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Sample records for global climate change

  1. Global Climate Change Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Climate Change Institute Place: Tsinghua University, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100084 Product: Global Climate...

  2. Brazil Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brazil Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change Place: Distrito Federal...

  3. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 C by the end of the 21st century.

  4. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  5. Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: United...

  6. Pew Center on Global Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pew Center on Global Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Place: Arlington, Virginia Zip: 22201 Product: Established in 1998 as a...

  7. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations...

  8. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  9. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

  10. Engineering change in global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}With increased public focus on global warming and in the wake of the intense heat waves, drought, fires, and super-hurricanes that occurred in 1988 and 1989, interest in geoengineering has surged,{close_quotes} says Stephen H. Schneider, professor of biological science at Stanford University in Stanford, California. One scheme set forth in a National Research Council report proposes using 16-inch naval guns to fire aerosol shells into the stratosphere in hopes of offsetting {open_quotes}the radiative effects of increasing carbon dioxide,{close_quotes} Schneider says. Schneider, however, would prefer that we {open_quotes}seek measures that can cure our global {open_quote}addiction{close_quote} to polluting practices.{close_quotes} Rather than playing God, he says we should {open_quotes}stick to being human and pursue problem - solving methods currently within our grasp.{close_quotes} Such strategies include efforts to promote energy efficiency and reduce our reliance on automobiles.

  11. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is helping address the global challenge of climate change by providing critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects, preventing more than 25 million metric tons of CO2 emissions to date.

  12. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  13. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  14. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  15. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  16. U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  17. Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Risk to Bank Loans Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations...

  18. Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reality | Department of Energy Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global Reality Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global Reality July 2, 2015 - 11:31am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. The U.S. Department of Energy was invited to be a panelist for a made-for-television educational program in Columbia, South Carolina, titled Climate Change: A Global Reality. DOE also co-sponsored the

  19. Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 14:49 The latest...

  20. Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change. Abstract not provided. Authors: Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick ; Harris, Alan W. Publication Date: 2008-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1142731 Report Number(s): SAND2008-5552C 511673 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: American

  1. Global climate change: Social and economic research issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.; Snow, J.; Jacobson, H.

    1992-05-01

    This workshop was designed to bring together a group of scholars, primarily from the social sciences, to explore research that might help in dealing with global climate change. To illustrate the state of present understanding, it seemed useful to focus this workshop on three broad questions that are involved in coping with climate change. These are: (1) How can the anticipated economic costs and benefits of climate change be identified; (2) How can the impacts of climate change be adjusted to or avoided; (3) What previously studied models are available for institutional management of the global environment? The resulting discussions may (1) identify worthwhile avenues for further social science research, (2) help develop feedback for natural scientists about research information from this domain needed by social scientists, and (3) provide policymakers with the sort of relevant research information from the social science community that is currently available. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  2. FactSheetOnGlobalClimateChange.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FactSheetOnGlobalClimateChange.pdf FactSheetOnGlobalClimateChange.pdf PDF icon U More Documents & Publications U Twenty In Ten: Strengthening America's Energy Security Climate...

  3. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. The economics of long-term global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

  5. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Sector | Department of Energy 2 DEER Conference Presentation: Joint Global Change Research Institute - Battelle PDF icon 2002_deer_dooley.pdf More Documents & Publications There is no Silver Bullet: Regionalization and Market Fragmentation in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies EAC Presentation - Roadmap 2050: A practical guide to a prosperous, low-carbon Europe (July 12, 2011) 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan

  6. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  7. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, H.P.

    1994-09-01

    This research is ultimately concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany CO2-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. This report concerns research conducted with funding from the Carbon Dioxide Research Program (now the Global Climate Change Program) of the US Department of Energy via grant no. DE-FG02-90ER61019 during the period 15 July 1990 - 14 July 1994. This was a three-year award, extended to a fourth year (15 July 1993 - 14 July 1994) via a no-cost extension. It is important to emphasize that this award has been renewed for an additional two years (15 July 1993 - 14 July 1995) via grant no. DE-FG03-93ER61646 (with the same title). Because the project was originally envisioned to be a five-year effort, many of the important results and conclusions will be available for the Final Report of that second award. This report therefore concerns mainly preliminary conclusions and a discussion of progress toward understanding the central hypothesis of the research.

  8. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, Patrick; Abdelaziz, Omar; Otanicar, Todd; Phelan, Bernadette; Prasher, Ravi; Taylor, Robert; Tyagi, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  9. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies EAC Presentation - Roadmap 2050: A practical guide to a prosperous, low-carbon Europe (July 12, 2011) 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan

  10. U.S. Global Climate Change program | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Climate Change program Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes...

  11. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  12. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  13. ARM - Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change ...

  14. National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new "low carbon" and "climate resilient" energy system. It will emphasize putting ideas into action - moving forward on policy and practice.

  15. Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Global ...

  16. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  17. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Global Climate & Energy HomeTag:Global Climate & Energy Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity ...

  18. Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2006-05-01

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  19. Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2005-04-15

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  20. Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2009-08-01

    Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

  1. National Environmental Health Association position on global climate change adopted July 2, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radtke, T.; Gist, G.L.; Wittkopf, T.E.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) supports the precept that anthropogenic sources, specifically greenhouse gases, are responsible for a significant portion of the measured change in global climate. Further, NEHA supports the concept of an association between global warming and an increased risk to public health. Reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere will benefit human health. This position paper reviews current information on the status of global climate change with particular emphasis on the implications for environmental and public health. It is intended to be used as a basis from which environmental and public health practitioners and colleagues in related fields can initiate discussions with policy makers at all levels -- local, state, national, and worldwide.

  2. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  3. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  4. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  5. Global Climate Change Response Program: Potential regional impacts of global warming on precipitation in the western United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leverson, V.

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to build upon a previous Global Climate Change Response Program investigation in which an initial `first guess` climate change scenario was derived for the Western United States. Using the scenario`s hypothesized northward shift in the mean wintertime storm track, historical upper-air patterns in the atmosphere were searched to identify winter months (December, January, or February) that would serve as appropriate global warming analogues (GWA). Contour charts were generated of four geopotential height parameters. Specific pattern configurations of the four parameters were identified that reflected the altered storm track pattern, and guidelines for selecting suitable analogues based on the configurations were developed. Monthly mean precipitation values for the GWA months at three climatological divisions in Western Montana, northern Utah, and east central Arizona were compared with median values for the 1946-89 period to determine if any significant differences existed.

  6. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  7. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Participated in the 2013 Domenici Public Policy Conference Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Climate, Earth Sciences Research Center, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, ...

  8. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Attends World Water Week in Stockholm Climate, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Water Security Sandia Team Attends World ...

  9. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  10. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  11. Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

    2003-08-24

    It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

  12. Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new ...

  13. Modeling U.S. Energy Use Changes with Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Erickson III, David J; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L

    2006-09-01

    Using a general circulation model of Earth climate (PCM-IBIS) to drive an energy use model (DD-NEMS), we calculated the energy use changes for each year from 2003-2025 for the nine U.S. Census regions. We used five scenarios: 1) a reference with no change in temperatures from the 1970-2003 average, 2) a gradual 1 F rise in temperature by 2025, 3) a gradual 3 F rise by 2025, 4) a climate simulation with low temperature response to CO2 doubling in the atmosphere, and 5) a climate simulation with a more extreme response. The low-?T scenario had a cumulative reduction in energy of 2.1 Quads but an increase in cost of $14.8 billion. The northern states had reductions in cost over the entire period, but most other regions had increases in costs because increases in cooling costs outweighed reductions in heating and other energy uses. Higher temperature sensitivity resulted in increased warming, especially in the winter months. Because heating needs decreased, total energy requirements declined by a cumulative 4.2 Quads. However, total cost still increased $6.1 billion and carbon emissions still rose as coal-based electricity for cooling needs grew.

  14. Managing the global commons decision making and conflict resolution in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S. ); Naegeli, W.; Lund, P. )

    1990-07-01

    A workshop was convened to develop a better understanding of decision-making matters concerning management of the global commons and to resolve conflicts in response to climate change. This workshop report does not provide a narrative of the proceedings. The workshop program is included, as are the abstracts of the papers that were presented. Only the introductory paper on social science research by William Riebsame and the closing summary by Richard Rockwell are reprinted here. This brief report focuses instead on the deliberations of the working groups that developed during the workshop. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Impacts of global warming on climate change over East Asia as simulated by 15 GCMs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zong-ci Zhao; Xiaodong Li

    1997-12-31

    About 15 GCMs (GFDL1, GISS, LLNL, MPI, OSU, UKMOL, UKMOH, GCMs90-92, GFDL2, NCAR, OPYC, LSG, HADL, GCMs95) obtained from the IPCC WG 1 1990, 1992 and 1995 reports have been chosen to examine the impacts of global warming, on the climate chance over East Asia. Although the models scenarios of the human activities were different for the different GCMs, the climate change over East Asia (70E-140E, 15N-60N) for tile doubled CO{sub 2} as simulated by about 15 GCMs have been analysed. The Simulations shown that the temperature might increased by about 0.5 - 1.5 C over East Asia, especially in winter and northwestern parts of East Asia. The precipitation might increase in northwestern and northeastern parts of East Asia and decrease in the central part of East Asia. The evaluations and assessments of the GCMs over East Asia have indicated that the GCMs have the abilities to simulate the climate change over East Asia, especially for the temperature and the winter season. There are some uncertainties for the simulations to compare with the observations, especially for tile precipitation and tile summer season.

  16. Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-01-01

    While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

  17. International potential of IGCC technology for use in reducing global warming and climate change emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    High efficiency advanced coal-based technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) that can assist in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions which contribute to Global Warming and Climate Change are becoming commercially available. U-GAS is an advanced gasification technology that can be used in many applications to convert coal in a high efficiency manner that will reduce the total amount of CO{sub 2} produced by requiring less coal-based fuel per unit of energy output. This paper will focus on the status of the installation and performance of the IGT U-GAS gasifiers which were installed at the Shanghai Cooking and Chemical Plant General located in Shanghai, China. Its use in future IGCC project for the production of power and the benefits of IGCC in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through its high efficiency operation will be discussed.

  18. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  19. The response of mangroves to projected impacts of global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twilley, R.R.; Chen, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A hierarchical classification system for mangroves together with a community-based ecological model (ESA abstract by Chen and Twilley, 1995) were used to asses the response of mangroves to global climate change. The hierarchical classification includes a matrix of the ecological type (riverine, fringe, basin, and dwarf mangroves) and the geomorphologic environmental setting (delta, estuarine, lagoon, carbonate platform systems). The significance of this hierarchical classification, referred to as a eco-geomorphic system, is demonstrated with a summary of the spatial variation in ecosystem function among different coastal settings. Changes in sea level, frequency of frost, and frequency of hurricanes were simulated and results of forest community composition, tree density and dominance, and forest biomass were compared to field sites of known disturbance. For lagoon basin forests, hurricane frequency increase from 28 yrs to 15 yrs had less impact on total biomass than increase in frost from 12 yrs to 8 yrs. Both disturbances changed the community composition of the forests. The patterns of recovery vary among geomorphic types due to nutrient limitation of regrowth.

  20. Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate ...

  1. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  2. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Highlights substantial growing efforts to support developing countries in the global response to climate change. Also details the financial assistance, education programs, and ...

  3. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  4. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  5. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandians Published in American Chemical Society's Environmental Science & Technology Analysis, Climate, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Systems Analysis, Water Security Sandians Published in American Chemical Society's Environmental Science & Technology Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  7. Understanding Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Sandia Researchers Travel to the North Slope of Alaska Exceptional Service in the National Interest Alaska C a n a d a U n i t e d S t a t e s Russia North Slope Barrow Oliktok Atqasuk Arctic Ocean Sandia researchers are members of a global research team whose work on the cold tundra in northern Alaska is helping to transform sci- entists' understanding of what the future may hold for Earth's climate. A Centerpiece of DOE Climate Research Sponsored by DOE's Office of Science and

  8. International impacts of global climate change: Testimony to House Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.; Cushman, R.M.; Marland, G.; Rayner, S.

    1989-02-21

    International impacts of global climate change are those for which the important consequences arise because of national sovereignty. Such impacts could be of two types: (1) migrations across national borders of people, of resources (such as agricultural productivity, or surface water, or natural ecosystems), of effluents, or of patterns of commerce; and (2) changes to the way nations use and manage their resources, particularly fossil fuels and forests, as a consequence of international concern over the global climate. Actions by a few resource-dominant nations may affect the fate of all. These two types of international impacts raise complex equity issues because one nation may perceive itself as gaining at the expense of its neighbors, or it may perceive itself as a victim of the actions of others. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Global climate change and maize production in Spain: Risk assessment and impacts of weather on yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feijoo, M.L.; Mestre, F.; Iglesias, A.; Rosenzweig, C.

    1996-12-31

    The study evaluates the potential effect of climate change on maize production in Spain, combining climate models, a crop productivity model, a decision support system and a yield-response model. The study was carried out for two agricultural regions that include the largest areas of Spain where maize is grown as a high input crop. The paper combines the output from a crop model with different techniques of analysis. The scenarios used in this study were generated from the output of two General Circulation Models (GCMs): the Goddard Institute for Space Studies model (GISS) and the Canadian Climate Change Model (CCCM). The study also includes a preliminary evaluation of the potential changes in monetary returns taking into account the possible variability of grain yields and prices, using mean-Gini stochastic dominance (MGSD). A yield response model was estimated using simulated data from the crop model. Weather variables are included. Typically, temperature and precipitation are the only weather variables included in these models. However, solar radiation is another important climate factor for plant growth and development and were included in the yield response model.

  10. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia, DOE Energy Storage Program, GeneSiC Semiconductor, U.S. Army ARDEC: Ultra-High-Voltage Silicon Carbide Thyristors Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage Systems, Global Climate & Energy, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, SMART Grid, Systems Engineering, Transmission Grid Integration Sandia, DOE Energy Storage Program, GeneSiC Semiconductor, U.S. Army ARDEC:

  11. Impact of modern climate change on the intercommunication: Global ocean-land (Northern Hemisphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanova, H.V.; Lobanov, V.A.; Stepanenko, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Two main temperature gradients define the synoptic and climatic conditions on the earth in general: equator-pole gradient and ocean-land gradient. The analysis of temperature on the basis of new cyclic-different-scales conception has been fulfilled in every important part of the climatic system in the Northern Hemisphere for assessment of their vulnerability to modern climate change. Historical time series of monthly surface temperature have been used for this aim in the points of regular grid over the Northern Hemisphere from 1891 to 1992. The main feature of the temperature in main climatic parts of the earth is a complexity of its spatial structure. New methods of spatial decomposition have been developed for the division of this complex fields structure into characteristics of mean value of the field and index of its non-homogeneity or spatial variation. It has been established, that the temperature gradient between ocean and land is increasing that is characterized of the increasing of an intensity of synoptic processes, their spatial non-homogeneity and more frequent appearance of the extreme synoptic events. The models of intercommunications between coefficients of temperature spatial decomposition over the ocean and land have been developed for two time period and the increasing of the relationships closeness has been established between ocean and land as well as the decrease of main planet gradient: the pole(the Polar ocean)-equator.

  12. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-08-25

    In this paper, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumpingmore » scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.« less

  13. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-08-25

    Abstract In this study, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumping scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.

  14. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-08-25

    In this paper, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumping scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.

  15. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview...

  16. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  17. Climate Change Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural ...

  18. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality ...

  19. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality ...

  20. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy: Meeting US global climate change action plan commitments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    The subject describes how the US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy will help meet the US goal of returning US greenhouse gas emissions to their 1990 levels by the year 2000. On October 19, 1993, President Clinton and Vice President Gore announced the publication of the Climate Change Action Plan. The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has a major role in implementing many of the initiatives contained in the Plan. The paper will outline the initiatives current programs, and demonstrate how once implemented, the strategy will help to stem US greenhouse gas emissions. The paper will also discuss how DOE in implementing it`s Climate Change Action Plan strategy, will work with the EPA to achieve a cost-effective strategy that will stem greenhouse gas emissions through public/private partnerships. Although the focus of this paper will be the connection between current programs and Clinton Administration`s year 2000 goal, it will also discuss a longer-term vision for reducing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases beyond the year 2000.

  1. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  2. climate change | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate change Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

  3. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  4. Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy ... Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells ...

  5. Measures used to tackle environmental problems related to global warming and climate change resulting from the use of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental issues continue to play a major role in strategic planning associated with the use of coal for power generation. Problems, such as Acid Rain resulting from SO{sub 2} emissions produced from the sulfur content of coal during coal combustion, have recently cornered the attention of policy makers and planners. More recently the carbon content of coal, which provides for most of the coals heating value, has been identified as the major contributor to the production of CO{sub 2} and other emissions associated with Global Warming and Climate Change. Total world carbon emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels were approximately 6 billion metric tons in 1990, of which 44% were from the consumption of oil, 39% from coal, and 17% from natural gas. Assuming no change in current regulations, carbon emissions are anticipated to grow by 1.5% per year, and are predicted to reach more than 8 billion tons by the year 2010. Most of this increase in carbon emissions is expected to come from developing countries in the Asian Pacific Region such as China where coal use dominates the power production industry and accounts for 71% of its total CO{sub 2} emissions. Asian Pacific coal demand is expected to double over the next 15 years accounting for a 46% increase in total primary energy demand, and China currently produces approximately 11% of the world`s global greenhouse gas emissions which is expected to grow to 15% by the year 2010.

  6. Climate Change Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural resources across America, and tribal communities are often the hardest hit by severe weather events such as droughts, floods and wildfires" - Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell "Impacts of climate change are increasingly evident for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and, in some cases, threaten

  7. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  8. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  9. Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  10. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  11. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 20302050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  12. Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Lecture - Climate Prisms Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change for All WHEN: Feb 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350...

  13. Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Lecture - Climate Prisms Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change for All WHEN: Feb 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 ...

  14. Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Minds about our Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental Science Division, ... We are regularly confronted with arguments that deny climate change is happening or is a ...

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  16. Identification and preliminary characterization of global water resource issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cohen, M.L.; Currie, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives were to: (1) identify, characterize, and define existing or projected regional and global water resource management issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate changes; and (2) develop research priorities for acquiring additional information about the potential effects of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on the availability and allocation of freshwater supplies. The research was broken into four work elements: (1) identification of water resource management issues on a global and regional basis; (2) identification of a subset of generic CO/sub 2/-related water resource management issues believed to have the highest probability of being affected, beneficially or adversely, by a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change; (3) selection of specific sites for examining the potential effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on these issues; and (4) conducting detailed case studies at these sites, the results from which will be used to identify future research and data needs in the area of water resources. This report summarizes the research related to the first three work elements. 6 figures, 9 tables.

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  18. ARM - Predictions of Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TeachersTopic ListPredictions of Climate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications ... Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Predictions of Climate Change There are no accurate ...

  19. ARM - Climate Change Through History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change Through History Scientists know ... Evidence of Climate Change It is important to remember that even minor fluctuations can ...

  20. Climate Change Adaptation/Resilience | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Adaptation/Resilience Climate Change Adaptation/Resilience DOE facilities are located in all eight climate regions identified in the 2014 National Climate Assessment (as established by the U.S. Global Change Research Program), and are vulnerable to identified climate change impacts in those regions. To assist with establishing and maintaining an effective climate adaptation process, DOE is working to integrate climate adaptation concerns into all applicable DOE orders, policies,

  1. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R.; Dixon, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  2. Global environmental change: Its nature and impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidore, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    This book is intended as an entry-level textbook on environmental science for nonscience majors. Twenty chapters address topics from historical geology and climatic change to population dynamics, land-use, water pollution, ozone depletion and biodiversity, global warming.

  3. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  4. Climate Change Adaptation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change Adaptation Climate Change Adaptation DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related...

  5. Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is ...

  6. Five-years of microenvironment data along an urban-rural transect; temperature and CO2 concentrations in urban area at levels expected globally with climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Kate; Ziska, Lewis H; Bunce, James A; Quebedeaux, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    The heat island effect and the high use of fossil fuels in large city centers is well documented, but by how much fossil fuel consumption is elevating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and whether elevations in both atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are consistent from year to year are less well known. Our aim was to record atmospheric CO2 concentrations, air temperature and other environmental variables in an urban area and compare it to suburban and rural sites to see if urban sites are experiencing climates expected globally in the future with climate change. A transect was established from Baltimore city center (Urban site), to the outer suburbs of Baltimore (suburban site) and out to an organic farm (rural site). At each site a weather station was set-up to monitor environmental variables annually for five years. Atmospheric CO2 was significantly increased on average by 66 ppm from the rural to the urban site over the five years of the study. Air temperature was significantly higher at the urban site (14.8 oC) compared to the suburban (13.6 oC) and rural (12.7 oC) sites. Relative humidity was not different between sites but vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was significantly higher at the urban site compared to the suburban and rural sites. During wet years relative humidity was significantly increased and VPD significantly reduced. Increased nitrogen deposition at the rural site (2.1 % compared to 1.8 and 1.2 % at the suburban and urban sites) was small enough not to affect soil nitrogen content. Dense urban areas with large populations and high vehicular traffic have significantly different microclimates compared to outlying suburban and rural areas. The increases in atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are similar to changes predicted in the short term with global climate change, therefore providing an environment suitable for studying future effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

  7. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Level and Climate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sea Level and Climate Change Atmospheric and oceanic processes have a powerful effect on changes in sea level. These changes are associated with variations in space and time of temperature, salinity, ocean currents and

  8. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 SahelMap ...

  9. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New ...

  10. Overview of the Climate Change Science Program \(by Richard Moss\)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Science Team Meeting The U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan 2003 ARM Science Team Meeting The U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan Susan K. Avery, Ph.D. Director, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Climate Change Science Program www.climatescience.gov U.S. Climate Change Science Program - Themes * Global climate change: a capstone issue for our generation. Major new technology is needed. * Accelerate the application of basic

  11. Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change New results, reported in a paper released today in the journal Nature Climate Change, suggest that global models may underestimate predictions of forest death. December 21, 2015 Los Alamos scientist Nate McDowell discusses how climate change is killing trees with PBS NewsHour reporter Miles O'Brien. Los Alamos scientist Nate McDowell discusses how climate change is

  12. Climate Change Press Release | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Change Press Release Climate Change Press Release Community Leaders Institutes (CLIs) to be conducted to promote awareness of climate change impacts. PDF icon CLI Climate Change ...

  13. MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate)...

  14. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global

  15. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  16. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar...

  17. Climate Change Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment Office presentation icon 66climornlsalev2mjs.ppt More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power ...

  18. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during years with abnormally wet winters While we cannot observe future climate, Williams said, we can consider projections of future climate trends produced by a collection of...

  19. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  20. Clouds and climate: Unraveling a key piece of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seinfeld, J.H.

    2000-02-01

    Federal policy decisions relating to mitigation of greenhouse gas and other emissions have the potential to exert an enormous impact on industries in which chemical engineers play a prominent role. Many in these industries keep close watch on the development of scientific understanding associated with predictions of global climate change. The authors review one of the most critical, and most uncertain, pieces of the climate puzzle, the role of aerosols and clouds in the global energy balance.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate-change Climate change en Using powerful computers, physicists uncover mechanism that stabilizes plasma within tokamaks...

  2. Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D.

    2005-07-16

    It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

  3. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Climate Change Climate Change May 5, 2016 VIDEO: Getting Started on the Road to Clean Energy A new program called Cyclotron Road connects clean energy entrepreneurs with the unique resources of our National Labs. April 22, 2016 PHOTOS: 11 Carbon-Fighting Energy Technologies Scroll through the photo gallery to see just a few of the ways the Energy Department is addressing climate change through technologies that cut carbon pollution, grow the economy and protect the

  4. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy and Climate Change Symposium in Honor of 2009 and 2010 ACS Fellows in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division Helena Chum, NREL Research Fellow August ...

  5. Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

    1994-11-30

    This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

  6. An open letter to the 2008 presidential candidates: get the facts right on what's responsible for global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, Henry R.

    2008-07-15

    The two remaining presidential candidates have adopted policies for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions that address factors that are mistakenly held responsible as the primary cause of global warming. Here's what they need to keep in mind in order to craft genuinely efficacious policies. (author)

  7. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  8. CCS: A Strategy for Tackling Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2007-10-22

    Invited article for The Fundamentals of the Global Oil & Gas Industry, 2007 that describes the promise and challenges that need to be overcome for carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies to play a significant role in helping to cost effectively address climate change.

  9. Science on Tap - Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Climate change At the Bradbury Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Science on Tap - Climate change Join us for this event starting at 5:30, May 19 The event will be held at the UnQuarked wine room in Los Alamos at the Central Park Square. We hope to see you there. Cathy Wilson, who heads the Lab's Atmosphere, Climate and Ecosystem Science team, is working to better understand what happens when warming climate causes Arctic permafrost to thaw. As the ground

  10. Climate change and the Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change and the Arctic Climate change and the Arctic WHEN: May 19, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us for convivial discussion on May 19 at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Cathy Wilson, who heads the Lab's Atmosphere, Climate and Ecosystem Science team, is working to better understand what happens when warming climate

  11. Office of Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Office of Climate Change Place: United Kingdom Product: UK government organisation that supports analytical work on climate change and the...

  12. PRESS RELEASE: Community Leaders Institutes (CLIs) Promote Awareness of Climate Change Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The science on climate change is crystal clear; climate change is a global reality.  The fact that the United Nations Climate Conference (Paris, 2015) yielded a historic agreement, signed by...

  13. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include: 1) the distinctly different roles played by atmospheric dynamical processes in establishing surface temperature response to ENSO at tropics and extratropics (i.e., atmospheric dynamics disperses energy out of tropics during ENSO warm events and modulate surface temperature at mid-, high-latitudes through controlling downward longwave radiation); 2) the representations of ENSO-related temperature response in climate models fail to converge at the process-level particularly over extratropics (i.e., models produce the right temperature responses to ENSO but with wrong reasons); 3) water vapor feedback contributes substantially to the temperature anomalies found over U.S. during different phases of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which adds new insight to the traditional picture that cold/warm advective processes are the main drivers of local temperature responses to the NAM; 4) the overall land surface temperature biases in the latest NCAR model (CESM1) are caused by biases in surface albedo while the surface temperature biases over ocean are related to multiple factors including biases in model albedo, cloud and oceanic dynamics, and the temperature biases over different ocean basins are also induced by different process biases. These results provide a detailed guidance for process-level model turning and improvement, and thus contribute directly to the overall goal of reducing model uncertainty in projecting future changes in the Earth’s climate system, especially in the ENSO and AM variability.

  14. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Climate Change The Energy Department is committed to addressing the country's environmental challenges by advancing transformative science and high-impact technologies. However, the only way these clean energy technologies can protect the planet is through the leadership of people who take small actions every day to bring about big changes that will last for generations. Learn more about everyday people making a big difference with #MySmallAct. | Energy Department Video.

  15. Human choice and climate change. Volume 2: Resources and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; The natural science of global climate change; Land and water use; Coastal zones and oceans; Energy and industry; Energy and social systems; Technological change; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  16. Global environmental change: Modifying human contributions through education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 1995 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Science report concludes that evidence now available {open_quotes}points toward a discernible human influence on global climate{close_quotes}. Reductions in emissions will require changes in human behavior. Knowledge, often through education, is an important moderator of human environmental behavior. This study assessed whether gains in global environmental change knowledge would lead to changes in human behaviors that could be deemed environmentally responsible.

  17. Climate change | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change Subscribe to RSS - Climate change Climate change COLLOQUIUM: Antarctic Ice Cores and Implications for the Earth's Climate Read more about COLLOQUIUM: Antarctic Ice Cores and Implications for the Earth's Climate COLLOQUIUM: Living with Climate Change: The Road from Paris The twenty-first Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris ended with an agreement that some call "the world's greatest diplomatic

  18. Elizabeth Hunke-Piloting polar warning of climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elizabeth Hunke Elizabeth Hunke-Piloting polar warning of climate change Hunke develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in climate change and projecting the impact of such change globally. March 20, 2014 Elizabeth Hunke Whether she's in the skies, flying a plane and analyzing wind patterns, or wondering how climate change affects the growth of the tender plants she's trying to raise her in backyard, Hunke always has weather on her mind. Hunke urges young

  19. Behavior, Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Behavior, Energy and Climate Change Conference (BECC) is the premier international conference focused on understanding human behavior and decision making so that this knowledge can accelerate the transition to an energy-efficient and low-carbon future.

  20. Climate Change Adaptation Policy Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This policy statement affirms the Department of Energy's commitment to plan for and manage the short and long-term impacts of climate change on its mission, policies, programs, and operations.

  1. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal...

  2. 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 U.S. Department of Energy June 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan Table of Contents Climate Change Adaptation Plan ................................................................................................................................2 Impetus for Action ..................................................................................................................................................2 The DOE Mission and Climate Change Adaptation

  3. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  4. How We Solve Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We Solve Climate Change How We Solve Climate Change December 5, 2015 - 3:00am Addthis How We Solve Climate Change Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy World leaders are gathering in Paris this week for the 21st United Nations climate conference, known as COP21. Our mission: Secure an ambitious global agreement to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and minimize climate change. As negotiators hammer out the details of an agreement, I will be meeting with energy ministers, mayors,

  5. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Contaminated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of potential climate change vulnerabilities and (2) presenting possible adaptation measures that may be considered to increase a remedy's resilience to climate change impacts. ...

  6. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability...

  7. Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Key Challenges: Perform fundamental research on the processes that influence the natural...

  8. Committee on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Committee on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Committee on Climate Change Place: United Kingdom Product: String representation "As a key part o ... 2020 and 2050."...

  9. London Climate Change Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name: London Climate Change Agency Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: SE1 8AA Product: Agency responsible for...

  10. Buildings and Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Buildings and Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme...

  11. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  12. Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation...

  13. Special Feature: Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate Special Feature: Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate September 23, 2013 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 ...

  14. Global Climate Change Impacts & Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... * Toyota: Energy efficiency tied in to kaizen philosophy of continuous improvement * ... Kaizen Scenarios: TMMI MMBTU 6.49 (US) Energy Savings Savings Implement. Impl. ...

  15. Climate Change Adaptation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Adaptation Climate Change Adaptation Mission The Climate Change Adaption team affirms the overall DOE commitment to plan for and manage the short- and long-term effects of climate change, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, and EO 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change The team endorses the President's Climate Action Plan,

  16. Biofuels: A Solution for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, S.

    1999-10-04

    Our lives are linked to weather and climate, and to energy use. Since the late 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in research and technology related to global climate change. DOE's Office Fuels Development (OFD) manages the National Biofuels Program and is the lead technical advisor on the development of biofuels technologies in the United States. Together with industry and other stakeholders, the program seeks to establish a major biofuels industry. Its goals are to develop and commercialize technologies for producing sustainable, domestic, environmentally beneficial, and economically viable fuels from dedicated biomass feedstocks.

  17. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 SahelMap Africarough The Sahel region is a narrow swath of semi-arid land that spans the African continent, from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Red Sea in the east. The low annual precipitation indicates the region is strongly reliant on the monsoon season for water supply. Increased agricultural activity is a rain taker,

  18. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  19. A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

    2009-09-08

    There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

  20. Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2007-01-19

    We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

  1. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  2. Coal in a changing climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lashof, D.A.; Delano, D.; Devine, J.

    2007-02-15

    The NRDC analysis examines the changing climate for coal production and use in the United States and China, the world's two largest producers and consumers of coal. The authors say that the current coal fuel cycle is among the most destructive activities on earth, placing an unacceptable burden on public health and the environment. There is no such thing as 'clean coal.' Our highest priorities must be to avoid increased reliance on coal and to accelerate the transition to an energy future based on efficient use of renewable resources. Energy efficiency and renewable energy resources are technically capable of meeting the demands for energy services in countries that rely on coal. However, more than 500 conventional coal-fired power plants are expected in China in the next eight years alone, and more than 100 are under development in the United States. Because it is very likely that significant coal use will continue during the transition to renewables, it is important that we also take the necessary steps to minimize the destructive effects of coal use. That requires the U.S. and China to take steps now to end destructive mining practices and to apply state of the art pollution controls, including CO{sub 2} control systems, to sources that use coal. Contents of the report are: Introduction; Background (Coal Production; Coal Use); The Toll from Coal (Environmental Effects of Coal Production; Environmental Effects of Coal Transportation); Environmental Effects of Coal Use (Air Pollutants; Other Pollutants; Environmental Effects of Coal Use in China); What Is the Future for Coal? (Reducing Fossil Fuel Dependence; Reducing the Impacts of Coal Production; Reducing Damage From Coal Use; Global Warming and Coal); and Conclusion. 2 tabs.

  3. China-Climate Change Research Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China-Climate Change Research Center (Redirected from ClimateWorks-China Climate Change Research Center) Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Climate Change Research Center...

  4. Climate Change: Science and Policy Robert...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entering the Cauldron of Climate Change: Science and Policy Robert Rosner University of ... of the American Physical Society "climate statement" - I chaired the Panel on ...

  5. Climate Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic Climate Perspectives An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, ...

  6. Human choice and climate change. Four volume set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    The four-volume set assesses social science research relevant to global climate change from a wide-ranging interdisciplinary perspective. Taking human choice within social institutions as the starting point, noted researchers examine climate change issues in the context of societal issues such as population and consumption; cultural, institutional, and economic arrangements for human well-being; and the social processes by which decisions are made from local to global levels. This four-volume assessment is intended to complement the work of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  7. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  8. Climate Change Projections of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Sain, Steve; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; McGinnis, Seth; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Jones, Richard; Nunes, A M B.; Tucker, S.; Herzmann, D.; McDaniel, Larry; Sloan, Lisa

    2013-10-01

    We investigate major results of the NARCCAP multiple regional climate model (RCM) experiments driven by multiple global climate models (GCMs) regarding climate change for seasonal temperature and precipitation over North America. We focus on two major questions: How do the RCM simulated climate changes differ from those of the parent GCMs and thus affect our perception of climate change over North America, and how important are the relative contributions of RCMs and GCMs to the uncertainty (variance explained) for different seasons and variables? The RCMs tend to produce stronger climate changes for precipitation: larger increases in the northern part of the domain in winter and greater decreases across a swath of the central part in summer, compared to the four GCMs driving the regional models as well as to the full set of CMIP3 GCM results. We pose some possible process-level mechanisms for the difference in intensity of change, particularly for summer. Detailed process-level studies will be necessary to establish mechanisms and credibility of these results. The GCMs explain more variance for winter temperature and the RCMs for summer temperature. The same is true for precipitation patterns. Thus, we recommend that future RCM-GCM experiments over this region include a balanced number of GCMs and RCMs.

  9. DOE Climate Change Adaptation Training (Richland, WA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This free training is a primer on climate science, identifying climate hazards, conducting vulnerability assessments, leveraging climate change data and tools and understanding the energy-water-food nexus.

  10. Selected Translated Abstracts of Chinese-Language Climate Change Publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Burtis, M.D.

    1999-05-01

    This report contains English-translated abstracts of important Chinese-language literature concerning global climate change for the years 1995-1998. This body of literature includes the topics of adaptation, ancient climate change, climate variation, the East Asia monsoon, historical climate change, impacts, modeling, and radiation and trace-gas emissions. In addition to the biological citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Chinese. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  11. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  12. Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S.

  13. Malaria and global change: Insights, uncertainties and possible surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.H.; Steel, A.

    1996-12-31

    Malaria may change with global change. Indeed, global change may affect malaria risk and malaria epidemiology. Malaria risk may change in response to a greenhouse warming; malaria epidemiology, in response to the social, economic, and political developments which a greenhouse warming may trigger. To date, malaria receptivity and epidemiology futures have been explored within the context of equilibrium studies. Equilibrium studies of climate change postulate an equilibrium present climate (the starting point) and a doubled-carbon dioxide climate (the end point), simulate conditions in both instances, and compare the two. What happens while climate changes, i.e., between the starting point and the end point, is ignored. The present paper focuses on malaria receptivity and addresses what equilibrium studies miss, namely transient malaria dynamics.

  14. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  15. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China Citation ...

  16. Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference October 20, 2016 9:00AM EDT to October 22, 2016 5:00PM EDT Renaissance ...

  17. 2016 Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference is the premiere event focused on understanding individual and organizational behavior and decision making related to energy usage, greenhouse gas emissions, climate change, and sustainability.

  18. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  19. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of

  20. BIA Climate Change Adaption—Tribal Liaison

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is accepting proposals from eligible entities impacted by climate change to enter into a cooperative agreement for the identification and hiring of tribal climate change liaisons to address tribal climate change science needs.

  1. Structural Design Feasibility Study for the Global Climate Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewin,K.F.; Nagy, J.

    2008-12-01

    Neon, Inc. is proposing to establish a Global Change Experiment (GCE) Facility to increase our understanding of how ecological systems differ in their vulnerability to changes in climate and other relevant global change drivers, as well as provide the mechanistic basis for forecasting ecological change in the future. The experimental design was initially envisioned to consist of two complementary components; (A) a multi-factor experiment manipulating CO{sub 2}, temperature and water availability and (B) a water balance experiment. As the design analysis and cost estimates progressed, it became clear that (1) the technical difficulties of obtaining tight temperature control and maintaining elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels within an enclosure were greater than had been expected and (2) the envisioned study would not fit into the expected budget envelope if this was done in a partially or completely enclosed structure. After discussions between NEON management, the GCE science team, and Keith Lewin, NEON, Inc. requested Keith Lewin to expand the scope of this design study to include open-field exposure systems. In order to develop the GCE design to the point where it can be presented within a proposal for funding, a feasibility study of climate manipulation structures must be conducted to determine design approaches and rough cost estimates, and to identify advantages and disadvantages of these approaches including the associated experimental artifacts. NEON, Inc requested this design study in order to develop concepts for the climate manipulation structures to support the NEON Global Climate Experiment. This study summarizes the design concepts considered for constructing and operating the GCE Facility and their associated construction, maintenance and operations costs. Comparisons and comments about experimental artifacts, construction challenges and operational uncertainties are provided to assist in selecting the final facility design. The overall goal of this report is to provide a cost and technological basis for selection of the appropriate GCE Facility design.

  2. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  3. Australia Department of Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department of Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Australia Department of Climate Change Name: Australia Department of Climate Change Address: 2 Constitution Ave...

  4. UNEP-Southeast Asia Climate Change Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southeast Asia Climate Change Network Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Southeast Asia Climate Change Network Name UNEP-Southeast Asia Climate Change Network AgencyCompany...

  5. Ethiopia-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethiopia-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ethiopia-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Name Ethiopia-African Climate Change...

  6. DB Climate Change Advisors DBCCA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DB Climate Change Advisors DBCCA Jump to: navigation, search Name: DB Climate Change Advisors (DBCCA) Place: New York, New York Product: New York-based climate change investement...

  7. World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Knowledge Portal Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal Name World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal AgencyCompany...

  8. Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia Name Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform...

  9. Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Name Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience...

  10. Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre Name Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre AgencyCompany...

  11. Uganda-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Uganda-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Name Uganda-African Climate Change Resilience...

  12. 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan Document presents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2014 plan for adapting to climate change....

  13. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  14. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number ...

  15. Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    :"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Web Site1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Stanford- Global...

  16. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Global ...

  17. Climate Action Champions: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, FL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact established a Climate Action Plan as a strategic framework for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to the effects of climate change in the region. The plan features 110 recommendations for implementation during the initial 5-year period, and individual Compact counties have established long-term emission reduction goals, including reductions of up to 80 percent of 2010 levels by 2050.

  18. Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health stressors, threatens our health and well-being in many ways. This webinar will provide an overview of climate-related health...

  19. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  20. Life cycle inventory analysis of regenerative thermal oxidation of air emissions from oriented strand board facilities in Minnesota - a perspective of global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Life cycle inventory analysis has been applied to the prospective operation of regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology at oriented strand board plants at Bemidji (Line 1) and Cook, Minnesota. The net system destruction of VOC`s and carbon monoxide, and at Cook a small quantity of particulate, has a very high environmental price in terms of energy and water use, global warming potential, sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions, solids discharged to water, and solid waste deposited in landfills. The benefit of VOC destruction is identified as minor in terms of ground level ozone at best and possibly slightly detrimental. Recognition of environmental tradeoffs associated with proposed system changes is critical to sound decision-making. There are more conventional ways to address carbon monoxide emissions than combustion in RTO`s. In an environment in which global warming is a concern, fuel supplemental combustion for environmental control does not appear warranted. Consideration of non-combustion approaches to address air emission issues at the two operations is recommended. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  1. Climate change: Clinton affirms binding emissions reduction policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, P.

    1996-12-04

    In Australia last month President Clinton called for an international agreement to negotiate {open_quotes}legally binding commitments to fight climate change.{close_quotes} His comments affirmed the line the Administration adopted in July and lent prominence to the effort to bring about a treaty by December 1997. Environmentalists welcomed Clinton`s comments, but industry response is divided. The Global Climate Coalition (Washington), of which CMA is a member, has tried to slow negotiations by questioning the scientific consensus on climate change and suggesting {open_quotes}serious damage to the American economy{close_quotes} could result from emissions reduction.

  2. Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Earth’s climate is changing. In some places such as the Arctic, the change is rapid and profound, while in other areas change has been less dramatic and more gradual. But virtually everywhere,...

  3. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New Golden Age November 12, 2014 Contact: Julie Chao, jchao@lbl.gov, 510.486.6491 wehnerclimate2 Simulated and observed annual maximum 5 day accumulated precipitation over land points, averaged. Observations are calculated from the period 1979 to 1999. Model results are calculated from the period 1979 to 2005. Not long ago,

  4. China-Climate Change Research Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China-Climate Change Research Center Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Climate Change Research Center AgencyCompany Organization ClimateWorks, Energy Foundation Sector...

  5. El Salvador - National Climate Change Strategy Support | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    El Salvador - National Climate Change Strategy Support Jump to: navigation, search Name National Climate Change Strategy of El Salvador AgencyCompany Organization Climate and...

  6. Modeling Transient Response of Forests to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that a high diversity of dominant life forms in Tennessee forests conveys resilience to disturbance such as climate change. Because of uncertainty in climate change and their effects, three climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) were used to simulate a range of potential climate conditions for the state. These climate changes derive from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B storyline that assumes rapid global economic growth. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in five ecological provinces using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation differences from the long-term average are more complex but less striking. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions for five ecological provinces from 1989 to 2300. Average output projects changes in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces in Tennessee with the greatest changes in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Projected declines in total tree biomass are followed by biomass recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The Southern Mixed Forest province results in less diversity in dominant trees as well as lower overall biomass than projections for the other four provinces. The biomass and composition changes projected in this study differ from forest dynamics expected without climate change. These results suggest that biomass recovery following climate change is linked to dominant tree diversity in the southeastern forest of the US. The generality of this observation warrants further investigation, for it relates to ways that forest management may influence climate change effects.

  7. New climate change exhibit opens May 25

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New climate change exhibit opens May 25 At the Bradbury Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit New climate change exhibit opens May 25 The intersections of climate change and artistic expression May 1, 2016 The event will run from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum On Wednesday, May 25 beginning at 4 p.m. and running through 6 p.m. you'll have an opportunity to celebrate the opening of a new exhibit at the Bradbury Science Museum. Titled Climate Perspectives: Change in the

  8. Approaches for Effective Climate Change Communication (NPS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register here. Join us for a webinar exploring the importance of effective communication strategies as a key component of climate change response. The presentation will highlight examples and...

  9. Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts. Presentation by Jonathan Pershing at the 2015 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program in Washington, DC.

  10. Climate Change Advisory Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advisory Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Climate Change Advisory Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: W1K 3HP Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: CCA provides...

  11. Global Change Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Change Associates Place: New York City, New York Zip: 10025-5657 Product: Consulting firm focusing on the convergence...

  12. Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers | Department of Energy Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers March 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - In recent discussions with a broad range of world energy ministers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed the need for global cooperation

  13. US forests and global change - precolonization to the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1997-12-31

    The forests of the United States and manufacture of products from raw materials produced in the forests are significant for the international global economy and for amelioration of threatening global climate change. This paper explores the conditions of the forests as a result of changing anthropogenic influences, and how these conditions might impact on global change.

  14. Climate Change What We Know and What We Need to Learn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2008-05-01

    How is human activity changing the climate and what are the consequences? Is global warming the cause of more frequent droughts, stronger storms and less snow in the mountains? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Scientist Dave Bader explores what scientists know about climate change and the research tools used to study the climate. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11544

  15. Climate Change What We Know and What We Need to Learn

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01

    How is human activity changing the climate and what are the consequences? Is global warming the cause of more frequent droughts, stronger storms and less snow in the mountains? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Scientist Dave Bader explores what scientists know about climate change and the research tools used to study the climate. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11544

  16. Climate Change: The Physical Basis and Latest Results

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes: "Warming in the climate system is unequivocal." Without the contribution of Physics to climate science over many decades, such a statement would not have been possible. Experimental physics enables us to read climate archives such as polar ice cores and so provides the context for the current changes. For example, today the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, the second most important greenhouse gas, is 28% higher than any time during the last 800,000 years. Classical fluid mechanics and numerical mathematics are the basis of climate models from which estimates of future climate change are obtained. But major instabilities and surprises in the Earth System are still unknown. These are also to be considered when the climatic consequences of proposals for geo-engineering are estimated. Only Physics will permit us to further improve our understanding in order to provide the foundation for policy decisions facing the global climate change challenge.

  17. Climate change: Update on international negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper outlines the following: United Nations` framework convention on climatic change; the United States` climate change action plan; current issues to be resolved (targets/timetables, policies, advancing commitments of all parties, and compliance); and implications for clean coal technologies.

  18. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change conference. The conference will share tribal strategies, plans, and regional, national, and international policies on climate change, energy and carbon emissions as well as discuss tribal needs and funding opportunities.

  19. Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2013-12-16

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCC’s Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  20. Advancing Climate Science with Global Research Facilities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research at the facilities focuses on four areas: how aerosols affect the global climate; the various stages of cloud evolution; the impact of aerosols on the radiative balance of ...

  1. Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

    2006-04-26

    CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  2. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  3. Tools for Teaching Climate Change Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maestas, A.M.; Jones, L.A.

    2005-03-18

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) develops public outreach materials and educational resources for schools. Studies prove that science education in rural and indigenous communities improves when educators integrate regional knowledge of climate and environmental issues into school curriculum and public outreach materials. In order to promote understanding of ACRF climate change studies, ACRF Education and Outreach has developed interactive kiosks about climate change for host communities close to the research sites. A kiosk for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) community was installed at the Iupiat Heritage Center in 2003, and a kiosk for the Tropical Western Pacific locales will be installed in 2005. The kiosks feature interviews with local community elders, regional agency officials, and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program scientists, which highlight both research and local observations of some aspects of environmental and climatic change in the Arctic and Pacific. The kiosks offer viewers a unique opportunity to learn about the environmental concerns and knowledge of respected community elders, and to also understand state-of-the-art climate research. An archive of interviews from the communities will also be distributed with supplemental lessons and activities to encourage teachers and students to compare and contrast climate change studies and oral history observations from two distinct locations. The U.S. Department of Energy's ACRF supports education and outreach efforts for communities and schools located near its sites. ACRF Education and Outreach has developed interactive kiosks at the request of the communities to provide an opportunity for the public to learn about climate change from both scientific and indigenous perspectives. Kiosks include interviews with ARM scientists and provide users with basic information about climate change studies as well as interviews with elders and community leaders discussing the impacts of climate change on land, sea, and other aspects of village life.

  4. Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2005-07-01

    Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments.

  5. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. PDF icon Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation Quadrennial Energy Review Fact Sheets Quadrennial Energy Review: First Installment Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power

  6. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Study shows clean diesel programs slashed black carbon, a powerful short-term contributor to global warming June 13, 2013 Jon Weiner 510-486-4014 jrweiner@lbl.gov CA-BC-graphic.jpg Sacramento - Reductions in emissions of black carbon since the late 1980s, mostly from diesel engines as a result of air quality programs, have resulted in a measurable reduction of concentrations of

  7. Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    October 2006. Investors require this information in order to analyze a company's business risks and opportunities resulting from climate change, as well as the company's...

  8. New Climate Research Centers Forecast Changes and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two new observation stations -– in Alaska and the Azore islands -– should reduce uncertainties and improve global climate models.

  9. ACEEE Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), the Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference is a three-day event focused on understanding individual and...

  10. Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The four-part Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country webinar series provided tribal leaders an opportunity to share their insights, experiences, and ideas with President Obamas State, Local,...

  11. Special Feature: Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate Special Feature: Supercomputers Map Our Changing Climate September 23, 2013 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 cam5-hurricane-2145950x400.jpg In this simulation, Berkeley researchers used the finite volume version of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model to see how well the model can reproduced observed tropical cyclone statistics. The simulated storms seen in this animation are generated spontaneously from the model's simulated weather

  12. The climate change and energy security nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Marcus Dubois; Gulledge, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The study of the impacts of climate change on national and interna-tional security has grown as a research field, particularly in the last five years. Within this broad field, academic scholarship has concentrated primarily on whether climate change is, or may become, a driver of violent conflict. This relationship remains highly contested. However, national security policy and many non-governmental organizations have identified climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. The U.S. Department of Defense and the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense have incorporated these findings into strategic planning documents such as the Quadrennial Defense Review and the Strategic Defence and Security Review. In contrast to the climate-conflict nexus, our analysis found that academic scholarship on the climate change and energy security nexus is small and more disciplinarily focused. In fact, a search of social science litera-ture found few sources, with a significant percentage of these works attribut-able to a single journal. Assuming that policymakers are more likely to rely on broader social science literature than technical or scientific journals, this leaves a limited foundation. This then begged the question: what are these sources? We identified a body of grey literature on the nexus of climate change and energy security of a greater size than the body of peer-reviewed social science literature. We reviewed fifty-eight recent reports, issue briefs, and transcripts to better understand the nexus of climate change and energy security, as well as to gain insight about the questions policymakers need answered by those undertaking the research. In this article, we describe the nature of the sources reviewed, highlight possible climate change and energy security linkages found within those sources, identify emerging risks, and offer conclusions that can guide further research.

  13. Sustainable Transport and Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Transport and Climate Change (Redirected from Day 1, Module 1: Sustainable Transport and Climate Change) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Day...

  14. Sustainable Transport and Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Transport and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Day 1, Module 1: Sustainable Transport and Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  15. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country, Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky and More DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian...

  16. Cambodia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany...

  17. Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany...

  18. Indonesia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany...

  19. China-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany...

  20. Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany...

  1. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Landfills and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of potential climate change vulnerabilities and (2) presenting possible adaptation measures that may be considered to increase a remedy's resilience to climate change impacts. ...

  2. Brazil National Plan on Climate Change (PNMC) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Plan on Climate Change (PNMC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil National Plan on Climate Change (PNMC) AgencyCompany Organization:...

  3. Aid for Trade and Climate Change Financing Mechanisms | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aid for Trade and Climate Change Financing Mechanisms Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Aid for Trade and Climate Change Financing Mechanisms: Best...

  4. Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Agency...

  5. Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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  6. IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information

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    Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research AgencyCompany Organization: International...

  7. Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework...

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    Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework (Redirected from CDKN-Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework) Jump to: navigation, search...

  8. California's Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan | Open Energy...

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    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name California's Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan AgencyCompany Organization State of California Resource...

  9. USFS-Climate Change Resource Center | Open Energy Information

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  10. Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

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  11. South Africa-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open...

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  12. OLADE-Central America Climate Change Vulnerability Program |...

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  13. USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse | Open...

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  14. The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico | Open Energy Information

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  15. The Cost to Developing Countries of Adapting to Climate Change...

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  16. Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change...

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    National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization...

  17. Ethiopia-Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action...

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    Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action AgencyCompany Organization...

  18. LBNL-Climate Change and International Studies | Open Energy Informatio...

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    Climate Change and International Studies Jump to: navigation, search Name LBNL-Climate Change and International Studies AgencyCompany Organization Lawrence Berkeley National...

  19. Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan | Open Energy...

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  20. Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information

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  1. UK Climate Change Projects Office | Open Energy Information

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    Climate Change Projects Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: UK Climate Change Projects Office Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1W 9SS Product: Government advisory office...

  2. Indonesia and Climate Change: Current Status and Policies | Open...

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  3. Mexico-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open Energy...

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  4. Britain's Department of Energy and Climate change | Open Energy...

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    Britain's Department of Energy and Climate change Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Britain's Department of Energy and Climate change. Name: Britain's Department of Energy and...

  5. South Africa - Climate Change Risks and Opportunities for the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Risks and Opportunities for the Economy Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Climate Change Risks and Opportunities for the Economy AgencyCompany...

  6. EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy...

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    ECUNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDPEC Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The European Union...

  7. Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program ...

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    EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The...

  8. China-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Climate Change Research Program Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Energy and Climate Change Research Program AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development...

  9. Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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  10. China Brazil Center on Climate Change and Energy Technology Innovation...

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    Center on Climate Change and Energy Technology Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: China-Brazil Center on Climate Change and Energy Technology Innovation Place: Beijing...

  11. UNEP Climate Change Resource Kit | Open Energy Information

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    Climate Change Resource Kit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNEP Climate Change Resource Kit AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment...

  12. United Kingdom Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC...

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    Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United Kingdom Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Name: United Kingdom Department for...

  13. A National Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change | Open Energy...

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    National Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A National Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  14. File:(PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY (english...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY (english).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:(PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY...

  15. Toward Low Carbon and Climate Change Resilient Territories |...

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    Toward Low Carbon and Climate Change Resilient Territories Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Toward Low Carbon and Climate Change Resilient Territories...

  16. Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana | Open Energy...

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    Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana AgencyCompany...

  17. Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in...

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    UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda Agency...

  18. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Hawaii & Pacific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Hawaii & Pacific Islands MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Hawaii & Pacific Islands November 5, 2015 1:00PM to...

  19. Impacts of Climate Change on Agriculture and Adaptation in Vietnam...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change on Agriculture and Adaptation in Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Impacts of Climate Change on Agriculture and Adaptation in...

  20. Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

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    Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization:...

  1. Clean Energy Investment and Climate Change | Open Energy Information

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    and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Energy Investment and Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development...

  2. FAO-Capacity Development on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

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    Capacity Development on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Capacity Development on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: Food and...

  3. Access to Climate Change Technology by Developing Countries ...

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    to Climate Change Technology by Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Access to Climate Change Technology by Developing Countries Agency...

  4. China's National Climate Change Programme | Open Energy Information

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    China's National Climate Change Programme Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: China's National Climate Change Programme AgencyCompany Organization: China...

  5. Nepal-Climate Change Support Programme | Open Energy Information

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    Nepal-Climate Change Support Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Climate Change Support Programme AgencyCompany Organization United Kingdom Department for...

  6. Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting Energy Technologies Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting Energy...

  7. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...

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    Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and...

  8. Kazakhstan Climate Change Coordination Center | Open Energy Informatio...

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    Kazakhstan Climate Change Coordination Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kazakhstan Climate Change Coordination Center Address: 48 Abai Street, Room 102 Astana (473000)...

  9. Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change IIGCC | Open...

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    Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change IIGCC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip:...

  10. Singapore National Climate Change Strategy | Open Energy Information

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    National Climate Change Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Singapore National Climate Change Strategy AgencyCompany Organization: Singapore...

  11. OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

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  12. Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  13. Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change |...

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    on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Agency...

  14. Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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  15. Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  16. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

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    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  17. IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources | Open Energy...

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    IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources AgencyCompany Organization:...

  18. India National Action Plan on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

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    Action Plan on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: India National Action Plan on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: India Prime...

  19. Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) | Open Energy Information

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    Capacity Development (C3D+) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) Name Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) AgencyCompany...

  20. Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change...

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    National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  1. New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open...

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    Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New...

  2. Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change | Open...

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    National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  3. Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

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    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  4. GIZ Sourcebook Module 5e: Transport and Climate Change | Open...

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    e: Transport and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 5e: Transport and Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: GIZ...

  5. Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather This U.S. Department of Energy Office of ...

  6. Climate Change and the Los Alamos National Laboratory: The Adaptation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change and the Los Alamos National Laboratory: The Adaptation Challenge The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been adapting to climate change related impacts that ...

  7. Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes Not surprisingly significant changes in climate leave their imprint on the landscape. During the last glacial maximum, 20,000 ...

  8. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 1: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country: Human Health and ... The Energy Department will help host a live webinar titled "Climate Change Impacts and ...

  9. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  10. Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting Energy Technologies Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting Energy ...

  11. Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change New results, reported in a paper released today in ...

  12. Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change...

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    Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change(StARCK) (Redirected from Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change in Kenya (StARCK)) Jump to:...

  13. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  14. Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-08-01

    The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

  15. 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan Document presents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2014 plan for adapting to climate change. PDF icon doe_ccap_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Executive Order -- Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change Executive Order 13653-Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change Climate Action Champions: Resilience and Equity

  16. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  17. Projections of Future Climate Change (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Projections of Future Climate Change Contents: Executive Summary 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Climate and Climate Change 9.3 Projections of ...

  18. Active Climate Stabilization: Practical Physics-Based Approaches to Prevention of Climate Change

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Teller, E.; Hyde, T.; Wood, L.

    2002-04-18

    We offer a case for active technical management of the radiative forcing of the temperatures of the Earth's fluid envelopes, rather than administrative management of atmospheric greenhouse gas inputs, in order to stabilize both the global- and time-averaged climate and its mesoscale features. We suggest that active management of radiative forcing entails negligible--indeed, likely strongly negative--economic costs and environmental impacts, and thus best complies with the pertinent mandate of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. We propose that such approaches be swiftly evaluated in sub-scale in the course of an intensive international program.

  19. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  20. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  1. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  2. New climate change exhibit opens May 25

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New climate change exhibit opens May 25 New climate change exhibit opens May 25 WHEN: May 25, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description The May 25 opening will run from 4 to 6 p.m. On Wednesday, May 25 beginning at 4 p.m. and running through 6 p.m. you'll have an opportunity to celebrate the opening of a new exhibit at the Bradbury Science

  3. Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California The magnitude of future climate change depends substantially on the greenhouse gas emission pathways we choose. Here we explore the implications of the highest and lowest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions pathways for climate change and associated impacts in

  4. Zooming in: From global to regional climate models | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to explore climate changes that occur on a diurnal scale, such as thunderstorms or urban heat islands. With Mira, approximately 1 million core-hours are needed to run a one-year...

  5. Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G

    2010-03-17

    Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

  6. Atmospheric Science: Solving Challenges of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, Charlette

    2015-08-05

    PNNL’s atmospheric science research provides data required to make decisions about challenges presented by climate change: Where to site power plants, how to manage water resources, how to prepare for severe weather events and more. Our expertise in fundamental observations and modeling is recognized among the national labs and the world.

  7. Analysis of the Climate Change Technology Initiative

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the impact of specific policies on the reduction of carbon emissions and their impact on U.S. energy use and prices in the 2008-2012 time frame. Also, analyzes the impact of the President's Climate Change Technology Initiative, as defined for the 2000 budget, on reducing carbon emissions from the levels forecast in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 reference case.

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Featured Climate Change Research from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Climate Change Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE R&D Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Climate Modeling Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE R&D ...

  9. President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    announced a robust package of resources, funding, and other programs to assist with combatting climate change and building climate resilience in remote Alaskan communities. ...

  10. How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

  11. Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Adaptation to Climate...

  12. Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network...

  13. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from hurricane storm surge and that climate change is likely to substantially ... of intense hurricanes in a warmer climate would further exacerbate infrastructure ...

  14. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on archives ...

  15. Impacts of Climate Change on Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    2014-04-30

    The overall goal of this research project was to improve and use our biogeochemistry model, TEM, to simulate the effects of climate change and other environmental changes on the production of biofuel feedstocks. We used the improved version of TEM that is coupled with the economic model, EPPA, a part of MIT’s Earth System Model, to explore how alternative uses of land, including land for biofuels production, can help society meet proposed climate targets. During the course of this project, we have made refinements to TEM that include development of a more mechanistic plant module, with improved ecohydrology and consideration of plant-water relations, and a more detailed treatment of soil nitrogen dynamics, especially processes that add or remove nitrogen from ecosystems. We have documented our changes to TEM and used the model to explore the effects on production in land ecosystems, including changes in biofuels production.

  16. Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

  17. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  18. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  19. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  20. Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows For U.S. Energy Information Administration Conference July 14, 2014 | Washington, D.C. By Susan Grissom, U.S. Energy Information Administration In 2011, the U.S. became a net exporter of petroleum products Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows, EIA Conference 2014 2 U.S. petroleum product imports and exports million barrels per day Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010

  1. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

  2. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education ...

  3. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince George's County, Maryland; Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State; corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This report was drafted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Policy and International Affairs

  4. Pacific Decadal Variability and Central Pacific Warming El Niño in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-02-27

    This research aimed at understanding the dynamics controlling decadal variability in the Pacific Ocean and its interactions with global-scale climate change. The first goal was to assess how the dynamics and statistics of the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the modes of Pacific decadal variability are represented in global climate models used in the IPCC. The second goal was to quantify how decadal dynamics are projected to change under continued greenhouse forcing, and determine their significance in the context of paleo-proxy reconstruction of long-term climate.

  5. Climate Change: The Role of Particles and Gases (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: A member of the Atmospheric Sciences Department in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), Surabi Menon's work focuses on the human contribution to increasing impacts of climate change. Her talk will focus on what humans can do about the effects of global warming by examining anthropogenic influences on climate and future anticipated impacts, using a climate model and her own observations.

  6. Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study INDEX Executive Summary..............................2 Climate Action Champion...................2 Project Spotlight...............................2-4 Co-benefits...........................................4 Challenges and lessons learned.........5 Resources & Contacts......................5-6 2 Executive Summary The Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, a collaboration among the

  7. Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail...

  8. Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures LANL researcher Nate McDowell will discuss climate change and its effects on forest ...

  9. Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest In a troubling ...

  10. Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2 ...

  11. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 4-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change....

  12. Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change(StARCK) Jump to: navigation, search Name Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change in Kenya (StARCK)...

  13. Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference Behavior, Energy & Climate Change (BECC) Conference October 20, 2016 9:00AM EDT to October 22, 2016 5:00PM EDT Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Baltimore, Maryland

  14. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the worlds energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  15. Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather This U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy report assesses climate change and extreme weather vulnerabilities specific to tribal energy infrastructure and systems in the contiguous United States and Alaska. It includes information about the impacts from climate change and extreme weather events on both onsite and offsite

  16. Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Center for Energy Storage Research March 19, 2015, Videos Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology George Crabtree gives keynote at Loyola University In March 2015, George Crabtree gave the keynote address, "Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology" at the Institute of Environmental Sustainability Climate Change Conference at Loyola University

  17. Global Change Research: Summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Global Research Program in FY 1993. This publication describes all of the projects funded by the Environmental Sciences Division of DOE under annual contracts, grants, and interagency agreements in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; its 3-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than 1 year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: climate modeling, quantitative links, global carbon cycle, vegetation research, ocean research, economics of global climate change, education, information and integration, and NIGEC. Within these categories, the descriptions are grouped alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers.

  18. National Institute for Global Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  19. Our impending energy, climate-change, and economic-development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    crisis : Options for Change - Part 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Our impending energy, climate-change, and economic-development crisis : Options for ...

  20. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change." Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future, November 18, 2008 More Documents & Publications...

  1. Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Strategy for Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change AgencyCompany...

  2. AEP Climate Change Strategy Bruce Braine

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AEP Climate Change Strategy Bruce Braine Vice President - Strategic Policy Analysis April 7, 2008 Mountaineer Plant - New Haven, WV Northeastern Plant - Oologah, OK 2 Coal/Lignite 67% Nat. Gas/Oil 24% Nuclear 6% Pumped Storage/ Hydro/Wind 3% AEP's Generation Fleet 38,388 MW Capacity Company Overview 5.1 million customers in 11 states Industry-leading size and scale of assets: Asset Size Industry Rank Domestic Generation ~38,300 MW # 2 Transmission ~39,000 miles # 1 Distribution ~208,000 miles #

  3. COLLOQUIUM: A Wild Solution for Climate Change | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab 15, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: A Wild Solution for Climate Change Professor Thomas E. Lovejoy George Mason University Presentation: PDF icon WC15APR2015_TELovejoy.pdf The impacts of climate change on biodiversity and nature is increasingly prevalent. Projected ahead climate change has increasingly greater impacts beyond what the Climate Convention refers to as allowing systems to adapt naturally. The presentation will examine the two degree target for

  4. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  5. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasing Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.

  6. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasingmore » Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

  7. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  8. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  9. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Edmonds, James A.

    2007-10-24

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world’s electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  10. Global Climate and Energy Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 DEER Conference Presentation: U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program PDF icon deer_2003_edwards.pdf More Documents & Publications ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation Audit Report: IG-0678

  11. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  12. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  13. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  14. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  15. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  16. Ecotones in a changing environment: Workshop on ecotones and global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risser, P.G.

    1990-02-01

    The Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has organized an international project to synthesize and advance current theory on the influence of ecotones, or transition zones between ecosystems, on biodiversity and flows of energy, nutrients, water, and project is other materials between ecosystems. In particular, the entire project is designed to evaluate the influence of global climate change and land-use practices on biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones, and will assess the feasibility of monitoring ecotones as early indicators of global change. The later stages of the project will recommend landscape management strategies for ecotones that produce desirable patterns of biodiversity and ecological flows. The result of the project--a comprehensive body of information on the theory and management of biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones--will be part of the planning for research to be carried out under the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program.

  17. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  18. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PIA, Office of Information Resources | Department of Energy ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources PDF icon ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office

  19. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2013-08-01

    A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of ways, one of which is through changes in demands for heating and cooling in buildings. Understanding the potential effect of climate on heating and cooling demands must take into account not only the manner in which the building sector might evolve over time - including, for example, movements from rural to urban environments in developing countries - but also important uncertainty about the nature of climate change itself and the growth and movements of populations over time. In this study, we explored the uncertainty in climate change impacts on heating and cooling by constructing estimates of heating and cooling degree days for both a reference (no-policy) scenario and a climate mitigation scenario built from 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude resolution output from three different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and three gridded scenarios of population distribution. The implications that changing climate and population distribution might have for building energy consumption in the U.S. and China were then explored by using the heating and cooling degree days results as inputs to a detailed, building energy model, nested in the long-term global integrated assessment framework, Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Across the climate models and population distribution scenarios, the results indicate that unabated climate change would cause total final energy consumption to decrease modestly in both U.S. and China buildings by the end of the century, as decreased heating consumption is more than balanced by increased cooling using primarily electricity. However, the results also indicate that when indirect emissions from the power sector are also taken into account, climate change may have negligible effect on building sector CO2 emissions in the two countries. The variation in results due to variation of population distribution is noticeably smaller than variation due to the use of different climate models.

  20. Ecuador-Quito City Climate Change Action Plan | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quito City Climate Change Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecuador-Quito City Climate Change Action Plan AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge...

  1. Climate Change Impact Valuation Models Revisited | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Climate Change Impact Valuation Models Revisited Biological and Environmental Research ... Climate Change Impact Valuation Models Revisited Valuing diverse climate impacts in ...

  2. Towards a Fine-Resolution Global Coupled Climate System for Prediction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    System for Prediction on DecadalCentennial Scales Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards a Fine-Resolution Global Coupled Climate System for Prediction on Decadal...

  3. Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1992-05-01

    There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

  4. Climate change legislation: what the Senate might do

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-15

    Two of the speakers who spoke at the Coal-Gen conference, Charlotte, NC, USA on 19 August discussed climate change legislation currently under consideration in the US Congress. The so-called Waxman-Markey bill passed the House in June and is currently being considered by the Senate. The title of Thomas Hewson's talk was 'Climate change is likely to pass' and Neal Cabral discussed 'Geography and region influence climate change politics'.

  5. Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S.

  6. Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from

  7. Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN) The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of

  8. From global change science to action with social sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, C. P.; Mooney, Sian; Allen, D.; Beller-Simms, Nancy; Fish, T.; Grambsch, A.; Hohenstein, W.; Jacobs, Kathy; Kenney, Melissa A.; Lane, Meredith A.; Langner, L.; Larson, E.; McGinnis, D. L.; Moss, Richard H.; Nichols, L. G.; Nierenberg, Claudia; Seyller, E. A.; Stern, Paul; Winthrop, R.

    2014-08-01

    US efforts to integrate social and biophysical sciences to address the issue of global change exist within a wider movement to understand global change as a societal challenge and to inform policy. Insights from the social sciences can help transform global change research into action.

  9. Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science, Third Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Morris A.; Parker, Elissa A.

    2003-10-10

    The Environmental Law Institute, the grantee, in the final quarter of operation under Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-02ER63414, successfully completed the following tasks associated with the grant: (1) published ''Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science'', the third edition of this resource intended primarily to help print and broadcast journalists report more effectively on scientific aspects of global climate change; (2) distributed the reporters guide directly to roughly 500 journalists and journalism educators participating in the annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in New Orleans, La.; (3) distributed the reporters guide to an additional 1,500 journalists and journalism educators by mail; (4) provided journalism educators bulk copies, upon specific request, for their use in upper-level science journalism and environmental journalism classes; (5) conducted outreach to science editors and environmental reporters on availability and use of the reporter's guide; (6) completed financial reporting associated with the reporter's guide grant. ELI has provided requested bulk numbers of copies of ''Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science'' to the DOE Project Officer, David C. Bader, Ph.D., and to Jeffrey Amthor, Ph.D., in the Office of Science. ELI currently has a remaining inventory of roughly 500 copies from the original printing of more than 3,000 copies of the guide. These copies are used for responding to continuing requests from journalists and educators for the guide. ELI is currently exploring opportunities for reprinting additional copies to help meet the continuing demand from the educational and journalism communities.

  10. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  11. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Groundwater Remediation Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key component of the preliminary Superfund climate change adaptation action plan involves developing tools that can help project managers and other cleanup stakeholders to identify, prioritize...

  12. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project to study climate change's effect on tropical forests Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues...

  13. Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    their decision making processes and operations. It presents an overview of the current science and policy of climate change, followed by self-guidance material on mitigation and...

  14. Analysis of the Climate Change Technology Initiative: Fiscal Year 2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the potential impacts of Climate Change Technology Initiative, relative to the baseline energy projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000).

  15. MAP: How Climate Change Threatens America's Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Learn more about climate change ... Speaking today with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti in L.A., Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz ...

  16. Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    federal-tribal partnership to combat climate change and strengthen community resilience. ... infrastructure resilience, and strengthening the government-to-government relationship. ...

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Groundwater Remediatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    can help project managers and other cleanup stakeholders to identify, prioritize and implement site-specific measures for increasing remedy resilience to climate change impacts. ...

  18. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and...

  19. Mexico National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change (INECC...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Ecology and Climate Change (INECC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico National Institute of Ecology Name: Mexico National Institute of Ecology Address:...

  20. UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDPEC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Retrieved from...

  1. Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to...

  2. Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

  3. London Climate Change Service Providers Group LCCSPG | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Service Providers Group LCCSPG Jump to: navigation, search Name: London Climate Change Service Providers Group (LCCSPG) Place: United Kingdom Product: Aims to promote the shared...

  4. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  5. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky and More DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country, Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky and More April 23,...

  6. Bridging the Divide Between Poverty Reduction and Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bridging the Divide Between Poverty Reduction and Climate Change Through Sustainable and Innovative Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  7. Climate Change: building the resilience of poor rural communities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of poor rural communities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: building the resilience of poor rural communities AgencyCompany...

  8. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage from the atmosphere (the carbon sink) may already be declining in response to climate change-induced reductions in precipitation and increases in temperature." Because...

  9. Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Economic Evaluation...

  10. Argentina-Support for the Preparation of National Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Argentina-Support for the Preparation of National Climate Change Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Argentina Regional Programme for LAC - Support for the preparation...

  11. Climate Change Development Policy Loan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Policy Loan Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Development Policy Loan AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Finance,...

  12. Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  13. The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive Summary for The Lancet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Health Benefits of Tackling...

  14. Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on...

  15. FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of...

  16. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Agency...

  17. Climate Change and Clean Energy Project (CEnergy) Toolkit | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project (CEnergy) Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change and Clean Energy Project (CEnergy) Toolkit AgencyCompany Organization:...

  18. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries...

  19. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  20. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary...

  1. Methods for Climate Change Technology Transfer Needs Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods for Climate Change Technology Transfer Needs Assessments and Implementing Activities: Experiences of Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  2. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  3. Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather ii NOTICE This ... States government or any agency thereof. energy.govindianenergy | indianenergy@hq.doe.go...

  4. Veterans Advancing Clean Energy and Climate Security Champions of Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House honors American veterans as Champions of Change for their extraordinary work to advance clean energy and increase climate resilience and preparedness in their communities.

  5. Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental quality and health and associated no-regrets mitigation measures Citation Details In-Document Search This content ...

  6. What Are You Doing to Fight Climate Change?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    October is a big month for climate change awareness! Whether you're blogging about it today or joining in the efforts on October 24th, tell us:

  7. A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science Gent, Peter; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Conley, Andrew; Vertenstein, Mariana; Craig, Anthony 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  8. ARM - Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Climate refers to the long-term changes in ...

  9. Global climate feedbacks: Conclusions and recommendations of the June 1990 BNL workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-08-01

    The issue of global change initiated by increases in the concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases is a scientific issue with major policy implications. The best means to examine the response of the Earth's climate to prospective perturbations in radiative forcing caused by such changes, and to other industrial activities, is modeling, specifically by means of general circulation models (GCMs) of the Earth's atmosphere and of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The purpose of this workshop was to identify the feedbacks inherent in the Earth's climate that actually or potentially govern the system's response to perturbations, to identify gaps in knowledge that preclude the accurate representation of these feedbacks in models, and to identify research required to represent these feedbacks accurately in models.

  10. Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OECD/IEA 2014 © OECD/IEA 2014 Antoine Halff 2014 EIA Energy Conference Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows Washington, DC July 14, 2014 © OECD/IEA 2014 Crude trade shifts further east  Asia imports increase by 2.6 mb/d to 22.1 mb, or 65% of the international crude market Crude Exports in 2019 and Growth in 2013-19 for Key Trade Routes 1 (million barrels per day) 0.2 0.3 (0) 2.0 (0.2) (-0.6) 4.1 (-0.6) 0.1 (-0.7) 3.1 1.2 (0.3) 1.0 (+0.1) -0.6 2.2 1.8 (+0.8) (-0.6) 1.1 (+0.3) Red

  11. Policies to encourage private sector responses to potential climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantor, R.A.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.; Rayner, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently completed work on a report commissioned by the US Congress from the Department of Energy entitled A Compendium of Options for Government Policy to Encourage Private Sector Responses to Potential Climate Change'' (US DOE 1989). Four classes of incentives (regulatory, fiscal, informational, and RD D) were surveyed in the context of greenhouse-related activities in five economic sectors as depicted in Figure 1. As the example shows, for each activity general policies and specific options were considered. The paper presented here does not summarize the DOE study but identifies some of the lessons ORNL staff learned during the study about policies to deal with potential global warming. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, John B; Worley, Patrick H; Hoffman, Forrest M; Jones, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

  13. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... However, regional variation does not imply regional ... Federal, state, and local governments and the ... climate-resilient, assessment of vulnerabilities in ...

  14. A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

  15. QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ QUIZ: Test Your Climate Change IQ April 18, 2016 - 11:30am Addthis Quiz: Test Your Climate IQ Climate change is one of the most urgent environmental challenges of our time. But how much do you know about it? Test your knowledge with this quiz! 1. How does the greenhouse effect work? Greenhouse gases reflect the sun's energy, causing it to warm the Earth. Greenhouse gases absorb the sun's energy, slowing or preventing heat from escaping into space. Greenhouse

  16. Climate Change: Effects on Our Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change: Effects on Our Energy Climate Change: Effects on Our Energy July 11, 2013 - 9:00am Addthis The Energy Sector's Vulnerabilities to Climatic Conditions x Impacts Due to... Increasing Temperatures Decreasing Water Availability Increasing Storms, Flooding, and Sea Level Rise See All Impacts Map locations are approximate. Find out more about this data here. Click and drag the map to read about each location. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of

  17. Questions about how plants die leads to climate change answers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Questions about how plants die leads to climate change answers Questions about how plants die leads to climate change answers Understanding mechanisms of mortality will provide important input to future climate forecasts. March 12, 2012 Tree in the desert The scientists' goal is to provide basic insights into questions such as how plants die, especially during drought. While the question of plant mortality is easy to conceptualize, it is difficult to study because of the spatial and temporal

  18. Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes Not surprisingly significant changes in climate leave their imprint on the landscape. During the last glacial maximum, ~20,000 years ago ice more than a mile thick covered vast portions of the continents. When a glacier retreats due to warmer or drier climate, it may expose boulders and fresh bedrock surfaces to cosmic rays entering earth's atmosphere from space. These newly exposed surfaces are often eroded by glacial scouring and erosion

  19. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2C target could potentially become out of reach.

  20. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening keynote of the Symbiosis Conference. PDF icon symbiosis_conference_hamilton.pdf More Documents & Publications The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase Feedstock Production Symbiosis

  1. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  2. The sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to climatic change: A simulation of the middle Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    A process-based ecosystem model, DEMETER, is used to simulate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to changes in climate. In this study, DEMETER is applied to the two following climatic regimes: (1) the modern observed climate and (2) a simulated mid-Holocene climate (6000 years before present). The mid-Holocene climate is simulated using the GENESIS global climate model, where shifts in the Earth`s orbital parameters result in warmer northern continents and enhanced monsoons in Asia, North Africa, and North America. DEMETER simulates large differences between modern and mid-Holocene vegetation cover: (1) mid-Holocene boreal forests extend farther poleward than present in much of Europe, Asia, and North America, and (2) mid-Holocene North African grasslands extend substantially farther north than present. The simulated patterns of mid-Holocene vegetation are consistent with many features of the paleobotanical record. Simulated mid-Holocene global net primary productivity is approximately 3% larger than present, largely due to the increase of boreal forest and tropical grasslands relative to tundra and desert. Global vegetation carbon is higher at 6 kyr B.P. compared to present by roughly the same amount (4%). Mid-Holocene global litter carbon is larger than present by 10%, while global soil carbon is approximately 1% less. Despite the regional changes in productivity and carbon storage the simulated total carbon storage potential of the terrestrial biosphere (not including changes in peat) does not change significantly between the two simulations. 53 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. MAP: How Climate Change Threatens America's Energy Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Read the report and explore the map above to learn how climate change can impact our energy sources and electricity infrastructure. We live in a rapidly changing world. The effects ...

  4. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  5. Improving models to predict phenological responses to global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-11-25

    The term phenology describes both the seasonal rhythms of plants and animals, and the study of these rhythms. Plant phenological processes, including, for example, when leaves emerge in the spring and change color in the autumn, are highly responsive to variation in weather (e.g. a warm vs. cold spring) as well as longer-term changes in climate (e.g. warming trends and changes in the timing and amount of rainfall). We conducted a study to investigate the phenological response of northern peatland communities to global change. Field work was conducted at the SPRUCE experiment in northern Minnesota, where we installed 10 digital cameras. Imagery from the cameras is being used to track shifts in plant phenology driven by elevated carbon dioxide and elevated temperature in the different SPRUCE experimental treatments. Camera imagery and derived products (“greenness”) is being posted in near-real time on a publicly available web page (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu/webcam/gallery/). The images will provide a permanent visual record of the progression of the experiment over the next 10 years. Integrated with other measurements collected as part of the SPRUCE program, this study is providing insight into the degree to which phenology may mediate future shifts in carbon uptake and storage by peatland ecosystems. In the future, these data will be used to develop improved models of vegetation phenology, which will be tested against ground observations collected by a local collaborator.

  6. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  7. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore » the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  8. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the boundary layer parameterization (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models.

  9. ARM - What is the ARM Climate Research Facility Doing About Global Warming?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WarmingWhat is the ARM Climate Research Facility Doing About Global Warming? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What is the ARM Climate Research Facility Doing About Global Warming? Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) scientists are studying the effects of clouds on weather

  10. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  11. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  12. What is the ARM Climate Research Facility: Is Global Warming a Real Bias or a Statistical Anomaly?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi; Sisterson, Douglas L.

    2010-03-10

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research national user facility. With multi-laboratory management of distributed facilities worldwide, the ACRF does not fit the mold of a traditional user facility located at a national laboratory. The ACRF provides the world's most comprehensive 24/7 observational capabilities for obtaining atmospheric data specifically for climate change research. Serving nearly 5,000 registered users from 15 federal and state agencies, 375 universities, and 67 countries, the ACRF Data Archive collects and delivers over 5 terabytes of data per month to its users. The ACRF users provide critical information about cloud formation processes, water vapor, and aerosols, and their influence on radiative transfer in the atmosphere. This information is used to improve global climate model predictions of climate change.

  13. DOE Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Change Technology Program Strategic Plan DOE Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan September 20, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Plan Outlines Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Development and Deployment of Advanced Technologies WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) Strategic Plan, which details measures to accelerate the development and reduce the cost of new and advanced

  14. PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Search for Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Science & Global Change Search for Staff Search for an ASGC staff member (Last, First) Search Search for staff member by Group View Alphabetical List of all ASGC Staff (may take a moment to load) Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change ASGC Home Our Research Facilities Measurement Capabilities Modeling Expertise Staff & Organization Search Publications Job Opportunities Seminar Series Frontiers in Global Change Science at PNNL Home Journal Cover Gallery Search Site Search

  15. ORNL Global Change and Developing Country Programs | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector Energy Website http:www.esd.ornl.goveessg References Global Change 1 "For more than twenty years, ORNL has been active in energy...

  16. Joint Global Change Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    solutions. Joint Institute staff bring decades of experience and expertise to bear in science, technology, economics, and policy. "The Joint Global Change Research Institute...

  17. ''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

    2003-05-09

    Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

  18. Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Kalendra, Eric

    2015-07-28

    Our purpose is to develop a methodology to quantify the impact of climate change on electric loads in the United States. We perform simple linear regression, assisted by geospatial smoothing, on paired temperature and load time-series to estimate the heating- and coolinginduced sensitivity to temperature across 300 transmission zones and 16 seasonal and diurnal time periods. The estimated load sensitivities can be coupled with climate scenarios to quantify the potential impact of climate change on load, with a primary application being long-term electricity scenarios. The method allows regional and seasonal differences in climate and load response to be reflected in the electricity scenarios. While the immediate product of this analysis was designed to mesh with the spatial and temporal resolution of a specific electricity model to enable climate change scenarios and analysis with that model, we also propose that the process could be applied for other models and purposes.

  19. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  20. The Mechanisms of Natural Variability and its Interaction with Anthropogenic Climate Change Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2015-02-01

    The project had two main components. The first concerns estimating the climate sensitivity in the presence of forcing uncertainty and natural variability. Climate sensitivity is the increase in the average surface temperature for a given increase in greenhouse gases, for example a doubling of carbon dioxide. We have provided new, probabilistic estimates of climate sensitivity using a simple climate model an the observed warming in the 20th century, in conjunction with ideas in data assimilation and parameter estimation developed in the engineering community. The estimates combine the uncertainty in the anthropogenic aerosols with the uncertainty arising because of natural variability. The second component concerns how the atmospheric circulation itself might change with anthropogenic global warming. We have shown that GCMs robustly predict an increase in the length scale of eddies, and we have also explored the dynamical mechanisms whereby there might be a shift in the latitude of the jet stream associated with anthropogenic warming. Such shifts in the jet might cause large changes in regional climate, potentially larger than the globally-averaged signal itself. We have also shown that the tropopause robustly increases in height with global warming, and that the Hadley Cell expands, and that the expansion of the Hadley Cell is correlated with the polewards movement of the mid-latitude jet.

  1. Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auffhammer, Maximilian; Hsiang, Solomon M.; Schlenker, Wolfram; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-06-28

    Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

  2. Framework for Probabilistic Projections of Energy-Relevant Streamflow Indicators under Climate Change Scenarios for the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, Thorsten; Mann, Michael; Crane, Robert

    2014-04-29

    This project focuses on uncertainty in streamflow forecasting under climate change conditions. The objective is to develop easy to use methodologies that can be applied across a range of river basins to estimate changes in water availability for realistic projections of climate change. There are three major components to the project: Empirical downscaling of regional climate change projections from a range of Global Climate Models; Developing a methodology to use present day information on the climate controls on the parameterizations in streamflow models to adjust the parameterizations under future climate conditions (a trading-space-for-time approach); and Demonstrating a bottom-up approach to establishing streamflow vulnerabilities to climate change. The results reinforce the need for downscaling of climate data for regional applications, and further demonstrates the challenges of using raw GCM data to make local projections. In addition, it reinforces the need to make projections across a range of global climate models. The project demonstrates the potential for improving streamflow forecasts by using model parameters that are adjusted for future climate conditions, but suggests that even with improved streamflow models and reduced climate uncertainty through the use of downscaled data, there is still large uncertainty is the streamflow projections. The most useful output from the project is the bottom-up vulnerability driven approach to examining possible climate and land use change impacts on streamflow. Here, we demonstrate an inexpensive and easy to apply methodology that uses Classification and Regression Trees (CART) to define the climate and environmental parameters space that can produce vulnerabilities in the system, and then feeds in the downscaled projections to determine the probability top transitioning to a vulnerable sate. Vulnerabilities, in this case, are defined by the end user.

  3. DOE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative (MIE) is hosting a webinar on Alaska impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  4. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  5. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  6. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  7. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  8. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  9. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  10. A deeper look at climate change and national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry; Backus, George A.; Romig, Alton Dale, Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Climate change is a long-term process that will trigger a range of multi-dimensional demographic, economic, geopolitical, and national security issues with many unknowns and significant uncertainties. At first glance, climate-change-related national security dimensions seem far removed from today's major national security threats. Yet climate change has already set in motion forces that will require U.S. attention and preparedness. The extent and uncertainty associated with these situations necessitate a move away from conventional security practices, toward a small but flexible portfolio of assets to maintain U.S. interests. Thoughtful action is required now if we are to acquire the capabilities, tools, systems, and institutions needed to meet U.S. national security requirements as they evolve with the emerging stresses and shifts of climate change.

  11. ITEP Webinar: Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The presentation will focus on climate-related health indicators and how the report highlights the far-reaching significance of these changes and their possible consequences for people, the environment, and society.

  12. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative (MIE) is hosting a webinar on Alaska impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  13. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  14. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southeast & Caribbean

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on southeast and Caribbean impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  15. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Midwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative (MIE) is hosting a webinar on Midwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  16. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southeast & Caribbean

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southeast and Caribbean impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring...

  17. Department of Energy Advances Commercialization of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will help us achieve the President's climate change initiative by confirming that the geology of North America is suitable for the permanent and safe storage of CO2 for millennia." ...

  18. COLLOQUIUM: Future Projections of Climate Change: An Update from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 28, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Future Projections of Climate Change: An Update from IPCC AR5IPCC AR5 WG1 Report Dr. Claudia Tebaldi NCAR I will...

  19. Rwanda-Developing a Strategic Climate Change Framework | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in a stronger position not only to face the twin challenges of climate change and poverty, but to take advantage of the opportunities presented by a low-carbon growth path in...

  20. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  1. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    guidebook assists planners working at the sub-national levels to identify and map the nature of current and future vulnerability to long-term climate change so that appropriate...

  2. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Northeast impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  3. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Northeast impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  4. Managing the Risks of Climate Change and Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosa, Eugene; Dietz, Tom; Moss, Richard H.; Atran, Scott; Moser, Susanne

    2012-04-07

    The article describes challenges to comparative risk assessment, a key approach for managing uncertainty in decision making, across diverse threats such as terrorism and climate change and argues new approaches will be particularly important in addressing decisions related to sustainability.

  5. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators

  6. President Barack Obama at UN Climate Change Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In his first address to the United Nations as Commander-in-Chief, President Obama addresses the pressing issue of climate change. The one-day UN summit brought together delegations from 90 nations.

  7. Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the surface ocean Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean You are ...

  8. Human choice and climate change. Volume 1: The societal framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; Science and decisionmaking; Population and climate change; Human needs and wants; Cultural discourses; Institutional frameworks for political action; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  9. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact: Hawaii & Pacific Islands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Hawaii and Pacific Islands impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  10. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Hawaii & Pacific Islands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Hawaii and Pacific Islands impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring...

  11. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Contaminated Sediment Remedies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet addresses remedies for contaminated sediment. It is intended to serve as an adaptation planning tool by (1) providing an overview of potential climate change vulnerabilities and (2)...

  12. President Barack Obama at UN Climate Change Summit

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Obama, Barack

    2013-05-29

    In his first address to the United Nations as Commander-in- Chief, President Obama addresses the pressing issue of climate change. The one-day UN summit brought together delegations from 90 nations. September 22, 2009 (Public Domain)

  13. Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature climate change features forest research Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of LANL scientist A. Park Williams and partners from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona and several other organizations. February 27, 2013 Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after

  14. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Future | Department of Energy Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future November 18, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy are helping states lead the way in an effort to promote low cost energy efficiency. More than 60 energy, environmental and state policy leaders from across the

  15. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediments and Related Deposits Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on archives that incorporate and preserve information about changes in temperature, precipitation, nutrients, vegetation, fire history, etc. The resolution and length of such paleoclimate/ecological records is dependent on the type of archive. Although much information is able to be determined

  16. Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesinger, M. E.

    2001-07-15

    During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

  17. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of LANL scientist A. Park Williams and partners from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona and several other organizations. February 27, 2013 Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after

  18. Report Outlines Promising Opportunities for Addressing Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Outlines Promising Opportunities for Addressing Climate Change For more information contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 email: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Nov. 15, 2000 - Researchers from five U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, including the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, have issued a major report that finds the United States can make impressive strides toward addressing climate change through smart policies and technologies. The report, "Scenarios for a

  19. Secretary Ernest J. Moniz's Written Testimony on Climate Change before

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power | Department of Energy Ernest J. Moniz's Written Testimony on Climate Change before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power Secretary Ernest J. Moniz's Written Testimony on Climate Change before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power September 18, 2013 - 12:46pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Chairmen Upton and

  20. New Biogas Opportunities Roadmap is Part of Climate Change Solution |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Biogas Opportunities Roadmap is Part of Climate Change Solution New Biogas Opportunities Roadmap is Part of Climate Change Solution August 1, 2014 - 11:39am Addthis Biogas -- a byproduct of anaerobic digestion or fermentation of materials like sewage, municipal waste, crops and manure -- currently provides enough renewable energy to power the equivalent of almost 70,000 average American homes. | Energy Department file photo. Biogas -- a byproduct of anaerobic digestion