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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over the North Slope of Alaska Xie, Shaocheng Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore...

2

Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

3

A University Perspective on Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric models are proliferating, in part because of the widespread availability of powerful computers. There are about two dozen global modeling groups at work in the United States today. These groups are put into four categories, ...

David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Prognostic Cloud Water Parameterization for Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient new prognostic cloud water parameterization designed for use in global climate models is described. The scheme allows for life cycle effects in stratiform clouds and permits cloud optical properties to be determined interactively. ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Mao-Sung Yao; William Kovari; Kenneth K-W. Lo

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Local and Global Climate Feedbacks in Models with Differing Climate Sensitivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatic response to a 5% increase in solar constant is analyzed in three coupled global ocean–atmosphere general circulation models, the NCAR Climate System Model version 1 (CSM1), the Community Climate System Model version 2 (CCSM2), and ...

Markus Stowasser; Kevin Hamilton; George J. Boer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Global Monsoon Variability Simulated by CMIP3 Coupled Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global monsoon climate variability during the second half of the twentieth century simulated by 21 coupled global climate models (CGCMs) that participated in the World Climate Research Programme’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 ...

Hyung-Jin Kim; Bin Wang; Qinghua Ding

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Global Climate Simulation with the University of Wisconsin Global Hybrid Isentropic Coordinate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to briefly describe the global atmospheric University of Wisconsin (UW) hybrid isentropic–eta coordinate (UW ?–?) model and document results from a 14-yr climate simulation. The model, developed through modification ...

Todd K. Schaack; Tom H. Zapotocny; Allen J. Lenzen; Donald R. Johnson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regional Climate Models Add Value to Global Model Data: A Review and Selected Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important challenge in current climate modeling is to realistically describe small-scale weather statistics, such as topographic precipitation and coastal wind patterns, or regional phenomena like polar lows. Global climate models simulate atmospheric ...

Frauke Feser; Burkhardt Rockel; Hans von Storch; Jörg Winterfeldt; Matthias Zahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Considerations in the Selection of Global Climate Models for Regional Climate Projections: The Arctic as a Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections at regional scales are in increased demand from management agencies and other stakeholders. While global atmosphere–ocean climate models provide credible quantitative estimates of future climate at continental scales and above,...

James E. Overland; Muyin Wang; Nicholas A. Bond; John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol particles in the lower atmosphere exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently, there is a need to represent these influences in global climate models, and models have ...

Steven J. Ghan; Stephen E. Schwartz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Incorporating Urban Systems in Global Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resolutions IPCC AR4 The Future? Preliminary Data #12;CLM Urban Canyon Model Building Building Solar Radiation properties Building Properties Thermal Conductivity (W/mK) Heat Capacity (MJ/m^3 K) Albedo Density (kg/m^3T ,1shdwlT min , maxi buildT T T

Peterson, Blake R.

12

Global Modeling of the Contrail and Contrail Cirrus Climate Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite considerable technological advances, aviation impacts on global climate are significant and may constitute a future constraint on the continued growth of air travel. The most important but least understood component in aviation climate ...

Ulrike Burkhardt; Bernd Kärcher; Ulrich Schumann

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Efficient Three-Dimensional Global Models for Climate Studies: Models I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmospheric model is developed with a computational efficiency which allows long-range climate experiments. The model solves the simultaneous equations for conservation of mass, energy and momentum, and the equation of state on a grid. ...

J. Hansen; G. Russell; D. Rind; P. Stone; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; R. Ruedy; L. Travis

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

GFDL's CM2 Global Coupled Climate Models. Part I: Formulation and Simulation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled climate models developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) are described. The models were designed to simulate atmospheric and oceanic climate and ...

Thomas L. Delworth; Anthony J. Broccoli; Anthony Rosati; Ronald J. Stouffer; V. Balaji; John A. Beesley; William F. Cooke; Keith W. Dixon; John Dunne; K. A. Dunne; Jeffrey W. Durachta; Kirsten L. Findell; Paul Ginoux; Anand Gnanadesikan; C. T. Gordon; Stephen M. Griffies; Rich Gudgel; Matthew J. Harrison; Isaac M. Held; Richard S. Hemler; Larry W. Horowitz; Stephen A. Klein; Thomas R. Knutson; Paul J. Kushner; Amy R. Langenhorst; Hyun-Chul Lee; Shian-Jiann Lin; Jian Lu; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; V. Ramaswamy; Joellen Russell; M. Daniel Schwarzkopf; Elena Shevliakova; Joseph J. Sirutis; Michael J. Spelman; William F. Stern; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Bruce Wyman; Fanrong Zeng; Rong Zhang

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Regional Climates in the GISS Global Circulation Model: Synoptic-Scale Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model simulations of global climate change are seen as an essential component of any program at understanding human impact on the global environment. A major weakness of current general circulation models (GCMs), however, is their perceived ...

B. Hewitson; R. G. Crane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The GISS Global Climate-Middle Atmosphere Model. Part I: Model Structure and Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GISS global climate model (Hansen et al.) has been extended to include the middle atmosphere up to an altitude of approximately 85 km. The model has the full array of processes used for climate research, i.e., numerical solutions of the ...

D. Rind; R. Suozzo; N. K. Balachandran; A. Lacis; G. Russell

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Comparison of Soil-Moisture Sensitivity in Two Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged surface hydrological processes from two global spectral general circulation climate models coupled to simple slab-ocean mixed layers are compared for the climates simulated with present-day (control) and increased atmospheric carbon ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

19

A Global Climate Model (GENESIS) with a Land-Surface Transfer Scheme (LSX). Part I: Present Climate Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present-day climatology of a global climate model (GENESIS Version 1.02) is described. The model includes a land-surface transfer component (LSX) that accounts for the physical effects of vegetation. The atmospheric general circulation model ...

Starley L. Thompson; David Pollard

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Local Versus Nonlocal Boundary-Layer Diffusion in a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a local and a nonlocal scheme for vertical diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer are compared within the context of a global climate model. The global model is an updated version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2). ...

A. A. M. Holtslag; B. A. Boville

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

California Wintertime Precipitation Bias in Regional and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California and compared. Several averaging methodologies are ...

Peter Caldwell

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

23

An Analysis of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves in 20 WCRP CMIP3 Global Coupled Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from 20 coupled global climate models is analyzed to determine whether convectively coupled Kelvin waves exist in the models, and, if so, how their horizontal and vertical structures compare to observations. Model data are obtained from ...

Katherine H. Straub; Patrick T. Haertel; George N. Kiladis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI Name: Venkatramani Balaji PI Email: balaji@princeton.edu Institution: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science We expect our understanding of the role of clouds in climate to undergo a qualitative change as the resolutions of global models begin to encompass clouds. At these resolutions, non-hydrostatic dynamics become significant and deep convective processes are resolved. We are poised at the threshold of being able to run global scale simulations that include direct, non-parameterized, simulations of deep convective clouds. The goal of this

25

GFDL's CM2 Global Coupled Climate Models. Part IV: Idealized Climate Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate response to idealized changes in the atmospheric CO2 concentration by the new GFDL climate model (CM2) is documented. This new model is very different from earlier GFDL models in its parameterizations of subgrid-scale physical ...

R. J. Stouffer; A. J. Broccoli; T. L. Delworth; K. W. Dixon; R. Gudgel; I. Held; R. Hemler; T. Knutson; Hyun-Chul Lee; M. D. Schwarzkopf; B. Soden; M. J. Spelman; M. Winton; Fanrong Zeng

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part I: Formulation and Evaluation for Two Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanization, the expansion of built-up areas, is an important yet less-studied aspect of land use/land cover change in climate science. To date, most global climate models used to evaluate effects of land use/land cover change on climate do not ...

K. W. Oleson; G. B. Bonan; J. Feddema; M. Vertenstein; C. S. B. Grimmond

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

•\tEPIC - (aka WinEPIC) The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

29

Multicentury Changes to the Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled climate and carbon (CO2) cycle model is used to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to the year 2300 that would occur if CO2 emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the ...

G. Bala; K. Caldeira; A. Mirin; M. Wickett; C. Delire

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Global Hydrological Cycle and Atmospheric Shortwave Absorption in Climate Models under CO2 Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spread among the predictions by climate models for the strengthening of the global hydrological cycle [i.e., the global mean surface latent heat flux (LH), or, equivalently, precipitation] at a given level of CO2-induced global warming is of ...

Ken Takahashi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Dec 16 2013 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Chris A. Fischer Speaker(s) Title: National Center for Atmospheric Research The Community Earth System Model (CESM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) are community models involving several different developers. With so many different developers it becomes imperative to carry out continuous testing during development. I'll provide a brief introduction to CESM and CAM then cover the testing that is being carried out on both. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a global climate model used to predict past, present and future climates. CESM is a fully couple model,

32

The Effect of a Solar Perturbation on a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-three-dimensional global climate model is used to study the effect of a transient change in solar radiation on the model's climate. The solar constant is decreased abruptly by 5 percent in the 10th year of a 50-year run. It is then ...

William D. Sellers

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Global Data on Land Surface Parameters from NOAA AVHRR for Use in Numerical Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews satellite datasets from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer that could be employed in support of numerical climate modeling at regional and global scales. Presently available NOAA operational and research datasets ...

G. Garik Gutman

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Equatorial Circulation of a Global Ocean Climate Model with Anisotropic Horizontal Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal momentum flux in a global ocean climate model is formulated as an anisotropic viscosity with two spatially varying coefficients. This friction can be made purely dissipative, does not produce unphysical torques, and satisfies the ...

William G. Large; Gokhan Danabasoglu; James C. McWilliams; Peter R. Gent; Frank O. Bryan

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Southern Ocean Response to Strengthening Winds in an Eddy-Permitting Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global climate model with horizontal resolutions in the ocean ranging from relatively coarse to eddy permitting is used to investigate the resolution dependence of the Southern Ocean response to poleward intensifying winds through the past and ...

Paul Spence; John C. Fyfe; Alvaro Montenegro; Andrew J. Weaver

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Global Database of Land Surface Parameters at 1-km Resolution in Meteorological and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecoclimap, a new complete surface parameter global dataset at a 1-km resolution, is presented. It is intended to be used to initialize the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATs) in meteorological and climate models (at all horizontal ...

Valéry Masson; Jean-Louis Champeaux; Fabrice Chauvin; Christelle Meriguet; Roselyne Lacaze

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global Climate and Ocean Circulation on an Aquaplanet Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low-resolution coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) is used to study the characteristics of the large-scale ocean circulation and its climatic impacts in a series of global coupled aquaplanet experiments. Three ...

Robin S. Smith; Clotilde Dubois; Jochem Marotzke

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Climate Drift in a Global Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global version of the GFDL modular ocean model is forced using conventional restoring boundary conditions (BCs), mixed BCs (i.e., restoring the upper-level temperature but specifying a fixed salt flux), and stochastic fluxes of both heat and ...

Scott B. Power

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparison of Arctic Climate Simulations by Uncoupled and Coupled Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of present-day Arctic climate are assessed from suites of 1) 13 global atmosphere-only models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) and 2) 8 coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice models from the Data Distribution Center ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman; Veronika Govorkova; Tatyana Pavlova

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simulated Diurnal Range and Variability of Surface Temperature in a Global Climate Model for Present and Doubled C02 Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of surface temperature simulated by a global climate model with a simple mixed-layer ocean is analyzed. The simulated diurnal and seasonal ranges of temperature are compared with observation, as is the day-to-day and interannual ...

Hong Xing Cao; J. F. B. Mitchell; J. R. Lavery

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the air–sea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. Two 150-yr simulations (1950–2099) of a global climate model are used to examine ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparison of explicitly simulated and downscaled tropical cyclone activity in a high-resolution global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of tropical cyclone activity to climate change is a matter of great inherent interest and practical importance. Most current global climate models are not, however, capable of adequately resolving tropical ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

44

Effect of Ice-Albedo Feedback on Global Sensitivity in a One-Dimensional Radiative-Convective Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feedback between ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. ...

Wei-Chyung Wang; Peter H. Stone

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Orogenic Propagating Precipitation Systems over the United States in a Global Climate Model with Embedded Explicit Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the lee of major mountain chains worldwide, diurnal physics of organized propagating convection project onto seasonal and climate time scales of the hydrologic cycle, but this phenomenon is not represented in conventional global climate models (...

Michael S. Pritchard; Mitchell W. Moncrieff; Richard C. J. Somerville

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Integrating chemistry into 3D climate models: Detailed kinetics in the troposphere and stratosphere of a global climate model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The motivation for the project is to create the first complete, three-dimensional climate model that enfolds atmospheric photochemistry. The LANL chemical global climate model (GCM) not only distributes the trace greenhouse gases and modifies their concentrations within the detailed photochemical web, but also permits them to influence the radiation field and so force their own transport. Both atmospheric chemistry and fluid dynamics are nonlinear and zonally asymmetric phenomena. They can only be adequately modeled in three dimensions on the global grid. The kinetics-augmented GCM is the only program within the atmospheric community capable of investigating interaction involving chemistry and transport. The authors have conducted case studies of timely three-dimensional chemistry issues. Examples include ozone production from biomass burning plumes, kinetic feedbacks in zonally asymmetric transport phenomena with month- to year-long time scales, and volcano sulfate aerosols with respect to their potential effects on tropospheric ozone depletion.

Kao, C.Y.J.; Elliott, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Turco, R.P.; Zhao, X. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Interactive chemistry and climate models in global change studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continually increasing atmospheric concentrations of radiatively important chemical species such as CO2, CH4, N2O, tropospheric O3, and certain halocarbons most likely will cause future climate changes, which could in turn ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

49

Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Formulation of an ocean model for global climate simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper summarizes the formulation of the ocean component to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s (GFDL) climate model used for the 4th IPCC Assessment (AR4) of global climate change. In particular, it reviews the numerical schemes and physical parameterizations that make up an ocean climate model and how these schemes are pieced together for use in a state-of-the-art climate model. Features of the model described here include the following: (1) tripolar grid to resolve the Arctic Ocean without polar filtering, (2) partial bottom step representation of topography to better represent topographically influenced advective and wave processes, (3) more accurate equation of state, (4) three-dimensional flux limited tracer advection to reduce overshoots and undershoots, (5) incorporation of regional climatological variability in shortwave penetration,

B. L. Samuels; M. J. Spelman; M. Winton; R. Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When President Bush announced his Global Climate Change Initiative in February 2002, he committed the United States to a new strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next...

53

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

54

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical climate formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate similar climate fidelity as the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Alistair J. Adcroft; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Matthew J. Harrison; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Peter J. Phillipps; Lori T. Sentman; Bonita L. Samuels; Michael J. Spelman; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Niki Zadeh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of...

56

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

What do people know about global climate change 1. Mental models  

SciTech Connect

A set of exploratory studies and mental model interviews was conducted in order to characterize public understanding of climate change. In general, respondents regarded global warming as both bad and highly likely. Many believed that warming has already occurred. They tended to confuse stratospheric ozone depletion with the greenhouse effect and weather with climate. Automobile use, heat and emissions from industrial processes, aerosol spray cans, and pollution in general were frequently perceived as primary causes of global warming. Additionally, the [open quotes]greenhouse effect[close quotes] was often interpreted literally as the cause of a hot and steamy climate. The effects attributed to climate change often included increased skin cancer and changed agricultural yields. The mitigation and control strategies proposed by interviewees typically focused on general pollution control, with few specific links to carbon dioxide and energy use. Respondents appeared to be relatively unfamiliar with such regulatory developments as the ban on CFCs for nonessential uses. These beliefs must be considered by those designing risk communications or presenting climate-related policies to the public. 20 refs., 4 tabs.

Bostrom, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)); Morgan, M.G.; Fischhoff, B.; Read, D. (Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Comparison of Short-Term and Long-Term Radiative Feedbacks and Variability in Twentieth-Century Global Climate Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate sensitivity uncertainty of global climate models (GCMs) is partly due to the spread of individual feedbacks. One approach to constrain long-term climate sensitivity is to use the relatively short observational record, assuming there ...

Meghan M. Dalton; Karen M. Shell

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Global Climate Model (GENESIS) with a Land-Surface Transfer Scheme (LSX). Part II: CO2 Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the equilibrium climate to doubled atmospheric CO2 is investigated using the GENESIS global climate model version 1.02. The atmospheric general circulation model is a heavily modified version of the NCAR CCM1 and is coupled to ...

Starley L. Thompson; David Pollard

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach  

SciTech Connect

Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

Estep, Donald

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bringing Clouds into Focus: A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bringing Clouds into Bringing Clouds into Focus Bringing Clouds into Focus A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the Uncertainty of Climate Forecasting May 11, 2010 | Tags: Lattice QCD Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 Randall-fig4.png The large data sets generated by the GCRM require new analysis and visualization capabilities. This 3D plot of vorticity isosurfaces was developed using VisIt, a 3D visualization tool with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used by the GCRM. (Image Courtesy of the NERSC Analytics Team) Clouds exert two competing effects on the Earth's temperature: they cool the planet by reflecting solar radiation back to space, but they also warm the planet by trapping heat near the surface. These two effects coexist in

62

Investigating the West African Climate System Using Global/Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-day workshop took place at Howard University in Washington D.C. 27 July through 29 July 2000 to examine scientific and social issues associated with climate research in West Africa. Atmospheric scientists from West Africa and United ...

Gregory S. Jenkins; Andre Kamga; Adamou Garba; Arona Diedhiou; Vernon Morris; Everette Joseph

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tropical Cyclone Climatology in a 10-km Global Atmospheric GCM: Toward Weather-Resolving Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern Hemisphere tropical cyclone (TC) activity is investigated in multiyear global climate simulations with the ECMWF Integrated Forecast System (IFS) at 10-km resolution forced by the observed records of sea surface temperature and sea ice. ...

Julia V. Manganello; Kevin I. Hodges; James L. Kinter III; Benjamin A. Cash; Lawrence Marx; Thomas Jung; Deepthi Achuthavarier; Jennifer M. Adams; Eric L. Altshuler; Bohua Huang; Emilia K. Jin; Cristiana Stan; Peter Towers; Nils Wedi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

GFDL's CM2 Global Coupled Climate Models. Part II: The Baseline Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current generation of coupled climate models run at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) as part of the Climate Change Science Program contains ocean components that differ in almost every respect from those contained in previous ...

Anand Gnanadesikan; Keith W. Dixon; Stephen M. Griffies; V. Balaji; Marcelo Barreiro; J. Anthony Beesley; William F. Cooke; Thomas L. Delworth; Rudiger Gerdes; Matthew J. Harrison; Isaac M. Held; William J. Hurlin; Hyun-Chul Lee; Zhi Liang; Giang Nong; Ronald C. Pacanowski; Anthony Rosati; Joellen Russell; Bonita L. Samuels; Qian Song; Michael J. Spelman; Ronald J. Stouffer; Colm O. Sweeney; Gabriel Vecchi; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Fanrong Zeng; Rong Zhang; John P. Dunne

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Consistency in Global Climate Change Model Predictions of Regional Precipitation Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of human-induced climate change impacts arising from the emission of atmospheric chemical constituents such as carbon dioxide typically utilize multiple integrations (or ensembles) of numerous numerical climate change models to arrive ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Catherine Reifen; Ralf Toumi

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effects of Cumulus Entrainment and Multiple Cloud Types on a January Global Climate Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved version of the GISS Model II cumulus parameterization designed for long-term climate integrations is used to study the effects of entrainment and multiple cloud types on the January climate simulation. Instead of prescribing ...

Mao-Sung Yao; Anthony D. Del Genio

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reconciling uncertainties in integrated science and policy models: Applications to global climate change  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis tools of data reconciliation are used to integrate available information into scientific and policy models of greenhouse gases. The role of uncertainties in scientific and policy models of global climate change is examined, and implications for global change policy are drawn. Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas. Global sources and sinks of methane have significant uncertainties. A chance constrained methodology was developed and used to perform inversions on the global methane cycle. Budgets of methane that are consistent with source fluxes, isotopic and ice core measurements were determined. While it is not possible to come up with a single budget for CH{sub 4}, performing the calculation with a number of sets of assumed priors suggests a convergence in the allowed range for sources. In some cases -- wetlands (70-130 Tg/yr), rice paddies (60-125 Tg/yr) a significant reduction in the uncertainty of the source estimate is achieved. Our results compare favorably with the most recent measurements of flux estimates. For comparison, a similar analysis using bayes monte carlo simulation was performed. The question of the missing sink for carbon remains unresolved. Two analyses that attempt to quantify the missing sink were performed. First, a steady state analysis of the carbon cycle was used to determine the pre-industrial inter-hemispheric carbon concentration gradient. Second, a full blown dynamic inversion of the carbon cycle was performed. An advection diffusion ocean model with surface chemistry, coupled to box models of the atmosphere and the biosphere was inverted to fit available measurements of {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes using Differential-Algebraic Optimization. The model effectively suggests that the {open_quotes}missing{close_quotes} sink for carbon is hiding in the biosphere. Scenario dependent trace gas indices were calculated for CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, HCFC-22.

Kandlikar, M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modeling the Recent Evolution of Global Drought and Projections for the Twenty-First Century with the Hadley Centre Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological drought in the Hadley Centre global climate model is assessed using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), a commonly used drought index. At interannual time scales, for the majority of the land surface, the model captures the ...

Eleanor J. Burke; Simon J. Brown; Nikolaos Christidis

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Simulation Skills of the SST-Forced Global Climate Variability of the NCEP–MRF9 and the Scripps–MPI ECHAM3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global responses of two atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–Medium Range Forecast (NCEP–MRF9) and the University of Hamburg climate model–3 (ECHAM), to simultaneous global SST ...

Peitao Peng; Arun Kumar; Anthony G. Barnston; Lisa Goddard

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

71

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

72

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable resolution global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable resolution global climate understand regional aspects of the South Asian monsoon rainfall distribution and the interactions between monsoon circulation and precipitation. For this purpose, two sets of ten member realizations are produced

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

73

Global climate change and international security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

Rice, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Community Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The community Earth System Model (CESM) is a fully coupled, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states.

Worley, Patrick H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluating the Consistency between Statistically Downscaled and Global Dynamical Model Climate Change Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency between rainfall projections obtained from direct climate model output and statistical downscaling is evaluated. Results are averaged across an area large enough to overcome the difference in spatial scale between these two types ...

B. Timbal; P. Hope; S. Charles

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Classical-Theory-Based Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust, Soot, and Biological Particles in a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ice nucleation parameterization based on classical nucleation theory, with aerosol-specific parameters derived from experiments, has been implemented into a global climate model—the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)-Oslo. The parameterization ...

Corinna Hoose; Jón Egill Kristjánsson; Jen-Ping Chen; Anupam Hazra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Response of the Polar Regions to Increased CO2 in a Global Climate Model with Elastic–Viscous–Plastic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model (GCM) is used in simulations of climate with present-day atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and with CO2 increasing to double the present-day values. The Parallel Climate Model includes the ...

John W. Weatherly; Yuxia Zhang

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Policy options for stabilizing global climate  

SciTech Connect

The structure of this paper is designed to answer the following questions in turn: What is the greenhouse effect What evidence i there that the greenhouse effect is increasing How will the Earth's climate respond to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations What activities are responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions How might emissions and climate change in the future What technologies are available for limiting greenhouse gas emissions And what domestic and international policy options, if implemented, would help to stabilize global climate This chapter provides a general introduction to the climate change issue and reviews selected previous studies. Chapter II discusses the greenhouse gases, their sources and sinks, chemical properties, current atmospheric concentrations and distributions, and related uncertainties. Chapter III relates the greenhouse gases to the process of climatic change. Once this link is made, Chapter IV examines those human activities that affect trace-gas emissions and ultimately influence climate change. Chapter V discusses the scenarios developed for this report to assist us in thinking about possible future emissions and climate change. Chapter VI then presents sensitivity analyses of the modeling results. Chapter VII gives a detailed description of existing and emerging technologies that should be considered in the formation of a comprehensive strategy for mitigating global warming. Chapter VIII outlines domestic policy options, and the concluding chapter (Chapter IX) discusses international mechanisms for responding to climate change.

Lashof, D.A.; Tirpak, D.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tropical Climate Regimes and Global Climate Sensitivity in a Simple Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple tropical climate regimes are found in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a global slab ocean when the model is forced by different values of globally uniform insolation. Even in this simple setting, convection ...

Joseph Barsugli; Sang-Ik Shin; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Implications for the creation of warm saline deep water: Late Paleocene reconstructions and global climate model simulations  

SciTech Connect

A global warming trend began during the late Paleocene that culminated in the early Eocene with the highest global temperatures of the Cenozoic. We have reconstructed late Paleocene surfacial boundary conditions and modeled atmospheric conditions using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model version II (GISS GCM II). These experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that warm saline deep water formed during the late paleocene and to understand atmospheric circulation near the beginning of a period of global warming. The warming is attributed primarily to increased sea surface temperatures at high latitudes. The sensitivity of the climate to ocean temperature was tested using two sea surface temperature distributions, each delimited latitudinally by oxygen isotope values, but with different east-west gradients. The simulations discussed here contain several features unique among warm climate experiments. The first experiment (P-1) used latitudinally constant (zonal) sea surface temperatures. The zonally distributed sea surface temperatures strengthen the general circulation of the atmosphere. In particular, Hadley Cell circulation is intensified, leading to extremes of precipitation in the equatorial region and extreme evaporation across subtropical oceans. The unusual results prompted a second experiment with modern east-west sea surface temperature gradients superimposed and referred to as P-Gradient (P-Grad). 84 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

O`Connell, S. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States); Chandler, M.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Ruedy, R. [Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling U.S. Energy Use Changes with Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a general circulation model of Earth climate (PCM-IBIS) to drive an energy use model (DD-NEMS), we calculated the energy use changes for each year from 2003-2025 for the nine U.S. Census regions. We used five scenarios: 1) a reference with no change in temperatures from the 1970-2003 average, 2) a gradual 1 F rise in temperature by 2025, 3) a gradual 3 F rise by 2025, 4) a climate simulation with low temperature response to CO2 doubling in the atmosphere, and 5) a climate simulation with a more extreme response. The low-?T scenario had a cumulative reduction in energy of 2.1 Quads but an increase in cost of $14.8 billion. The northern states had reductions in cost over the entire period, but most other regions had increases in costs because increases in cooling costs outweighed reductions in heating and other energy uses. Higher temperature sensitivity resulted in increased warming, especially in the winter months. Because heating needs decreased, total energy requirements declined by a cumulative 4.2 Quads. However, total cost still increased $6.1 billion and carbon emissions still rose as coal-based electricity for cooling needs grew.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transient Future Climate over the Western United States Using a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional climate models (RCMs) have improved our understanding of the effects of global climate change on specific regions. The need for realistic forcing has led to the use of fully coupled global climate models (GCMs) to produce boundary ...

Mark A. Snyder; Lisa C. Sloan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A 3-D Canopy Radiative Transfer Model for Global Climate Modeling: Description, Validation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of solar radiative transfer at the land surface is important to energy, water and carbon balance, especially for vegetated areas. Currently the most commonly used two-stream model considers the Plant Functional Types (PFTs) within a ...

Hua Yuan; Robert E. Dickinson; Yongjiu Dai; Muhammad J. Shaikh; Liming Zhou; Wei Shangguan; Duoying Ji

87

The Granular Sea Ice Model in Spherical Coordinates and Its Application to a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granular sea ice model (GRAN) from Tremblay and Mysak is converted from Cartesian to spherical coordinates. In this conversion, the metric terms in the divergence of the deviatoric stress and in the strain rates are included. As an ...

Jan Sedlacek; Jean-François Lemieux; Lawrence A. Mysak; L. Bruno Tremblay; David M. Holland

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on Mainstreaming Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) Sector: Climate Topics: Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: www.gcca.eu/pages/75_2-OCT-Workshop.html Cost: Free References: GCCA Countries Training Workshop[1] A GCCA workshop for OCT countries took place 27-28 January 2012 immediately following the OCT-EU Forum meeting in Brussels, Belgium. The workshop aimed at sharing views, knowledge, tools and experiences on climate change mitigation and adaptation and at raising awareness on the benefits and

90

Forecast cloudy; The limits of global warming models  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on climate models used to study global warming. It discusses factors which must be included in climate models, shortcomings of existing climate models, and scenarios for global warming.

Stone, P.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sensitivity of Global Climate Model Simulations to Increased Stomatal Resistance and C02 Increases*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 will not only modify climate, they will also likely increase the water-use efficiency of plants by decreasing stomatal openings. The effect of the imposition of “doubled stomatal resistance” on climate is ...

A. Henderson-Sellers; K. McGuffie; C. Gross

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

93

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

94

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

95

Exploring Perturbed Physics Ensembles in a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbed physics ensembles (PPEs) have been widely used to assess climate model uncertainties and have provided new estimates of climate sensitivity and parametric uncertainty in state-of-the-art climate models. So far, mainly global climate ...

Omar Bellprat; Sven Kotlarski; Daniel Lüthi; Christoph Schär

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the equatorial Indian Ocean climate to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. In all of the analyzed climate models, the SSTs ...

Chie Ihara; Yochanan Kushnir; Mark A. Cane; Victor H. de la Peńa

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Multinational Course on Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel multinational course on global climate change was developed by East Carolina University in collaboration with five international universities and the U.S. Department of State. This course was developed to help foster the global conversation needed ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Andrew Herdman; Scott Curtis; Rosina Chia; Elmer Poe; Robert Thompson; Biwu Yang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to generate the energy supply mix that would meet given energy demands at lowest cost, assuming strongRegionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets ­ cost effective fuel in the energy system it is less costly to reduce CO2-emissions #12;Global energy system model #12;Global energy

99

The Indonesian Throughflow and the Global Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Indonesian Throughflow in the global climate system is investigated with a coupled ocean–atmosphere model by contrasting simulations with realistic throughflow and closed Indonesian passages.

Niklas Schneider

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Monitoring Global Climate Change: The Case of Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent record high temperatures and drought conditions in many regions of the United States have prompted heightened concern about whether these are early manifestations of the global green house warming projected by the major climate models. An ...

Fred B. Wood

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effect of the Drake Passage Throughflow on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Southern Ocean in global climate is examined using three simulations with a coupled model employing geometries different only at the location of Drake Passage (DP). The results of three main experiments are examined: 1) a ...

Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Simulation and Projection of Arctic Freshwater Budget Components by the IPCC AR4 Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art AOGCM simulations have recently (late 2004–early 2005) been completed for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in order to provide input to the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). The present paper ...

Vladimir M. Kattsov; John E. Walsh; William L. Chapman; Veronika A. Govorkova; Tatyana V. Pavlova; Xiangdong Zhang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Stable Isotopes as Validation Tools for Global Climate Model Predictions of the Impact of Amazonian Deforestation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines changes in isotopic abundances for 18O and deuterium in precipitation over the Amazon basin based on data in the Global Network on Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/...

A. Henderson-Sellers; K. McGuffie; H. Zhang

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). This “climate forcing” differs from the conventionally defined radiative ...

Piers Mde F. Forster; Karl E. Taylor

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stochastic rainfall downscaling of climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation extremes and small-scale variability are essential drivers in many climate change impact studies. However, the spatial resolution currently achieved by Global (GCM) and Regional (RCM) Climate Models is still insufficient to correctly ...

D. D’Onofrio; E. Palazzi; J. von Hardenberg; A. Provenzale; S. Calmanti

106

Climates of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Simulated by the NCAR Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Climate System Model, a coupled global climate model without “flux adjustments” recently developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, was used to simulate the twentieth-century climate using historical greenhouse gas and sulfate ...

Aiguo Dai; T. M. L. Wigley; B. A. Boville; J. T. Kiehl; L. E. Buja

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of cloudy/clear air mixing and droplet pH on sulfate aerosol formation in a coupled chemistry/climate global model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we will briefly describe our coupled ECHAM/GRANTOUR model, provide a detailed description of our atmospheric chemistry parameterizations, and discuss a couple of numerical experiments in which we explore the influence of assumed pH and rate of mixing between cloudy and clear air on aqueous sulfate formation and concentration. We have used our tropospheric chemistry and transport model, GRANTOUR, to estimate the life cycle and global distributions of many trace species. Recently, we have coupled GRANTOUR with the ECHAM global climate model, which provides several enhanced capabilities in the representation of aerosol interactions.

Molenkamp, C.R.; Atherton, C.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Assessment of Physical Parameterizations Using a Global Climate Model with Stretchable Grid and Nudging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique atmospheric general circulation model with zooming capability (LMDZ) has been used in a nudged mode to enable comparison of model outputs with routine observations and evaluate the model physical ...

O. Coindreau; F. Hourdin; M. Haeffelin; A. Mathieu; C. Rio

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Coupled Climate Simulation of the Evolution of Global Monsoons in the Holocene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evolution of global monsoons in the Holocene is simulated in a coupled climate model—the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model—and is also compared with the simulations in another coupled climate model—the NCAR Climate System Model. Holocene climates are ...

Z. Liu; B. Otto-Bliesner; J. Kutzbach; L. Li; C. Shields

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

111

Evaluation of the Global Climate Models in the CMIP5 over the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of 24 GCMs available in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) is evaluated over the eastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) by comparing the model outputs with ground observations for the period 1961–2005. The ...

Fengge Su; Xiaolan Duan; Deliang Chen; Zhenchun Hao; Lan Cuo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Fast Spherical Harmonics Transform for Global NWP and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high-resolution spectral transform models are believed to become prohibitively expensive because of the relative increase in computational cost of the Legendre transforms compared to the gridpoint computations. This article describes the ...

Nils P. Wedi; Mats Hamrud; George Mozdzynski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A fast spherical harmonics transform for global NWP and climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high resolution spectral transform models are believed to become prohibitively expensive, due to the relative increase in computational cost of the Legendre transforms compared to the gridpoint computations. This article describes the ...

Nils P. Wedi; Mats Hamrud; George Mozdzynski

114

Analysis of Regional Climate Model Results for Simulations of Future Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary global climate models produce results that are too coarse to provide the level of detail required to evaluate environmental, social, and economic impacts of global climate change. High-resolution limited-area models (regional climate models) nested within the global model output have been used to create physically and spatially consistent climates with high spatial resolution. This report evaluates the effectiveness of these models.

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Response of Tropical Cyclones to Idealized Climate Change Experiments in a Global High-Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present an assessment of how tropical cyclone activity might change owing to the influence of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, using the U.K. High-Resolution Global Environment Model (HiGEM) with N144 resolution (~...

Ray Bell; Jane Strachan; Pier Luigi Vidale; Kevin Hodges; Malcolm Roberts

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Improving Global Model Precipitation Forecasts over India Using Downscaling and the FSU Superensemble. Part II: Seasonal Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses seasonal forecasts of rains over India using the following components: high-resolution rain gauge–based rainfall data covering the years 1987–2001, rain-rate initialization, four global atmosphere–ocean coupled models, a ...

Arindam Chakraborty; T. N. Krishnamurti

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Diagnosing Northern Hemisphere Jet Portrayal in 17 CMIP3 Global Climate Models: Twenty-First-Century Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anthropogenic climate change impacts on the eddy–jet system include an intensified midlatitude jet stream and an elevated tropopause, as well as a poleward-shifted jet. While both responses are evident in phase 3 of the Coupled Model ...

Sharon C. Delcambre; David J. Lorenz; Daniel J. Vimont; Jonathan E. Martin

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

120

Global Climate Data, Sept. 18, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Data Climate Data The ORNL DAAC announces the addition of "Global Monthly Climatology for the Twentieth Century (New et al.)" to its collection of climate data. The newest addition contains gridded data related to monthly surface climate over global land areas at 0.5-degree resolution. Precipitation, mean temperature, and diurnal temperature range are interpolated directly from station time-series. Wet-day frequency, vapor pressure, cloud cover, and ground-frost frequency are interpolated where data are available and estimated for regions with no data. Data can be accessed through an on-line interface that allows users to select the data by parameter and years. By agreement with the data provider, users who wish to request the complete 400-megabyte data set on a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

122

Global climate change and pedogenic carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Global Climate Change summarizes what is known about soil inorganic carbon and develops strategies that could lead to the retention of more carbon in the soil. It covers basic concepts, analytical methods, secondary carbonates, and research and development priorities. With this book one will get a better understanding of the global carbon cycle, organic and inorganic carbon, and their roles, or what is known of them, in the greenhouse effect.

Lal, R.; Kimble, J.M.; Stewart, B.A.; Eswaran, H. [eds.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Physically Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmosphere–land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977–2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated ...

Steven J. Ghan; Timothy Shippert

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Coupling of Convective Momentum Transport with Convective Heating in Global Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of convective momentum transport (CMT) on global climate simulations are examined in this study. Comparison between two sets of 20-yr (1979–98) integration using the NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) illustrates that the ...

Xiaoqing Wu; Liping Deng; Xiaoliang Song; Guang Jun Zhang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Simulation of Tropical Climate with a Linear Primitive Equation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical climate simulated with a new global atmosphere model is presented. The model is purposely designed for climate studies and is still under development. It is designed to bridge the gap between very efficient but simple models of the ...

Richard Seager; Stephen E. Zebiak

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information & Modeling Print E-mail The specific impacts and vulnerabilities posed by climate change are largely defined by regional differences 9in things like geography,...

127

Global fish production and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Global Climate Change Impacts & Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Andre de Fontaine Pew Center on Global Climate Change DOE ITP Webinar April 1, 2010 Andre de Fontaine Pew Center on Global Climate Change DOE ITP Webinar April 1, 2010 Introduction to Pew Center Introduction to Pew Center * Established in 1998 as an independent, non- partisan climate organization * Three-fold structure - a "do" tank: - Research - 100+ reports over 10 years - Actively advise on policy - state, federal, international - Business Environmental Leadership Council (BELC) o 46 companies o $2 trillion in revenues o Nearly 4 million employees Introduction to BELC Introduction to BELC 3 Efficiency Project Overview

129

Global climate change: Social and economic research issues  

SciTech Connect

This workshop was designed to bring together a group of scholars, primarily from the social sciences, to explore research that might help in dealing with global climate change. To illustrate the state of present understanding, it seemed useful to focus this workshop on three broad questions that are involved in coping with climate change. These are: (1) How can the anticipated economic costs and benefits of climate change be identified; (2) How can the impacts of climate change be adjusted to or avoided; (3) What previously studied models are available for institutional management of the global environment? The resulting discussions may (1) identify worthwhile avenues for further social science research, (2) help develop feedback for natural scientists about research information from this domain needed by social scientists, and (3) provide policymakers with the sort of relevant research information from the social science community that is currently available. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

Rice, M.; Snow, J.; Jacobson, H. [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Response of tropical cyclones to idealized climate change experiments in a global high resolution coupled general circulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an assessment of how tropical cyclone activity might change due to the influence of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, using the UK’s High Resolution Global Environment Model (HiGEM) with N144 resolution (~90 km in the ...

Ray Bell; Jane Strachan; Pier Luigi Vidale; Kevin Hodges; Malcolm Roberts

131

Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Simulations of Present and Future Climates in the Western United States with Four Nested Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western United States performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean–atmosphere climate models. The primary goal here is to ...

P. B. Duffy; R. W. Arritt; J. Coquard; W. Gutowski; J. Han; J. Iorio; J. Kim; L.-R. Leung; J. Roads; E. Zeledon

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Climate Modeling with Spectral Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an effort toward improving climate model–component performance and accuracy, an atmospheric-component climate model has been developed, entitled the Spectral Element Atmospheric Climate Model and denoted as CAM_SEM. CAM_SEM includes a unique ...

Ferdinand Baer; Houjun Wang; Joseph J. Tribbia; Aimé Fournier

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of AMIP II Global Climate Model Simulations of the Land Surface Water Budget and Its Components over the GEWEX-CEOP Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface water balance components simulated by 20 atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) participating in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II) are analyzed globally and over seven Global Energy and ...

P. Irannejad; A. Henderson-Sellers

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

An Efficient Approach to Modeling the Topographic Control of Surface Hydrology for Regional and Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current generation of land-surface models used in GCMs view the soil column as the fundamental hydrologic unit. While this may be effective in simulating such processes as the evolution of ground temperatures and the growth/ablation of a ...

Marc Stieglitz; David Rind; James Famiglietti; Cynthia Rosenzweig

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Pacific Northwest Climate Sensitivity Simulated by a Regional Climate Model Driven by a GCM. Part II: 2×CO2 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate change due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases has stimulated numerous studies and discussions about its possible impacts on water resources. Climate scenarios generated by climate models at spatial resolutions ranging ...

L. R. Leung; S. J. Ghan

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Global climate change and infectious diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Climate Simulation and Change in the Brazilian Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the global climate system to atmospheric CO2 concentration increase in time is scrutinized employing the Brazilian Earth System Model Ocean–Atmosphere version 2.3 (BESM-OA2.3). Through the achievement of over 2000 yr of coupled ...

Paulo Nobre; Leo S. P. Siqueira; Roberto A. F. de Almeida; Marta Malagutti; Emanuel Giarolla; Guilherme P. Castelăo; Marcus J. Bottino; Paulo Kubota; Silvio N. Figueroa; Mabel C. Costa; Manoel Baptista Jr.; Luiz Irber Jr.; Gabriel G. Marcondes

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The economics of long-term global climate change  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_framework.pdf Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Screenshot References: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure[1] Summary "A group of leading institutional investors from around the world released the Global Framework for Climate Risk Disclosure-a new statement on disclosure that investors expect from companies-in October 2006. Investors require this information in order to analyze a company's business risks and opportunities resulting from climate change, as well as

146

Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_climate_change_risk.pdf Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Screenshot References: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans[1] Summary "The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of climate change related risks on bank borrowers, utilizing as much data and analysis as possible. The first section of this report reviews the current climate change policies in place in Canada, Europe, and the US, in order to provide

147

Sensitivity of Global Tropical Climate to Land Surface Processes: Mean State and Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of the global climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on ...

Hsi-Yen Ma; Heng Xiao; C. Roberto Mechoso; Yongkang Xue

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

149

The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

150

Review article: Modelling effects of geoengineering options in response to climate change and global warming: Implications for coral reefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change will have serious effects on the planet and on its ecosystems. Currently, mitigation efforts are proving ineffectual in reducing anthropogenic CO"2 emissions. Coral reefs are the most sensitive ecosystems on the planet to climate change, ... Keywords: Aerosols, Afforestation, Albedo, Biochar, Bleaching, CCS, Carbon capture and storage, Caribbean, Coral growth, Downwelling, Ecosystems, El nińo, Great Barrier Reef, IPCC, Interdecadal, SST, Satellite, Scleractinian, Small islands, Symbiosis, Tropics, Weather

M. J. C. Crabbe

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

White House Conference on Global Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

153

Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios Douglas Arent National...

154

Spatial-Scale Dependence of Climate Model Performance in the CMIP3 Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 20 global climate models have been run for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) to predict climate change due to anthropogenic activities. Evaluating these models is an important step to ...

David Masson; Reto Knutti

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Regional Changes in Wind Energy Potential over Europe Using Regional Climate Model Ensemble Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on wind power generation potentials over Europe is investigated by considering ensemble projections from two regional climate models (RCMs) driven by a global climate model (GCM). Wind energy density and its ...

Hanna Hueging; Rabea Haas; Kai Born; Daniela Jacob; Joaquim G. Pinto

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/FinancingGlobalDeal.pdf References: Financing a Global Deal for Climate Change [1] Summary "This Green Paper builds on this experience and focuses on the priorities identified by UNEP FI to mobilise the skills and resources of the banking, investment and insurance sectors behind an effective, efficient and equitable global deal on climate change at COP15 in Copenhagen. The Paper addresses the types of decisions that governments could take in Copenhagen

157

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland, Joint Global Change Research Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry, Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application

158

Greenland and Antarctic Mass Balances for Present and Doubled Atmospheric CO2 from the GENESIS Version-2 Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in ...

Starley L. Thompson; David Pollard

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Global Vegetation and Climate Change due to Future Increases in CO2 as Projected by a Fully Coupled Model with Dynamic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient simulations are presented of future climate and vegetation associated with continued rising levels of CO2. The model is a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–land–ice model with dynamic vegetation. The impacts of the radiative and ...

Michael Notaro; Steve Vavrus; Zhengyu Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pacific Northwest Climate Sensitivity Simulated by a Regional Climate Model Driven by a GCM. Part I: Control Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model nesting approach has been used to simulate the regional climate over the Pacific Northwest. The present-day global climatology is first simulated using the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3) driven by observed sea surface temperature and ...

L. R. Leung; S. J. Ghan

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Variability in a Stable, 1000-Yr Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Cycle Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 3D global coupled carbon–climate model is presented in the framework of the Community Climate System Model (CSM-1.4). The biogeochemical module includes explicit land water–carbon coupling, dynamic carbon allocation to leaf, root, and wood, ...

Scott C. Doney; Keith Lindsay; Inez Fung; Jasmin John

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Effect of Eurasian Snow Cover on Regional and Global Climate Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the global climate system to interannual variability of he Eurasian snow cover has been investigated with numerical models. It was found that heavier than normal Eurasian snow cover in spring leads to a “poor” monsoon over ...

T. P. Barnett; L. Dümenil; U. Schlese; E. Roeckner; M. Latif

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Amazonian Deforestation: Impact of Global Warming on the Energy Balance and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled biosphere–atmosphere statistical–dynamical model is used to study the relative roles of the impact of the land change caused by tropical deforestation and global warming on energy balance and climate. Three experiments were made: 1) ...

E. C. Moraes; Sergio H. Franchito; V. Brahmananda Rao

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Climate Simulations With NCAR CCM2 Forced by Global Sea Surface Temperature, 1950–89  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 40-yr integration is conducted using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model Version 2 (CCM2). The simulation was forced by observed monthly global sea surface temperature (SST) changes during 1950–89. The ...

C-Y. J. Kao; A. Quintanar; M. J. Newman; W. Eichinger; D. L. Langley; S-C. Chen

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Bayesian Assessment of Climate Change Using Multimodel Ensembles. Part I: Global Mean Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian approach is applied to the observed global surface air temperature (SAT) changes using multimodel ensembles (MMEs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) simulations and single-model ...

Seung-Ki Min; Andreas Hense

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

System Design and Evaluation of Coupled Ensemble Data Assimilation for Global Oceanic Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled data assimilation (CDA) system, consisting of an ensemble filter applied to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s global fully coupled climate model (CM2), has been developed to facilitate the detection and prediction of ...

S. Zhang; M. J. Harrison; A. Rosati; A. Wittenberg

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable4 resolution global climate model5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1 2 3 High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable4 resolution global of the South Asian monsoon rainfall distribution and the interactions27 between monsoon circulation of resolution on the overall quality of the simulated regional33 monsoon fields. It is found that the monsoon

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

168

Several Computational Opportunities and Challenges Associated with Climate Change Modeling  

SciTech Connect

One of the key factors in the improved understanding of climate science is the development and improvement of high fidelity climate models. These models are critical for projections of future climate scenarios, as well as for highlighting the areas where further measurement and experimentation are needed for knowledge improvement. In this paper, we focus on several computing issues associated with climate change modeling. First, we review a fully coupled global simulation and a nested regional climate model to demonstrate key design components, and then we explain the underlying restrictions associated with the temporal and spatial scale for climate change modeling. We then discuss the role of high-end computers in climate change sciences. Finally, we explain the importance of fostering regional, integrated climate impact analysis. Although we discuss the computational challenges associated with climate change modeling, and we hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving multiscale system dynamics.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wilson, Bruce E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate simulation map Climate Global climate change processes and impacts research in EETD is aimed at understanding the factors-and the feedbacks among these factors-driving...

170

Testing Climate Models: An Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific merit of decadal climate projections can only be established by means of comparisons with observations. Testing of models that are used to predict climate change is of such importance that no single approach will provide the ...

Richard Goody; James Anderson; Gerald North

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sustainable biochar to mitigate global climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed by pyrolysis of biomass), in combination with its storage in soils, has been suggested as a means to abate anthropogenic climate change, while simultaneously increasing crop yields. The climate mitigation potential stems primarily from the highly recalcitrant nature of biochar, which slows the rate at which photosynthetically fixed carbon is returned to the atmosphere. Significant uncertainties exist, however, regarding the impact, capacity, and sustainability of biochar for carbon capture and storage when scaled to the global level. Previous estimates, based on simple assumptions, vary widely. Here we show that, subject to strict environmental and modest economic constraints on biomass procurement and biochar production methods, annual net emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O could be reduced by 1.1 - 1.9 Pg CO2-C equivalent (CO2-Ce)/yr (7 - 13% of current anthropogenic CO2-Ce emissions; 1Pg = 1 Gt). Over one century, cumulative net emissions of these gases could be reduced by 72-140 Pg CO2-Ce. The lower end of this range uses currently untapped residues and wastes; the upper end requires substantial alteration to global biomass management, but would not endanger food security, habitat or soil conservation. Half the avoided emissions are due to the net C sequestered as biochar, one-quarter to replacement of fossil-fuel energy by pyrolysis energy, and one-quarter to avoided emissions of CH4 and N2O. The total mitigation potential is 18-30% greater than if the same biomass were combusted to produce energy. Despite limited data for the decomposition rate of biochar in soils and the effects of biochar additions on soil greenhouse-gas fluxes, sensitivity within realistic ranges of these parameters is small, resulting in an uncertainty of ±8% (±1 s.d.) in our estimates. Achieving these mitigation results requires, however, that biochar production be performed using only low-emissions technologies and feedstocks obtained sustainably, with minimal carbon debt incurred from land-use change.

Woolf, Dominic; Amonette, James E.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Joseph, Stephen

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Improvement and Implementation of a Parameterization for Shallow Cumulus in the Global Climate Model ECHAM5-HAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transient shallow-convection scheme is implemented into the general circulation model ECHAM5 and the coupled aerosol model HAM, developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. The shallow-convection scheme is extended to take ...

Francesco A. Isotta; P. Spichtinger; U. Lohmann; K. von Salzen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

174

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan Chen, Zhengyu Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice-land model with dynamic vegetation monsoon regions is reduced and the climatic response assessed. Consistent responses among the regions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

175

Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program  

SciTech Connect

The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Name Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unece.org/energy/se/pdfs/gee21/gee21_pub/GEE21_GlobalClimateChange UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

178

State Roles in the Global Climate Change Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Events in 1988 helped focus the attention of several states on the global climate change issue. Consequently, the National Governors’ Association conducted an assessment in 1989 and recommended various actions. By 1994, 22 states have enacted ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Computer-based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Color-shaded and contoured images of global gridded instrumental data have been produced as a computer-based atlas, available to the climate community through Internet. Each image simultaneously depicts anomaly maps of surface temperature, sea ...

Raymond S. Bradley; Linda G. Ahern; Frank T. Keimig

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development Speaker(s): Geoffrey J. Blanford Date: July 21, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Documenting Climate Models and Their Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of climate models are of increasing and widespread importance. No longer is climate model output of sole interest to climate scientists and researchers in the climate change impacts and adaptation fields. Now nonspecialists such as government ...

Eric Guilyardi; V. Balaji; Bryan Lawrence; Sarah Callaghan; Cecelia Deluca; Sébastien Denvil; Michael Lautenschlager; Mark Morgan; Sylvia Murphy; Karl E. Taylor

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Generalized Energy Balance Climate Model with Parameterized Dynamics and Diabatic Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy balance models have proven useful in understanding mechanisms and feedbacks in the climate system. An original global energy balance model is presented here. The model is solved numerically for equilibrium climate states defined by zonal ...

Karen M. Shell; Richard C. J. Somerville

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Do General Circulation Models Underestimate the Natural Variability in the Arctic Climate?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the natural variability of the arctic climate system simulated by two very different models: the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global climate model, and an area-averaged model of the arctic atmosphere–sea ice–...

D. S. Battisti; C. M. Bitz; R. E. Moritz

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydrological Cycle in the Danube basin in present-day and XXII century simulations by IPCCAR4 global climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of 20 GCMs included in the 4th IPCC assessment report regarding their representation of the hydrological cycle on the Danube river basin for 1961-2000 and for the 2161-2200 SRESA1B scenario runs. The basin-scale properties of the hydrological cycle are computed by spatially integrating the precipitation, evaporation, and runoff fields using the Voronoi-Thiessen tessellation formalism. The span of the model simulated mean annual water balances is of the same order of magnitude of the observed Danube discharge of the Delta; the true value is within the range simulated by the models. Some land components seem to have deficiencies since there are cases of violation of water conservation when annual means are considered. The overall performance and the degree of agreement of the GCMs are comparable to those of the RCMs analyzed in a previous work, in spite of the much higher resolution and common nesting of the RCMs. The reanalyses are shown to feature severa...

Lucarini, Valerio; Kriegerova, Ida; Speranza, Antonio; 10.1029/2007JD009167

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers March 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - In recent discussions with a broad range of world energy ministers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed the need for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. Over the past several weeks, Secretary Chu's dialogue with representatives of both energy producing and consuming nations has reinforced the Obama Administration's commitment to energy independence and stressed the shared opportunities to create jobs and boost the global economy through energy

186

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science This SciDAC project will transform an existing, state-of-the-science, third-generation global climate model, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3), into a first-generation Earth system model that fully simulates the relationships between the physical, chemical, and bio-geochemical processes in the climate system. The model will incorporate new processes necessary to predict future climates based on the specification of greenhouse gas emissions rather than specification of atmospheric concentrations, as is done in present models, which make assumptions about the carbon cycle that are likely not valid. This project will include comprehensive treatments of the processes

187

Controls of Global Snow under a Changed Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the ability of a newly developed high-resolution coupled model from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to simulate the cold-season hydroclimate in the present climate and examines its response to climate change forcing. ...

Sarah B. Kapnick; Thomas L. Delworth

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mapping environments at risk under different global climate change scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON Significant disruptions to natural ecosystems are widely expected as a result of global climate change. There is uncertainty about the pace of this change because that depends on future greenhouse gas emissions and complex no readily predictable community structure or composition. We introduce a novel approach to mapping global

Hoffman, Forrest M.

189

Globally Gridded Satellite Observations for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive ...

Kenneth R. Knapp; Steve Ansari; Caroline L. Bain; Mark A. Bourassa; Michael J. Dickinson; Chris Funk; Chip N. Helms; Christopher C. Hennon; Christopher D. Holmes; George J. Huffman; James P. Kossin; Hai-Tien Lee; Alexander Loew; Gudrun Magnusdottir

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Amazon Deforestation and Climate Change in a Coupled Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of Amazon deforestation on climate change are investigated using twin numerical experiments of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed global sea surface temperature and the same AGCM coupled to an ocean GCM (...

Paulo Nobre; Marta Malagutti; Domingos F. Urbano; Roberto A. F. de Almeida; Emanuel Giarolla

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Response of Upper Clouds in Global Warming Experiments Obtained Using a Global Nonhydrostatic Model with Explicit Cloud Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud processes, upper-cloud changes are investigated by comparing the present climate condition under the perpetual July setting and the global warming condition, in which the sea surface ...

Masaki Satoh; Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Akira T. Noda

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

An Improved Parameterization for Simulating Arctic Cloud Amount in the CCSM3 Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple alternative parameterization for predicting cloud fraction in the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) global climate model is presented. This formula, dubbed “freeezedry,” is designed to alleviate the bias of excessive low ...

Steve Vavrus; Duane Waliser

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several multidecadal simulations have been carried out with the new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). This paper reports an analysis of the land component of these simulations. Global annual averages over land appear to be ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Keith W. Oleson; Gordon Bonan; Forrest Hoffman; Peter Thornton; Mariana Vertenstein; Zong-Liang Yang; Xubin Zeng

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Interpretation of Simulated Global Warming Using a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gas–induced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the ...

I. G. Watterson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development A Global Portfolio Strategy for Climate Change Technology Development Speaker(s): Geoffrey J. Blanford Date: July 21, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Afzal Siddiqui John Stoops In this study we propose a novel formulation of a decision problem in R&D strategy. The problem is motivated by and applied to the context of technologies relevant to global climate change, but is characterized in general by an aggregate R&D decision-maker with a social welfare objective, technology diffusion markets subject to externalities in which private costs are minimized, and uncertainty in both technological and environmental factors. A technology strategy is defined as the allocation of R&D investment across several broad research programs, and the

196

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications A sampling of what CDIAC staff members have been following: Extreme summer weather in northern mid-latitudes linked to a vanishing cryosphere. Tang, Q., X. Zhang, and J.A. Francis, 2013, Nature Climate Change DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2065. Uncertainty in annual aankings from NOAA's global temperature time series. Arguez A., T.R. Karl, M.F. Squires, and R.S. Vose, 2013, Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2013GL057999. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle. Reichstein, M., et al.., 2013, Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature12350. Anatomy of an extreme event. Hoerling, M., et al., 2013, J. Climate DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00270.1. Australia's unique influence on global sea level in 2010-2011. Fasullo, J.T., C. Boening, F.W. Landerer, and R.S. Nerem, 2013, Geophysical

197

The Physical Properties of the Atmosphere in the New Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1). Part II: Aspects of Variability and Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the atmospheric component of the new Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1) is assessed in terms of its ability to represent a selection of key aspects of variability in the Tropics and extratropics. These include ...

M. A. Ringer; G. M. Martin; C. Z. Greeves; T. J. Hinton; P. M. James; V. D. Pope; A. A. Scaife; R. A. Stratton; P. M. Inness; J. M. Slingo; G.-Y. Yang

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

A High-Resolution Climate Model for the U.S. Pacific Northwest: Mesoscale Feedbacks and Local Responses to Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of future climate scenarios produced with a high-resolution climate model show markedly different trends in temperature and precipitation over the Pacific Northwest than in the global model in which it is nested, apparently because of ...

Eric P. Salathé Jr.; Richard Steed; Clifford F. Mass; Patrick H. Zahn

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sensitivity of Simulated Global Climate to Perturbations in Low Cloud Microphysical Properties. Part II: Spatially Localized Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the global climate to spatially localized (20°–70°N) perturbations in the microphysical properties of low clouds is investigated using a general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean with fixed cloud distributions. ...

C-T. Chen; V. Ramaswamy

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in sea ice, and canopy leaf density--as well as by the phase state of water (meltwater on sea ice1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center

Long, David G.

202

A Regional Ocean–Atmosphere Model for Eastern Pacific Climate: Toward Reducing Tropical Biases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical Pacific Ocean is a climatically important region, home to El Nińo and the Southern Oscillation. The simulation of its climate remains a challenge for global coupled ocean–atmosphere models, which suffer large biases especially in ...

Shang-Ping Xie; Toru Miyama; Yuqing Wang; Haiming Xu; Simon P. de Szoeke; R. Justin O. Small; Kelvin J. Richards; Takashi Mochizuki; Toshiyuki Awaji

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Evaluating hydro-climatic change signals from statistically and dynamically downscaled GCMs and hydrologic models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzed potential hydro-climatic change in the Peace River basin in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, based on two structurally different approaches: i) statistically-downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs) using the Bias ...

Rajesh R. Shrestha; Markus A. Schnorbus; Arelia T. Werner; Francis W. Zwiers

204

Revolutionizing Climate Modeling with Project Athena: A Multi-Institutional, International Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of using dedicated high-end computing resources to enable high spatial resolution in global climate models and advance knowledge of the climate system has been evaluated in an international collaboration called Project Athena. Inspired by ...

J. L. Kinter; III; B. Cash; D. Achuthavarier; J. Adams; E. Altshuler; P. Dirmeyer; B. Doty; B. Huang; E. K. Jin; L. Marx; J. Manganello; C. Stan; T. Wakefield; T. Palmer; M. Hamrud; T. Jung; M. Miller; P. Towers; N. Wedi; M. Satoh; H. Tomita; C. Kodama; T. Nasuno; K. Oouchi; Y. Yamada; H. Taniguchi; P. Andrews; T. Baer; M. Ezell; C. Halloy; D. John; B. Loftis; R. Mohr; K. Wong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development and Evaluation of a Convection Scheme for Use in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulus convection is a key process in controlling the water vapor content of the atmosphere, which is in turn the largest feedback mechanism for climate change in global climate models. Yet scant attention has been paid to designing convective ...

Kerry A. Emanuel; Marina Živkovi?-Rothman

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of Ocean Biology on the Penetrative Radiation in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of phytoplankton on the seasonal cycle and the mean global climate is investigated in a fully coupled climate model. The control experiment uses a fixed attenuation depth for shortwave radiation, while the attenuation depth in the ...

Patrick Wetzel; Ernst Maier-Reimer; Michael Botzet; Johann Jungclaus; Noel Keenlyside; Mojib Latif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Challenges to Reproduce Vegetation Structure and Dynamics in Amazonia Using a Coupled Climate–Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest constitutes one of the major global stocks of carbon. Recent studies, including the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report and the Coupled Climate Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project, have suggested ...

Mônica Carneiro Alves Senna; Marcos Heil Costa; Lucía Iracema Chipponelli Pinto; Hewlley Maria Acioli Imbuzeiro; Luciana Mara Freitas Diniz; Gabrielle Ferreira Pires

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Greenhouse effect and the global climate. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning terrestrial climatic changes known as the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is an accumulation of carbon dioxide and other gases that retain solar-induced heat, thereby increasing the average global temperature. Modeling studies, measurements of atmospheric gases, pollutants and temperatures, studies of climatic records for occurrence of similar changes (paleoclimatology), prediction of environmental changes due to the greenhouse effect, government energy policy as a result of possible climate change, and the contributions of manmade and natural pollutants to the greenhouse effect are among the topics discussed. (Contains a minimum of 52 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

211

Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Climate Drift in the CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the absence of external forcing, climate models often exhibit long-term trends that cannot be attributed to natural variability. This so-called climate drift arises for various reasons including the following: perturbations to the climate ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Les C. Muir; Jaclyn N. Brown; Steven J. Phipps; Paul J. Durack; Didier Monselesan; Susan E. Wijffels

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Understanding Hydrometeorology Using Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface coupling, a crucial element of the climate system, is explored in the recent 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-40) model. In seasonal forecasts for the Northern Hemisphere summer, ...

Alan K. Betts

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the ...

Mark Z. Jacobson; John E. Ten Hoeve

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pew Center on Global Climate Change | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pew Center on Global Climate Change Pew Center on Global Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Pew Center on Global Climate Change Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22201 Product Established in 1998 as a non-profit, non-partisan and independent organisation aiming to provide unbiased information and solutions in the efforts to tackle climate change. Coordinates 43.337585°, -89.379449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.337585,"lon":-89.379449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2K-2854 RAB 4/01 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 Hydro 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Other 1% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy Annual 1999 (February 2001) 2020 data from International Energy Outlook 2001 (March 2001) + 6 0 % Oil 40% Hydro 7% Other 0.7% Nuclear 7% 1999 85% Fossil Energy 382 Qbtu / yr 2020 85% Fossil Energy 607 Qbtu / yr Oil 40% Nuclear 4% 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 0 2 4 6 8 12 2000 2050 2100 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) Population Projections: United Nations "Long-Range World Population Projections: Based on the 1998 Revision" Energy Projections: "Global Energy Perspectives" ITASA / WEC World Population Population of

217

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

218

Analysis of Permafrost Thermal Dynamics and Response to Climate Change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze global climate model predictions of soil temperature [from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) database] to assess the models’ representation of current-climate soil thermal dynamics and their predictions ...

Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Alex Stern

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Assessment of a Model-, Grid-, and Basin-Independent Tropical Cyclone Detection Scheme in Selected CMIP3 Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel tropical cyclone (TC) detection technique designed for coarse-resolution models is tested and evaluated. The detector, based on the Okubo–Weiss–Zeta parameter (OWZP), is applied to a selection of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; R. A. Dare; J. L. McBride

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Comparison of the Impact of Global Climate Changes and Urbanization on Summertime Future Climate in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the impact of global climate change and anticipated urbanization over the next 70 years is estimated with regard to the summertime local climate in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA), whose population is already near its peak now. ...

Sachiho A. Adachi; Fujio Kimura; Hiroyuki Kusaka; Tomoshige Inoue; Hiroaki Ueda

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation feedbacks on climate, on the subannual time scale, are examined across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice–land model with dynamic vegetation. Initial value ensemble experiments are run in which the total ...

Michael Notaro; Guangshan Chen; Zhengyu Liu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

Rice, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Climate and Energy Project Name Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega, Suite 324 Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Number of employees 201-500 Year founded 2002 Phone number (650) 725-3230 Coordinates 37.428392°, -122.175919° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.428392,"lon":-122.175919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

A mechanism for landocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism for land­ocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate J. Fasullo of the global monsoon record involves reported decreases in rainfall over land during an era in which the global in the monsoons in a warming climate while bolstering the concept of the global monsoon in the context of shared

Fasullo, John

228

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a ``Mini Nuclear Winter`` as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a Mini Nuclear Winter'' as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analyzing the Climate Sensitivity of the HadSM3 Climate Model Using Ensembles from Different but Related Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate models (GCMs) contain imprecisely defined parameters that account, approximately, for subgrid-scale physical processes. The response of a GCM to perturbations in its parameters, which is crucial for quantifying uncertainties in ...

Jonathan Rougier; David M. H. Sexton; James M. Murphy; David Stainforth

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.  

SciTech Connect

Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

233

Global climate change and effects on Pacific Northwest salmonids: An exploratory case study  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a number of papers have addressed global warming and freshwater fisheries. The recent report to Congress by the US Environmental Protection Agency included an analysis of potential effects of global warming on fisheries of the Great Lakes, California, and the Southeast. In California, the report stated that salinity increases in the San Francisco Bay could enhance the abundance of marine fish species, while anadromous species could be adversely affected. This paper discusses global climate changes and the effects on Pacific Northwest Salmonids. The impacts of climate change or Spring Chinook production in the Yakima Sub-basin was simulated using a computer modeling system developed for the Northwest Power planning council. 35 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Shankle, S.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modeling Global Sea Ice with a Thickness and Enthalpy Distribution Model in Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parallel ocean and ice model (POIM) in generalized orthogonal curvilinear coordinates has been developed for global climate studies. The POIM couples the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) with a 12-category thickness and enthalpy distribution (TED) ...

Jinlun Zhang; D. A. Rothrock

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. Global Climate Change program | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Climate Change program U.S. Global Climate Change program Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures

237

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

239

Mobile Climate Observatory on the Pacific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Observatory on the Pacific The AMF2 mobile climate observatory is traveling the Pacific ocean between Los Angeles and Honolulu to improve the way global climate models...

240

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Purdue University Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/models/current.asp Cost: Free References: GTAP[1] Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste ICCT Roadmap Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20°C for 1° horizontal resolution in each component. This is about a half degree Celsius higher than in the previous version (CCSM3). The transient ...

C. M. Bitz; K. M. Shell; P. R. Gent; D. A. Bailey; G. Danabasoglu; K. C. Armour; M. M. Holland; J. T. Kiehl

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Stochastic Averaging of Idealized Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in the climate system involves interactions across a broad range of scales in space and time. While models of slow “climate” variability may not explicitly account for fast “weather” processes, the dynamical influence of these ...

Adam H. Monahan; Joel Culina

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Testing Climate Models Using Thermal Infrared Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach to test climate models with observations is presented. In this approach, it is possible to directly observe the longwave feedbacks of the climate system in time series of annual average outgoing longwave spectra. Tropospheric ...

Stephen Leroy; James Anderson; John Dykema; Richard Goody

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Community Climate System Model, Version 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Climate System Model, version 2 (CCSM2) is briefly described. A 1000-yr control simulation of the present day climate has been completed without flux adjustments. Minor modifications were made at year 350, which included all five ...

Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Peter R. Gent

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Community Climate System Model Version 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all CCSM components, and documents fully coupled preindustrial control runs ...

Peter R. Gent; Gokhan Danabasoglu; Leo J. Donner; Marika M. Holland; Elizabeth C. Hunke; Steve R. Jayne; David M. Lawrence; Richard B. Neale; Philip J. Rasch; Mariana Vertenstein; Patrick H. Worley; Zong-Liang Yang; Minghua Zhang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Inadvertent Weather Modification in Urban Areas: Lessons for Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the nation's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Continental-Scale River Flow in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrologic cycle is a major part of the global climate system. There is an atmospheric flux of water from the ocean surface to the continents. The cycle is closed by return flow in rivers. In this paper a river routing model is developed to ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell; Guilherme Caliri

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Integrated Global System Modeling Framework | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Agency/Company /Organization: MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: globalchange.mit.edu/research/IGSM Cost: Free Related Tools Transport Co-benefits Calculator General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK)

251

Global climate change: An east room roundtable. Held in Washington, DC, on July 24, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The report provides comments from a roundtable that discusses global climate change and its possible effects on the environment and humans.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

OpenEI Community - U.S. Global Climate Change program  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgcommunitytaxonomyterm1770 en U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States http:en.openei.org...

253

Response of the NCAR Climate System Model to Increased CO2 and the Role of Physical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global warming resulting from increased CO2 is addressed in the context of two regional processes that contribute to climate change in coupled climate models, the “El Nińo–like” response (slackening of the equatorial Pacific SST gradient) and ...

Gerald A. Meehl; William D. Collins; Byron A. Boville; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; T. M. L. Wigley; Julie M. Arblaster

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Formal Analysis of the Feedback Concept in Climate Models, part I: exclusive and inclusive feedback analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate sensitivity and feedback are key concepts if the complex behavior of climate response to perturbation is to be interpreted in a simple way. They have also become an essential tool for comparing Global Circulation Models and assessing the ...

Alain Lahellec; Jean-Louis Dufresne

255

Estimation of Climate Change Impact on Mean Annual Runoff across Continental Australia Using Budyko and Fu Equations and Hydrological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the climate change impact on mean annual runoff across continental Australia estimated using the Budyko and Fu equations informed by projections from 15 global climate models and compares the estimates with those from extensive ...

J. Teng; F. H. S. Chiew; J. Vaze; S. Marvanek; D. G. C. Kirono

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Can a Regional Climate Model Improve the Ability to Forecast the North American Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate models are challenged to represent the North American monsoon, in terms of its climatology and interannual variability. To investigate whether a regional atmospheric model can improve warm season forecasts in North America, a ...

Christopher L. Castro; Hsin-I Chang; Francina Dominguez; Carlos Carrillo; Jae-Kyung Schemm; Hann-Ming Henry Juang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Application of Scale-Selective Data Assimilation to Regional Climate Modeling and Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method referred to as scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA) is designed to inject the large-scale components of the atmospheric circulation from a global model into a regional model to improve regional climate simulations and predictions. ...

Shiqiu Peng; Lian Xie; Bin Liu; Fredrick Semazzi

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Global climate feedbacks: Conclusions and recommendations of the June 1990 BNL workshop  

SciTech Connect

The issue of global change initiated by increases in the concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases is a scientific issue with major policy implications. The best means to examine the response of the Earth's climate to prospective perturbations in radiative forcing caused by such changes, and to other industrial activities, is modeling, specifically by means of general circulation models (GCMs) of the Earth's atmosphere and of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The purpose of this workshop was to identify the feedbacks inherent in the Earth's climate that actually or potentially govern the system's response to perturbations, to identify gaps in knowledge that preclude the accurate representation of these feedbacks in models, and to identify research required to represent these feedbacks accurately in models.

Manowitz, B.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures

260

Accelerating Progress in Global Atmospheric Model Development through Improved Parameterizations: Challenges, Opportunities, and Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting societal needs in weather, seasonal, and decadal prediction and climate projection requires a continuous improvement of the main tools used in making the predictions—global models of the Earth system. Despite significant progress in model ...

Christian Jakob

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Brass Ring of Climate Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brass Ring of Climate Modeling For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight Finding a simple way to...

262

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

263

Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

Wood, E.F. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

On the Effective Number of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of future climate change are increasingly based on the output of many different models. Typically, the mean over all model simulations is considered as the optimal prediction, with the underlying assumption that different models ...

Christopher Pennell; Thomas Reichler

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.  

SciTech Connect

While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Testing for the Possible Influence of Unknown Climate Forcings upon Global Temperature Increases from 1950-2000  

SciTech Connect

Global-scale variations in the climate system over the last half of the twentieth century, including long-term increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures, are consistent with concurrent human-induced emissions of radiatively active gases and aerosols. However, such consistency does not preclude the possible influence of other forcing agents, including internal modes of climate variability or unaccounted for aerosol effects. To test whether other unknown forcing agents may have contributed to multidecadal increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures from 1950 to 2000, data pertaining to observed changes in global-scale sea surface temperatures and observed changes in radiatively active atmospheric constituents are incorporated into numerical global climate models. Results indicate that the radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trends in sea surface temperatures—and global-mean near-surface temperatures—is provided predominantly by known changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols. Further, results indicate that less than 10% of the long-term historical increase in global-mean near-surface temperatures over the last half of the twentieth century could have been the result of internal climate variability. In addition, they indicate that less than 25%of the total radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trend in global-mean near-surface temperatures could have been provided by changes in net radiative forcing from unknown sources (either positive or negative). These results, which are derived from simple energy balance requirements, emphasize the important role humans have played in modifying the global climate over the last half of the twentieth century.

Anderson, Bruce T.; Knight, Jeff R.; Ringer, Mark A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Cherchi, Annalisa

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

269

An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, the authors presented a formulation and evaluation of an urban parameterization designed to represent the urban energy balance in the Community Land Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity ...

K. W. Oleson; G. B. Bonan; J. Feddema; M. Vertenstein

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) Agency/Company /Organization: Australia Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry (ABARES) Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.daff.gov.au/abares/publications_remote_content/publication_topics/ Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Intertemporal Computable Equilibrium System (ICES) Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model ... further results Captures the impact of policy changes on large numbers of economic

273

The Influence of Hadley Circulation Intensity Changes on Extratropical Climate in an Idealized Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been performed using a simple global model with idealized physics and zonally symmertrical forcings to investigate the influence of Hadley circulation intensity changes on extratropical climate. The heating within the Tropics is ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regional Climates in the GISS General Circulation Model: Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more viable research techniques into global climate change for the purpose of understanding the consequent environmental impacts is based on the use of general circulation models (GCMs). However, GCMs are currently unable to reliably ...

Bruce Hewitson

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Surface Ocean Fluxes and Water-Mass Transformation Rates in the Coupled NCAR Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distributions of the air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater and water mass transformation rates from a control integration of the coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Climate System Model (CSM) are compared with ...

Scott C. Doney; William G. Large; Frank O. Bryan

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Surface-Pressure Signature of Atmospheric Tides in Modern Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although atmospheric tides driven by solar heating are readily detectable at the earth’s surface as variations in air pressure, their simulations in current coupled global climate models have not been fully examined. This work examines near-...

Curt Covey; Aiguo Dai; Dan Marsh; Richard S. Lindzen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Spatiotemporal Climate Model Validation—Case Studies for MM5 over Northwestern Canada and Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) is aimed at understanding the role of high-latitude terrestrial ecosystems in the response of the Arctic system to global change through collection and comparison of climate datasets and model results. ...

Ute C. Herzfeld; Sheldon Drobot; Wanli Wu; Charles Fowler; James Maslanik

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The NCAR Climate System Model, Version One  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NCAR Climate System Model, version one, is described. The spinup procedure prior to a fully coupled integration is discussed. The fully coupled model has been run for 300 yr with no surface flux corrections in momentum, heat, or freshwater. ...

Byron A. Boville; Peter R. Gent

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interactive Canopies for a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models depend on evapotranspiration from models of plant stomatal resistance and leaf cover, and hence they depend on a description of the response of leaf cover to temperature and soil moisture. Such a description is derived as an ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Muhammad Shaikh; Ross Bryant; Lisa Graumlich

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Changes in 20th century extreme temperature and precipitation over the western United States based on observations and regional climate model simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in extreme temperature and precipitation in two regional climate model simulations forced by two global climate models are compared with observed trends over the western United States. The observed temperature extremes show substantial and ...

Valérie Duličre; Yongxin Zhang; Eric P. Salathé Jr.

282

Assessment of Dynamical Downscaling in Near-Surface Fields with Different Spectral Nudging Approaches Using the Nested Regional Climate Model (NRCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic downscaling with regional-scale climate models is used widely for increasing the spatial resolution of global-scale climate model projections. One uncertainty in generating these projections is the choice of boundary forcing applied. In ...

Jiali Wang; Veerabhadra R. Kotamarthi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

COMPARING MODEL RESULTS TO NATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY GOALS: RESULTS FROM THE ASIA MODELING EXERCISE  

SciTech Connect

While the world has yet to adopt a single unified policy to limit climate change, many countries and regions have adopted energy and climate policies that have implications for global emissions. In this paper, we discuss a few key policies and how they are included in a set of 24 energy and integrated assessment models that participated in the Asia Modeling Exercise. We also compare results from these models for a small set of stylized scenarios to the pledges made as part of the Copenhagen Accord and the goals stated by the Major Economies Forum. We find that the targets outlined by the United States, the European Union, Japan, and Korea require significant policy action in most of the models analyzed. For most of the models in the study, however, the goals outlined by India are met without any climate policy. The stringency of climate policy required to meet China’s Copenhagen pledges varies across models and accounting methodologies.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Jiang, Kejun

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Coupled Biosphere–Atmosphere Climate Model Suitable for Studies of Climatic Change Due to Land Surface Alterations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosphere model based on BATS (Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) is coupled to a primitive equation global statistical–dynamical model in order to study the climatic impact due to land surface alterations. The fraction of the earth’s ...

Mário Adelmo Varejăo-Silva; Sergio H. Franchito; Vadlamudi Brahmananda Rao

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

286

Transient Response of a Global Ocean-Atmosphere Model to a Doubling of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient response of climate to an instantaneous increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has been investigated by a general circulation model of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system with global geography and annual ...

Syukuro Manabe; Kirk Bryan; Michael J. Spelman

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An Improved Land Surface Emissivity Parameter for Land Surface Models Using Global Remote Sensing Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because land surface emissivity (?) has not been reliably measured, global climate model (GCM) land surface schemes conventionally set this parameter as simply constant, for example, 1 as in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (...

Menglin Jin; Shunlin Liang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Emission Scenario Dependency of Precipitation on Global Warming in the MIROC3.2 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation sensitivity per 1 K of global warming in twenty-first-century climate projections is smaller in an emission scenario with larger greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol emissions, according to the Model for Interdisciplinary ...

Hideo Shiogama; Seita Emori; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Tatsuya Nagashima; Tomoo Ogura; Toru Nozawa; Toshihiko Takemura

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Visualization for public-resource climate modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climateprediction.net aims to harness the spare CPU cycles of a million individual users' PCs to run a massive ensemble of climate simulations using an up-to-date, full-scale 3D atmosphere-ocean climate model. Although it has many similarities with other ...

D. A. Stainforth; D. Frame; J. P. R. B. Walton

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Parameterization of Wind Farms in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing the impacts of wind farms on regional climate, wind farms may be represented in climate models by an increase in aerodynamic roughness length. Studies employing this method have found near-surface temperature changes of 1-2 K over ...

Anna C. Fitch; Joseph B. Olson; Julie K. Lundquist

291

Parameterization of Wind Farms in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing the impacts of wind farms on regional climate, wind farms may be represented in climate models by an increase in aerodynamic roughness length. Studies employing this method have found near-surface temperature changes of 1–2 K over ...

Anna C. Fitch; Joseph B. Olson; Julie K. Lundquist

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

Katich, Kristina Noel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL AND REGIONAL HYDROLOGIC PROCESSES AND APPROPRIATE CONSERVATION OF MOIST ENTROPY  

SciTech Connect

The research supported by DOE funding addressed the fundamental issues of understanding and modeling of hydrologic processes in relation to regional and global climate change. The emphasis of this research effort was on the application of isentropic modeling and analysis to advance the accuracy of the simulation of all aspects of the hydrologic cycle including clouds and thus the climate state regionally and globally. Simulation of atmospheric hydrologic processes by the UW hybrid isentropic coordinate models provided fundamental insight into global monsoonal circulations, and regional energy exchange in relation to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Inter-comparison of UW hybrid model simulations with those from the NCAR Community Climate Model and other climate and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models investigated the increased accuracies gained in modeling long-range transport in isentropic coordinates and isolated differences in modeling of the climate state. The inter-comparisons demonstrated advantages in the simulation of the transport of the hydrologic components of the climate system and provided insight into the more general problems of simulating hydrologic processes, aerosols and chemistry for climate. This research demonstrated the viability of the UW isentropic-eta model for long-term integration for climate and climate change studies and documented that no insurmountable barriers exist to simulation of climate utilizing hybrid isentropic coordinate models. The results provide impetus for continued development of hybrid isentropic coordinate models as a means to advance accuracies in the simulation of global and regional climate in relation to transport and the planetary distribution of heat sources and sinks.

Donald Johnson, Todd Schaack

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Long-Term Predictions of Global Climate Using the Ocean Conveyor  

SciTech Connect

Many have attributed the Great Ocean Conveyor as a major driver of global climate change over millennia as well as a possible explanation for shorter (multidecadal) oscillations. The conveyor is thought to have a cycle time on the order of 1000 years, however recent research has suggested that it is much faster than previously believed (about 100 years). A faster conveyor leads to the possibility of the conveyor's role in even shorter oscillations such as the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The conveyor is primarily density driven. In this study the salty outflow of the Red Sea is used to predict its behavior ten years into the future. A successful model could lead to a long-term prediction (ten years) of El Ninos, Atlantic hurricane season intensity, as well as global temperature and precipitation patterns.

Ray, P.; Wilson, J.R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Multiple Equilibria, Natural Variability, and Climate Transitions in an Idealized Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized coupled ocean–atmosphere is constructed to study climatic equilibria and variability. The model focuses on the role of large-scale fluid motions in the climate system. The atmospheric component is an eddy-resolving two-level global ...

R. Saravanan; James C. Mc Williams

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) has recently been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a ...

William D. Collins; Cecilia M. Bitz; Maurice L. Blackmon; Gordon B. Bonan; Christopher S. Bretherton; James A. Carton; Ping Chang; Scott C. Doney; James J. Hack; Thomas B. Henderson; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; William G. Large; Daniel S. McKenna; Benjamin D. Santer; Richard D. Smith

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Community Climate System Model Version 4  

SciTech Connect

The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all the CCSM components, and documents fully coupled pre-industrial control runs compared to the previous version, CCSM3. Using the standard atmosphere and land resolution of 1{sup o} results in the sea surface temperature biases in the major upwelling regions being comparable to the 1.4{sup o} resolution CCSM3. Two changes to the deep convection scheme in the atmosphere component result in the CCSM4 producing El Nino/Southern Oscillation variability with a much more realistic frequency distribution than the CCSM3, although the amplitude is too large compared to observations. They also improve the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the frequency distribution of tropical precipitation. A new overflow parameterization in the ocean component leads to an improved simulation of the deep ocean density structure, especially in the North Atlantic. Changes to the CCSM4 land component lead to a much improved annual cycle of water storage, especially in the tropics. The CCSM4 sea ice component uses much more realistic albedos than the CCSM3, and the Arctic sea ice concentration is improved in the CCSM4. An ensemble of 20th century simulations runs produce an excellent match to the observed September Arctic sea ice extent from 1979 to 2005. The CCSM4 ensemble mean increase in globally-averaged surface temperature between 1850 and 2005 is larger than the observed increase by about 0.4 C. This is consistent with the fact that the CCSM4 does not include a representation of the indirect effects of aerosols, although other factors may come into play. The CCSM4 still has significant biases, such as the mean precipitation distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean, too much low cloud in the Arctic, and the latitudinal distributions of short-wave and long-wave cloud forcings.

Gent, Peter R.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Donner, Leo J.; Holland, Marika M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Jayne, Steve R.; Lawrence, David M.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhang, Minghua

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on 2012/09/03 "Co-organized by Viet Nam and the Netherlands, in close collaboration with other partners, including FAO and the World Bank, the conference will allow global leaders, practitioners, scientists, civil society and the private sector to share experiences and demonstrate how early action on how Climate-Smart Agriculture can act as a driver of green growth." Event Details Name Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Date 2012/09/03 Location Hanoi, Vietnam Tags LEDS, training, CLEAN Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

300

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ocean Radiant Heating in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally simple, double exponential, chlorophyll-dependent solar transmission parameterization for ocean general circulation models used in climate studies is presented. The transmission parameterization comes from empirical fits to a ...

J. Carter Ohlmann

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Climate Model for Winter Wheat Yield Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter wheat yields were simulated by a model requiring climatic data as input for estimating crop evapotranspiration and phenological development. An assumed relationship between the winter wheat yields and the amount and timing of crop water ...

Kenneth G. Hubbard; R. J. Hanks

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sensitivity of Simulated Climate to Model Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical measures of the climate (e.g., winds, eddy fluxes) simulated by a general circulation model are compared at different horizontal and vertical resolutions for the December, January, and February period. The simulations of the troposphere ...

Byron A. Boville

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Political Ecology of “Water in Mind”: Attributing Perceptions in the Era of Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article explores how researchers can apply social science methods and theoretical frames to capture how place-based communities are perceiving and responding to the immediate effects of global climate change. The study focuses on research ...

Susan A. Crate

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sensitivity of a GCM Simulation of Global Climate to the Representation of Land-Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of global climate to the characterization of the land-surface hydrology is investigated using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory GCM at R15 resolution with the standard Budyko bucket and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (...

John F. Stamm; Eric F. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY G. Marland' Ahsiract.--It is widcly agrccd that thc concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphcrc is increasing, that this increase is a consequence of man's activities, and that there is signilicant risk that this will lead to changes in the earth's climate. T h c qucstion is now k i n g discusscd what, if anything, we should be doing to minimize and/or adapt to changes in climate. Virtually evcry statcmcnt on this matter; from the G.S. Oflice of Tcchnology Assessment. to the National Acadcmy of Science, to the Nairobi Declaration on Climatic Change. includes some recommendation for planting and protecting forests. In fact, forestry is intimately involved in the climate change

307

Modeling global temperature changes with genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use genetic programming (GP), a variant of evolutionary computation, to build interpretable models of global mean temperature as a function of natural and anthropogenic forcings. In contrast to the conventional approach, which engages models that ... Keywords: Data-driven modeling, Evolutionary computation, Genetic programming, Global temperature modeling, Unconstrained optimization

Karolina Stanislawska; Krzysztof Krawiec; Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative [80]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. GHG intensitydefined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic outputby 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Climate Change Modeling:Computational Opportunities and Challenges  

SciTech Connect

High- delity climate models are the workhorses of modern climate change sciences. In this article, the authors focus on several computational issues associated with climate change modeling, covering simulation methodologies, temporal and spatial modeling restrictions, the role of high-end computing, as well as the importance of data-driven regional climate impact modeling.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wilson, Bruce E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Temporal- and Spatial-Scale Dependence of Three CMIP3 Climate Models in Simulating the Surface Temperature Trend in the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by increasing interests in regional- and decadal-scale climate predictions, this study systematically analyzed the spatial- and temporal-scale dependence of the prediction skill of global climate models in surface air temperature (SAT) ...

Koichi Sakaguchi; Xubin Zeng; Michael A. Brunke

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effects of Salt Compensation on the Climate Model Response in Simulations of Large Changes of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freshwater hosing experiments with a comprehensive coupled climate model and a coupled model of intermediate complexity are performed with and without global salt compensation in order to investigate the robustness of the bipolar seesaw. In both ...

Thomas F. Stocker; Axel Timmermann; Manuel Renold; Oliver Timm

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Stratospheric Variability in Twentieth-Century CMIP5 Simulations of the Met Office Climate Model: High Top versus Low Top  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination is made of stratospheric climate, circulation, and variability in configurations of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2 (HadGEM2) differing only in stratospheric resolution and the placement of the model lid. This ...

Scott M. Osprey; Lesley J. Gray; Steven C. Hardiman; Neal Butchart; Tim J. Hinton

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Innovative approaches to integrated global change modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated models are important tools to investigate the interactions between planetary processes and the growing impacts of human populations - in short: global change. Current models still have significant shortcomings, notably in their representation ... Keywords: Global change, Innovative approaches, Integrated assessment, Modelling, Research priorities

Carlo Giupponi, Mark E. Borsuk, Bert J. M. De Vries, Klaus Hasselmann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Climate Change Impacts on Jordan River Flow: Downscaling Application from a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integration of climate change projections into hydrological and other response models used for water resource planning and management is challenging given the varying spatial resolutions of the different models. In general, climate models are ...

Rana Samuels; Alon Rimmer; Andreas Hartmann; Simon Krichak; Pinhas Alpert

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earth’s Surface—Evaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earth’s surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

317

Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations over the Great Lakes Region Driven by Three Global Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

The performance of regional climate simulations is evaluated for the Great Lakes region. Three 10-year (1990–1999) current-climate simulations are performed using the MM5 regional climate model (RCM) with 36-km horizontal resolution. The simulations employed identical configuration and physical parameterizations, but different lateral boundary conditions and sea-surface temperatures derived from the NCEP Global Reanalysis and output from the CCSM3 and GISS general circulation models (GCMs). The simulation results are compared to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The three RCM simulations appeared to be more accurate in winter and least accurate in summer, and more accurate aloft than near the surface. The reanalysis-constrained simulation adequately captured the spatial distribution and seasonal cycle of the observed surface-air temperature and precipitation, but it produced consistently across all seasons a cold bias that is generally larger over the lakes than over land and a wet bias due to an overestimation of nonconvective precipitation. The simulated seasonal cycle of moisture–flux convergence over the region was in very good agreement with NARR. The two GCM-driven runs adequately simulated the spatial and seasonal variation of temperature, but overestimated cold-season precipitation and underestimated summer precipitation, reversing the observed annual precipitation cycle. The GISS-driven run failed to simulate the prevailing low-level flow and moisture convergence patterns. All three RCM simulations successfully captured the impact of the Great Lakes on the region's climate, especially on winter precipitation, a significant improvement over coarse-resolution GCM simulations over the region.

Zhong, Shiyuan (Sharon); Li, Xiuping; Bian, Xindi; Heilman, Warren E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

318

Climate Change Projections for the Twenty-First Century and Climate Change Commitment in the CCSM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change scenario simulations with the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3), a global coupled climate model, show that if concentrations of all greenhouse gases (GHGs) could have been stabilized at the year 2000, the climate ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington; Benjamin D. Santer; William D. Collins; Julie M. Arblaster; Aixue Hu; David M. Lawrence; Haiyan Teng; Lawrence E. Buja; Warren G. Strand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

320

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data By Brian Grabowski * September 13, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint While the idea of a cruise to Hawaii may sound like paradise, making that same journey 25 times back and forth in a year might start to lose its appeal. But for a climate data-gathering machine called AMF2, perched aboard the ship, every trip is a chance to gather more data that is critical to understanding the Pacific Ocean's role in the global climate. The machine is the Department of Energy's second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility, operated and managed by Argonne scientists. It carries a suite of instruments to measure properties of clouds, the ocean, precipitation, aerosols, and radiation. Over the summer of 2013, the AMF2 traveled back and forth between Hawaii and Los Angeles,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Effects of Imperfect Spatial and Temporal Sampling on Estimates of the Global Mean Temperature: Experiments with Model Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long time series of data simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model is used to empirically determine the effects of imperfect spatial and temporal sampling on estimates of the model's global-mean surface air temperature. Results determined ...

R. A. Madden; D. J. Shea; G. W. Branstator; J. J. Tribbia; R. O. Weber

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The New GFDL Global Atmosphere and Land Model AM2–LM2: Evaluation with Prescribed SST Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The configuration and performance of a new global atmosphere and land model for climate research developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) are presented. The atmosphere model, known as AM2, includes a new gridpoint dynamical ...

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. with four nested regional climate models  

SciTech Connect

We analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean-atmosphere climate models. Our primary goal is to assess the range of regional climate responses to increased greenhouse gases in available RCM simulations. The four RCMs used different geographical domains, different increased greenhouse gas scenarios for future-climate simulations, and (in some cases) different lateral boundary conditions. For simulations of the present climate, we compare RCM results to observations and to results of the GCM that provided lateral boundary conditions to the RCM. For future-climate (increased greenhouse gas) simulations, we compare RCM results to each other and to results of the driving GCMs. When results are spatially averaged over the western U.S., we find that the results of each RCM closely follow those of the driving GCM in the same region, in both present and future climates. In present-climate simulations, the RCMs have biases in spatially-averaged simulated precipitation and near-surface temperature that seem to be very close to those of the driving GCMs. In future-climate simulations, the spatially-averaged RCM-projected responses in precipitation and near-surface temperature are also very close to those of the respective driving GCMs. Precipitation responses predicted by the RCMs are in many regions not statistically significant compared to interannual variability. Where the predicted precipitation responses are statistically significant, they are positive. The models agree that near-surface temperatures will increase, but do not agree on the spatial pattern of this increase. The four RCMs produce very different estimates of water content of snow in the present climate, and of the change in this water content in response to increased greenhouse gases.

Duffy, P B; Arritt, R W; Coquard, J; Gutowski, W; Han, J; Iorio, J; Kim, J; Leung, L R; Roads, J; Zeledon, E

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Modeling Greenhouse Gas Energy Technology Responses to Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of the global energy system can help shed light on the competition and complementarities among technologies and energy systems both in the presence and absence of actions to affect the concentration of greenhouse gases. This paper explores the role of modeling in the analysis of technology deployment in addressing climate change. It examines the competition among technologies in a variety of markets, and explores conditions under which new markets, such as for hydrogen and carbon disposal, or modern commercial biomass, could emerge. Carbon capture and disposal technologies are shown have the potential to play a central role in controlling the cost of stabilizing the concentration of greenhouse gases, the goal of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, John F.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Projected changes in late 21st century tropical cyclone frequency in thirteen coupled climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in tropical cyclone (TC) frequency under anthropogenic climate change are examined for thirteen global models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), using the OWZP TC detection method developed by the authors in ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; J. L. McBride; H. Ye; R. A. Dare

326

Dependence of Warm and Cold Climate Depiction on Climate Model Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate model results are now being used to asses the potential societal impact of climate change, and to compare with paleoclimate indicators. The models used for these purposes currently employ relatively coarse resolution, and a key question ...

David Rind

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is described in terms of the equilibrium change in surface temperature due to a doubling of carbon dioxide in a slab ocean version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and ...

Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields; James J. Hack; William D. Collins

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation of Summer Monsoon Climate over East Asia with an NCAR Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summertime season climate over east Asia is simulated with a regional climate model (RegCM) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to validate the model's capability to produce the basic characteristics of monsoon ...

Yongqiang Liu; Filippo Giorgi; Warren M. Washington

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Examining the Interaction of Growing Crops with Local Climate Using a Coupled Crop–Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines to what extent crops and their environment should be viewed as a coupled system. Crop impact assessments currently use climate model output offline to drive process-based crop models. However, in regions where local climate is ...

Tom Osborne; Julia Slingo; David Lawrence; Tim Wheeler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

SciTech Connect

We investigated how climate, rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and land use change influenced continental river flow over the period 1948-2004 using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled river transfer model (RTM), a global river routing scheme. The model results indicate that the global mean river flow shows significant decreasing trend and climate forcing likely functions as the dominant controller of the downward trend during the study period. Nitrogen deposition and land use change account for about 5% and 2.5% of the decrease in simulated global scale river flow, respectively, while atmospheric CO2 accounts for an upward trend. However, the relative role of each driving factor is heterogeneous across regions in our simulations. The trend in river flow for the Amazon River basin is primarily explained by CO2, while land use change accounts for 27.4% of the downward trend in river flow for the Yangtze rive basin. Our simulations suggest that to better understand the trends of river flow, it is not only necessary to take into account the climate, but also to consider atmospheric composition, carbon-nitrogen interaction and land use change, particularly for regional scales.

Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Research Needs and Directions of Regional Climate Modeling Using WRF and CCSM  

SciTech Connect

Climate varies across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Yet, climate modeling has long been approached using global models that can resolve only the broader scales of atmospheric processes and their interactions with land, ocean, and sea ice. Clearly, large-scale climate determines the environment for mesoscale and microscale processes that govern the weather and local climate, but, likewise, processes that occur at the regional scale may have significant impacts on the large scale circulation. Resolving such scale interactions will lead to much improved understanding of how climate both influences, and is influenced by, human activities. Since October 2003, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has supported an effort through the Opportunity Fund to develop regional climate modeling capability using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) (http://www.ccsm.ucar.edu/models), with participations by members of both the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology and Climate and Global Dynamics Divisions. The goal is to develop a next generation community Regional Climate Model (RCM) that can address both downscaling and upscaling issues in climate modeling. Downscaling is the process of deriving regional climate information based on large-scale climate conditions. Both dynamical and statistical downscaling methods have been used to produce regional climate change scenarios; however, their resolution and physical fidelity are considered inadequate. Hence, the global change community has expressed a strong demand for improved regional climate information to explore the implications of adaptation and mitigation and assess climate change impacts (http://www.climatescience.gov/events/workshop2002/). Upscaling encapsulates the aggregate effects of small-scale physical and dynamical processes on the large-scale climate. One form of upscaling is the use of physical parameterizations such as that for deep convection. These are also considered to be inadequate, as much of the uncertainty in model sensitivity to greenhouse gases is now known to be associated with cloud parameterizations. Another form of upscaling is to explicitly include the effects of regional processes on the large-scale environment, both locally and remotely. Since their inception in the late 1980s, RCMs have been used predominantly to address downscaling issues through one-way coupling with global analyses or climate models. As part of the NCAR project, WRF has been adapted for simulating regional climate. Seasonal simulations over the U.S. have shown realistic features including the low-level jet and diurnal cycle of rainfall in the Central U.S. (Leung et al. 2005), and orographic precipitation in the western U.S. (Done et al. 2005). A WRF Regional Climate Modeling Working Group has been established to coordinate RCM research activities. To help define the next steps, a workshop on “Research Needs and Directions of Regional Climate Modeling Using WRF and CCSM” was organized to engage the regional and global climate modeling communities to: (1) define research needs for the development of a next generation community RCM based on WRF and CCSM; (2) define upscaling and downscaling research that can be addressed by RCMs; and (3) develop a plan of actions that would meet the research needs. This article summarizes the research issues and recommendations discussed at the workshop. There is no implied order in the research priorities listed below. Workshop agenda and presentations can be found at http://box.mmm.ucar.edu/events/rcm05/.

Leung, Lai R.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Tribbia, J.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Phenological Crop–Climate Models for Illinois, 1951–80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examine whether crop climate modeling using data based on phonological stages is appropriate for identifying different climatic effects on corn yields, two phonological models and a model using monthly data are devised for portions of Illinois ...

Pradnya S. Dharmadhikari; David M. Sharpe; Wayne M. Wendland

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Process-Oriented Small Lake Scheme for Coupled Climate Modeling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional dynamic lake model is presented as a candidate for simulating small unresolved lakes within the land surface scheme of a regional or global climate model. This model is based largely on well-established process algorithms with ...

Murray D. MacKay

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Local Implications of Globally Restricted Mobility: A study of Queenstown’s vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis employs a case study approach to investigate local implications of globally restricted mobility by examining Queenstown’s vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.… (more)

Walsh, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Constraints on Climate Sensitivity from Radiation Patterns in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimated range of climate sensitivity, the equilibrium warming resulting from a doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, has not decreased substantially in past decades. New statistical methods for estimating the climate ...

Markus Huber; Irina Mahlstein; Martin Wild; John Fasullo; Reto Knutti

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Global Profiling System for Improved Weather and Climate Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new long-term global observing system is proposed that would provide routine, detailed vertical profiles of measurements in the atmosphere and oceans. The system, which would need to be designed, developed, and operated by a consortium of ...

Alexander E. MacDonald

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Identifying Signatures of Natural Climate Variability in Time Series of Global-Mean Surface Temperature: Methodology and Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global-mean surface temperature is affected by both natural variability and anthropogenic forcing. This study is concerned with identifying and removing from global-mean temperatures the signatures of natural climate variability over the period ...

David W. J. Thompson; John M. Wallace; Phil D. Jones; John J. Kennedy

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative [91]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Computer demonstration of an interactive modeling system for the study of global change and biogeochemistry  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for visually oriented materials to aid in the study of global ecological science. Analysis of the carbon cycle is key to understanding Potential climate change. We have used satellite imagery along with global climate and soil texture data sets to simulate seasonal patterns in net carbon fixation and soil CO[sub 2] production. An interactive computer system is used to illustrate graphical results from various model scenarios of climate warming and land use change. These include global animations of monthly gridded CO[sub 2] exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. This modeling demonstration highlights the importance of annual CO[sub 2] fluxes in tropical forests (40% of global totals) and the large carbon storage potential in boreal and arctic soils.

Klooster, S.A.; Potter, S. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and ClimateChange Analyses of Extreme Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period May 2003 to May 2004, there were two CEC/PIER funded primary research activities by the Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences Group/Earth Science Division at LBNL. These activities are the implementation and testing of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model (CLM) into MM5, and the analysis of extreme heat days under a new set of climate simulations. The new version of MM5,MM5-CLM, has been tested for a 90 day snowmelt period in the northwestern U.S. Results show that this new code upgrade, as compared to the MM5-NOAH, has improved snowmelt, temperature, and precipitation when compared to observations. These are due in part to a subgrid scheme,advanced snow processes, and advanced vegetation. The climate change analysis is the upper and lower IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios, representing fossil fuel intensive and energy conserving future emission scenarios, and medium and low sensitivity Global Climate Models. Results indicate that California cities will see increases in the number of heat wave and temperature threshold days from two to six times.These results may be viewed as potential outcomes based on today's decisions on emissions.

Miller, Norman L.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Arctic Inversion Strength in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work indicates that climate models have a positive bias in the strength of the wintertime low-level temperature inversion over the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. It has been argued this bias leads to underestimates of the Arctic’s ...

Brian Medeiros; Clara Deser; Robert A. Tomas; Jennifer E. Kay

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Bayesian methods for discontinuity detection in climate model predictions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discontinuity detection is an important component in many fields: Image recognition, Digital signal processing, and Climate change research. Current methods shortcomings are: Restricted to one- or two-dimensional setting, Require uniformly spaced and/or dense input data, and Give deterministic answers without quantifying the uncertainty. Spectral methods for Uncertainty Quantification with global, smooth bases are challenged by discontinuities in model simulation results. Domain decomposition reduces the impact of nonlinearities and discontinuities. However, while gaining more smoothness in each subdomain, the current domain refinement methods require prohibitively many simulations. Therefore, detecting discontinuities up front and refining accordingly provides huge improvement to the current methodologies.

Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

Drake, John B [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jones, Phil [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modeling Northern Hemisphere Summer Heat Extreme Changes and Their Uncertainties Using a Physics Ensemble of Climate Sensitivity Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in extreme daily temperature events are examined using a perturbed physics ensemble of global model simulations under present-day and doubled CO2 climates where ensemble members differ in their representation of various physical ...

Robin T. Clark; Simon J. Brown; James M. Murphy

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frédéric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

LINKING MICROBES TO CLIMATE: INCORPORATING MICROBIAL ACTIVITY INTO CLIMATE MODELS COLLOQUIUM  

SciTech Connect

This report explains the connection between microbes and climate, discusses in general terms what modeling is and how it applied to climate, and discusses the need for knowledge in microbial physiology, evolution, and ecology to contribute to the determination of fluxes and rates in climate models. It recommends with a multi-pronged approach to address the gaps.

DeLong, Edward; Harwood, Caroline; Reid, Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of a Regional Climate Model of the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Arctic region climate system model has been developed to simulate coupled interactions among the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, and land surface of the western Arctic. The atmospheric formulation is based upon the NCAR regional climate model ...

Amanda H. Lynch; William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh; Gunter Weller

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Antarctic Clouds and Radiation within the NCAR Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate and improve the treatment of clouds and radiation by the climate models of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), simulations by the NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3), as well as the recently released ...

Keith M. Hines; David H. Bromwich; Philip J. Rasch; Michael J. Iacono

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Simple Coupled Midlatitude Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of simple analytical models is presented and evaluated for interannual to decadal coupled ocean–atmosphere modes at midlatitudes. The atmosphere and ocean are each in Sverdrup balance at these long timescales. The atmosphere’s temperature ...

Lynne D. Talley

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Long-Term Climate Commitments Projected with Climate–Carbon Cycle Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Simulations are run until the year ...

G.-K. Plattner; R. Knutti; F. Joos; T. F. Stocker; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; D. Cameron; E. Driesschaert; S. Dutkiewicz; M. Eby; N. R. Edwards; T. Fichefet; J. C. Hargreaves; C. D. Jones; M. F. Loutre; H. D. Matthews; A. Mouchet; S. A. Müller; S. Nawrath; A. Price; A. Sokolov; K. M. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Evolution of Climate Sensitivity and Climate Feedbacks in the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major evolution of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is used to diagnose climate feedbacks, understand how climate feedbacks change with different physical parameterizations, and identify the ...

A. Gettelman; J. E. Kay; K. M. Shell

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Chemistry–Climate Model Simulations of Twenty-First Century Stratospheric Climate and Circulation Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of stratospheric climate and circulation to increasing amounts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone recovery in the twenty-first century is analyzed in simulations of 11 chemistry–climate models using near-identical forcings and ...

Neal Butchart; I. Cionni; V. Eyring; T. G. Shepherd; D. W. Waugh; H. Akiyoshi; J. Austin; C. Brühl; M. P. Chipperfield; E. Cordero; M. Dameris; R. Deckert; S. Dhomse; S. M. Frith; R. R. Garcia; A. Gettelman; M. A. Giorgetta; D. E. Kinnison; F. Li; E. Mancini; C. McLandress; S. Pawson; G. Pitari; D. A. Plummer; E. Rozanov; F. Sassi; J. F. Scinocca; K. Shibata; B. Steil; W. Tian

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Climates at the Last Glacial Maximum: Influence of Model Horizontal Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate at the last glacial maximum (LGM) has been simulated using the U.K. Universities Global Atmospheric Modeling Programme (UGAMP) general circulation model (GCM) truncated at total wavenumbers 21, 42, and 63 (T21, T42, and T63) with ...

Buwen Dong; Paul J. Valdes

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Assessment of the Primary Sources of Spread of Global Warming Estimates from Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate feedback analysis constitutes a useful framework for comparing the global mean surface temperature responses to an external forcing predicted by general circulation models (GCMs). Nevertheless, the contributions of the different radiative ...

Jean-Louis Dufresne; Sandrine Bony

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling Global Lightning Distributions in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general circulation model (GCM) is used to model global lightning distributions and frequencies. Both total and cloud-to-ground lightning frequencies are modeled using parameterizations that relate the depth of convective clouds to lightning ...

Colin Price; David Rind

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Develop- ment (LDRD) Program and the Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) of the Oak Ridge National Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Civil and Environmental for each basin using the following approach: ORNL's Global LandScan 2007 product described in Section 2

Minnesota, University of

362

Global Modes of Sea Surface Temperature Variability in Relation to Regional Climate Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A century-long EOF analysis of global sea surface temperature (SST) was carried out and the first six modes, independent by construction, were found to be associated with well-known regional climate phenomena: the El Nińo–Southern Oscillation (...

Monique Messié; Francisco Chavez

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change: Report of a Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. The satellite instruments must be capable of observing atmospheric and surface temperature trends as small as 0.1°C decade?1, ozone changes ...

George Ohring; Bruce Wielicki; Roy Spencer; Bill Emery; Raju Datla

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evidence for a Rapid Global Climate Shift across the Late 1960s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that a number of important characteristics of the global atmospheric circulation and climate changed in a near-monotonic fashion over the decade, or less, centered on the late 1960s. These changes were largest or commonest in tropical ...

Peter G. Baines; Chris K. Folland

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Computational Efficiency and Accuracy of Methods for Asynchronously Coupling Atmosphere–Ocean Climate Models. Part I: Testing with a Mean Annual Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the mean annual, globally-averaged, coupled atmosphere–ocean energy balance model of Harvey and Schneider, the effect on the transient climate response to a step function solar constant increase using a variety of asynchronous coupling ...

S. H. Schneider; L. D. D. Harvey

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Examining Internal and External Contributors to Greenland Climate Variability Using CCSM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenland climate variability is connected to internal and external sources of global climate variability in six millennium simulations using Community Climate System Model 3. Simulation forcings are consistent with the PaleoClimate Model Inter-...

Heather J. Andres; W. R. Peltier

367

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.db1003 data Data Investigators R. S. Bradley, L. G. Ahern, and F. T. Keimig Color-shaded and contoured images of global, gridded instrumental data have been produced as a computer-based atlas. Each image simultaneously depicts anomaly maps of surface temperature, sea-level pressure, 500-mbar geopotential heights, and percentages of reference-period precipitation. Monthly, seasonal, and annual composites are available in either cylindrical equidistant or northern and southern hemisphere polar projections. Temperature maps are available from 1854 to 1991, precipitation from 1851 to 1989, sea-level pressure from 1899 to 1991, and 500-mbar heights from 1946 to 1991. The source of data for the temperature

368

Agent-Based Modelling of Socio-Ecosystems: A Methodology for the Analysis of Adaptation to Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated-environmental, economic and social-analysis of climate change calls for a paradigm shift as it is fundamentally a problem of complex, bottom-up and multi-agent human behaviour. There is a growing awareness that global environmental change ... Keywords: Agent-Based Modelling, Bottom-Up Exploration, Climate Change Adaptation, Socio-Ecosystems, Sustainability Strategies

Stefano Balbi; Carlo Giupponi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Cost: Paid Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Screenshot

370

Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, ...

Kirsten L. Findell; Elena Shevliakova; P. C. D. Milly; Ronald J. Stouffer

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

How Well Do Coupled Models Simulate Today's Climate?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information about climate and how it responds to increased greenhouse gas concentrations depends heavily on insight gained from numerical simulations by coupled climate models. The confidence placed in quantitative estimates of the rate and ...

Thomas Reichler; Junsu Kim

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Challenges in Combining Projections from Multiple Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent coordinated efforts, in which numerous general circulation climate models have been run for a common set of experiments, have produced large datasets of projections of future climate for various scenarios. Those multimodel ensembles sample ...

Reto Knutti; Reinhard Furrer; Claudia Tebaldi; Jan Cermak; Gerald A. Meehl

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Periodic Solutions in Low-Dimensional Climatic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classic climatic models use constitutive laws without any response time. A more realistic approach to the natural processes governing climate dynamics must introduce response time for heat and radiation fluxes. Extended irreversible ...

Toni Pujol; Josep Enric Llebot

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Compensation between Model Feedbacks and Curtailment of Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spread in climate sensitivity obtained from 12 general circulation model runs used in the Fourth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates a 95% confidence interval of 2.1°–5.5°C, but this reflects compensation ...

Peter Huybers

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Temperature Trends in the NARCCAP Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The skill of six regional climate models (RCMs) in reproducing short-term (24-yr), observed, near-surface temperature trends when driven by reanalysis is examined. The RCMs are part of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (...

Melissa S. Bukovsky

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Application of MJO Simulation Diagnostics to Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of eight climate models to simulate the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is examined using diagnostics developed by the U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) MJO Working Group. Although the MJO signal has been extracted ...

D. Kim; K. Sperber; W. Stern; D. Waliser; I.-S. Kang; E. Maloney; W. Wang; K. Weickmann; J. Benedict; M. Khairoutdinov; M.-I. Lee; R. Neale; M. Suarez; K. Thayer-Calder; G. Zhang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Climate Drift in a Coupled Land–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled land–atmosphere climate model is examined for evidence of climate drift in the land surface state variable of soil moisture. The drift is characterized as pathological error growth in two different ways. First is the systematic error ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Changing climate and energy modeling: a review  

SciTech Connect

A review of a 1983 National Academy of Sciences report on the greenhouse effect focuses on the link between energy and carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) emissions, which is examined in Chapter 2 of the report. While in substantial agreement with the major qualitative conclusions and appreciative of the literature review, the authors note a bias toward low carbon emissions in the year 2000 in the model structure. They suggest introducing some process model characteristics, such as conversion processes. They also note the need to broaden research to other atmospheric constituents with potential to effect climatic change. 24 references.

Reilly, J.; Edmonds, J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Impact of Climate Change on the Future Chemical Composition of the Global Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global chemical transport model of the atmosphere [the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2)] driven by prescribed surface emissions and by meteorological fields provided by the ECHAM5/Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-...

Guy P. Brasseur; Martin Schultz; Claire Granier; Marielle Saunois; Thomas Diehl; Michael Botzet; Erich Roeckner; Stacy Walters

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The dilemma of fossil fuel use and global climate change  

SciTech Connect

The use of fossil fuels and relationship to climate change is discussed. As the use of fossil fuels has grown, the problems of protecting the environment and human health and safety have also grown, providing a continuing challenge to technological and managerial innovation. Today that challenge is to control atmospheric emissions from combustion, particularly those emissions that cause acidic deposition, urban pollution, and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Technology for reducing acidic deposition is available and needs only to be adopted, and the remedies for urban pollution are being developed and tested. How effective or expensive these will be remains to be determined. The control of emissions of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}, seems possible only be reducing the total amounts of fossil fuels used worldwide, and by substituting efficient natural gas technologies for coal. Long before physical depletion forces the transition away from fossil fuels, it is at least plausible and even likely that the greenhouse effect will impose a show-stopping constraint. If such a transition were soon to be necessary, the costs would be very high because substitute energy sources are either limited or expensive or undesirable for other reasons. Furthermore, the costs would be unevenly felt and would be more oppressive for developing nations because they would be least able to pay and, on average, their use rates of fossil fuels are growing much faster than those of many industrialized countries. It is prudent, therefore, to try to manage the use of fossil fuels as if a greenhouse constraint is an important possibility.

Judkins, R.R.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanghvi, M.K. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Climate Drift in a Multicentury Integration of the NCAR Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Climate System Model is a comprehensive model of the physical climate system. A 300-yr integration of the model has been carried out without flux correction. The solution shows very little drift in ...

Frank O. Bryan

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Preliminary Synthesis of Modeled Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Regional Ozone Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a synthesis of results that have emerged from recent modeling studies of the potential sensitivity of U.S. regional ozone (O3) concentrations to global climate change (ca. 2050). This research has been carried out under the ...

C. P. Weaver; E. Cooter; R. Gilliam; A. Gilliland; A. Grambsch; D. Grano; B. Hemming; S. W. Hunt; C. Nolte; D. A. Winner; X-Z. Liang; J. Zhu; M. Caughey; K. Kunkel; J-T. Lin; Z. Tao; A. Williams; D. J. Wuebbles; P. J. Adams; J. P. Dawson; P. Amar; S. He; J. Avise; J. Chen; R. C. Cohen; A. H. Goldstein; R. A. Harley; A. L. Steiner; S. Tonse; A. Guenther; J-F. Lamarque; C. Wiedinmyer; W. I. Gustafson; L. R. Leung; C. Hogrefe; H-C. Huang; D. J. Jacob; L. J. Mickley; S. Wu; P. L. Kinney; B. Lamb; N. K. Larkin; D. McKenzie; K-J. Liao; K. Manomaiphiboon; A. G. Russell; E. Tagaris; B. H. Lynn; C. Mass; E. Salathé; S. M. O'neill; S. N. Pandis; P. N. Racherla; C. Rosenzweig; J-H. Woo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comments on climate change scenario development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short review is presented of progress in climate change scenario development. Sources of uncertainty are discussed. Critical assessment of climate models for their veracity in describing the present climate is considered essential. Methods of deriving ... Keywords: Climate change, Global climate models, Greenhouse effect, Scenarios

A. B. Pittock

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Downscaling of Global Climate Change Estimates to Regional Scales: An Application to Iberian Rainfall in Wintertime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical strategy to deduct regional-scale features from climate general circulation model (GCM) simulations has been designed and tested. The main idea is to interrelate the characteristic patterns of observed simultaneous variations of ...

Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita; Ulrich Cubasch

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

From Short-Scale Atmospheric Variability to Global Climate Dynamics: Toward a Systematic Theory of Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, climate is defined by the properties of the averages of the meteorological fields over an appropriate time interval. In this paper the properties of the time-averaged observables of a red noise atmosphere and of a simplified model ...

C. Nicolis; G. Nicolis

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Stability of Antarctic Bottom Water Formation to Freshwater Fluxes and Implications for Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) to freshwater (FW) perturbations is investigated in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. It is found that AABW is stable to surface freshwater fluxes greater in volume and rate to ...

Jessica Trevena; Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Using and Designing GCM–RCM Ensemble Regional Climate Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimodel ensembles, whereby different global climate models (GCMs) and regional climate models (RCMs) are combined, have been widely used to explore uncertainties in regional climate projections. In this study, the extent to which information ...

Elizabeth J. Kendon; Richard G. Jones; Erik Kjellström; James M. Murphy

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Role of aerosols in radiative forcing of climate change: Global mean and uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenically induced climate change is of great current interest because of increases in atmospheric loading of infrared active (greenhouse) gases over the past 150 years and the inferred resultant increase in infrared radiation flux in the troposphere. However, the climate change ascribed to such increases, not to mention predictions of future climate change in response to prospective changes in the earth`s radiation budget, is based virtually entirely on climate model simulations of how the earth`s climate would respond to changes in radiation rather than on empirically established relationships between changes in the earth`s radiation budget and climate change. There is thus an urgent need to evaluate the performance of climate models to ascertain the accuracy with which they represent the changes in temperature and other indicia of climate that have been observed over the industrial period. Such an evaluation, however, requires an accurate assessment of the totality of changes in the earth`s radiation budget in both the longwave (thermal infrared) and shortwave (solar) spectral regions, not just of changes in the longwave due to increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases.

Schwartz, S.E.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A GCM Simulation of Global Climate Trends: 1950–1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric general circulation model has been forced with observed mean monthly sea surface temperatures for the period 1950–1988 and the trends in annual mean fields from an ensemble of three such experiments analyzed. During this period, ...

I. N. Smith

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Canadian Climate Centre Second-Generation General Circulation Model and Its Equilibrium Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Climate Centre second generation general circulation model (GCMII) is described. The description emphasizes aspects in which the new model differs from the 1984 model (GCMI) as described by Boer and collaborators. Important features ...

N. A. McFarlane; G. J. Boer; J-P. Blanchet; M. Lazare

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Combining climate model output via model correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 9, 2010 ... we fit a statistical model linking the ensemble members explicitly through the .... for the domain (winds, temperature, moisture, etc.) are obtained .... ever, there are different dynamical features to the indi- .... Further, it is possible.

394

U.K. HiGEM: The New U.K. High-Resolution Global Environment Model—Model Description and Basic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the development and evaluation of the U.K.’s new High-Resolution Global Environmental Model (HiGEM), which is based on the latest climate configuration of the Met Office Unified Model, known as the Hadley Centre Global ...

L. C. Shaffrey; I. Stevens; W. A. Norton; M. J. Roberts; P. L. Vidale; J. D. Harle; A. Jrrar; D. P. Stevens; M. J. Woodage; M. E. Demory; J. Donners; D. B. Clark; A. Clayton; J. W. Cole; S. S. Wilson; W. M. Connolley; T. M. Davies; A. M. Iwi; T. C. Johns; J. C. King; A. L. New; J. M. Slingo; A. Slingo; L. Steenman-Clark; G. M. Martin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America Using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The Impact of the Great Lakes System on Regional Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale global warming projections produced using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The analyses are focused on the Great Lakes Basin of North America and the ...

Jonathan Gula; W. Richard Peltier

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Global Futures: A Multithreaded Execution Model for Global Arrays-based Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible active message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry ... Keywords: Global Arrays, multithreading, execution models

Daniel Chavarria-Miranda; Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Abhinav Vishnu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Report of the EMF 19 Study on Technology and Global Climate Change Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON REPORT ON THE EMF 19 STUDY ON TECHNOLOGY AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE POLICIES David J. Beecy (david.beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2786) Office of Environmental Systems Technology U.S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road GTN, FE-23, E-133 Germantown, MD 20545 Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov; 202-586-0883) Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, EI-80 Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy 100 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Richard G. Richels (rrichels@epri.com; 650-855-2602) Global Climate Change Program Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 John P. Weyant (weyant@stanford.edu; 650-723-3506) Department of Management Science & Engineering Terman Building: Room 406 Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-4026

399

Integration of Space and In Situ Observations to Study Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The currently available model-based global data sets of atmospheric circulation are a by-product of the daily requirement of producing initial conditions for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. These data sets have been quite useful for ...

L. Bengtsson; J. Shukla

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

402

Predictor Screening, Calibration, and Observational Constraints in Climate Model Ensembles: An Illustration Using Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections have been remarkably difficult to constrain by comparing the simulated climatological state from different models with observations, in particular for small ensembles with structurally different models. In this study, the ...

David Masson; Reto Knutti

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Long-Term Climate Modeling and Hydrological Response to Climate Cycles in the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate and its influence on hydrological conditions are important considerations in the evaluation of the Yucca Mountain (YM) site as a geologic repository for disposal of U.S. commercial spent nuclear fuel and defense high level radioactive wastes. This report updates previous EPRI studies (reports 1013445 and 1015045), which produced a quantitative and paleo-climate-calibrated/verified model of how climate, infiltration, and YM flow properties might appear in the future. The studies also supported ass...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Comparisons of the Second-Moment Statistics of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the magnitude and the temporal and spatial correlation scales of background fluctuations generated by three climate models, two different coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models and one energy balance model, were ...

Kwano-Y. Kim; Gerald R. North; Gabriele C. Hegerl

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Transient Climate Simulations with the HadGEM1 Climate Model: Causes of Past Warming and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of climate models to simulate large-scale temperature changes during the twentieth century when they include both anthropogenic and natural forcings and their inability to account for warming over the last 50 yr when they exclude ...

Peter A. Stott; Gareth S. Jones; Jason A. Lowe; Peter Thorne; Chris Durman; Timothy C. Johns; Jean-Claude Thelen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CO2 capture, reuse, and sequestration technologies for mitigating global climate change  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently supply over 85% of the world`s energy needs. They will remain in abundant supply well into the 21st century. They have been a major contributor to the high standard of living enjoyed by the industrialized world. We have learned how to extract energy from fossil fuels in environmentally friendly ways, controlling the emissions of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates. Even with these added pollution controls, the cost of fossil energy generated power keeps falling. Despite this good news about fossil energy, its future is clouded because of the environmental and economic threat posed by possible climate change, commonly referred to as the `greenhouse effect`. The major greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the major source of anthropogenic C0{sub 2} is combustio of fossil fuels. The potential impacts of global climate change are many and varied, though there is much uncertainty as to the timing and magnitude (Watson et al., 1996). Because of the potential adverse impacts, the world community has adopted the Framework Convention on Climate Change (see Box 1). The urgency of their work was recently underscored when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued their Second Assessment Report which stated that `the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate`. The goal of stabilization of greenhouse gas emissions at their 1990 levels in the year 2000 will not be met by the vast majority of countries. Based on this experience, it is obvious that more aggressive technology responses are required if we want to control greenhouse gas emissions.

Herzog, H.J., MIT Energy Laboratory

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Future climate in the Tibetan Plateau from a statistical regional climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use a statistical regional climate model (STAR) to project the Tibetan Plateau (TP) climate for the period 2015-2050. Reanalysis datasets covering 1958-2001 are used as a substitute of observations and resampled by STAR to optimally fit ...

Xiuhua Zhu; Weiqiang Wang; Klaus Fraedrich

408

Poster: Data intensive uncertainty quantification: applications to climate modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October of 2009, LLNL began a three-year Strategic Initiative, "The Advance of Uncertainty Quantification Science with Application to Climate Modeling, Inertial Confinement Fusion Design, and Stockpile Stewardship Science." The goal of the project ... Keywords: climate model, uncertainty quantification

John Tannahill; Donald D. Lucas; David Domyancic; Scott Brandon; Richard Klein

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Response of ice and liquid water paths of tropical cyclones to global warming simulated by a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud feedback plays a key role in the future climate projection. Using global non-hydrostatic model (GNHM) simulation data for a present-day (CTL) and a warmer (GW) experiment, we estimate the contribution of tropical cyclones (TC) to ice/liquid ...

Yohei Yamada; Masaki Satoh

410

Testing for the Possible Influence of Unknown Climate Forcings upon Global Temperature Increases from 1950 to 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global-scale variations in the climate system over the last half of the twentieth century, including long-term increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures, are consistent with concurrent human-induced emissions of radiatively active gases ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Jeff R. Knight; Mark A. Ringer; Jin-Ho Yoon; Annalisa Cherchi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Analytical Model of Atmospheric Feedback and Global Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of the globally averaged surface temperature response to changes in radiative forcing induced by greenhouse gases is developed from a time-dependent version of the global energy budget. The model clarifies the role of feedback ...

John A. Dutton

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of an Integrated Global Energy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to develop a forefront analysis tool for application to enhance understanding of long-term, global, nuclear-energy and nuclear-material futures. To this end, an existing economics-energy-environmental (E{sup 3}) model was adopted, modified, and elaborated to examine this problem in a multi-regional (13), long-term ({approximately}2,100) context. The E{sup 3} model so developed was applied to create a Los Alamos presence in this E{sup 3} area through ''niche analyses'' that provide input to the formulation of policies dealing with and shaping of nuclear-energy and nuclear-materials futures. Results from analyses using the E{sup 3} model have been presented at a variety of national and international conferences and workshops. Through use of the E{sup 3} model Los Alamos was afforded the opportunity to participate in a multi-national E{sup 3} study team that is examining a range of global, long-term nuclear issues under the auspices of the IAEA during the 1998-99 period . Finally, the E{sup 3} model developed under this LDRD project is being used as an important component in more recent Nuclear Material Management Systems (NMMS) project.

Krakowski, R.A.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Category: Modeling Statistical cloud schemes (or assumed probability distribution function cloud schemes) are attractive because they provide a way to implement horizontal sub-grid scale cloud heterogeneity in a self-consistent way between physical parameterizations of the a climate model, such as radiation and cloud microphysics. In this work, we will present results dealing with two aspects of our ongoing work towards the implementation of statistical cloud scheme ideas in the climate model of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. First, we will address the representation of cloud

414

Initiative to improve process representation in chemistry-climate models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Initiative (AC&C) will address the current large uncertainties in our understanding of chemistry-climate interactions for short-lived atmospheric chemical constituents (e.g. aerosols, ozone, and methane). Understanding what controls the distribution of these species, how they affect climate, and how their distributions might change with a changing climate are important for air quality and climate forecasts. AC&C will address this issue in its first phase through a series of modeling exercises designed to test models’ ability to reproduce observed changes in these species distributions, to produce a set of coordinated forecasts for their future distribution, and to understand how processes are represented in different models. Observational databases will be used to test the models and to better understand processes represented in the models. This article describes the plans for this first phase of activities and seeks participation from the research community.

Doherty, Sarah J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Ravishankara, A.R.

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of the first nonhydrostatic nested-grid grid-point global atmospheric modeling system on parallel machines  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Evaluating the importance of global and regional climate response to increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases requires a comprehensive global atmospheric modeling system (GAMS) capable of simulations over a wide range of atmospheric circulations, from complex terrain to continental scales, on high-performance computers. Unfortunately, all of the existing global circulation models (GCMs) do not meet this requirements, because they suffer from one or more of the following three shortcomings: (1) use of the hydrostatic approximation, which makes the models potentially ill-posed; (2) lack of a nested-grid (or multi-grid) capability, which makes it difficult to consistently evaluate the regional climate response to the global warming, and (3) spherical spectral (opposed to grid-point finite-difference) representation of model variables, which hinders model performance for parallel machine applications. The end product of the research is a highly modularized, multi-gridded, self-calibratable (for further parameterization development) global modeling system with state-of-the-science physics and chemistry. This system will be suitable for a suite of atmospheric problems: from local circulations to climate, from thunderstorms to global cloud radiative forcing, from urban pollution to global greenhouse trace gases, and from the guiding of field experiments to coupling with ocean models. It will also provide a unique testbed for high-performance computing architecture.

Kao, C.Y.J.; Langley, D.L.; Reisner, J.M.; Smith, W.S.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

How Much Do Different Land Models Matter for Climate Simulation? Part II: A Decomposed View of the Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) built a framework to estimate the strength of the land–atmosphere interaction across many weather and climate models. Within this framework, GLACE-type experiments are performed with a single ...

Jiangfeng Wei; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Zhichang Guo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Climatology of the Middle Atmosphere in a Vertically Extended Version of the Met Office’s Climate Model. Part II: Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratospheric variability is examined in a vertically extended version of the Met Office global climate model. Equatorial variability includes the simulation of an internally generated quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and semiannual oscillation (...

Scott M. Osprey; Lesley J. Gray; Steven C. Hardiman; Neal Butchart; Andrew C. Bushell; Tim J. Hinton

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Do Global Models Properly Represent the Feedback between Land and Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment/Climate Variability and Predictability (GEWEX/CLIVAR) Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) has provided an estimate of the global distribution of land–atmosphere coupling strength during ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

420

Analysis of Timescales of Response of a Simple Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis is made of various analytic solutions to a 0D climate model coupled to an upwelling diffusion ocean model. In particular, the responses to impulse, step-function, exponential, and linear forcings are addressed. The coupled ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Kimberly J. Schaudt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

422

The Thermal Balance of the NCAR Community Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal balance of the NCAR Community Climate Model is examined using the zonally averaged temperature tendency equation of the model. The perpetual January and perpetual July control simulations are used to determine the relative importance ...

Byron A. Boville

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Antarctic Bottom Water Variability in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural variability of the Weddell Sea variety of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is examined in a long-term integration of a coupled climate model. Examination of passive tracer concentrations suggests that the model AABW is predominantly ...

Agus Santoso; Matthew H. England

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model-resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of unresolved gravity waves that,...

Marvin A. Geller; Tiehan Zhou; Reto Ruedy; Igor Aleinov; Larissa Nazarenko; Nikolai L. Tausnev; Shan Sun; Maxwell Kelley; Ye Cheng

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model-resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of ...

Geller, Marvin A.

426

Numerical Experiments with a Stochastic Zonal Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zonally averaged energy balance climate model is used to generate zonal temperature variability through fluctuating meridional energy transports. In the base model, stochastic transport fluctuations are introduced by multiplying the eddy ...

H. Nuzhet Dalfes; S. H. Schneider; Starley L. Thompson

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

Luxmoore, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baldocchi, D.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Managing the global commons decision making and conflict resolution in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

A workshop was convened to develop a better understanding of decision-making matters concerning management of the global commons and to resolve conflicts in response to climate change. This workshop report does not provide a narrative of the proceedings. The workshop program is included, as are the abstracts of the papers that were presented. Only the introductory paper on social science research by William Riebsame and the closing summary by Richard Rockwell are reprinted here. This brief report focuses instead on the deliberations of the working groups that developed during the workshop. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Rayner, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Naegeli, W.; Lund, P. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regional Climate Change Scenarios over the United States Produced with a Nested Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper two continuous 3˝-year-long climate simulations over the continental United States are discussed, one for present-day conditions and one for conditions under double carbon dioxide concentration, conducted with a limited area model (...

Filippo Giorgi; Christine Shields Brodeur; Gary T. Bates

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans  

SciTech Connect

Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

Sisneros, Roberto R [ORNL; Huang, Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ostrouchov, George [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Biophysical Evaluation of Land-Cover Products for Land–Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for accurate characterization of the land surface as boundary conditions in climate models has been recognized widely in the climate modeling community. A large number of land-cover datasets are currently used in climate models either to ...

Jianjun Ge; Nathan Torbick; Jiaguo Qi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a method to change the ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; Erwan Monier

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Vegetation Dynamics Enhancing Long-Term Climate Variability Confirmed by Two Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different coupled climate–vegetation models, the Community Climate Model version 3 coupled to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (CCM3–IBIS) and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique’s climate model coupled to the Organizing Carbon and ...

Christine Delire; Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Adriana Sima; Isabelle Gouirand

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Global and Seasonal Assessment of Interactions between Climate and Vegetation Biophysical Processes: A GCM Study with Different Land–Vegetation Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global and seasonal assessment of regions of the earth with strong climate–vegetation biophysical process (VBP) interactions is provided. The presence of VBP and degree of VBP effects on climate were assessed based on the skill of simulations ...

Yongkang Xue; Fernando De Sales; Ratko Vasic; C. Roberto Mechoso; Akio Arakawa; Stephen Prince

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angstr¨om exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they overestimate the AOD and they transport too fine particles. The models also reproduce the dust transport across the Atlantic in the summer in terms of both AOD and AE but not so well in winter-spring nor the southward displacement of the dust cloud that is responsible of the dust transport into South America. Based on the dependency of AOD on aerosol burden and size distribution we use model bias with respect to AOD and AE to infer the bias of the dust emissions in Africa and the Middle East. According to this analysis we suggest that a range of possible emissions for North Africa is 400 to 2200 Tg yr?1 and in the Middle East 26 to 526 Tg yr?1.

Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, Stefan; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginnoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M.; Landing, W.; Liu, Xiaohong; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Seasonal Climatic Changes Induced by Doubled CO2 as Simulated by the OSU Atmospheric GCM/Mixed-Layer Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The OSU global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) has been coupled to a 60-m deep mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the equilibrium seasonal climatic changes induced by a doubling of the CO2 concentration. Simulations with CO2 ...

Michael E. Schlesinger; Zong-ci Zhao

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Virtual Field Campaigns on Deep Tropical Convection in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution time–height data over warm tropical oceans are examined, from three global atmosphere models [GFDL’s Atmosphere Model 2 (AM2), NCAR’s Community Atmosphere Model, version 3 (CAM3), and a NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office ...

Brian Mapes; Julio Bacmeister; Marat Khairoutdinov; Cecile Hannay; Ming Zhao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A stochastic control model for optimal timing of climate policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic control model is proposed as a paradigm for the design of optimal timing of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission abatement. The resolution of uncertainty concerning climate sensitivity and the technological breakthrough providing access to a carbon-free ... Keywords: Climate policies, Environmental hedging strategies, Piecewise deterministic Markov process, Stochastic control

O. Bahn; A. Haurie; R. Malhamé

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

THE WCRP CMIP3 Multimodel Dataset: A New Era in Climate Change Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coordinated set of global coupled climate model [atmosphere–ocean general circulation model (AOGCM)] experiments for twentieth- and twenty-first-century climate, as well as several climate change commitment and other experiments, was run by 16 ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Curt Covey; Karl E. Taylor; Thomas Delworth; Ronald J. Stouffer; Mojib Latif; Bryant McAvaney; John F. B. Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Global Climate Change and the Unique Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and consumers on the planet. To date, however, most efforts to address climate change have focused on only a few sectors of the economy (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) and a handful of large industrialized nations. While useful as a starting point, these efforts must be expanded to include other sectors of the economy and other nations. The transportation sector presents some unique challenges, with its nearly exclusive dependence on petroleum based products as a fuel source coupled with internal combustion engines as the prime mover. Reducing carbon emissions from transportation systems is unlikely to be solely accomplished by traditional climate mitigation policies that place a price on carbon. Our research shows that price signals alone are unlikely to fundamentally alter the demand for energy services or to transform the way energy services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

Dooley, J.J.; Geffen, C.A.; Edmonds, J.A.

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling A NOAA of the NWS's forecast products, even its regional forecast products, are constrained by the limitations of NOAA's global forecast model. Unfortunately, our global forecasts are less accurate than those from

Hamill, Tom

442

Physical basis for climate change models  

SciTech Connect

The objectives for this research were two-fold: To identify means of using measurements of the outgoing radiation stream from earth to identify mechanisms of climate change; and to develop a flexible radiation code based upon the correlated-k method to enable rapid and accurate calculations of the outgoing radiation. The intended products are three papers and a radiation code. The three papers are to be on Entropy fluxes and the dissipation of the climate system, Radiation fingerprints of climate change, and A rapid correlated-k code.

Goody, R.; Gerstell, M.

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Climate Determinism Revisited: Multiple Equilibria in a Complex Climate Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple equilibria in a coupled ocean–atmosphere–sea ice general circulation model (GCM) of an aquaplanet with many degrees of freedom are studied. Three different stable states are found for exactly the same set of ...

Ferreira, David

444

Climate Determinism Revisited: Multiple Equilibria in a Complex Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple equilibria in a coupled ocean–atmosphere–sea ice general circulation model (GCM) of an aquaplanet with many degrees of freedom are studied. Three different stable states are found for exactly the same set of parameters and external ...

David Ferreira; John Marshall; Brian Rose

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood and magnitude of the impacts of climate change on potential vegetation and the water cycle in Mesoamerica is evaluated. Mesoamerica is a global biodiversity hotspot with highly diverse topographic and climatic conditions and is ...

Pablo Imbach; Luis Molina; Bruno Locatelli; Olivier Roupsard; Gil Mahé; Ronald Neilson; Lenin Corrales; Marko Scholze; Philippe Ciais

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Climate Impacts of Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes in Tropical Islands under Conditions of Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes have significant climate impacts in tropical coastal regions with the added complexity of occurring within the context of a warming climate. The individual and combined effects of these two factors in ...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. González; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Robert D. Bornstein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

451

Climate–Carbon Cycle Feedback Analysis: Results from the C4MIP Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eleven coupled climate–carbon cycle models used a common protocol to study the coupling between climate change and the carbon cycle. The models were forced by historical emissions and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special ...

P. Friedlingstein; P. Cox; R. Betts; L. Bopp; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; P. Cadule; S. Doney; M. Eby; I. Fung; G. Bala; J. John; C. Jones; F. Joos; T. Kato; M. Kawamiya; W. Knorr; K. Lindsay; H. D. Matthews; T. Raddatz; P. Rayner; C. Reick; E. Roeckner; K.-G. Schnitzler; R. Schnur; K. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver; C. Yoshikawa; N. Zeng

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Why Analyze Mental Models of Local Climate Change? A Case from Southern Mozambique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People construct mental models of local climate change based on their observations and experiences of past climate events and changes. These mental models offer critical insight into locally important factors that trigger responses to new climate ...

L. Jen Shaffer; Leocadia Naiene

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Climate system modeling on massively parallel systems: LDRD Project 95-ERP-47 final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss are some of the major climate-related issues presently being addressed by climate and environmental scientists. Because unexpected changes in the climate could have significant effect on our economy, it is vitally important to improve the scientific basis for understanding and predicting the earth`s climate. The impracticality of modeling the earth experimentally in the laboratory together with the fact that the model equations are highly nonlinear has created a unique and vital role for computer-based climate experiments. However, today`s computer models, when run at desired spatial and temporal resolution and physical complexity, severely overtax the capabilities of our most powerful computers. Parallel processing offers significant potential for attaining increased performance and making tractable simulations that cannot be performed today. The principal goals of this project have been to develop and demonstrate the capability to perform large-scale climate simulations on high-performance computing systems (using methodology that scales to the systems of tomorrow), and to carry out leading-edge scientific calculations using parallelized models. The demonstration platform for these studies has been the 256-processor Cray-T3D located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our plan was to undertake an ambitious program in optimization, proof-of-principle and scientific study. These goals have been met. We are now regularly using massively parallel processors for scientific study of the ocean and atmosphere, and preliminary parallel coupled ocean/atmosphere calculations are being carried out as well. Furthermore, our work suggests that it should be possible to develop an advanced comprehensive climate system model with performance scalable to the teraflops range. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Mirin, A.A.; Dannevik, W.P.; Chan, B.; Duffy, P.B.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Wehner, M.F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Climatic Impact of Amazon Deforestation—A Mechanistic Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments suggest a drastic change in the regional climate, especially the hydrological cycle, after hypothesized Amazon basinwide deforestation. To facilitate the theoretical understanding of such a ...

Ning Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Xubin Zeng

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

South Atlantic Multidecadal Variability in the Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong multidecadal variability is detected in a 300-yr integration of the NCAR Climate System Model in the South Atlantic region, through the application of two signal recognition techniques: the multitaper method and singular spectrum analysis. ...

Ilana Wainer; Silvia A. Venegas

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A Semiempirical Cloudiness Parameterization for Use in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data produced from explicit simulations of observed tropical cloud systems and subtropical stratocumuli are used to develop a “semiempirical” cloudiness parameterization for use in climate models. The semiempirical cloudiness parameterization ...

Kuan-Man Xu; David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Causal Discovery for Climate Research Using Graphical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Causal discovery seeks to recover cause–effect relationships from statistical data using graphical models. One goal of this paper is to provide an accessible introduction to causal discovery methods for climate scientists, with a focus on ...

Imme Ebert-Uphoff; Yi Deng

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Storm Tracks and Barotropic Deformation in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between the time-mean planetary-scale deformation field and the structure of midlatitude storm tracks is studied in wintertime simulations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model and the ...

Robert X. Black; Randall M. Dole

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Evaluation of Statistically Based Cloudiness Parameterizations Used in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing cloudiness parameterizations based on specified probability distribution functions (PDFs) and large-scale relative humidity (RH) in climate-models are evaluated with data produced from explicit simulations of observed tropical cloud ...

Kuan-Man Xu; David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Regional Climate–Weather Research and Forecasting Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CWRF is developed as a climate extension of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) by incorporating numerous improvements in the representation of physical processes and integration of external (top, surface, lateral) forcings that are ...

Xin-Zhong Liang; Min Xu; Xing Yuan; Tiejun Ling; Hyun I. Choi; Feng Zhang; Ligang Chen; Shuyan Liu; Shenjian Su; Fengxue Qiao; Yuxiang He; Julian X. L. Wang; Kenneth E. Kunkel; Wei Gao; Everette Joseph; Vernon Morris; Tsann-Wang Yu; Jimy Dudhia; John Michalakes

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Surface Boundary Conditions for Mesoscale Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper utilizes the best available quality data from multiple sources to develop consistent surface boundary conditions (SBCs) for mesoscale regional climate model (RCM) applications. The primary SBCs include 1) fields of soil characteristic (...

Xin-Zhong Liang; Hyun I. Choi; Kenneth E. Kunkel; Yongjiu Dai; Everette Joseph; Julian X. L. Wang; Praveen Kumar

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Modeling Climate Variability in the Tropical Atlantic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate variability in the tropical Atlantic sector as represented in six atmospheric general circulation models is examined. On the annual mean, most simulations overestimate wind stress away from the equator although much of the variability can ...

Jiande Wang; James A. Carton

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Accelerating the Convergence to Equilibrium of Ocean-Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solutions corresponding to climatic equilibrium are usually obtained from atmospheric general circulation models by extended numerical integration with respect to time. Because the ocean contains a much wider range of time scales the same ...

Kirk Bryan

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

What Determines Meridional Heat Transport in Climate Models?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean maximum meridional heat transport (MHTMAX) differs by approximately 20% among coupled climate models. The value of MHTMAX can be expressed as the difference between the equator-to-pole contrast in absorbed solar radiation (ASR*) ...

Aaron Donohoe; David S. Battisti

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Parameterizing Subgrid Orographic Precipitation and Surface Cover in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous development of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s regional climate model has focused on representing orographic precipitation using a subgrid parameterization where subgrid variations of surface elevation are aggregated to a ...

L. R. Leung; S. J. Ghan

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fluctuation–Dissipation Supplemented by Nonlinearity: A Climate-Dependent Subgrid-Scale Parameterization in Low-Order Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate-system models use a multitude of parameterization schemes for small-scale processes. These should respond to externally forced climate variability in an appropriate manner so as to reflect the response of the parameterized process to a ...

Ulrich Achatz; Ulrike Löbl; Stamen I. Dolaptchiev; Andrey Gritsun

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling of Downward Surface Longwave Flux Density for Global Change Applications and Comparison with Pyrgeometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of satellite monitoring of global climate change depends on the ability to validate satellite inference methods against accurate “ground truth.” Under a recent World Meteorological Organization—World Climate Research Program activity ...

F. Miskolczi

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

469

Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment (IMAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency Focus Area: Biomass Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: themasites.pbl.nl/en/themasites/image/index.html Cost: Paid Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integrated-model-access-global-enviro Related Tools ENV-Linkages-KEI Model World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model ... further results IMAGE is an ecological-environmental framework that simulates the

470

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Regional climate change scenarios over the United States produced with a nested regional climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two continuous 31/2-year-long climate simulation over the continental United States are discussed, one of present-day conditions and one for conditions under double carbon dioxide concentration, conducted with a limited area model (LAM) nested in a general circulation model (GCM). The models used are a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) at rhomboidal 15 spectral resolution and the climate version of the NCAR/Penn State mesoscale model (MM4) at 60-km gridpoint spacing. For present-day conditions the model temperatures are within 1[degrees]-2[degrees]C of observations except over the Great Lakes region, where temperature is overpredicted. The CCM overpredicts precipitation throughout the continental United States (overall by about 60%) and especially over the West (by up to 300%). The nested MM4 overpredicts precipitation over the West but underpredicts it over the eastern United States. In addition, it produces a large amount of topographically and lake-induced sub-GCM grid-scale detail that compares well with available high-resolution climate data. Overall, the nested MM4 reproduces observed spatial and seasonal precipitation patterns better than the driving CCM. Doubled carbon dioxide-induced temperature change scenarios produced by the two models generally differ by less than several tenths of a degree except over the Great Lakes region where, because of the presence of the lakes in the nested model, the two model scenarios differ by more than one degree. Conversely, precipitation change scenarios from the two model simulations can locally differ in magnitude, sign, spatial, and seasonal detail. These differences are associated with topographical features in the MM4, such as the presence of steep coastal ranges in the western United States. This work illustrates the feasibility of the use of the nested modeling technique for long-term regional climate simulation. 43 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Brodeur, C.S.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling the Uncertain Future of a Threatened Habitat: Climate Change and Urban Growth in California Sage Scrub  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zhao. 2007. Global climate projections. Pages 747–845 in S.Reducing uncertainty in projections of extinction risk fromZhao. 2007. Global climate projections. Pages 747–845 in S.

Riordan, Erin Coulter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005 the highest global surface temperature ever was recorded. A virtual consensus exists today among scientists that global warming is underway and that human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a significant cause. Possible mitigation of climate change through reduction of net GHG emissions has become a worldwide concern. Under the United Nation’s Framework convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol was formed in 1997 and required ratifying countries to co-operate in stabilizing atmospheric GHG concentrations. The protocol took effect on February 16, 2005. The mitigation cost for reducing GHG emissions for the US economy has been argued to be high particularly through the energy sector. Agriculture and Forestry (AF) can provide some low cost strategies to help with this mitigation principally through carbon sequestration but must be competitive with mitigation costs in the rest of the economy. A general equilibrium approach is used herein to evaluate the role of AF mitigation in an economy wide setting. The results show that the AF sectors have significant mitigation potential. Higher carbon prices lead to more sequestration, less emissions, reduced consumer and total welfare, improved environmental indicators and increased producer welfare. AF mitigation increases as the carbon price increase over time. In the earlier periods, while the carbon price is low, AF emissions and sink are quite small compared to the energy sector. As carbon prices increase over time, the AF sectors mitigate about 25% of the net emissions. This verifies McCarl et al's (2001) argument that the AF sectors “may be very important in a world that requires time and technological investment to develop low-cost greenhouse gas emission offsets.” AF GHG emission mitigation is sensitive to saturation of sequestration sinks. This research finds that ignoring saturation characteristics leads to a severe overestimate of mitigation potential with estimates being inflated by as much as a factor of 6.

Zhu, En

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A DATA-DRIVEN MODEL FOR THE GLOBAL CORONAL EVOLUTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the construction of a data-driven model for the study of the dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetic field. The data-driven model consists of a surface flux transport (SFT) model and a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) coronal model. The SFT model is employed to produce the global time-varying and self-consistent synchronic snapshots of the photospheric magnetic field as the input to drive our 3D numerical global coronal AMR-CESE-MHD model on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the 3D global coronal model are coupled through the boundary condition of the projected characteristic method. Numerical results of the coronal evolution from 1996 September 4 to October 29 provide a good comparison with multiply observed coronal images.

Feng Xueshang; Jiang Chaowei; Xiang Changqing [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhao Xuepu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Wu, S. T., E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: cqxiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: xpzhao@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: wus@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Global Cloud Climatologies: A Historical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate global cloud information is required for many climate studies, particularly for validation of climate model simulations. This paper reviews the cloud climatologies currently available, identifying and attempting to explain the ...

N. A. Hughes

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sensitivity of the Ocean’s Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity in an EMIC. Part II: Global Warming Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the ocean’s climate to the diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is studied for a global warming scenario in which CO2 increases by 1% yr?1 for 75 yr. The thermohaline circulation slows down for about 100 yr and recovers afterward,...

Fabio Dalan; Peter H. Stone; Andrei P. Sokolov

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Stochastic modeling and global warming trend extraction for ocean acoustic travel times. Interim technical report  

SciTech Connect

A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is a negative trend for the travel time of an acoustic pulse along a fixed long path, or paths, in the ocean over a period of many years. The goal of this report is the development of methods specifically for determining the presence of a long term trend for climate change from a temporal sequence of measurements of acoustic propagation times. Robust statistical methods for determining whether a significant trend is present in a given set of time series data have been developed and, for illustration, applied to some specific traveltime time series generated by the MASIG and GFDL ocean models. In this report we consider line + noise and ARIMA statistical models. We show that if the time series are long enough, somewhat over 20 years, then series such as those simulated by the MASIG and GFDL models can be classified reliably as line + noise when this is the case. However, it is shown that the results are considerably different for the two ocean models under consideration and that these models can not currently be relied upon by themselves to predict global warming. Experimental data is most certainly needed, not only to measure global warming itself, but to help improve the ocean model themselves.

Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

478

Structure and Energetics of Standing Eddies in the Winter Northern Hemisphere Simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model and the GLA Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM) and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) Climate Model (CM) differ from each other both in numerical structure and in forcing scheme. Since a proper ...

Yen-Huei Lee; Tsing-Chang Chen

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Global Energy Technology Strategy: Addressing Climate Change Phase 2 Findings from an international Public-Private Sponsored Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book examines the role of global energy technology in addressing climate change. The book considers the nature of the climate change challenge and the role of energy in the issue. It goes on to consider the implications for the evolution of the global energy system and the potential value of technology availability, development and deployment. Six technology systems are identified for special consideration: CO2 capture and storage, Biotechnology, Hydrogen systems, Nuclear energy, Wind and solar energy, and End-use energy technologies. In addition, consideration is given to the role of non-CO2 gases in climate change as well as the potential of technology development and deployment to reduce non-CO2 emissions. Present trends in energy R&D are examined and potentially fruitful avenues for research. The book concludes with a set of key findings.

Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Runci, Paul J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Stokes, Gerald M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Preparing for climate change: major changes in global climate are virtually certain by the mid-21st century; researchers are beginning to explore ways we can adapt  

SciTech Connect

Major changes in the global climate are virtually certain by the mid-21st century due to the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Researchers are beginning to explore ways we can adopt. Scientist have long known that human activities, particularly the burning of fossil fuels, are artificially increasing the volume of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere. This increase will eventually make the planet the hottest it has been in history. What remains controversial about the greenhouse effect is the rate of this global warming, its regional distribution, and most of all, what to do about the problem.

Tangley, L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global climate modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Earth observations and global change decision making, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This book covers: global change databases;; satellite data for climate and global change; reversing the greenhouse effect; hydrological implications of the greenhouse effect; and policy models for global change.

Ginsberg, I.W. (Information Analysis and Exploitation Lab., ERIM, MI (US)); Angelo, J.A. Jr. (Florida Institute of Technology, FL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Aerosol, Cloud, and Climate: From Observation to Model (457th Brookhaven Lecture)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by about 1şF, glaciers and sea ice have been melting more quickly than previously, especially during the past decade, and the level of the sea has risen about 6-8 inches worldwide. Scientists have long been investigating this phenomenon of “global warming,” which is believed to be at least partly due to the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the air from burning fossil fuels. Funded by DOE, teams of researchers from BNL and other national labs have been gathering data in the U.S. and internationally to build computer models of climate and weather to help in understanding general patterns, causes, and perhaps, solutions. Among many findings, researchers observed that atmospheric aerosols, minute particles in the atmosphere, can significantly affect global energy balance and climate. Directly, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight. Indirectly, increased aerosol concentration can lead to smaller cloud droplets, changing clouds in ways that tend to cool global climate and potentially mask overall warming from man-made CO2.

Wang, Jian (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department)

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

483

Paleoclimate data–model comparison and the role of climate forcings over the past 1500 years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provides a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving our understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

484

The New Hadley Centre Climate Model (HadGEM1): Evaluation of Coupled Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new coupled general circulation climate model developed at the Met Office's Hadley Centre is presented, and aspects of its performance in climate simulations run for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC ...

T. C. Johns; C. F. Durman; H. T. Banks; M. J. Roberts; A. J. McLaren; J. K. Ridley; C. A. Senior; K. D. Williams; A. Jones; G. J. Rickard; S. Cusack; W. J. Ingram; M. Crucifix; D. M. H. Sexton; M. M. Joshi; B.-W. Dong; H. Spencer; R. S. R. Hill; J. M. Gregory; A. B. Keen; A. K. Pardaens; J. A. Lowe; A. Bodas-Salcedo; S. Stark; Y. Searl

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Paleoclimate Data–Model Comparison and the Role of Climate Forcings over the Past 1500 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provide a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving the understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

A Demonstration of Long-Term Memory and Climate Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate forecast skills are evaluated for surface temperature time series at grid points of a millennium control simulation from a state-of-the-art global circulation model [ECHAM5–Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-OM)]. First, climate ...

Xiuhua Zhu; Klaus Fraedrich; Zhengyu Liu; Richard Blender

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Climate Change and the Middle Atmosphere. Part I: The Doubled CO2 Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of doubled atmospheric CO2 on the climate of the middle atmosphere is investigated using the GISS global climate/middle atmosphere model. In the standard experiment, t