Stone, P., and Wang, Z., 2002, Earth system models of intermediate complexity: Closing the gap in the spectrum of climate system: Climate Dynamics, v. 18 p. 579-586...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

422

Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

Gueneau, Arthur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global climate policy impacts on livestock, land use, livelihoods, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per year. For comparison, the Green Climate Fund, established at the...forestry total abatement curve (green) and the intensification curve...products 34 nmm Non-Metallic Minerals: cement, plaster, lime, gravel, concrete 35 i_s Iron...

Alla A. Golub; Benjamin B. Henderson; Thomas W. Hertel; Pierre J. Gerber; Steven K. Rose; Brent Sohngen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting...quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology...influence a population's capacity to respond to climatic...otherwise minimizing solar radiation. However...behavioural thermoregulation capacity [52]. As shown in...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3 /yr for the climateHESSD 4, 4069­4124, 2007 Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler System Sciences Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler Institute

Boyer, Edmond

426

Responses of energy use to climate change: A climate modeling study  

SciTech Connect

[1] Using a general-circulation climate model to drive an energy-use model, we projected changes in USA energy-use and in corresponding fossil-fuel CO2 emissions through year 2025 for a low (1.2 XC) and a high (3.4 XC) temperature response to CO2 doubling. The low- T scenario had a cumulative (2003-2025) energy increase of 1.09 quadrillion Btu (quads) for cooling/heating demand. Northeastern states had net energy reductions for cooling/heating over the entire period, but in most other regions energy increases for cooling outweighed energy decreases for heating. The high-?T scenario had significantly increased warming, especially in winter, so decreased heating needs led to a cumulative (2003-2025) heating/cooling energy decrease of 0.82 quads. In both scenarios, CO2 emissions increases from electricity generation outweighed CO2 emissions decreases from reduced heating needs. The results reveal the intricate energy-economy structure that must be considered in projecting consequences of climate warming for energy, economics, and fossil-fuel carbon emissions.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Blasing, T J [ORNL; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L [ORNL; Broniak, C [Oregon State University

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Climate change and uncertainty in ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enhance regional climate change impact studies." Eos Trans.hydrologic impacts of climate change in the Sierra Nevada,of a century of climate change on small-mammal communities

Alvarez, Otto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FCC-70 FCC-70 Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems John Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The air-conditioning (A/C) system compressor load can significantly impact the fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric automobiles. With the increasing emphasis on fuel economy, it is clear that the A/C compressor load needs to be reduced. In order to accomplish this goal, more efficient climate control delivery systems and reduced peak soak temperatures will be necessary to reduce the impact of vehicle A/C systems on fuel economy and tailpipe emissions. Good analytical techniques are important in identifying promising concepts. The goal at

429

Environmental stratification to model climate change impacts on biodiversity and rubber production in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis and multi-model approach, based on a statistically derived Global Environmental Stratification (GEnS) and using a downscaled ensemble (n=63) of CIMP5 Earth System Models applied across four representative concentration pathways (RCP), has been used to project the impact of climate change on spatial distribution of bioclimatic zones and ecosystems within the biodiverse rich Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province, by the year 2050. Four bioclimatic zones and 9 strata were identified, overlaid with protected areas, and associated with on-going landuse change, i.e. a rapid increase in rubber plantation from 8% to 22% of total area between 2002 and 2010. Significant changes in the areal extent and distribution of all zones and strata are projected, with an averaged mean annual temperature increase ranging from 1.6C to 2.4C. By 2050, there are significant geographical shifts in all identified strata, with an average upward shift of 309m of elevation for all strata. On average, more than 75% of Xishuangbanna is predicted to shift to a different zone, with 96% shifting to a different stratum. The area conducive to rubber plantations, currently limited by climatic conditions, expands to nearly 75% of the total area. Climatic change potentially removes the bioclimatic barriers to further expansion of rubber plantations within the area and increases pressure on remaining biodiversity both within and outside of protected areas. The analysis provides the basis for understanding potential impacts of changing bioclimatic conditions on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and landuse change trends, within the context of ongoing rapid change and agricultural expansion in the area. Current efforts to conserve forests, biodiversity and traditional landuse systems require an improved understanding of both the projected climatic changes and the responses of biodiversity and traditional agricultural systems to changing conditions.

Robert J. Zomer; Antonio Trabucco; Mingcheng Wang; Rong Lang; Huafang Chen; Marc J. Metzger; Alex Smajgl; Philip Beckschfer; Jianchu Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

431

Climate mitigations impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sectors use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sectors water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Global ocean modeling on the Connection Machine  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed a version of the Bryan-Cox-Semtner ocean model (Bryan, 1969; Semtner, 1976; Cox, 1984) for massively parallel computers. Such models are three-dimensional, Eulerian models that use latitude and longitude as the horizontal spherical coordinates and fixed depth levels as the vertical coordinate. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with a turbulent eddy viscosity, and mass continuity equation are solved, subject to the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations. The traditional model formulation uses a rigid-lid approximation (vertical velocity = 0 at the ocean surface) to eliminate fast surface waves. These waves would otherwise require that a very short time step be used in numerical simulations, which would greatly increase the computational cost. To solve the equations with the rigid-lid assumption, the equations of motion are split into two parts: a set of twodimensional ``barotropic`` equations describing the vertically-averaged flow, and a set of three-dimensional ``baroclinic`` equations describing temperature, salinity and deviations of the horizontal velocities from the vertically-averaged flow.

Smith, R.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Malone, R.C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Global climate change: Some implications, opportunities, and challenges for US forestry  

SciTech Connect

It is widely agreed that the concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere is increasing, that this increase is a consequence of man's activities, and that there is significant risk that this will lead to changes in the earth's climate. The question is now being discussed what, if anything, we should be doing to minimize and/or adapt to changes in climate. Virtually every statement on this matter; from the US Office of Technology Assessment, to the National Academy of Science, to the Nairobi Declaration on Climatic Change, includes some recommendation for planting and protecting forests. In fact, forestry is intimately involved in the climate change debate for several reasons: changing climate patterns will affect existing forests, tropical deforestation is one of the major sources of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, reforestation projects could remove additional carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and there is renewed interest in wood-based or other renewable fuels to replace fossil fuels. Part of the enthusiasm for forestry-related strategies in a greenhouse context is the perception that forests not only provide greenhouse benefits but also serve other desirable social objectives. This discussion will explore the current range of thinking in this area and try to stimulate additional thinking on the rationality of the forestry-based approaches and the challenges posed for US forestry.

Marland, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A fully traits-based approach to modeling global vegetation distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biosphereclimate interactions. Despite their importance, DGVMs are among the most uncertain components of earth system models when predicting climate change (2). DGVMs have been built around the concept of Plant Functional Types (PFTs...

Peter M. van Bodegom; Jacob C. Douma; Lieneke M. Verheijen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Further Program Development for the Cost Minimizing Global Energy System Model GET-RC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The linear programming Global Energy Transition (GET) model covers the global energy system and is designed to meet exogenously given energy demand levels, subject to (more)

Andersson, Magnus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A framework for interpreting climate model outputs Nadja A. Leith and Richard E. Chandler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to illustrate the methodology. Some key words: Climate change; Climate model uncertainty; Contemporaneous ARMA acknowledged that human activities have caused changes in the Earth's climate (Solomon et al., 2007). Indeed #12;the hydrological cycle (Solomon et al., 2007). To accommodate this possibility therefore, planners

Guillas, Serge

437

Developing an integrated end-to-end TeraGrid climate modeling environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a widely used community model for studying the climate system on the Earth. The CESM model is both data and computationally intensive, making it difficult for users to set up and run CESM simulations using local ... Keywords: CCSM, CESM, ESMF, Purdue CCSM portal, TeraGrid, climate model, earth system grid, metadata, science gateway

Lan Zhao; Carol X. Song; Christopher S. Thompson; Han Zhang; Madhavan Lakshminarayanan; Cecelia DeLuca; Sylvia Murphy; Kathy Saint; Don Middleton; Nathan Wilhelmi; Eric Nienhouse; Michael Burek

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Detecting anthropogenic influences on climate with an atmospheric model forced with observed variations in sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect

Six ensembles of four simulations with the Hadley Centre atmospheric general circulation model (HADAM2a) have been carried out for late 1948 to the end of 1994 with different specified atmospheric forcing distributions. These simulations are being used to understand the role of different forcing processes in determining the observed climate variations during the second half of the twentieth century. All ensembles started from different initial conditions and were forced with specified global observed monthly sea ice and sea surface temperature distributions using the GISST1.1 data set. The approach used deterministic sampling of observed variations in climate rather than a coupled model. The technique was also different in that it looked at the smaller residual climate signal due to direct anthropogenic over and above those captured in ocean surface temperatures. The results indicate that this method is a useful complement to approaches based on coupled models, aided by the fact that some of the residual climate signals are almost as large as the full signals seen in coupled models, particularly in the stratosphere. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Folland, C.K.; Sexton, D. [Hadley Centre, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Karoly, D. [Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component Francois Leblanc a,*, R 2010 Accepted 27 April 2010 Available online 5 May 2010 Keywords: Mercury, Atmosphere Aeronomy a b s t r a c t Our understanding of Mercury's sodium exosphere has improved considerably in the last 5

Johnson, Robert E.

440

Global sensitivity analysis of computer models with functional inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function. Lastly, the new methodology is applied to an industrial computer code that simulates the nuclear with scalar input variables. For example, in the nuclear engineering domain, global SA tools have been applied (Helton et al. [7]), environmental model of dose calculations (Iooss et al. [10]), reactor dosimetry

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ARM - Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change The U.S. Environmental...

442

The Greenhouse Theory of Climate Change: A Test by an Inadvertent Global Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...climate change. Next to water vapor, douds play the...is referred to as the atmospheric 'window." Abbreviations...L is the doud liquid water content, and r is the...radius. The liquid water content L = (4/3...closely correlated with condensation nudei. Hence, on combining...

V. RAMANATHAN

1988-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ecological Restoration and Global Climate Change James A. Harris,1,5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses to climate change because such activities help influence the planet's carbon budget in a positive ``brave new world,'' also known as our ``planet in peril,'' where rapidly changing environmental and socio cases over periods of intensity. However, it is clear

Schweik, Charles M.

444

Projected impacts of climate change on regional capacities for global plant species richness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A1, B1, B2). The dark green colour stands for 100% congruence...Hawkins, B. A. , 2003 Energy, water, and broad-scale...between contemporary water-energy dynamics and other non-climatic...significantly (-9.4%) under the 'business as usual' A1FI/+4.0 degrees...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Opinion: Canada's efforts accelerate a global tragedy of the climate commons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Keystone XL pipeline overlaps Nature this week, which projects that, within a generation, known climates' for an answer" regarding the impending U.S. decision about the Keystone XL pipeline overlaps inauspiciously on Keystone XL exemplifies the point where the wheels of informed and ethical decision-making come off

446

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. A. Grodsky (2005), Sea level rise and the warming of thecontributions to sea level rise, Oceanography, 24, 112121,acceleration in global sea-level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Climate Change and a Global City: An Assessment of the Metropolitan East Coast (MEC) Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wastewater processing plants are located at critical low elevations. They are exposed to coastal or riverine cities in the US and the world face similar problems. Sea level rise is a global issue of increasing

448

The Politics and Culture of Climate Change: US Actors and Global Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the scientific consensus on global warming, many people in the USA,both ordinary citizens and elected leaders alikeremain skeptical of the need to act, and in fact remain skeptical of the idea that h...

Charles Waugh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Global Climatic and Stable Isotopic Correlations During the Early Permian (Cisuralian)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effects of global warming. This study presents new oxygen and carbon stable isotopic data (?18O and ?13C, VPDB) from carefully screened, early Permian brachiopod shells from the Ural Mountains. Using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, 24 specimens were...

Noret, Jordan R.

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Towards the Prediction of Decadal to Centennial Climate Processes in the Coupled Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect

In this proposal, we have made major advances in the understanding of decadal and long term climate variability. (a) We performed a systematic study of multidecadal climate variability in FOAM-LPJ and CCSM-T31, and are starting exploring decadal variability in the IPCC AR4 models. (b) We develop several novel methods for the assessment of climate feedbacks in the observation. (c) We also developed a new initialization scheme DAI (Dynamical Analogue Initialization) for ensemble decadal prediction. (d) We also studied climate-vegetation feedback in the observation and models. (e) Finally, we started a pilot program using Ensemble Kalman Filter in CGCM for decadal climate prediction.

Zhengyu Liu, J. E. Kutzbach, R. Jacob, C. Prentice

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » Climate and Research » Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

452

Berkeley Lab Scientific Programs: Climate Change and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change and Environmental Science Climate image Earth scientists study global climate with the help of computational models At Berkeley Lab, climate scientists, geologists, microbiologists, computer scientists, and engineers tackle some of the planet's most pressing issues. Climate modeling Lab scientists are creating a new kind of climate model that integrates cutting-edge climate science, such as the pioneering work on the carbon cycle conducted at Berkeley Lab. The goal is not to predict climate alone but interactions among climate, water, and energy on a global scale. It will be able to incorporate fresh data and generate new scenarios at any point: energy demand and carbon emissions; changes in the composition of the atmosphere and the heat entering and leaving it; impacts on ecosystems

453

Probabilistic Forecast for Twenty-First-Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (Without Policy) and Climate Parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the models first projections were published in 2003, substantial improvements ...

A. P. Sokolov; P. H. Stone; C. E. Forest; R. Prinn; M. C. Sarofim; M. Webster; S. Paltsev; C. A. Schlosser; D. Kicklighter; S. Dutkiewicz; J. Reilly; C. Wang; B. Felzer; J. M. Melillo; H. D. Jacoby

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Probabilistic Forecast for Twenty-First-Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (Without Policy) and Climate Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the models first projections were published in 2003, ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

455

Transient climate change and potential croplands of the world in the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cropland distribution model, which is based on climate, soil and topography, is applied to estimate the area and spatial distribution of global potential croplands under contemporary climate and to assess the effect of ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Tian, Hanqin.; Pan, Yude.; Vrsmarty, Charles, J.; Yang, Zili.

456

An Evaluation of Tropical Cyclone Genesis Forecasts from Global Numerical Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) forecasts rely heavily on output from global numerical models. While considerable research has investigated the skill of various models with respect to track and intensity, few studies have considered how well global models ...

Daniel J. Halperin; Henry E. Fuelberg; Robert E. Hart; Joshua H. Cossuth; Philip Sura; Richard J. Pasch

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, ?Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Models?.

Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

The computational future for climate and Earth system models: on the path to petaflop and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...computational future for climate and Earth system models: on the path to petaflop and...development of the climate and Earth system models has had a long history, starting...long-term goal of building the Earth system models that would go beyond what is...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Modeling Obliquity and CO2 Effects on Southern Hemisphere Climate during the Past 408 ka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of obliquity and CO2 changes on Southern Hemispheric climate is studied with a series of numerical modeling experiments. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LochVECODEECBiltCLIOAgism Model (LOVECLIM) and a ...

Axel Timmermann; Tobias Friedrich; Oliver Elison Timm; Megumi O. Chikamoto; Ayako Abe-Ouchi; Andrey Ganopolski

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Global climate policy impacts on livestock, land use, livelihoods, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...households, the effect of rising food prices on food consumption...of changing prices and consumption...the spending effect). When this...nutrition profile, average per capita...tax on fossil fuel CO2 emissions...paper. The net effect on abatement...global carbon price of $27/tCO2eq...

Alla A. Golub; Benjamin B. Henderson; Thomas W. Hertel; Pierre J. Gerber; Steven K. Rose; Brent Sohngen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Protecting terrestrial ecosystems and the climate through a global carbon market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a global carbon market Robert Bonnie Melissa...Washington, DC 20009, USA Protecting terrestrial...through a carbon market 1861 0 400 800 1200 1600 USA China Russia Japan...US Department of Energy (1999). ural...typically have market values for the...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

SYNTHESIS Ecotypic variation in the context of global climate change: revisiting the rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Yoram Yom-Tov6 1 Redpath Museum, McGill University, 859 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH 8057 Zu¨ rich, Switzerland 6 Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978). In light of the increased rate of global warming, we urgently require a clear understanding

Yom-Tov, Yoram

465

Climate Change Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

Romano, Daniela

466

Climate Change at Annual Timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

Stine, Alexander Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

Codron, Francis

468

Global Health: Response to the AIDS Pandemic A Global Health Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...new infections, two thirds occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. International Response to AIDS A Global Health Model. It was not until the third decade of the epidemic that the world's public health officials, community leaders, and politicians united to combat AIDS. In 2001, the United Nations General... The HIVAIDS pandemic is now in its fourth decade. This article describes how HIVAIDS has been transformed from a death sentence into a manageable illness and outlines the need for continued and coordinated international efforts.

Piot P.; Quinn T.C.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

469

PURDUE UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY RESEARCH Recognizing the grand-challenge problems of global energy demands with evidence of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PURDUE UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY RESEARCH Recognizing the grand-challenge problems of global of energy including fossil fuels, nuclear, solar, wind and bioenergy. The activities incorporate socio energy demands with evidence of climate change and broader environmental impacts, Purdue is building

470

Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

Makundi, Willy R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

Harker, Geraint

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Investment Dimension: Enhanced Data Equals Better Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy provided the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility with $60 million for new and upgraded instrumentation, equipment, and infrastructure to improve atmospheric data sets. These enhancements will take place among the permanent ARM research sites in Oklahoma and Alaska in the United States, and near the equator in the tropical Western Pacific. They will also advance the capabilities of ARMs mobile and aerial research platforms. This article focuses on key enhancements - particularly new scanning radars, enhanced lidar technologies, aerosol observation systems, and in situ aircraft probes - that will provide unprecedented data sets for the modeling community.

Roeder, Lynne R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

474

An Evaluation of Biomass Energy Potential with a Global Energy and Land Use Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors evaluate global land use competition and bioenergy potential through developing a global energy and land use model using a SD ... The model describes competition among various uses of biomass such as ...

H. Yamamoto; K. Yamaji

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Analysis of Workload and Load Balancing Issues in the NCAR Community Climate Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Climate Model were instrumented to produce per­cell load data for each time step, revealing load, this approach reduced the amount of load data by a factor of 12, and simplified greatly the taskAnalysis of Workload and Load Balancing Issues in the NCAR Community Climate Model John G

476

A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Brunswick, NJ. 5 Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Robock, Alan

477

A Sparse Bayesian Model for Dependence Analysis of Extremes: Climate Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sparse Bayesian Model for Dependence Analysis of Extremes: Climate Applications Debasish Das applications, such as climate, finance and social media among others, we are often interested in extreme events. An important part of modeling extremes is dis- covery of covariates on which the quantities related

Obradovic, Zoran

478

RESPONSES OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND TOTAL CARBON STORAGE TO CHANGES IN CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total. For contemporary climate with 315 ppmv CO2, TEM estimated that global NPP is 47.9 PgC/yr and global total carbon-q climate and +20.6% (9.9 PgC/yr) for the GISS climate. The responses of global total carbon storage are +17

479

Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

480

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Mechanisms of Decadal Arctic Climate Variability in the Community Climate System Model, Version 2 (CCSM2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain natural climate variability in the Arctic. These include processes related to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO), anticyclonic/cyclonic regimes, changes in ...

Hugues Goosse; Marika M. Holland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Sensitivity of Climate Change Projections to Uncertainties in the Estimates of Observed Changes in Deep-Ocean Heat Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT 2D climate model is used to make probabilistic projections for changes in global mean surface temperature and for thermosteric sea level rise under a variety of forcing scenarios. The uncertainties in climate ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

485

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Modelling the economic and social consequences of drought under future projections of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China, Ethiopia, India, Spain/Portugal and the USA. Future projections of drought magnitude for 2003-2050 were modelled using the integrated assessment model CIAS (Community Integrated Assessment System), for a range of climate and emission scenarios...

Jenkins, Katie L.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part I: The Seasonal Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The West African monsoon seasonal cycle is simulated with two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), which uses traditional convective parameterizations, and the superparameterized CCSM (SP-CCSM), in which ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part II: African Easterly Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between African easterly waves and convection is examined in two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the superparameterized CCSM (SP-CCSM). In the CCSM, the easterly waves are much ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: Climate Relations in Eight CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Probabilistic Forecast for 21st Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (without Policy) and Climate Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model's first projections were published in 2003 substantial improvements have been made to ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

491

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

492

Cpl6: The New Extensible, High-Performance Parallel Coupler forthe Community Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Coupled climate models are large, multiphysics applications designed to simulate the Earth's climate and predict the response of the climate to any changes in the forcing or boundary conditions. The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a widely used state-of-art climate model that has released several versions to the climate community over the past ten years. Like many climate models, CCSM employs a coupler, a functional unit that coordinates the exchange of data between parts of climate system such as the atmosphere and ocean. This paper describes the new coupler, cpl6, contained in the latest version of CCSM,CCSM3. Cpl6 introduces distributed-memory parallelism to the coupler, a class library for important coupler functions, and a standardized interface for component models. Cpl6 is implemented entirely in Fortran90 and uses Model Coupling Toolkit as the base for most of its classes. Cpl6 gives improved performance over previous versions and scales well on multiple platforms.

Craig, Anthony P.; Jacob, Robert L.; Kauffman, Brain; Bettge,Tom; Larson, Jay; Ong, Everest; Ding, Chris; He, Yun

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

493

ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Climate Modeling and Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the familiar seven-day weather forecast and the century-long global-warming projection, Maryland-Rabinovitz's work is leading to improved predictions of extreme weather events such as monsoons, intense storms-use patterns and their contribution to climate change. Ning Zeng investigates how ice sheets store carbon

Hill, Wendell T.

494

Climate change under aggressive mitigation: the ENSEMBLES multi-model experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-10, 12165 Berlin, Germany H. Huebener Hessian Agency for the Environment and Geology, Rheingaustra?e 186, Italy W. May Á S. Yang Danish Climate Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2100.4) with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K, is studied

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

495

Integrating seasonal climate prediction and agricultural models for insights into agricultural practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the global climate system, and substantial...a number of pilot studies targeting smallholder...and tradeoffs, and foster co-learning and...discussion support systems (Meinke et al...Challinor, A., Wheeler, T. Moron, V...Burkina Faso as a case study. Agr. Syst. 74...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: sei-us.org/projects/id/218 CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Screenshot References: SEI-CRED[1] SEI's Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) is an integrated

497

Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Title Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hansen, James E., Makiko Sato, Reto Ruedy, Pushker A. Kharecha, Andrew A. Lacis, Ronald L. Miller, Larissa Nazarenko, Kwok-Wai Ken Lo, Gavin A. Schmidt, Gary L. Russell, Igor D. Aleinov, Susanne E. Bauer, Ellen Baum, Brain Cairns, Vittorio M. Canuto, Mark Chandler, Ye Cheng, Armond Cohen, Anthony Del Genio, Gregory S. Faluvegi, Eric L. Fleming, Andrew D. Friend, Timothy M. Hall, Charles H. Jackman, Jeffrey Jonas, Maxwell Kelley, Nancy Y. Kiang, Dorothy M. Koch, Gordon J. Labow, J. Lerner, Surabi Menon, Tihomir Novakov, Valdar Oinas, Jan Perlwitz, Judith Perlwitz, David H. Rind, Anastasia Romanou, Robert B. Schmunk, Drew T. Shindell, Peter H. Stone, S. Sun, David G. Streets, Nicholas Tausnev, D. Thresher, Nadine Unger, Mao-Sung Yao, and S. Zhang

498

DOE Science Showcase - Featured Climate Change Research from DOE Databases  

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Featured Climate Change Research from DOE Databases Featured Climate Change Research from DOE Databases Search Results from DOE Databases View research documents, citations, accomplishments, patents, and projects related to climate change, one of the primary scientific challenges addressed through the Incite Program. Climate Change Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE R&D Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Climate Modeling Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE R&D Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Ocean Turbulence and Climate Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Cloud Simulation and Models Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Global Warming Information Bridge Energy Citations Database

499

Reconciling Sectoral Abatement Strategies with Global Climate Targets: The Case of the Chinese Passenger Vehicle Fleet  

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(7-11) The latter report(11) estimates future vehicle ownership based on per capita GDP and stresses the importance of a dynamic stock model and technological change. ... The annual kilometrage (K) and fuel consumption per km (F) for all model years, cohorts, and drive technologies as well as the CO2 intensity of gasoline determine direct energy demand and emissions. ...

Stefan Pauliuk; Ni Made A. Dhaniati; Daniel B. Mller

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

500

Climate Studies with a Multi-Layer Energy Balance Model. Part I: Model Description and Sensitivity to the Solar Constant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nine-layer, zonally averaged, steady-state model has been developed for use in climate sensitivity studies. The model is based upon thermal energy balance and includes recently developed accurate treatment of radiative transfer, parameterized ...

Li Peng; Ming-Dah Chou; Albert Arking

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z