National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for global change geophysical

  1. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  2. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  3. Global Change at Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    at Edinburgh | 2 The Global Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice and to the CarboEurope programme. Cryosphere: field & remote observations & experiments on glacial erosion Biodiversity and the carbon cycle in Peru 10 Radiation penetration in forest stands 12 Genetics and Past

  4. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 80, No. 39, September28, 1999, Pages 453-454, 457-458 In 1997 the American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Committee on Global Environmental Change proposed that AGU d~velop a position statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - dustrial period began has given rise to concern over potential resultant climate changes. The AGU Council are carbon dioxide (C02), methane (CH4), ni- trous oxide (N20), and chlorofluorocarbons Copyright 1999 and Whorl, 1998] has come largely from fossil fuel combustion and cement production. These sources amounled

  5. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  6. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume 51. April 1986. Number 4. GEOPHYSICS. P-SV wave propagation in heterogeneous medla: Velocity-stress ?nite-difference method. Jean Virieux*.

  7. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  8. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  9. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  10. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  11. Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

  12. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01

    impacts and responses to environmental change making it anhuman security or environmental change if the lecturer isReview: Global Environmental Change and Human Security By

  13. Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in Drosophila subobscura" Francisco in response to global warming. However, that conclusion is not adequately buttressed by their data, because that chromosomal inversion polymorphisms of Drosophila subobscura are evolving in response to global warming. (2

  14. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  15. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team : 1995/1996 Scientific Report February 1997 CERFACS ACTIVITY REPORT 1 #12; Contents 1 Climate Modelling) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2

  16. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  18. Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy Tyson Research Center and International Center et al. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice http://data, 2012 Tyson Research Center International Center for Advanced Research and Sustainability (I

  19. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  20. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global Warming vs. Climate Change 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global

  1. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training...

  2. 35.1 Introduction Flows.involving.phase.change.are.ubiquitous.in.geophysical.and.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    467 35.1 Introduction Flows.involving.phase.change.are.ubiquitous.in.geophysical.and. industrial.and.atmosphere.but.also.some.that.occur.in.water- saturated.soils,.in.magmatic.systems,.and.in.industrial.processes. 35.2 Principles Changes.of.phase,.from.and.associated.buoyancy.forces..The.importance.of.phase. change.to.a.given.flow.can.be.assessed.by.estimating.certain.key. dimensionless.parameters. 35

  3. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's research group. The seminar will present the development of our U.S. monitoring and forecasting systemFrontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Towards a global drought monitoring, forecasting, activities under the Group of Earth Observations (GEO) and the World Climate Research Programme have

  4. Global environmental change: Its nature and impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidore, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    This book is intended as an entry-level textbook on environmental science for nonscience majors. Twenty chapters address topics from historical geology and climatic change to population dynamics, land-use, water pollution, ozone depletion and biodiversity, global warming.

  5. Engineering change in global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}With increased public focus on global warming and in the wake of the intense heat waves, drought, fires, and super-hurricanes that occurred in 1988 and 1989, interest in geoengineering has surged,{close_quotes} says Stephen H. Schneider, professor of biological science at Stanford University in Stanford, California. One scheme set forth in a National Research Council report proposes using 16-inch naval guns to fire aerosol shells into the stratosphere in hopes of offsetting {open_quotes}the radiative effects of increasing carbon dioxide,{close_quotes} Schneider says. Schneider, however, would prefer that we {open_quotes}seek measures that can cure our global {open_quote}addiction{close_quote} to polluting practices.{close_quotes} Rather than playing God, he says we should {open_quotes}stick to being human and pursue problem - solving methods currently within our grasp.{close_quotes} Such strategies include efforts to promote energy efficiency and reduce our reliance on automobiles.

  6. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  7. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    . This applies both to gas extracted bythe petrochemical industries and to the methane which is naturallyreleased, and methane naturallyleaking from the seabed, could in future be detected using changes in acoustic signals from the seabed." Natural leaks of methane gas can be damaging to the environment because

  8. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  9. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

  10. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  11. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Short-lived Climate Pollutants: A Second Front in Climate, is not sufficient to ward off this near-term risk. Mitigation of four short-term climate warming pollutants has the Climate and Clean Air Coalition. The seminar will describe the recent scientific developments that led

  12. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is helping address the global challenge of climate change by providing critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects, preventing more than 25 million metric tons of CO2 emissions to date.

  13. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  14. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  15. National Institute for Global Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  16. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 17591 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: OCEANS, VOL. 118, 1759­1 , doi:10.1002/jgrc.20155, 2013 A three-dimensional eddy census of a high-resolution global ocean simulation Mark R. Petersen,1 Sean J. Williams,1,2 Mathew from a global ocean simulation with one-tenth degree resolution and a duration of 7 years. The census

  18. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  19. Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research: Annotated Bibliography Compiled by Ashton: Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research. The bibliography consists of an annotated collection of articles concerned with the application of GIS in global change research. These papers range from reviewed

  20. From global change science to action with social sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, C. P.; Mooney, Sian; Allen, D.; Beller-Simms, Nancy; Fish, T.; Grambsch, A.; Hohenstein, W.; Jacobs, Kathy; Kenney, Melissa A.; Lane, Meredith A.; Langner, L.; Larson, E.; McGinnis, D. L.; Moss, Richard H.; Nichols, L. G.; Nierenberg, Claudia; Seyller, E. A.; Stern, Paul; Winthrop, R.

    2014-08-01

    US efforts to integrate social and biophysical sciences to address the issue of global change exist within a wider movement to understand global change as a societal challenge and to inform policy. Insights from the social sciences can help transform global change research into action.

  1. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector 2002 DEER Conference...

  2. 173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) of the United Nations Environment Programme, and the US Global Change173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change World-wide monitoring of agricultural and other natural-resource ecosystems

  3. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  4. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  5. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  6. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Organization Contact Us Contact Us Home Operational Management Services Offices ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of...

  7. Global Change and Sustainability Center Spring Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    science. His research interests include sustainable development, Muslim and South Asian politicsGlobal Change and Sustainability Center Spring Seminar Series " Environment, Development & Security in the Age of Climate Change Adaptation

  8. Global environmental change: Modifying human contributions through education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 1995 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Science report concludes that evidence now available {open_quotes}points toward a discernible human influence on global climate{close_quotes}. Reductions in emissions will require changes in human behavior. Knowledge, often through education, is an important moderator of human environmental behavior. This study assessed whether gains in global environmental change knowledge would lead to changes in human behaviors that could be deemed environmentally responsible.

  9. GEOGRAPHY 288: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE 4 credits (or negotiable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    (GEC). Global environmental change has often been framed as an issue of the biophysical sciences, yet will explore these issues through perspectives from geography, political ecology, ecology, institutionalGEOGRAPHY 288: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE 4 credits (or negotiable) Winter 2007 Class: W 5:00PM-7

  10. Global Environmental Change 9 (1999) S1}S2 The global impact of climate change: a new assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Global Environmental Change 9 (1999) S1}S2 Viewpoint The global impact of climate change: a new assessment Martin Parry *, Nigel Arnell , Mike Hulme , Pim Martens , Robert Nicholls , Andrew White Jackson due to the sheer complexity of the issue and the state of science in impact assessment that is less

  11. Is climate change the greatest threat to global health?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Commentary Is climate change the greatest threat to global health? ANDREW PAPWORTH, MARK MASLIN for publication in October 2014 This commentary critically engages with the argument that climate change that although it is important to be aware of the risk that climate change presents, health status is caused

  12. Transient Floral Change and Rapid Global Warming at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, S. Kathleen

    #12;Transient Floral Change and Rapid Global Warming at the Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Scott L. Wing. Freeman3 Rapid global warming of 5- to 10-C during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) coincided shape and size suggest that climate warmed by È5-C during the PETM and that precipitation was low early

  13. Global Change and Sustainability Center Fall Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center Fall Seminar Series that mitigate negative effects of human activities and sustain ecosystems. Noted project focused on environmental sustainability and funded by a cooperative agreement

  14. Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 15:49 The latest...

  15. Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    drivers of population growth and socio-economic development to agricultural yield changes and alternative productivity and stable relationships with global food suppliers are important determinants of food security

  16. Game Changing Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclear PhysicsGE GlobalGetting&Tools »GambitI

  17. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns about rising energy demand and cost, diminishing oil reserves, and climate change, Central a critical analysis of this experience focusing on non-technical barriers to investment. Survey results America . Caribbean basin initiative . Trade and investment . Energy security Mitig Adapt Strateg Glob

  18. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Chasing a specter: Risk management for global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Riordan, T. ); Rayner, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Global environmental change is both a concept and a process that changes in meaning with scientific discovery, public concern, and political responsiveness. It is the relationship between the problems as perceived and the various institutions that help shape and adapt to such problems that defines global environmental change. There is a kind of race between scientific detective work and political adjustment to lessen the likely impacts that predictive science is trying to verify. Risk analysis, because of its capacity to recognize this relationship in many spheres of problem identification, can contribute to the political debate, mostly by proposing institutional redesign of the relationship among scientific research, public entry, and experimental readjustments to consensus formation and international action. This paper discusses the factors involved in global environmental change, the risk management involved, the holistic interpretation, and the environmental impacts. 21 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Global Change Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlant <SilverChange Associates Jump to:

  1. Malaria and global change: Insights, uncertainties and possible surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.H.; Steel, A.

    1996-12-31

    Malaria may change with global change. Indeed, global change may affect malaria risk and malaria epidemiology. Malaria risk may change in response to a greenhouse warming; malaria epidemiology, in response to the social, economic, and political developments which a greenhouse warming may trigger. To date, malaria receptivity and epidemiology futures have been explored within the context of equilibrium studies. Equilibrium studies of climate change postulate an equilibrium present climate (the starting point) and a doubled-carbon dioxide climate (the end point), simulate conditions in both instances, and compare the two. What happens while climate changes, i.e., between the starting point and the end point, is ignored. The present paper focuses on malaria receptivity and addresses what equilibrium studies miss, namely transient malaria dynamics.

  2. Global climate change: Social and economic research issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.; Snow, J.; Jacobson, H.

    1992-05-01

    This workshop was designed to bring together a group of scholars, primarily from the social sciences, to explore research that might help in dealing with global climate change. To illustrate the state of present understanding, it seemed useful to focus this workshop on three broad questions that are involved in coping with climate change. These are: (1) How can the anticipated economic costs and benefits of climate change be identified; (2) How can the impacts of climate change be adjusted to or avoided; (3) What previously studied models are available for institutional management of the global environment? The resulting discussions may (1) identify worthwhile avenues for further social science research, (2) help develop feedback for natural scientists about research information from this domain needed by social scientists, and (3) provide policymakers with the sort of relevant research information from the social science community that is currently available. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  3. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  4. Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    . Plants often shift carbon allocation belowground and the activities of mycorrhizal associates responding to global change is not well understood. We emphasize the need for more research in this emerging scientific disciplines and society. ª 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. * Corresponding

  5. Groundwater and global hydrological change current challenges and new insight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater and global hydrological change ­ current challenges and new insight R. TAYLOR1 , L Groundwater Resources Assessment Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands 11 Federal Institute for Geosciences, groundwater plays a critical role in enabling communities to adapt to freshwater shortages derived from low

  6. Z .Global and Planetary Change 20 1999 93123 Global sea level rise and glacial isostatic adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    adjustment W.R. Peltier ) Department of Physics, UniÕersity of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Z .rather recently Peltier and Tushingham, 1989 , it was not clearly;( )W.R. PeltierrGlobal and Planetary Change 20 1999 93­12394 Z .existed at that time e.g., Peltier

  7. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    woods are driven by climate change. Proc Natl Acad Sci USASE, Wallenstein MD. (2014). Climate change alters ecologicalresponse to global climate change. Phil Trans R Soc B Biol

  8. Temporal variation overshadows the response of leaf litter microbial communities to simulated global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    multi- ple experimental climate change drivers. Appl EnvironCEC (2003). Global Climate Change and California: Potential2008). The effects of climate change on plant phenology.

  9. The economics of long-term global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

  10. Climate change has been one of the major issues of global economic and social concerns in the past decade. To quantitatively predict global climate change, the Intergovernmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change has been one of the major issues of global economic and social concerns in the past decade. To quantitatively predict global climate change, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change-ocean models to project anthropogenically induced climate changes in the 21st century. The computer simulations

  11. Fossils in an era of globalization, technology and climate change: what has changed and what has to be changed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shikanai, Mitsuru

    This dissertation considers why inaction of people and governments against global and intergenerational injustice prompted by climate change and other environmental issues persists, and provides some theoretical and actual solutions for the problem...

  12. Global Analysis of Snow Cover Changes Using Google Earth Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coll, Jim

    2014-11-19

    Global Analysis of Snow Cover Changes Using MODIS and Google Earth Engine By: Jim Coll Importance of This Project • To establish whether or not Google Earth Engine is a viable platform for this type of “big data” analysis • Depending... is Google Earth Engine? Google Earth Engine is a massive data warehouse (2+ petabytes) of remote sensing imagery including all past Landsat and MODIS data. The platform supports JavaScript and Python analysis of these data, and performs the calculations...

  13. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The Effects of Changing Consumption established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy No. 64 August 2000 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

  14. (Meeting on human dimensions of global environmental change)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-12-18

    Traveler attended the meeting of the Standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change of the International Social Science Council (ISSC) and the Scientific Symposium organized by the Standing Committee. The purpose of the meeting and symposium was to discuss the Draft Framework and the Workplan of the Standing Committee prior to its presentation to the 1990 Congress of the ISSC on November 28--30, 1990. The meetings indicate that ORNL Global Environmental Studies Center is on the international leading edge of human dimensions research, except in the area of human dimensions data systems. This weakness could be rectified by close collaboration with the efforts of the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) in Michigan.

  15. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, H.P.

    1994-09-01

    This research is ultimately concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany CO2-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. This report concerns research conducted with funding from the Carbon Dioxide Research Program (now the Global Climate Change Program) of the US Department of Energy via grant no. DE-FG02-90ER61019 during the period 15 July 1990 - 14 July 1994. This was a three-year award, extended to a fourth year (15 July 1993 - 14 July 1994) via a no-cost extension. It is important to emphasize that this award has been renewed for an additional two years (15 July 1993 - 14 July 1995) via grant no. DE-FG03-93ER61646 (with the same title). Because the project was originally envisioned to be a five-year effort, many of the important results and conclusions will be available for the Final Report of that second award. This report therefore concerns mainly preliminary conclusions and a discussion of progress toward understanding the central hypothesis of the research.

  16. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbHFerrisFillmore CityGlobal Climate Change

  17. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  18. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPRMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Unemployment Effects of Climate Policy on the Science and Policy of Global Change is an organization for research, independent policy analysis

  19. US forests and global change - precolonization to the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1997-12-31

    The forests of the United States and manufacture of products from raw materials produced in the forests are significant for the international global economy and for amelioration of threatening global climate change. This paper explores the conditions of the forests as a result of changing anthropogenic influences, and how these conditions might impact on global change.

  20. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change What Should the Government Do analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research

  1. Nitrogen Deposition: A Component of Global Change Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norby, Richard J.

    1997-12-31

    The global cycles of carbon and nitrogen are being perturbed by human activities that increase the transfer from large pools of nonreactive forms of the elements to reactive forms that are essential to the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere. The cycles are closely linked at all scales, and global change analyses must consider carbon and nitrogen cycles together. The increasing amount of nitrogen originating from fossil fuel combustion and deposited to terrestrial ecosystems as nitrogen oxides could increase the capacity of ecosystems to sequester carbon thereby removing some of the excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and slowing the development of greenhouse warming. Several global and ecosystem models have calculated the amount of carbon sequestration that can be attributed to nitrogen deposition based on assumptions about the allocation of nitrogen among ecosystem components with different carbon-nitrogen ratios. They support the premise that nitrogen deposition is responsible for a an increasing terrestrial carbon sink since industrialization began, but there are large uncertainties related to the continued capacity of ecosystems to retain exogenous nitrogen. Whether terrestrial ecosystems continue to sequester additional carbon will depend in part on their response to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, which is widely thought to be constrained by limited nitrogen availability. Ecosystem models generally support the conclusion that the responses of ecosystems to increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide will be larger, and the range of possible responses will be wider, in ecosystems with increased nitrogen inputs originating as atmospheric deposition.

  2. Global Change Research: Summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Global Research Program in FY 1993. This publication describes all of the projects funded by the Environmental Sciences Division of DOE under annual contracts, grants, and interagency agreements in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; its 3-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than 1 year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: climate modeling, quantitative links, global carbon cycle, vegetation research, ocean research, economics of global climate change, education, information and integration, and NIGEC. Within these categories, the descriptions are grouped alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers.

  3. TRENDS 1991: A compendium of data on global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, T.A.; Sepanski, R.J.; Stoss, F.W.

    1991-12-01

    This document is a source of frequently used global-change data. This second issue of the Trends series expands the coverage of sites recording atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), and it updates records reported in the first issue. New data for other trace atmospheric gases have been included in this issue; historical data on nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}) from ice cores, modern records of atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12) and N{sub 2}O, and estimates of global estimates of CFC-11 and CFC-12. The estimates for global and national CO{sub 2} emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, the production of cement, and gas flaring have been revised and updated. Regional CO{sub 2} emission estimates have been added, and long-term temperature records have been updated and expanded. Data records are presented in four- to six-page formats, each dealing with a specific site, region, or emissions species. The data records include tables and graphs; discussion of methods for collecting, measuring, and reporting the data; trends in the data; and references to literature that provides further information. All data appearing in the document are available on digital media from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center.

  4. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, Patrick; Abdelaziz, Omar; Otanicar, Todd; Phelan, Bernadette; Prasher, Ravi; Taylor, Robert; Tyagi, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  5. Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

  6. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  7. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR and Policy of Global Change, MIT 3 AVL List GmbH, Graz, Austria 4 ECOFYS energy & environment, Energy Technologies Centre (ETZ), Nuremberg, Germany Abstract Future global climate projections are subject to large

  8. Political Polarization over Global Warming: Analyzing Twitter Data on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukthankar, Gita Reese

    Political Polarization over Global Warming: Analyzing Twitter Data on Climate Change Alireza/Democrats are more likely to ex- press personal concern about global warming than are self-identified conservatives

  9. Global Priority Conservation Areas in the Face of 21st Century Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junsheng; Lin, Xin; Chen, Anping; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ma, Keping; Bertzky, Monika; Ciais, Philippe; Kapos, Valerie; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin

    2013-01-24

    In an era when global biodiversity is increasingly impacted by rapidly changing climate, efforts to conserve global biodiversity may be compromised if we do not consider the uneven distribution of climate-induced threats. Here, via a novel...

  10. Local and Seasonal Effects in the U.S. of Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    2012-05-21

    Though the facts of global climate change are beyond doubt, there has been relatively limited information about its local consequences. Global climate models and their derivatives have provided often differing and unspecific ...

  11. Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large impacts on agri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Articles Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large (Dunbar et al.1994).Such changes in global climate patterns portend potentially large effects on both be crucial in the tropics, where most agriculture is in rain-fed systems and climate change has a potentially

  12. A DBMS Architecture for Global Change Research \\Lambda Nabil I. Hachem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Matthew

    A DBMS Architecture for Global Change Research \\Lambda Nabil I. Hachem Michael A. Gennert Matthew O to understand and predict global change. I. Introduction Conventional database management systems (DBMS) are and processed. By studying the history of change in particular areas, researchers are better able to form

  13. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy.S. annual residential energy consumption by a statistically significant 15% to 30MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Climate Change, Mortality

  14. Global Climate Change and Contaminants, a Call to Arms Not Yet Heard?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohr, Jason

    Global Climate Change and Contaminants, a Call to Arms Not Yet Heard? A consensus has existed from the mid2000s that climate change is occurring and is the result of anthropogenic causes (Oreskes 2004 (SETAC) to develop research on the potential interactions between global climate change (GCC

  15. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  16. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234 Course Syllabus: Fall 2014 that can be found at: https://catalog

  17. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    The implication of projected climate change for freshwaterand P. Martens, 2004. Climate change and malaria: analysisEra for Conservation: Review of Climate Change Adaptation

  18. Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist The Herald" and must reflect, at least in part, the climate system response to the increase in global warming. What if we wanted to prevent global warming. This is just doomsday speaking of the same type that he

  19. Forecasting changes in population genetic structure of alpine plants in response to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François, Olivier

    Forecasting changes in population genetic structure of alpine plants in response to global warming the European Alps, we applied this approach to 20 alpine plant species considering a global increase populations potentially adapted to warmer environments and other populations. While a global trend of movement

  20. Global warming and changes in risk of concurrent climate extremes: Insights from the 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    Global warming and changes in risk of concurrent climate extremes: Insights from the 2014 for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing, University of California, Irvine, California, USA Abstract Global warming The warming global climate has increased concurrent climatic extremes such as droughts and heat waves [Leonard

  1. Migration and Global Environmental DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    .....................................................................................................9 Cultural and information ecosystem services1 Migration and Global Environmental Change DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration .............................................................................................................................................5 Ecosystem services in low-lying coastal areas

  2. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  3. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change What to Expect from Sectoral Trading centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental.mit.edu / Printed on recycled paper #12;1 What to Expect from Sectoral Trading: A U.S.­China Example Claire Gavard

  4. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy issue, the uncertainties, and the economic and social implications of policy alternatives. Henry D and Policy of Global Change, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 4 Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska

  5. WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE of tools for quantitative policy analysis. As policy analysts have turned to the consideration of climate and other problems of global change, they have found it natural to employ such now standard tools as utility

  6. RESEARCH INITIATIVE 15: Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    RESEARCH INITIATIVE 15: Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research REPORT OF THE FIRST, for their assistance with the conference. #12;2 #12;3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Background Research Initiative 15" Global change research communities The issues NCGIA plans for the initiative Data Issues Data quality

  7. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for research, independent policy analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate

  8. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    similar to those in the U.S. wind atlas developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NRELMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Characterization of Wind Power established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy

  9. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Rising per capita income plays an important role in lower energy intensity. Higher energy prices alsoMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Energy Conservation in the United centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental

  10. Defining a changing world: the discourse of globalization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Gillian

    2004-09-30

    Globalization has, within academic, political and business circles alike, become a prominent buzzword of the past decade, conjuring a diversity of associations, connotations and attendant mythologies. The literature devoted to the issue...

  11. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The Community Atmosphere Model...

  12. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  13. Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [2]. Increasingly, climate change research is data intensive@mcs.anl.gov, bernholdtde@ornl.gov Abstract. The recent release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 4th

  14. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  15. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a changing and uncertain climate. Frontiers in Ecology andother/ipcc_tar/? src=/climate/ipcc_tar/wg2/index.htm.The implication of projected climate change for freshwater

  16. Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    1 Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis of how, Andrew J. Dougill and Piers M. Forster August 2010 Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 29 #12;2 The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) was established

  17. GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS OF SQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goubau, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    W. M. , and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Zimmerman, J. : Second1976). Sims, W. K. :, Geophysics E. , physics~. and Ketchen,Geo- and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Gamble, T. D. , Goubau, W.

  18. The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory science institutes; it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory of the University of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission. We address the problem within four specific disciplines: · Geophysics · Global

  19. "The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their field at the ESA 2010 General Meeting. However, more importantly, the session will provide for a broad range of interests for ecosystem ecologists, theoretical ecologists, and global change biologists, and will foster communication between these groups to generate informative microbial community data in the future.

  20. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmosphericConceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar will introduce a very simple, globally resolved energy bal- ance (GREB) model, which is capable of simulating

  1. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is driven primarily by a world oil price that in the year 2100 is over 4.5 times the price in the year 2000. In the scenarios of stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations, the global biomass energy production increasesMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Biomass Energy and Competition

  2. The change in oceanic O2 inventory associated with recent global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph

    The change in oceanic O2 inventory associated with recent global warming Ralph F. Keeling, 2002 (received for review September 24, 2001) Oceans general circulation models predict that global warming may cause a decrease in the oceanic O2 inventory and an associated O2 outgassing. An independent

  3. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The EU's Emissions Trading Scheme on recycled paper #12;1 The EU's Emissions Trading Scheme: A Prototype Global System? Denny Ellerman* Abstract The European Union's Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is the world's first multinational cap- and-trade system

  4. Tectonics, global changes in sea level and their relationship to stratigraphical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Tectonics, global changes in sea level and their relationship to stratigraphical sequences. Keywords: Sea level; Stratigraphy; Tectonics The development of stratigraphical modelling techni- ques have al., 1982) have focussed on modelling the stratigraphy of rifted Atlantic-type continental margin

  5. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  6. Climate Change Influences on Global Distributions of Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M.; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-01-01

    This packet presents raster data files that accompany a manuscript submitted for publication to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, titled “Climate Change Influences on Global Vector Distributions for Dengue ...

  7. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  8. Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbHFerrisFillmore CityGlobal Climate

  9. Interactive chemistry and climate models in global change studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Continually increasing atmospheric concentrations of radiatively important chemical species such as CO2, CH4, N2O, tropospheric O3, and certain halocarbons most likely will cause future climate changes, which could in turn ...

  10. CHANGES TO THE GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS PROGRAMS FOR 2015-16 Feb 26, 2015 In 2015-16, the third and fourth years of the new Geology program will be introduced. This means that those who are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    CHANGES TO THE GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS PROGRAMS FOR 2015-16 Feb 26, 2015 In 2015-16, the third and fourth years of the new Geology program will be introduced. This means that those who are third-year geology students in 2015-16 (i.e., those who have completed the second year of their program this year

  11. Global Climate Change Response Program: Potential regional impacts of global warming on precipitation in the western United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leverson, V.

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to build upon a previous Global Climate Change Response Program investigation in which an initial `first guess` climate change scenario was derived for the Western United States. Using the scenario`s hypothesized northward shift in the mean wintertime storm track, historical upper-air patterns in the atmosphere were searched to identify winter months (December, January, or February) that would serve as appropriate global warming analogues (GWA). Contour charts were generated of four geopotential height parameters. Specific pattern configurations of the four parameters were identified that reflected the altered storm track pattern, and guidelines for selecting suitable analogues based on the configurations were developed. Monthly mean precipitation values for the GWA months at three climatological divisions in Western Montana, northern Utah, and east central Arizona were compared with median values for the 1946-89 period to determine if any significant differences existed.

  12. Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:Change | Open EnergyChange: Risk to

  13. Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:Change | Open Energy

  14. Revision of the global carbon budget due to changing air-sea oxygen fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    -derived relationship between changes in atmospheric O2/N2 due to oceanic outgassing and heat fluxes to estimate ocean O2 outgassing. The inferred terrestrial carbon sink for the 1990s is reduced by a factor of two: global carbon budget, changes in ocean heat content, oceanic oxygen outgassing, ocean and land sinks

  15. Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean Bruce Buffett of methane clathrate in marine sediments, and use it to predict the sensitivity of the steady-state methane inventory to changes in the deep ocean. The methane inventory is determined by binning the seafloor area

  16. Global Change II Water is central to life on Earth. Energy is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Lectures Today's state of global energy oil, gas, coal Alternatives to fossil fuels renewables, nuclear only change from type to type. Second Law of Thermodynamics: Increasing Entropy Changes always occur molecular bonds is called CHEMICAL ENERGY. Choices: Types of Energy #12;Human Use of Energy Before

  17. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " in Climate Policy: Should We Wait for More Data? Mort D. Webster Report No. 67 October 2000 #12;The MIT Joint: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research-profit organizations. To inform processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs

  18. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  19. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  20. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  1. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  2. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:Change | Open Energy Information

  3. Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechowicz, Martin J.

    Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental change. Wiley, London. Phenology Martin J. Lechowicz Department of Biology McGill University Montréal, Québec, CANADA Phenology

  4. Does the location of a company’s global headquarters have an influence on its climate change awareness? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zao

    This paper studies whether the location of a company’s global headquarters has an influence on its climate change awareness. The global headquarters hosting business elites from multinational companies are the surrogate ...

  5. An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    2012-06-18

    This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

  6. Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

    2013-04-01

    Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

  7. The dilemma of fossil fuel use and global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanghvi, M.K. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The use of fossil fuels and relationship to climate change is discussed. As the use of fossil fuels has grown, the problems of protecting the environment and human health and safety have also grown, providing a continuing challenge to technological and managerial innovation. Today that challenge is to control atmospheric emissions from combustion, particularly those emissions that cause acidic deposition, urban pollution, and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Technology for reducing acidic deposition is available and needs only to be adopted, and the remedies for urban pollution are being developed and tested. How effective or expensive these will be remains to be determined. The control of emissions of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}, seems possible only be reducing the total amounts of fossil fuels used worldwide, and by substituting efficient natural gas technologies for coal. Long before physical depletion forces the transition away from fossil fuels, it is at least plausible and even likely that the greenhouse effect will impose a show-stopping constraint. If such a transition were soon to be necessary, the costs would be very high because substitute energy sources are either limited or expensive or undesirable for other reasons. Furthermore, the costs would be unevenly felt and would be more oppressive for developing nations because they would be least able to pay and, on average, their use rates of fossil fuels are growing much faster than those of many industrialized countries. It is prudent, therefore, to try to manage the use of fossil fuels as if a greenhouse constraint is an important possibility.

  8. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 00, M 0, 2001 Positive feedback between future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    to drive both terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle models. These two models allow one to translate an climate change and the carbon cycle Pierre Friedlingstein, Laurent Bopp, Philippe Ciais, IPSL/LSCE, CE and the carbon cycle. Climate change reduces land and ocean uptake of CO2 , respectively by 54% and 35% at 4 × CO

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 Positive feedback between future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    to drive both terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle models. These two models allow one to translate an climate change and the carbon cycle Pierre Friedlingstein, Laurent Bopp, Philippe Ciais, IPSL/LSCE, CE system and the carbon cycle. Climate change reduces land and ocean uptake of CO2, respectively by 54

  10. Future global environmental changes: Comparison with past and present rates of change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, K.L. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Quantification of past and present rates of vegetation change provides a yardstick for the evaluation of future rates of change. Holocene and post-settlement rates of vegetation change were measured at Channel Islands and Capitol Reef National Parks, and at Indiana Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores, using various paleoecological proxy data. Vegetation changes were quantified using several multivariate ordination techniques. Comparison of past vegetation changes due to climatic shifts, plant succession, and plant migration, with ongoing changes due to grazing, logging, exotic species invasions, and modified fire regimes, demonstrates that plant communities are presently suffering rates of change which are unprecedented in their severity for the Last 5000 years. The climatic warming projected for the next 50 years will exacerbate these ongoing changes, but win only be one of many variables operating in the unplanned experimental redesign our natural ecosystems.

  11. Global Climate Change Policy A significant proportion of scientific opinion, based on both empirical data and large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Change Policy A significant proportion of scientific opinion, based on both of climate change are more uncertain. Global models seem to agree that Northwest temperatures will be higher of climate change on the hydropower system are discussed in Appendix N. Nationwide, the electric power system

  12. National Environmental Health Association position on global climate change adopted July 2, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radtke, T.; Gist, G.L.; Wittkopf, T.E.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) supports the precept that anthropogenic sources, specifically greenhouse gases, are responsible for a significant portion of the measured change in global climate. Further, NEHA supports the concept of an association between global warming and an increased risk to public health. Reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere will benefit human health. This position paper reviews current information on the status of global climate change with particular emphasis on the implications for environmental and public health. It is intended to be used as a basis from which environmental and public health practitioners and colleagues in related fields can initiate discussions with policy makers at all levels -- local, state, national, and worldwide.

  13. Global Environmental Change 18 (2008) 2637 The new climate discourse: Alarmist or alarming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Global Environmental Change 18 (2008) 26­37 The new climate discourse: Alarmist or alarming? James breakdown in response to sustained warming. Whether this rate is fast or slow, the amount of time available of warming required and the inertia of the climate and energy systems. A new discourse is emerging which

  14. National Institute for Global Environmental Change, July 1, 1994-- June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This document contains the report from the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the period July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995. Separate sections for the Great Plains, Midwestern, Norhteast, South Central, Southeast and Western regions are present. Each section contains project descriptions and abstracts for projects managed by the respective regional offices.

  15. UCIrvineEnvironmentInstitute: GlobalChange,Energy,andSustainableResources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UCIrvineEnvironmentInstitute: GlobalChange,Energy,andSustainableResources 2010SustainabilityScienceTeam 2010SSTCohort_pics.docx.8/6/10 Alexis Hickman School of Social Ecology Department: Planning, Policy & Design Adviser: Joe DiMento Concentration: Urban & Community Development hickmana@uci.edu Joe Horwath

  16. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental issue, the uncertainties, and the economic and social implications of policy alternatives. Titles, and Alaska are the major CH4 regional sources to the atmosphere; responsible for 64%, 11%, and 7

  17. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental in the formulation of a cost-effective response. To provide improved facilities for addressing their role, we develop (CGE) model of the world economy. The calculation is consistent with underlying economic production

  18. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Emissions Trading to Reduce Greenhouse://mit.edu/globalchange/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Emissions Trading to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States, allowances acquired from foreign emissions trading systems, and from a special incentive program

  19. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Is International Emissions Trading://mit.edu/globalchange/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Is International Emissions Trading Always Beneficial? M. Babikerab , J with the emission targets. However, we show that international emission trading could be welfare decreasing under

  20. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The Value of Emissions Trading Mort paper #12;The Value of Emissions Trading Mort Webster, Sergey Paltsev and John Reilly Abstract This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here

  1. National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new "low carbon" and "climate resilient" energy system. It will emphasize putting ideas into action - moving forward on policy and practice.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Global Change Fellowships, 1991-2006: Participant Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2006-09-01

    This report provides information on the impact of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs supporting graduate study related to global change. The information was obtained from former fellows in the two programs, and the report examines their subsequent careers and the benefits of program participation.

  3. The Global Economy and Changes in the Determinants of Cross-National Income Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa M.

    1999-04-01

    economic changes,stemming from the collapse of the Bretton Woods system in 1971 and the OPEC oil crisis in 1973 and 1974, occurred in the global economy. Data from two cohorts of countries are used to test these theories. The first cohort contains thirty...

  4. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Russia's Natural Gas Export Potential.mit.edu / Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Russia's Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050 Sergey Paltsev Abstract a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy

  5. .Industrial Ecology and Global Change R. SOCOLOW, C. ANDREV/S, F. BERKHOUT, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Management and Science 261 SusanAnderson 19. Industrial Activity and Metals Emissions 277 Jerome Nriagu 20 IN FIRMS 23. Introduction 331 The Editors 24. Product Life-Cycle Management to Replace Waste Management 335--- .Industrial Ecology and Global Change Edited by R. SOCOLOW, C. ANDREV/S, F. BERKHOUT, and V

  6. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Climatic Impacts and Reliability of Very Large-Scale Wind Farms such as wind energy. The widespread availability of wind power has fueled legitimate interest in this renewable

  7. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in China Kira Matus, Kyung-Min Nam, Noelle E. Selin, Lok N. Lamsal, John M. Reilly and Sergey Paltsev established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy analysis need to be related to the economic, technological, and political forces that drive emissions

  8. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emissions taxes. Using a stylized energy-economic model, we analyze the impact of BCAs for alternative Adjustments under Alternative Producer Responses Niven Winchester Report No. 192 February 2011 #12;The MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research

  9. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed economy in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We

  10. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed Pacific Islands in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We develop

  11. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Russia's Role in the Kyoto Protocol, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate://mit.edu/globalchange/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Russia's Role in the Kyoto Protocol A. Bernarda , S. Paltsevb , J. Reillyb

  12. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbonMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Andrei P. Sokolov, David W

  13. Women Changing Africa: Barnard's Third Annual Global Symposium Johannesburg, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Women Changing Africa: Barnard's Third Annual Global Symposium Johannesburg, South Africa March Banking Division, Development Bank of Southern Africa It really is a tremendous honor to welcome you all to South Africa and to this very special symposium. We have been incredibly honored to see the guest list

  14. Women Changing Africa: Barnard's Third Annual Global Symposium Johannesburg, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Women Changing Africa: Barnard's Third Annual Global Symposium Johannesburg, South Africa March in South Africa. She, in her key role, saw to it that the World Cup was a smoothly run success and let me of the franchise at Coca Cola, South Africa. She has many times been honoured for her talents in advertising

  15. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , on balance increasing its role from present levels. The shale gas resource is a major contributor including the scale and cost of gas resources, the costs of competing technologies, the patternMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The Future of U.S. Natural Gas

  16. Impacts of Global Change on Diseases of Agricultural Crops and Forest Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5502, USA. 5 Natural Resources on Climate Change projects rising levels of greenhouse gas and global temperature. The well-known dependence on pathogens have recently been shown in literature linking pathogen abundance to atmospheric composition. Past

  17. CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change A White Paper Gas R&D Programme; Jefferson Tester, MIT Energy Laboratory; and Edward Winter, Burns and Roe. Helpful production), Klaus Lackner of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (carbonate storage) and Meyer Steinberg

  18. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON THE PHENOLOGY AND YIELD OF MAIZE IN VENEZUELA *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON THE PHENOLOGY AND YIELD OF MAIZE IN VENEZUELA de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mdrida 5101, Venezuela 21nstitute of Applied Sciences, Venezuela 4Centro de Estudios Avanzados del Clima Tropical (CEACT), Ministerio deI Ambiente y de los

  19. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to economic viability affects the nation's energy outlook and the expected role of natural gas in climate, the other using price to achieve a 50% emissions reduction. The shale gas is shown both to benefitMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change The Influence of Shale Gas on U

  20. Soil microbial responses to fire and interacting global change factors in a California annual grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    and ecosystem control. Regional and global climate changes that affect aboveground biomass will alter fire such as annual grasslands. We examined the effects of a low- severity fire on microbial biomass and specific-deposition, precipitation and CO2) on plant biomass and soil microbial communities for three growing seasons after fire. Our

  1. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Energy Scenarios for East Asia: 2005 paper #12;1 Energy Scenarios for East Asia: 2005­2025* Sergey Paltsev and John Reilly Abstract We describe several scenarios for economic development and energy use in East Asia based on the MIT Emissions

  2. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Future United States Energy Security paper #12;1 Future United States Energy Security Concerns John Deutch Department of Chemistry the connection between energy and security, especially how the energy security issues that we face in the future

  3. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  4. Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER, YUQING WANG, AND KEVIN HAMILTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER The influence of global warming on the climatology of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin Model version 2 (CCSM2) coupled global climate model. The regional model is first tested in 10 yr

  5. WHAT TO DO ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? Slowing the rate of carbon burning won't stop global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    WHAT TO DO ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? #12;Slowing the rate of carbon burning won't stop global warming: most CO2 stays in the air over a century, though individual molecules come and go. Global warming. But we need to research it -- starting now. If global warming gets bad, public opinion may suddently flip

  6. Water Resources Challenges in the Next Decade and Beyond - Global Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke

    2008-05-01

    One of the most pressing issues facing water resources professionals in the next decade is “Global Change” and its impacts on humans and the environment. Global change research focuses on the anthropogenic aspects of climate change, land use change, water resources development and urbanization. Global change, at its root, is driven by two major factors; first, the overall size and growth of the human population, and second, by a combination of our life styles, our economies and technology development. Arguably, much of the success associated with human survival and prosperity has been related to our ability to control and utilize water resources to our benefit. However, while such development has helped extend human longevity, health and prosperity, our activities have greatly altered the earth’s climate and land and water resources. The hydrological and biological capacity of the earth must be shared by all living creatures. The challenges for water resources professionals in the next decade and beyond are to limit our population growth, to moderate our life styles and economies, and to develop technologies that will provide for our human needs, yet protect and maintain the earth’s environment for all current and future inhabitants.

  7. Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2006-05-01

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  8. Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2005-04-15

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  9. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21

    change management issues in local policy making have remained a research rhetoric and have not yet translated into planning action. This gap between planning research and practice is probably due to lack of evidence based research on this issue...

  10. Coordinated Approaches to Quantify Long-Term Ecosystem Dynamics in Response to Global Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Many serious ecosystem consequences of climate change will take decades or even 50 centuries to emerge. Long-term ecological responses to global change are strongly regulated by 51 slow processes, such as changes in species composition, carbon dynamics in soil and by long-52 lived plants, and accumulation of nutrient capitals. Understanding and predicting these processes 53 requires experiments on decadal time scales. But decadal experiments by themselves may not be 54 adequate because many of the slow processes have characteristic time scales much longer than 55 experiments can be maintained. This article promotes a coordinated approach that combines 56 long-term, large-scale global change experiments with process studies and modeling. Long-term 57 global change manipulative experiments, especially in high-priority ecosystems such as tropical 58 forests and high-latitude regions, are essential to maximize information gain concerning future 59 states of the earth system. The long-term experiments should be conducted in tandem with 60 complementary process studies, such as those using model ecosystems, species replacements, 61 laboratory incubations, isotope tracers, and greenhouse facilities. Models are essential to 62 assimilate data from long-term experiments and process studies together with information from 63 long-term observations, surveys, and space-for-time studies along environmental and biological 64 gradients. Future research programs with coordinated long-term experiments, process studies, 65 and modeling have the potential to be the most effective strategy to gain the best information on 66 long-term ecosystem dynamics in response to global change. 67 68

  11. Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 the effect on China's ozone air quality from 2000-2050 global15 changes in climate and anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean

  12. What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global underestimate the response to solar variations, then there is a potential for a reduction in solar activity will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface temperature

  13. Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2009-08-01

    Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

  14. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  15. Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    1996-01-01

    Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy. The integrated carbon sequestration in 1994 was 2.1 t C ha-l y-l with a 90% confidence interval due to sampling an overall uncertainty on the annual carbon sequestration in 1994 of --0.3to +0.8 t C ha-l y-l. Keywords

  16. Project title: Global environmental change: biomineral proxies of ocean chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10

    for tomato plants. Tyndall conference was a brainstorming session, tables many farfetched ideas for solving with CO2 problem. Carbon Sequestration: Mining Cos. Geological Cos. Auto industry Schlumberger, BP. PIs want to hold a followup conference in a... ;objective met#7;objective changed#7;#7;1#7;The oceans play a central role in modulating the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Indicators of the chemistry of past oceans and the variation of global climate over Earth history are locked up...

  17. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  18. Modeling U.S. Energy Use Changes with Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Erickson III, David J; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L

    2006-09-01

    Using a general circulation model of Earth climate (PCM-IBIS) to drive an energy use model (DD-NEMS), we calculated the energy use changes for each year from 2003-2025 for the nine U.S. Census regions. We used five scenarios: 1) a reference with no change in temperatures from the 1970-2003 average, 2) a gradual 1 F rise in temperature by 2025, 3) a gradual 3 F rise by 2025, 4) a climate simulation with low temperature response to CO2 doubling in the atmosphere, and 5) a climate simulation with a more extreme response. The low-?T scenario had a cumulative reduction in energy of 2.1 Quads but an increase in cost of $14.8 billion. The northern states had reductions in cost over the entire period, but most other regions had increases in costs because increases in cooling costs outweighed reductions in heating and other energy uses. Higher temperature sensitivity resulted in increased warming, especially in the winter months. Because heating needs decreased, total energy requirements declined by a cumulative 4.2 Quads. However, total cost still increased $6.1 billion and carbon emissions still rose as coal-based electricity for cooling needs grew.

  19. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  20. Marine Geophysics: A Navy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shor, Elizabeth N; Ebrahimi, Carolyn L

    1987-01-01

    electrical polarization. Geophysics 22:660-687. Vacquier,Raitt, R. W. 1964. Geophysics of the South Pacific.Research in Geophysics 2:223-241. Francis, T. J. G. , and R.

  1. GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook - 1 · Geology & Geophysics Core Values - 2 · A Message from the Graduate Advisor - 3 · Department Organizations - 60 · Departmental Executive Committee - 61 · Geology& Geophysics Development Advisory Council

  2. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  3. The role of moisture transport between ground and atmosphere in global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rind, D.; Rosenzweig, C.; Stieglitz, M.

    1997-12-31

    Projections of the effect of climate change on future water availability are examined by reviewing the formulations used to calculate moisture transport between the ground and the atmosphere. General circulation models and climate change impact models have substantially different formulations for evapotranspiration, so their projections of future water availability often disagree, even though they use the same temperature and precipitation forecasts. General circulation models forecast little change in tropical and subtropical water availability, while impact models show severe water and agricultural shortages. A comparison of observations and modeling techniques shows that the parameterizations in general circulation models likely lead to an underestimate of the impacts of global warming on soil moisture and vegetation. Such errors would crucially affect the temperature and precipitation forecasts used in impact models. Some impact model evaporation formulations are probably more appropriate than those in general circulation models, but important questions remain. More observations are needed, especially in the vicinity of forests, to determine appropriate parameterizations.

  4. Gene expression profiling--Opening the black box of plant ecosystem responses to global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leakey, A.D.B.; Ainsworth, E.A.; Bernard, S.M.; Markelz, R.J.C.; Ort, D.R.; Placella, S.A.P.; Rogers, A.; Smith, M.D.; Sudderth, E.A.; Weston, D.J.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Yuan, S.

    2009-11-01

    The use of genomic techniques to address ecological questions is emerging as the field of genomic ecology. Experimentation under environmentally realistic conditions to investigate the molecular response of plants to meaningful changes in growth conditions and ecological interactions is the defining feature of genomic ecology. Since the impact of global change factors on plant performance are mediated by direct effects at the molecular, biochemical and physiological scales, gene expression analysis promises important advances in understanding factors that have previously been consigned to the 'black box' of unknown mechanism. Various tools and approaches are available for assessing gene expression in model and non-model species as part of global change biology studies. Each approach has its own unique advantages and constraints. A first generation of genomic ecology studies in managed ecosystems and mesocosms have provided a testbed for the approach and have begun to reveal how the experimental design and data analysis of gene expression studies can be tailored for use in an ecological context.

  5. Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone in the United States Shiliang Wu,1 Loretta J. Mickley,1 Daniel J. Jacob,1 David Rind) on the global tropospheric ozone budget and on the policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone in the United States

  6. Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new ...

  7. 15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

  8. 15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

  9. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  10. Managing the global commons decision making and conflict resolution in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S. ); Naegeli, W.; Lund, P. )

    1990-07-01

    A workshop was convened to develop a better understanding of decision-making matters concerning management of the global commons and to resolve conflicts in response to climate change. This workshop report does not provide a narrative of the proceedings. The workshop program is included, as are the abstracts of the papers that were presented. Only the introductory paper on social science research by William Riebsame and the closing summary by Richard Rockwell are reprinted here. This brief report focuses instead on the deliberations of the working groups that developed during the workshop. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  12. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  13. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  14. GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    W HAT IS GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.] In applied geophysics we inject a signal into the ground and record how the ground changes that signal as it passes://duke.usask.ca~merriam/geo_phys/ Rewarding careers are possible in exploration and environmental geophysics. Graduates of the U of S qualify

  15. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  16. Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2013-01-01

    Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of WritingMcKibben, Bill, ed. The Global Warming Reader: A Century ofrecord of no action on global warming. Those who have done

  17. The Role of Knowledge in Global Climate Change Governance: Modes of Legitimation in Tuvalu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazrus, Heather

    2005-01-01

    Local  and  global  environmental  governance.  pp335?350.  Local and global  environmental governance.  pp1?31.  Local and global environmental governance.   pp103?126.  

  18. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  19. Conservation priorities under global change : protected areas, threatened biodiversity and research trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tien Ming

    2011-01-01

    global protected area governance, 1992-2002. Environmentalgovernance and wealth? Shortfalls in the environmental coverage of terrestrial reserve networks under global

  20. Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa-Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell's physiological state and various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa- tures Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell cancer types. Less is known about the underlying biological processes, or relationships between different cancer types with respect to these changes. While each specific cancer type has a set of unique

  1. Preprint Downscaling Climate Change Salath 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salathé Jr., Eric P.

    statistics to streamflow computed from the observed data. Downscaled climate-change scenarios fromPreprint Downscaling Climate Change ­ Salathé 02/02/2005 Downscaling Simulations of future Global Climate with Application to Hydrologic Modeling Eric P. Salathé Jr. Center for Science in the Earth System

  2. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  3. ENV/ERS 467/667 Regional and Global Issues in Environmental & Resource Sciences Spring 2005 Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    ) Socio-economic futures in climate change impact assessment: using scenarios as "learning machines synchronous changes in climate. Quaternary Research 56:289-298. Gruber N, Keeling CD, Bates NR (2002

  4. Trends `91: A compendium of data on global change---highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, T.A.; Sepanski, R.J.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-03-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been prompted to produce the series Trends, a concise inventory of data in response to heightened concern about global environmental issues, in particular climate changes induced by the greenhouse effect. This report contains extracts from Trends `91 to illustrate the content, style, and presentation of data contained in the full 700-page report. This report includes a listing of the investigators contributing data for Trends `91. In addition, it contains the abstract, foreword, and acknowledgments, as well as the introduction and a sample data record from each of the reports`s five chapters. The chapters are ``Atmospheric CO{sub 2},`` ``Atmospheric CH{sub 4},`` ``Other Trace Gases,`` ``CO{sub 2} Emissions,`` and ``Temperature.`` Appendix A provides information about CDIAC and its activities related to global environmental issues. Appendix B lists the contents of the full report. An order form for obtaining a free copy of Trends `91 is found in Appendix C.

  5. Trends '91: A compendium of data on global change---highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, T.A.; Sepanski, R.J.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-03-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been prompted to produce the series Trends, a concise inventory of data in response to heightened concern about global environmental issues, in particular climate changes induced by the greenhouse effect. This report contains extracts from Trends '91 to illustrate the content, style, and presentation of data contained in the full 700-page report. This report includes a listing of the investigators contributing data for Trends '91. In addition, it contains the abstract, foreword, and acknowledgments, as well as the introduction and a sample data record from each of the reports's five chapters. The chapters are Atmospheric CO[sub 2],'' Atmospheric CH[sub 4],'' Other Trace Gases,'' CO[sub 2] Emissions,'' and Temperature.'' Appendix A provides information about CDIAC and its activities related to global environmental issues. Appendix B lists the contents of the full report. An order form for obtaining a free copy of Trends '91 is found in Appendix C.

  6. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  7. International potential of IGCC technology for use in reducing global warming and climate change emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    High efficiency advanced coal-based technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) that can assist in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions which contribute to Global Warming and Climate Change are becoming commercially available. U-GAS is an advanced gasification technology that can be used in many applications to convert coal in a high efficiency manner that will reduce the total amount of CO{sub 2} produced by requiring less coal-based fuel per unit of energy output. This paper will focus on the status of the installation and performance of the IGT U-GAS gasifiers which were installed at the Shanghai Cooking and Chemical Plant General located in Shanghai, China. Its use in future IGCC project for the production of power and the benefits of IGCC in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through its high efficiency operation will be discussed.

  8. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  9. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  10. Evaluation of Global Monsoon Precipitation Changes based on Five Reanalysis Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Renping; Zhou, Tianjun; Qian, Yun

    2014-02-01

    With the motivation to identify whether or not a reasonably simulated atmospheric circulation would necessarily lead to a successful reproduction of monsoon precipitation, the performances of five sets of reanalysis data (NCEP2, ERA40, JRA25, ERA-Interim and MERRA) in reproducing the climatology, interannual variation and long-term trend of global monsoon (GM) precipitation are comprehensively evaluated. In order to better understand the variability and long-term trend of GM precipitation, we also examined the major components of water budget, including evaporation, water vapor convergence and the change in local water vapor storage, based on five reanalysis datasets. The results show that all five reanalysis data reasonably reproduce the climatology of GM precipitation. The ERA-Interim (NCEP2) shows the highest (lowest) skill among the five datasets. The observed GM precipitation shows an increasing tendency during 1979-2001 along with a strong interannual variability, which is reasonably reproduced by the five sets of reanalysis data. The observed increasing trend of GM precipitation is dominated by the contribution from the North African, North American and Australian monsoons. All five data fail in reproducing the increasing tendency of North African monsoon precipitation. The wind convergence term in water budget equation dominate the GM precipitation variation, indicating a consistency between the GM precipitation and the seasonal change of prevailing wind.

  11. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  12. Impacts of global warming on climate change over East Asia as simulated by 15 GCMs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zong-ci Zhao; Xiaodong Li

    1997-12-31

    About 15 GCMs (GFDL1, GISS, LLNL, MPI, OSU, UKMOL, UKMOH, GCMs90-92, GFDL2, NCAR, OPYC, LSG, HADL, GCMs95) obtained from the IPCC WG 1 1990, 1992 and 1995 reports have been chosen to examine the impacts of global warming, on the climate chance over East Asia. Although the models scenarios of the human activities were different for the different GCMs, the climate change over East Asia (70E-140E, 15N-60N) for tile doubled CO{sub 2} as simulated by about 15 GCMs have been analysed. The Simulations shown that the temperature might increased by about 0.5 - 1.5 C over East Asia, especially in winter and northwestern parts of East Asia. The precipitation might increase in northwestern and northeastern parts of East Asia and decrease in the central part of East Asia. The evaluations and assessments of the GCMs over East Asia have indicated that the GCMs have the abilities to simulate the climate change over East Asia, especially for the temperature and the winter season. There are some uncertainties for the simulations to compare with the observations, especially for tile precipitation and tile summer season.

  13. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 11 (Geophysics) On Original Copies Dr. Terence K. Young Professor and Head Department of Geophysics Approved

  14. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry

  15. Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-01-01

    While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

  16. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  18. Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T. Matsuno and H. Kida, pp. 145172.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    145 Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T, NH 03824, U.S.A. Abstract--Here we examine the cause, size and future of the U.S. carbon sink.4%, with the remainder due to land use. To forecast the future of the U.S. carbon sink, we used the Ecosystem Demography

  19. Z .The Science of the Total Environment 262 2000 263 286 Assessing the consequences of global change for forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayres, Matthew.P.

    Z .The Science of the Total Environment 262 2000 263 286 Assessing the consequences of global , and competitors. Because of their short life cycles, mobility, reproductive potential, and physiological. Changes in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, and atmospheric CO concentra-2 tions can alter

  20. 2, 637671, 2005 Geophysics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor brines S. B. Joye et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Geophysical and geochemical signatures under a Creative Commons License. 637 #12;BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor

  1. The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) at Los Alamos National: · Geophysics · Global Climate · Space Science · Astrophysics and Cosmology FY15 CALL FOR RESEARCH PROPOSALS and quality of life in our increasingly technological society. 3. Solid earth geoscience (geophysics

  2. Global Warming, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Interview with Ron Stouffer Global Warming, and the Intergovernmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or making -- burning coal for power plants generates carbon dioxide. When you burn wood, it makes carbon just about whenever you burn anything. Virtually any form of combustion, burning gasoline in cars are happening. And, in response, the natural system, way animals and plants are responding, are also changing

  3. Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa: Capacity Building for ElectronicCapacity Building for Electronic Geophysical YearGeophysical Year · VGMO.NET is a middleware architecture that provides a new way for the worldwide geomagnetic community

  4. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  5. Joint Master Applied Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    , engineering geophysics Year 2, October to February: RWTH Aachen Univer- sity Geothermics, petrophysics, borehole logging Year 2, March to August: Master thesis at one of the three universities or other approved is in geothermal exploration and basin modelling Aachen is situated on the rim of the wooded Eifel and Hautes

  6. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINTIES FOR GEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to directly measure the amount of oil in an area is to drill several wells, but drilling is a very expensive. These techniques are applied to the inversion of traveltime data collected in a cross well seismic experiment procedure, and the whole idea of geophysics is to predict the amount of oil without drilling in all possible

  7. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY N. J. Karberg K. S. Pregitzer J. S. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbon dioxide partial pressure and dissolved inorganic carbonate chemistry under elevated carbon dioxide Carbon-13 Æ Carbon sequestration Æ FACE Æ Free air carbon dioxide and ozone enrichment Æ Global carbonate-Verlag 2004 Abstract Global emissions of atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 are rising and expected to impact

  8. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://mit.edu/globalchange/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry Angelo Gurgel of a Global Biofuels Industry Angelo Gurgel, John M. Reilly and Sergey Paltsev Report No. 155 March 2008 #12. The Program involves sponsorship and active participation by industry, government, and non

  9. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  10. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 10 (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date May 15, 2006 Signed: on original copy Jeongmin Lee Signed: on original

  11. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: September fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date

  12. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date: April 14, 2005 Signed

  13. Z .Global and Planetary Change 26 2000 7784 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    is only calculated radiation and atmospheric optical depth estimated from a database of global volcanicityArchaeol. Res., 13, pp. 483­501 . Modeled precipitation histories for specific sites in China, Thailand

  14. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    J. Intl 171 497–508 Peltier W R 2004 Annu. Rev. Earthof GIA models: (1) global (Peltier 2004) and (2) regionala layered approximation of the Peltier VM2 mantle viscosity

  15. Book Series Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    ocean currents/fronts. Finally, various atmospheric and oceanic bridges that link different ocean basinsBook Title Book Series Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union 1 A Global Survey of Ocean, College Park, Maryland The interaction of the ocean and atmosphere plays an important role in shaping

  16. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  17. International impacts of global climate change: Testimony to House Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.; Cushman, R.M.; Marland, G.; Rayner, S.

    1989-02-21

    International impacts of global climate change are those for which the important consequences arise because of national sovereignty. Such impacts could be of two types: (1) migrations across national borders of people, of resources (such as agricultural productivity, or surface water, or natural ecosystems), of effluents, or of patterns of commerce; and (2) changes to the way nations use and manage their resources, particularly fossil fuels and forests, as a consequence of international concern over the global climate. Actions by a few resource-dominant nations may affect the fate of all. These two types of international impacts raise complex equity issues because one nation may perceive itself as gaining at the expense of its neighbors, or it may perceive itself as a victim of the actions of others. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  19. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  20. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01

    duckling of environmental geophysics, Leading Edge, 21(5),Pure and Applied Geophysics, 157, 357-382. Pinder, G.F. ,sulfide self-potentials, Geophysics, 25, 226–249. Sauck, W.

  1. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  2. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for 100 parameters in the EPPA model, including labor productivity growth rates, energy efficiency trends) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two centers bridge many key areas in emissions factors for urban pollutants. The resulting uncertainty in emissions and global costs is explored

  3. Projected changes in global tropospheric ozone to 2030 David Stevenson, Institute for Meteorology, University of Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    ,000 Lagrangian air parcels, and simulates 70 species with 160 reactions. It has an output resolution of 5° x 5° x much of the troposphere, often reinforcing the existing spring maximum. Tateno Japan36°N Hilo Hawaii20 globally. Emissions controls have been used successfully to reduce peak O3 values seen during pollution

  4. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 1997); P. 630643, 12 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Data-matrix asymmetry and polarization changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    methods for interpreting data-matrix asymmetry and polarization changes with depth from multicomponent with fracture swarms. Presented at the 65th Annual International Meeting, Society of Exploration Geophysicists Kingdom. c 1997 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved. INTRODUCTION Shear

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 10, PAGES 2133-2136, MAY 15, 2001 Origin of postseismic streamflow changes inferred from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    that the hydraulic conductivity of groundwater system providing baseflow does not change. For (at least) the studied streams, the coseismic increase of discharge therefore requires increased hydraulic head gradients, the careful monitoring of wells has revealed subsurface responses, including both per- sistent water level

  6. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  7. Global Change and Mountain Lakes: Establishing Nutrient Criteria and Critical Loads for Sierra Nevada Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, ANDREA Michelle

    2013-01-01

    and climate change in European mountain lakes assessed usinglimitation in Colorado mountain lakes. Freshwater Biologyparks of the Rocky Mountains. Ecological Applications 19(4):

  8. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2014-2015 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated January 2015 #12;INTRODUCTION 1 Geology OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS _ 2 Who We Are _ 2 Where To Get Help _ 2 POLICIES, PROCEDURES & REQUIREMENTS 3

  9. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://MIT.EDU/globalchange/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy Ian industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ratio into shifts in sectoral

  10. alpine space -man & environment, vol. 7: Global Change and Sustainable Development in Mountain Regions 2008 iup innsbruck university press, ISBN 978-3-902571-97-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    95 alpine space - man & environment, vol. 7: Global Change and Sustainable Development in Mountain Mountain Forests: Connecting People and Ecology Dan Binkley Colorado Forest Restoration Institute, Warner Mountains form the backbone of the North American continent, separating waters flowing eastward

  11. Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, P.; Wise, M.; Smith, S.

    2006-01-01

    Conference 2006 Session 11 – Industrial Energy Modeling: What is the State of the Art? Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change ParamitaSinha 1 MarshallWise 2* ,and...StevenSmith 2 1 UniversityofMaryland,CollegePark. 2 PacificNorthwestNationalLaboratory,JointGlobalChangeResearch Institute,CollegePark,MD. 1. Introduction Thispaperpresentsanewapproachtounderstandingthepotentiallong-termevolutionofenergy demandsinthe...

  12. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  13. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  14. Global Change and Mountain Lakes: Establishing Nutrient Criteria and Critical Loads for Sierra Nevada Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, ANDREA Michelle

    2013-01-01

    change in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta. Journalor the Canadian Athabasca Oil Sands (Curtis et al. 2010),Rose et al. 1999 Athabasca Oil Sands SM6 Curtis et al. 2010

  15. A Model of Global Learning: How Students Change Through International High-Impact Experiences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Tobin Dean

    2014-12-12

    is warranted. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to explain the viewpoints of student changes by students who participate in a study abroad experience. To meet that purpose, three objectives were utilized. First, a qualitative phenomenology...

  16. CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    W. HARGROVE 29 , TERESE B. HART 30 , BILLY C.H. HAU 31 ,McMahon SM, Thomas SC, Hart TB, Condit R (2011) DemographyChange Biology Makana  J,  Hart  T,  Liengola  I,  Ewango  

  17. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Alisa Marie Green #12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: November 06, 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li

  18. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Dongjie Cheng #12;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: December 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li (GP

  19. Measures used to tackle environmental problems related to global warming and climate change resulting from the use of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental issues continue to play a major role in strategic planning associated with the use of coal for power generation. Problems, such as Acid Rain resulting from SO{sub 2} emissions produced from the sulfur content of coal during coal combustion, have recently cornered the attention of policy makers and planners. More recently the carbon content of coal, which provides for most of the coals heating value, has been identified as the major contributor to the production of CO{sub 2} and other emissions associated with Global Warming and Climate Change. Total world carbon emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels were approximately 6 billion metric tons in 1990, of which 44% were from the consumption of oil, 39% from coal, and 17% from natural gas. Assuming no change in current regulations, carbon emissions are anticipated to grow by 1.5% per year, and are predicted to reach more than 8 billion tons by the year 2010. Most of this increase in carbon emissions is expected to come from developing countries in the Asian Pacific Region such as China where coal use dominates the power production industry and accounts for 71% of its total CO{sub 2} emissions. Asian Pacific coal demand is expected to double over the next 15 years accounting for a 46% increase in total primary energy demand, and China currently produces approximately 11% of the world`s global greenhouse gas emissions which is expected to grow to 15% by the year 2010.

  20. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  1. Possible changes for mudflow and avalanche activity in former Soviet Union due to the global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazovskaya, T.G.; Sidorova, T.L.; Seliverstov, Y.G.

    1996-12-31

    Past research, as well as laboratory evidence have revealed a relationship between climate, mudflow, and avalanche activity. It is possible to predict changes in mudflow and avalanche activity by using climate models. In this study, the GFDL model was used which contained data on mean monthly air temperature, precipitation, and carbon dioxide concentrations.

  2. Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    now in changing the climate, it is only one of the two major components that energize the climate system. Because the air is transparent to sunlight at most of the solar wavelengths, most of the solar radiation is delivered to the atmosphere indirectly by surface heating. However, most (~ 77%) of the solar

  3. Z .Global and Planetary Change 29 2001 149152 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    : Inference of climate change from geothermal data Over the past century, both anthropogenic green- house instrumental records. Geothermal data provide an important supplement to traditional proxy records was recognized almost as soon as tempera- ture­depth measurements were made in boreholes Z .Lane, 1923; Hotchkiss

  4. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    find the cost-effective climate policy to include a combination of R&D subsidies and CO2 emission differentiated toward CO2-intensive sectors are more cost effective than constraints that generate uniform CO2 links between CO2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We

  5. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two, and political forces that drive emissions, and to the results of international agreements and mitigation Agriculture Richard S. Eckaus and Katherine Kit-Yan Tso Abstract In this paper the variations across China

  6. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two, and political forces that drive emissions, and to the results of international agreements and mitigation damages occur in the eastern U.S., Europe, and eastern China, with reductions in Net Primary Production

  7. A comparison of neural network and processbased models for vegetation distribution under global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate change Eric Chown chown@cs.orst.edu Thomas G. Dietterich tgd@cs.orst.edu Department of Computer covering current climate and vegetation distribution in the coterminous United States. Completely automated on two tasks: prediction of current vegetation distribution given current climate and prediction

  8. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (climate sensitivity and rate of heat penetration into the deep ocean) by comparing a modelÕs response-dimensional (2D) climate model in conjunction with results from the UK Hadley CentreÕs coupled atmosphere-ocean into the deep ocean. Vertical patterns of zonal mean temperature change through the troposphere and lower

  9. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is the world's first large experiment with an emission trading system for CO2 and it is likely to be copied in dealing with climate change is deciding who has a right to emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and under what analysis need to be related to the economic, technological, and political forces that drive emissions

  10. APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE STORAGE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    letal Ore Deposits, 11 in Geophysics and Geochemistry in the11 Applications of Borehole Geophysics to Water-ResourcesAPPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE

  11. Lunar geophysics: The Moon's fundamental shape and paleomagnetism studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Viranga

    2014-01-01

    Tectonics.   Reviews  of  Geophysics  and  Space   Physics  SANTA CRUZ Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental shapeViranga Perera Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental

  12. Global climate change and maize production in Spain: Risk assessment and impacts of weather on yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feijoo, M.L.; Mestre, F.; Iglesias, A.; Rosenzweig, C.

    1996-12-31

    The study evaluates the potential effect of climate change on maize production in Spain, combining climate models, a crop productivity model, a decision support system and a yield-response model. The study was carried out for two agricultural regions that include the largest areas of Spain where maize is grown as a high input crop. The paper combines the output from a crop model with different techniques of analysis. The scenarios used in this study were generated from the output of two General Circulation Models (GCMs): the Goddard Institute for Space Studies model (GISS) and the Canadian Climate Change Model (CCCM). The study also includes a preliminary evaluation of the potential changes in monetary returns taking into account the possible variability of grain yields and prices, using mean-Gini stochastic dominance (MGSD). A yield response model was estimated using simulated data from the crop model. Weather variables are included. Typically, temperature and precipitation are the only weather variables included in these models. However, solar radiation is another important climate factor for plant growth and development and were included in the yield response model.

  13. Numerical evaluation of mechanisms driving Early Jurassic changes in global carbon cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beerling, D.J.; Brentnall, S.J.

    2007-03-15

    The Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, ca. 183 Ma) carbon cycle perturbation is characterized by aabout -5 parts per thousand {delta} {sup 13}C excursion in the exogenic carbon reservoirs, a 1000 ppm rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and a 6-7 degrees warming. Two proposed explanations for this presumed global carbon cycle perturbation are the liberation of massive amounts of isotopically light CH4 from (1) Gondwanan coals by heating during the intrusive eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) or (2) the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates. Carbon cycle modeling indicates that the release of CH4 from Gondwanan coals synchronous with the eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar LIP fails to reproduce the magnitude or timing of the CO{sub 2} and {delta} {sup 13}C excursions. However, sensitivity analyses constrained by a marine cyclostratigraphically dated {delta}{sup 13}C record indicate that both features of geologic record can be explained with the huge input of about 15,340-24,750 Gt C over about 220 k.y., a result possibly pointing to the involvement of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin. The simulated release of > 6000 Gt C from gas hydrates also reproduces aspects of the early Toarcian rock record, but the large mass involved raises fundamental questions about its formation, storage, and release.

  14. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Final Technical Report 1990-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athanasios Toulopoulos

    2007-11-01

    Research conducted by the six NIGEC Regional Centers during recent years is reported. An overview of the NIGEC program from its beginnings provides a description and evaluation of the program's vision, strategy and major accomplishments. The program's purpose was to support academic research on environmental change in regions of the country that had historically received relatively little federal funding. The overall vision of NIGEC may be stated as the performance of academic research on the regional interactions between ecosystems and climate. NIGEC's research presents important evidence on the impacts of climate variability and change, and in some cases adaptability, for a broad range of both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, and has thereby documented significant regional issues on the environmental responses to climate change. NIGEC's research has demonstrated large regional differences in the atmospheric carbon exchange budgets of croplands and forests, that there are significant variations of this exchange on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales due to atmospheric variability (including temperature, precipitation and cloudiness), and that management practices and past history have predominant effects in grasslands and croplands. It is the mid-latitude forests, however, that have received more attention in NIGEC than any other specific ecosystem, and NIGEC's initiation of and participation in the AmeriFlux program, network of carbon flux measurement sites in North American old-growth forests, is generally considered to be its most significant single accomplishment. By including appendices with complete listings of NIGEC publications, principal investigators and participating institutions, this report may also serve as a useful comprehensive documentation of NIGEC.

  15. Possible impacts of a future Grand Solar Minimum on climate: Stratospheric and global circulation changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maycock, A. C.; Ineson, S.; Gray, L. J.; Scaife, A. A.; Anstey, J. A.; Lockwood, M.; Butchart, N.; Hardiman, S. C.; Mitchell, D. M.; Osprey, S. M.

    2015-04-28

    record of the solar modulation potential, ?, for the last 9300 years. This is a measure of35 the shielding of the Earth from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) by the Sun’s magnetic field,36 and is derived from cosmogenic radionuclide data from ice cores... and changes in surface temperature that resemble the positive96 phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) [Seppa¨la¨ et al., 2009]. Such effects will not97 be considered in this study because solar particles are not currently represented in the98 climate...

  16. Impact of modern climate change on the intercommunication: Global ocean-land (Northern Hemisphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanova, H.V.; Lobanov, V.A.; Stepanenko, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Two main temperature gradients define the synoptic and climatic conditions on the earth in general: equator-pole gradient and ocean-land gradient. The analysis of temperature on the basis of new cyclic-different-scales conception has been fulfilled in every important part of the climatic system in the Northern Hemisphere for assessment of their vulnerability to modern climate change. Historical time series of monthly surface temperature have been used for this aim in the points of regular grid over the Northern Hemisphere from 1891 to 1992. The main feature of the temperature in main climatic parts of the earth is a complexity of its spatial structure. New methods of spatial decomposition have been developed for the division of this complex fields structure into characteristics of mean value of the field and index of its non-homogeneity or spatial variation. It has been established, that the temperature gradient between ocean and land is increasing that is characterized of the increasing of an intensity of synoptic processes, their spatial non-homogeneity and more frequent appearance of the extreme synoptic events. The models of intercommunications between coefficients of temperature spatial decomposition over the ocean and land have been developed for two time period and the increasing of the relationships closeness has been established between ocean and land as well as the decrease of main planet gradient: the pole(the Polar ocean)-equator.

  17. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  18. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  19. ATM S 211 Climate and Climate Change Prof. David Catling EXAMPLES OF MISINFORMATION FROM GLOBAL WARMING DENIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    in great detail in the IPCC report. The IPCC consensus concluded: - There was a global warming trend warming. Kuwaiti Foundation funded Balling's skeptic book on global warming. Prof. Richard Lindzen (MIT) Mostly has his own scientific reasons for "opposing" global warming. But 1991 trip to Senate hearings

  20. INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY (LANL) FY11, 2010 1. INTRODUCTION The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission is to promote

  1. 2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States AU: Ragunathan, S EM: srivatta@gi.alaska.edu AF: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United

  2. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  3. ENV/ERS 467/667 Regional and Global Issues in Environmental & Resource Sciences Spring 2006 Global Change Readings and Assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    ) Socio-economic futures in climate change impact assessment: using scenarios as "learning machines synchronous changes in climate. Quaternary Research 56:289-298. Gruber N, Keeling CD, Bates NR (2002

  4. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  5. Global Cool and Vodafone Recycling Phones to Save the Planet Climate-change campaign Global Cool and mobile network Vodafone have joined forces to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark

    in hot countries, bringing light and energy to the people who need it most. For more information on Solar households - and less than 5% of the 15 million that get thrown away each year are recycled. What's more old phone with Vodafone and Global Cool will raise money for two major projects: Solar Aid

  6. Alien Species as Agents of Global Change Ecology and Management of the Gypsy Moth in North America as a Case History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    Alien Species as Agents of Global Change Ecology and Management of the Gypsy Moth in North America-down and alien species are increasingly being transported into new habitats. Many alien species have had of temperate northeastern North America have been affected by alien insects and diseases particularly

  7. A valuation of possible glacio-hydrological characteristics changes under global warming for Pamiro-Alay glaciation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananicheva, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Scenarios of global climate change for doubled carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is transformed into isoline maps for glaciated mountain region. Model data of monthly air temperature and precipitation are recalculated to values of annual solid precipitation and mean summer air temperature reduced to the level of 4,000 meters a.s.l. with the help of contemporary vertical gradients of air temperature and solid precipitation. The calculation algorithm is based on new techniques which analyze relationships between the spatial and altitudinal variability of meteorological parameters and their influence on snow and ice extent. Results form the basis for the calculation of the primary glaciologic and hydrologic characteristics: accumulation, ablation, melt runoff. New altitudes of main glaciological levels are calculated together with corresponding ablation and accumulation in the condition of doubled CO{sub 2}. These data are then used to produce a new spatial distribution of the input variables which can be used for improved melt water and heat resources calculation. The time period over which the model is run to obtain spatial distribution of pointed characteristics is the middle of 21 century, the situation of doubled CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Model output is in the form of isoline maps as well as digital data and covers the territory of Pamiro-Alay mountains and adjacent areas.

  8. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  9. 2012 Fellow American Geophysical Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) are critical to the intensity of ocean currents, to long- and short-term climate variations, and the health2012 Fellow American Geophysical Union James Moum, professor in the College of Earth, Ocean contributions to our understanding of ocean mixing in coastal, abyssal and Equatorial regimes using innovative

  10. The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

  11. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    EXPEDITED ITE S CHARACTERIZATION EOPHYSICS G GEOPHYSICALM AND TOOLSFORSITE CHARACTERIZATION NORMAN E. GOLDSTEINExpedited Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS

  12. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION Environment Geophysics Other: GeoEng Earth Science Teaching Anticipated & Geophysics 115 S. 1460 E. Room 383, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0102 Phone 801

  13. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  14. Towards Real Earth Models --Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Towards Real Earth Models -- Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes? Colin tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Disadvantages, difficulties, challenges. Conclusions. #12;Outline: Geological models! Advantages of unstructured tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics

  15. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhance a student's knowledge by going beyond a standard classroom-based geophysics curriculum, and to encourage qualified students in related fields to consider careers in...

  17. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IGPPS Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience and...

  18. On the Quantum Aspects of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi

    2004-10-10

    We introduce a simple quantum mechanical justification for the formation of folded mountains. It is very appealing to develop this idea to a theory of {\\it Quantum Geophysics}

  19. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the...

  20. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets. These surveys and the drilling process have been designed to severely limit the impact of the exploration. The geophysics...

  1. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While still over-parametrized, this choice of model space contains far fewer parameters than before, thus easing the computational burden, in some cases, of the optimization problem. And most importantly, the associated finite element discretization is aligned with the abrupt changes in material properties associated with lithologic boundaries as well as the interface between buried cultural artifacts and the surrounding Earth. In section 4, algorithms and tools are described that associate a smooth interface surface to a given triangulation. In particular, the tools support surface refinement and coarsening. Section 5 describes some preliminary results on the application of interface identification methods to some model problems in geophysical inversion. Due to time constraints, the results described here use the GNU Triangulated Surface Library for the manipulation of surface meshes and the TetGen software library for the generation of tetrahedral meshes.

  2. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D...

  3. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Borehole geophysics...

  4. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East * Geophysics & Tectonics; Marine & Environmental Geology; Planetary Geosciences; Volcanology, Geochemistry

  5. The Madotz Urgonian platform (Aralar, northern Spain): Paleoecological changes in response to Early Aptian global environmental events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    The Madotz Urgonian platform (Aralar, northern Spain): Paleoecological changes in response to Early. The paleoecological change coinciding with the base of OAE1a occurred at a time of sea level rise and it coincided with a demise of heavily calcified nannoconids in the Tethys and Pacific Oceans. The paleoecological change

  6. Identification and preliminary characterization of global water resource issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cohen, M.L.; Currie, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives were to: (1) identify, characterize, and define existing or projected regional and global water resource management issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate changes; and (2) develop research priorities for acquiring additional information about the potential effects of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on the availability and allocation of freshwater supplies. The research was broken into four work elements: (1) identification of water resource management issues on a global and regional basis; (2) identification of a subset of generic CO/sub 2/-related water resource management issues believed to have the highest probability of being affected, beneficially or adversely, by a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change; (3) selection of specific sites for examining the potential effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on these issues; and (4) conducting detailed case studies at these sites, the results from which will be used to identify future research and data needs in the area of water resources. This report summarizes the research related to the first three work elements. 6 figures, 9 tables.

  7. An open letter to the 2008 presidential candidates: get the facts right on what's responsible for global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, Henry R.

    2008-07-15

    The two remaining presidential candidates have adopted policies for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions that address factors that are mistakenly held responsible as the primary cause of global warming. Here's what they need to keep in mind in order to craft genuinely efficacious policies. (author)

  8. WHAT TO DO ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? Slowing the rate of carbon burning won't stop global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    : most CO2 stays in the air over a century, though individual molecules come and go. Global warming. In 2004, Pacala and Socolow said merely holding worldwide carbon emissions constant for 50 years would. Starting now, double existing nuclear power. Replace 1400 gigawatts of coal-burning power plants with gas

  9. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  10. Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS Lesparre N., Adler A., Gibert to adapt EIDORS for applications in geophysics. In geophysics, we apply EIT in order to image inner. The spatial resolution of the method in geophysics is of the order of meters and the penetration depth can

  11. Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency with Lab 4 COMPSCI 115 Introduction to C 2 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOPH 300 Physics of the Earth 3 GEOPH 305 Applied Geophysics 3 GEOPH 420 Geophysical Applications

  12. PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise on the GrIS. A solid background in field geophysics is preferred. The successful applicant will join the CryoGars group and Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface (CGISS) at Boise

  13. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy.dinter@utah.edu, office: 321 FASB, phone 801-581-7937) Faculty Advisor for Geophysics Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof

  14. Networks of Networks: Changing Patterns in Country Bandwidth and Centrality in Global Information Infrastructure, 2002-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyunjin

    2012-04-01

    of density, degree, and eigenvector centrality from 2002 to 2010. Graphs and statistics were calculated in R (R Development Core Team, 2011) and networks were visualized using Gephi (Bastian, Heymann, & Jacomy, 2009). Global internet geography data obtained....070), Jordan (0.060), Morocco (0.052), Algeria (0.025), Libya (0.014), Palestine Territory (0.012), and Sudan (0.012). The United Arab Emirates showed the highest degree with 12, and the degree of Israel was 8. Data for Iraq and Tunisia were not available...

  15. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    19 800 sismi ues dans les milieux strati?és a deux et trois dimensions: contri ution a la construction et a lime relation des sismo- grammes synthetiques: These

  16. Geophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing RadiationSNACGeographyGeometry

  17. Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D.

    2005-07-16

    It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

  18. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  19. A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies Article Published persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies. Journal of Geophysical Research, 115. D18119. ISSN 0148-0227 doi global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies S. Tegtmeier,1,2 V. E

  20. Five-years of microenvironment data along an urban-rural transect; temperature and CO2 concentrations in urban area at levels expected globally with climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Kate; Ziska, Lewis H; Bunce, James A; Quebedeaux, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    The heat island effect and the high use of fossil fuels in large city centers is well documented, but by how much fossil fuel consumption is elevating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and whether elevations in both atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are consistent from year to year are less well known. Our aim was to record atmospheric CO2 concentrations, air temperature and other environmental variables in an urban area and compare it to suburban and rural sites to see if urban sites are experiencing climates expected globally in the future with climate change. A transect was established from Baltimore city center (Urban site), to the outer suburbs of Baltimore (suburban site) and out to an organic farm (rural site). At each site a weather station was set-up to monitor environmental variables annually for five years. Atmospheric CO2 was significantly increased on average by 66 ppm from the rural to the urban site over the five years of the study. Air temperature was significantly higher at the urban site (14.8 oC) compared to the suburban (13.6 oC) and rural (12.7 oC) sites. Relative humidity was not different between sites but vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was significantly higher at the urban site compared to the suburban and rural sites. During wet years relative humidity was significantly increased and VPD significantly reduced. Increased nitrogen deposition at the rural site (2.1 % compared to 1.8 and 1.2 % at the suburban and urban sites) was small enough not to affect soil nitrogen content. Dense urban areas with large populations and high vehicular traffic have significantly different microclimates compared to outlying suburban and rural areas. The increases in atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are similar to changes predicted in the short term with global climate change, therefore providing an environment suitable for studying future effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii THE APPLICATION CHECKLIST SEND THESE ITEMS TO : University of Hawaii Graduate Division Admissions Office 2540 Maile Way, Spalding Hall 354 Honolulu, HI 96822 Original application and fees. http://www.hawaii

  2. Assessing Soil Strength From Geophysical Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Rehan

    2014-04-24

    A study is presented to develop framework for correlating sand strength (friction angle) to geophysical measurements, primarily shear wave and body wave velocities. Triaxial tests accompanied by wave velocity measurements was performed to generate a...

  3. Wave radiation in simple geophysical models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Stuart William

    2013-07-01

    Wave radiation is an important process in many geophysical flows. In particular, it is by wave radiation that flows may adjust to a state for which the dynamics is slow. Such a state is described as “balanced”, meaning ...

  4. Engineering and environmental geophysics at the millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    Near?surface geophysics is being applied to a broader spectrum of problems than ever before, and new application areas are arising continually. Currently, the tools used to examine the near?surface environment include a variety of noninvasive...

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  6. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  7. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2014) 197, 630635 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    , Indonesia, from transdimensional seismic ambient noise tomography Z. Zulfakriza,1 E. Saygin,2 P. R. Cummins, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, ITB, Bandung, 40132, Indonesia. E-mail: zulfakriza 3Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, ITB, Bandung, 40132

  8. Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Energy Outlook (EIA, 2006), also shown in the figure. Another feature of projections only a few.S. shale gas resources to economic viability affects the nation's energy outlook and the expected role shale resources is changing the U.S. energy outlook. Shale deposits, found in many parts of the U

  9. Response of the Indian Ocean Basin Mode and Its Capacitor Effect to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Response of the Indian Ocean Basin Mode and Its Capacitor Effect to Global Warming* XIAO-TONG ZHENG under global warming are in- vestigated using a pair of integrations with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics itself weakens in response to global warming. In the prior spring, an antisymmetric pattern of rainfall

  10. Life cycle inventory analysis of regenerative thermal oxidation of air emissions from oriented strand board facilities in Minnesota - a perspective of global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Life cycle inventory analysis has been applied to the prospective operation of regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology at oriented strand board plants at Bemidji (Line 1) and Cook, Minnesota. The net system destruction of VOC`s and carbon monoxide, and at Cook a small quantity of particulate, has a very high environmental price in terms of energy and water use, global warming potential, sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions, solids discharged to water, and solid waste deposited in landfills. The benefit of VOC destruction is identified as minor in terms of ground level ozone at best and possibly slightly detrimental. Recognition of environmental tradeoffs associated with proposed system changes is critical to sound decision-making. There are more conventional ways to address carbon monoxide emissions than combustion in RTO`s. In an environment in which global warming is a concern, fuel supplemental combustion for environmental control does not appear warranted. Consideration of non-combustion approaches to address air emission issues at the two operations is recommended. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  11. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  12. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  13. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, DR; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael; Clauser, Karl; Qiao, Jana; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri; Ruggles, Kelly; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. T.; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narcisco; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-07-01

    Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have sparked efforts to characterize the proteomes of tumor samples to provide complementary and unique information inaccessible by genomics. Tumor samples are usually not accrued with proteomic characterization in mind, raising concerns regarding effects of undocumented sample ischemia on protein abundance and phosphosite stoichiometry. Here we report the effects of cold ischemia time on clinical ovarian cancer samples and patient-derived basal and luminal breast cancer xenografts. Tumor tissues were excised and collected prior to vascular ligation, subjected to accurately defined ischemia times up to 60 min, and analyzed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics using isobaric tags and high-performance, multidimensional LC-MS/MS. No significant changes were detected at the protein level in each tumor type after 60 minutes of ischemia, and the majority of the >25,000 phosphosites detected were also stable. However, large, reproducible increases and decreases in protein phosphorylation at specific sites were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome starting as early as 5 minutes post-excision. Early and sustained activation of stress response, transcriptional regulation and cell death pathways were observed in common across tumor types. Tissue-specific changes in phosphosite stability were also observed suggesting idiosyncratic effects of ischemia in particular lineages. Our study provides insights into the information that may be obtained by proteomic characterization of tumor samples after undocumented periods of ischemia, and suggests caution especially in interpreting activation of stress pathways in such samples as they may reflect sample handling rather than tumor physiology.

  15. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    national Climate Governance. Global Environmental Politicsof Global Climate Governance change and other environmentalenvironmental foreign policymakers in responding to global climate governance

  16. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  17. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East's admissibility into the Graduate Program in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Strongly

  18. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  19. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-05

    hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production. Local variations in the fluid and solid matrix properties, fine layering,.

  20. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-09

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon explo- ration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  1. MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS DANIEL SCHERTZER LEESU, Que. H3A 2T8, Canada lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Received The complexity of geophysics has been with anisotropy, which is rather ubiquitous in geophysics. Keywrods: multifractals, generalized scale invariance

  2. Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights Daniel Schertzer Department, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Uncertainty and error growth are crosscutting geophysical extremes. The focus is now on time-space geophysical scaling behavior: their multifractality. It is found

  3. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  4. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 The DIGISOIL multi-sensor system: from geophysical measurements to soil properties. Gilles geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues

  5. Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics The University of Texas Pickle Research Campus@utig.ig.utexas.edu EDUCATION B.A. Williams College, 1983, Geology and Physics M.A. Columbia University, 1986, Marine Geophysics M. Phil. Columbia University, 1987, Marine Geophysics Ph.D. Columbia University, 1991, Marine

  6. Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits (Version 110824e) Instructor: Mark Grasmueck, Associate Professor Marine Geology and Geophysics RSMAS University of Miami Tel: The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the fundamentals of near-surface geophysical site

  7. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  8. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author are known to be highly dependent on local site characteristics. Therefore combining geophysical meth- ods. In order to calibrate geophysical measurements, obser- vations of 130 boreholes (4 meters deep) were made

  9. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Contribution of the airborne geophysical survey to the study of the regolith : A case study of regolith properties: superficial studies combining geology, geochemistry and geophysics become essential

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Geophysical observations at cavity collapse Philippe Jousset, Behrooz Bazargan-Sabet, François relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals

  11. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT Graig McHendrie Stuart M. Smith National Geophysical Data Center Boulder, Colorado September 1977 countries participated in a workshop at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) in Boulder, Colorado

  12. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  13. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  14. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie; Lumley, David; Sherlock, Don; Daley, Tom; Lawton, Don; Masters, Ron; Verliac, Michel; White, Don

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  15. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  16. Using and losing land to feed a growing world It's taken a long time, but the issue of global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Erle C.

    of the need to confront energy security and global warming. We finally acknowledge that our addiction fixation on global warming at the expense of other issues. Learning from the research my colleagues and I have done over the past decade, I fear we are neglecting "the other" inconvenient truth: a global

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical viscoelastic flow Oleg V. Vasilyev,1 David A. Yuen,2 and Yuri Yu. Podladchikov3 Abstract. This paper introduces a newly developed wavelet technique for modeling of geophysical

  18. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 3615 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters Geoffrey Blewitt Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology is gener- alized here, to seek the network configuration that optimizes the precision of geophysical

  19. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  20. GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK Section Engineering Geology, Centre for Technical-mail: hack@itc.nl (Received 2 June, 2000; Accepted 4 September, 2000) Abstract. A pre-requisite in slope Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;424 ROBERT HACK the slope material with, for example, manganese

  1. Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys * Exploratory drilling using various of these incremental steps; leasing and exploration. Subsequent phases of OCS development (production, transportation) prepared by MMS, as well as pertinent research on the bowhead whale and matters related to oil exploration

  2. INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    velocity, electrical conductivity, or magnetic susceptibility. The appropriate geophysical survey. To obtain that information the data need to be inverted to generate a 3D subsurface distribution principles. Our goal is to present those principles, discuss in detail the essential elements of the inverse

  3. Geophysics of Chemical Heterogeneity in the Mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stixrude, Lars

    , transition zone Abstract Chemical heterogeneity, produced by the near-surface rock cycle and dom- inatedGeophysics of Chemical Heterogeneity in the Mantle Lars Stixrude and Carolina Lithgow. This lithologic-scale chemical het- erogeneity may survive in the mantle for as long as the age of Earth because

  4. Transdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Thomas

    complicated and quantitative mechanisms with simple qualitative concepts. This research was supported underTransdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems Thomas Bodin October 2010 A thesis Except where otherwise indicated in the text, the research described in this thesis is my own original

  5. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER 10.1002/2014GL061661 Key Points: · The 1934 drought), The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, doi:10 North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934 Benjamin I. Cook1,2 , Richard Seager2

  6. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER 10.1002/2014GL061661 Key Points: · The 1934 drought), The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 7298­7305, doi Published online 18 OCT 2014 The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934 Benjamin I

  7. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J.; King, W.C.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  8. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  9. The Interdisciplinary Global Change Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foundation · Michigan Space Grant Consortium Program Characteristics and GCminor ·Three core courses and two, Oceanography, Climatology, Geochemistry, Hydrology, Surficial processes Sociosphere Urban planning, Population, tree of life Natural selection, speciation Ecosystems Cells and energy transformations Biogeochemical

  10. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  11. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  12. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEophySicS College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 credits The geophysics program at UAF specializes in several broad areas of re- search and is closely connected with the Geophysical Institute. Although much of the research conducted by geophysics faculty

  13. Geophysical Monograph Series IUGG Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.

    : Tectonics, Sedimentation, and Climate Change Between Australia and Antarctica Neville Exon, James P. Kennett, and Mitchell Malone (Eds.) 152 Sea Salt Aerosol Production: Mechanisms, Methods, Measurements, and Models Ernie. Anser, and Richard A. Houghton (Eds.) 154 The Rocky Mountain Region--An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics

  14. 2 Global Gas Turbine News August 2008 There is an old saying that the only constant in life is change. Our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    2 Global Gas Turbine News August 2008 There is an old saying that the only constant in life to improve gas turbines over the last 50 years, it has also played an active role in fostering a global our community. One area of discussion has been the role of turbomachinery outside of the gas turbine

  15. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: GREENHOUSE GASES, AEROSOLS, RADIATIVE FORCING dioxide increase: sources, mixing ratio, forcing Global temperature change Climate sensitivity and time;#12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL

  16. Forecasting phenology under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Forecasting phenology under global warming Ine´s Iba´n~ez1,*, Richard B. Primack2, Abraham J in phenology. Keywords: climate change; East Asia, global warming; growing season, hierarchical Bayes; plant is shifting, and these shifts have been linked to recent global warming (Parmesan & Yohe 2003; Root et al

  17. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) 193, 238251 doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    2013-01-01

    -0006, Japan. E-mail: sawa@bosai.go.jp 2Center for Wave Phenomena, Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of VP, VS and shear wave splitting parameters are explained by the generation of omnidirectional cracks GJISeismology Time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting in the first year after

  18. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Pore pressure evolution in deforming granular1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Pore pressure evolution in deforming. Often deformation of the granular network leads to pore fluid8 pressure (PP) changes. If the PP rises coupling6 between two deforming phases: the solid granular network and the fluid-filled7 pore network

  19. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  20. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  1. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumley, D.

    2010-01-01

    on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” David Lumley (U. W.on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” was held August 23-27,sequestration: Model Studies: Geophysics, 73, WA105-WA112.

  2. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  3. Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 141 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition, Eds. T. Spohn & G. Schubert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2014-01-01

    Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition Author manuscript, published in "Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd edition, G. Schubert, T. Spohn (Ed.) (2014) in press" #12;T. Guillot & D. Gautier / Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 2 Contents 1

  4. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the acquisition environment too challenging for seismic reflection to be routinely cost-effective. The geophysical parameter most commonly correlated with the overall...

  5. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  6. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5490655 Citation Applegate, J. K.; Moens, T. A. . 411980. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho. () : DOE Information Bridge. Related...

  7. Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  8. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2012-01-01

    We describe the ongoing development of joint geophysical imaging methodologies for geothermal site characterization and demonstrate their potential in two regions: Krafla volcano and associated geothermal fields in ...

  9. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone...

  10. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include: 1) the distinctly different roles played by atmospheric dynamical processes in establishing surface temperature response to ENSO at tropics and extratropics (i.e., atmospheric dynamics disperses energy out of tropics during ENSO warm events and modulate surface temperature at mid-, high-latitudes through controlling downward longwave radiation); 2) the representations of ENSO-related temperature response in climate models fail to converge at the process-level particularly over extratropics (i.e., models produce the right temperature responses to ENSO but with wrong reasons); 3) water vapor feedback contributes substantially to the temperature anomalies found over U.S. during different phases of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which adds new insight to the traditional picture that cold/warm advective processes are the main drivers of local temperature responses to the NAM; 4) the overall land surface temperature biases in the latest NCAR model (CESM1) are caused by biases in surface albedo while the surface temperature biases over ocean are related to multiple factors including biases in model albedo, cloud and oceanic dynamics, and the temperature biases over different ocean basins are also induced by different process biases. These results provide a detailed guidance for process-level model turning and improvement, and thus contribute directly to the overall goal of reducing model uncertainty in projecting future changes in the Earth’s climate system, especially in the ENSO and AM variability.

  11. Multiple Roles for GIS in US Global Change Research (NCGIA Research Initiative 15): Report of the First Specialist Meeting (95-10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodchild, Michael F.; Estes, John E.; Beard, Kate M.; Foresman, Tim; Robinson, Jenny

    1995-01-01

    Schimel (1991) A temporal GIS prototype for global changeresearch. In GIS/LIS ’91 Proceedings, Vol. 2. pp 752-765.Technology Vol. 36, No. 1. GIS World (1995) Special Issue -

  12. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  13. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2000 1 Sensing Volcanism, Remote Sensing of Active Volcanism, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series 116, Mouginis

  14. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal...

  15. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  16. GEOPHYSICAL JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL, 133, 379389, 1998 1 A continuous plate-tectonic model using geophysical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL, 133, 379­389, 1998 1 A continuous plate-tectonic model using and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, 96822, USA Summary A continuous kinematic model of present day of the standard plate model; the differences, however, are systematic and indicate the greater proportion of spin

  17. FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013 1. Fourier Transforms Fourier transform are use in many areas of geophysics such as image processing, time series analysis, and antenna design. Here we focus on the use of fourier transforms for solving linear partial differential

  18. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Steering Panel, NASA GRM mission University Corporation of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  19. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Dynamics EDUCATION: Ph.D. Geophysics, June 1977, University of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B.A. Geology, June 1972, University

  20. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  1. DEVELOPING GIS VISUALIZATION WEB SERVICES FOR GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEVELOPING GIS VISUALIZATION WEB SERVICES FOR GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS A. Sayar a,b. *, M. Pierce Commission II, WG II/2 KEY WORDS: GIS, Geophysics, Visualization, Internet/Web, Interoperability, Networks Information System (GIS) community. In this paper we will describe our group's efforts to implement GIS

  2. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2015 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  3. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  4. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  5. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining's crust and induce attenuation, dispersion and anisotropy of the seismic waves observed at the macroscale process. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale ­ p. #12

  6. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics Graduate work in Geology are designed to provide you with an understanding of the fundamentals and principles of geology, geochemistry and Environmental Geochemistry · Mineralogy/Petrology/Economic Geology · Geophysics/Tectonics/Remote Sensing

  7. Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation, searchGeophysical Techniques Jump to:

  8. Global Warming and the Free State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland of the report. Citation Boesch, D.F. (editor). 2008. Global Warming and the Free State: Comprehensive AssessmentJuskelis,MarylandSierraClub Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland Report

  9. CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    45 CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate during the Cenozoic SARAH J. FEAKINS AND PETER by significant climate change. Major global changes included massive tectonic reorganization, a reduction in atmospheric pCO2 (Pagani et al., 1999; Pearson and Palmer, 2000), and a dramatic cooling of global climate

  10. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dry by Global Warming" Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Climate change will challenge tall trees like California's redwoods. June 7, 2015...

  11. Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate...

  12. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  13. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5: ++41 (0) 44 633 3154 fax: ++41 (0) 44 633 1065 AUGUST 5, 2010 Education 2007 Ph.D. Geophysics in field geology, mathematics, seismology, geodynamics, geophysics 2001 Diplom Geophysics (M

  14. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  15. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01

    III, S. (1977) Seismic Stratigraphy and the global changeset al. (1986). “High-Resolution Seismic Stratigraphyof sea level. In:Seismic Stratigraphy – Applications to

  16. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01

    Resolution Seismic Stratigraphy and Its SedimentologicalIII, S. (1977) Seismic Stratigraphy and the global changesof sea level. In:Seismic Stratigraphy – Applications to

  17. Expedited Site Characterization geophysics: Geophysical methods and tools for site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report covers five classes of geophysical technologies: Magnetics; Electrical/electromagnetic; Seismic reflection; Gamma-ray spectrometry; and Metal-specific spectrometry. Except for radiometry, no other classes of geophysical tedmologies are specific for direct detection of the types of contaminants present at the selected sites. For each of the five classes covered, the report gives a general description of the methodology, its field use, and its general applicability to the ESC Project. In addition, the report gives a sample of the most promising instruments available for each class, including the following information: Hardware/software attributes; Purchase and rental costs; Survey rate and operating costs; and Other applicable information based on case history and field evaluations.

  18. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01

    Local and Global Environmental Governance, edited by M. L.Local and Global in Environmental Governance. Cambridge, MA:Global Atmosphere: Computer Models, Data, and Knowledge about Climate Change. In Changing the Atmosphere: Expert Knowledge and Environmental Governance,

  19. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  20. GLOBALIZATION HAS EXISTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -tech and social spheres. Leading in our highly connected, dynamic and fast-changing world takes special skills that you will consider joining us in expanding and strengthening Darden's global community and impact. MARC countries with active alumni chapters around the globe. EXAMPLES India Mexico Brazil PARTNER SCHOOLS Darden

  1. Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co of global climate change­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Projected Climate Change 200-2100 What Global

  2. Assessment of U.S. Cap-and-Trade Proposals MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Report 160

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Net Crude Oil Imports (billion 2005$) 77.40 85.21 93.97 102.60 110Assessment of U.S. Cap-and-Trade Proposals MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global.00 0.00 0.00 PRICES (index, 2005=1.00) Petroleum Product 1.00 1.15 1.30 1.48 1.69 1.87 1.97 2.09 2.19 2

  3. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  4. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  5. A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  6. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  7. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrew

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated transport of warm, and over- turning circulation. 1 Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. 2 Environmental Sciences and Engineering, California

  8. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming* The Perfect Storm Jim Hansen 29 January 2008 Health Implications of Climate Change opinion #12;Perfect Storm, Perfect Disaster 1. Great Inertia of Systems - Ocean: Half of Warming still "In

  9. Mike Batzle holds the Baker Hughes Distinguished Chair of Petrophysics and Borehole Geophysics, at the Colorado School of Mines, where he has been a member of the geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Batzle holds the Baker Hughes Distinguished Chair of Petrophysics and Borehole Geophysics, at the Colorado School of Mines, where he has been a member of the geophysics department for the past 17 years from the University of California, Riverside, and a PhD in geophysics from MIT. His main interests have

  10. REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986 RecentResearchin SnowHydrology JEFF DOZIER Centerfor Remote thespectraldistri- butionof the incomingsolardirectanddiffuseirradianceand thespectralalbedo: Copyfight1987bytheAmericanGeophysical

  11. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2013-12-31

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

  12. Effects of Large Volcanic Eruptions on Global Summer Climate and East Asian Monsoon Changes during the Last Millennium: Analysis of MPI-ESM Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    the scattering of incoming solar radiation by aerosol particles produces an increase of the fraction of solar for Meteorology. The model was driven by up-to-date reconstructions of external forcing, including natural forcing (solar and volcanic) and anthropogenic forcing (land-cover change and greenhouse gases). Cooling

  13. Invited Paper, Conference on Global Change: Economic Issues in Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources. Washington, D.C. November 19-21, 1990.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    of these economic evaluations, while preliminary, suggest that climate change is not a food security issue, #12 and control" strategies. Objectives There are few economic evaluations of the costs to agricultural producers is to perform a preliminary economic evaluation of the social costs of selected strategies to reduce trace gas

  14. "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real or presumed developments is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real of catastrophic global warming the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" What is climate change we have ever seen" What is climate change? Lord Nicholas Stern, October 2006 #12;"Global warming

  15. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational

  16. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01

    Scientific Uncertainty about Global Climate Change. PublicConservation Foundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter ofFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  17. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  18. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  19. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    © 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming make Triton blush? Neptune's largest moon (refs 5,6), and global warming has now been observed7 . We obtained four spectra of Triton between 0. Both the spectral changes and the global warming may have been caused by a triggering event

  20. Wildfires ignite debate on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    Wildfires ignite debate on global warming Astemperaturessoar. Is there a link with global warming? We have good reason to think so, and not taking the link seriously could have on climate change and global fire predictions last month, and I have been in my own media storm ever since

  1. Global Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security

  2. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1 Global

  3. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  4. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; Spane, Frank A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  5. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Vermeul, Vince R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Bonneville, Alain [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Sullivan, E. Charlotte [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Johnson, Tim C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Gilmore, Tyler J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  6. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; et al

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number ofmore »geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.« less

  7. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi

  8. Geophysical Investigations of the Mound City Borrow Pits, Ross County, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Blair

    2012-05-31

    Geophysical subsurface imaging is becoming a common practice in archaeology. Non-invasive geophysical methods provide efficient alternatives to costly and invasive excavations, allowing archaeologists to analyze sites before any excavation is done...

  9. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2003 1 volcanic collapse formation, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 4 (9), 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000483

  10. Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojahedi, Mohammad

    Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service · Find Similar Abstracts (with default | Query Form | Preferences | HELP | FAQ Physics/Geophysics arXiv e-prints Send Query Reset #12;

  11. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2005 1. 2 craters. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, E10001, doi: 10.1029/2004JE002338, 2005. 7. Blewett, D. T

  12. ERNEST LUTHER MAJER Ph.D., June 1978 Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , and for tracking fluid injection fronts. Staff Scientist, Group Leader Geophysics/Geomechanics Group Earth Sciences/Subsurface Geosciences, Geophysics/ Geomechanics Earth Sciences Division, 1994 - 2002 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Recent

  13. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data using Bayesian techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data velocity for hydraulic conductivity estimation at the South Oyster Site, using a Bayesian framework. Since site- specific relations between hydraulic conductivity and geophysical properties are often nonlinear

  14. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A.

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  16. Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo In a historic moment of Justice for the Climate) backgrounds. It aimed to establish a set of guiding global principles for a just response to climate change. The intention of the Climate Justice Dialogue was to lend new impetus to an awareness of climate change

  17. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  18. GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL AS DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL ´AS DEPOSIT information to the explorationist. This thesis examines the role geophysical inversion can assume in an integrated explo- ration program, and the impact it can have on the results. As an example, geophysical data

  19. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2006 1 with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands. Geophysical Research Letters. 9. Boyce viewed by the THEMIS instrument: Double-layered ejecta craters. J. Geophysical Research, 111, E10005, doi

  20. Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin developing earthquake location techniques in support. Associate Program Director, Geophysics National Science Foundation 4201 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22230

  1. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt425

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nore, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt425 GJIGeomagnetismInstitute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8092, Switzerland. E-mail: ajackson@ethz.ch 2Institute of Geophysics, University of G¨ottingen, D-37077 G¨ottingen, Germany 3Solar Physics, Hansen Experimental Physics

  2. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 56, OctoberDecember 2007, 469487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 5­6, October­December 2007, 469, USA zInstitute of Geophysics, University of Go¨ ttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Go¨ ttingen (though later work by Banka and *Corresponding author. Email: dpl@complex.umd.edu Geophysical

  3. Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe to create the IRGGEA (International Group in Geophysics Europe Africa) in order to pursue the scientific: Scientific network, ethical rules, geophysics, sustainable research, Africa. 1. Introduction

  4. Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University, Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University of pos- sible applications in geophysics. It is elaborated how a description of the well log measurement to the mentioned elds. This paper is written in the hope of achieving the same in the area of geophysics. The idea

  5. Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty Boise State University conducted a geophysics field camp in northern Thailand in January, 2010 to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental and engineering challenges. Faculty, technicians

  6. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  7. Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project [Extended for geophysical surveying. This paper describes the main features of the envisaged developments, with a focus.00. Figure 1: Conventional geophysical surveying using long lines of towed streamers team. Such teams

  8. Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree General Chemistry II with Lab 4 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOG 360 Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs Physics Option II: PHYS 111-112 General Physics 8-10 Geophysics

  9. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS GRADUATE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA · GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS GRADUATE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 1680 East-West Road, POST 701, Honolulu, HI 96822 For Semester/YEAR FALL ________ SPRING ________ Intended Graduate Program GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Degree

  10. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  11. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  12. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  13. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  14. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position ­ Geophysics - The University of Alabama invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure track visiting faculty position in geophysics geophysical sub-disciplines, preference will be given to candidates who will enhance our existing geophysics

  15. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  16. Marine Geophysical Research An International Journal for the Study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    1 23 Marine Geophysical Research An International Journal for the Study of the Earth Beneath just prior to full break-up. We identify a major continental block separated from the shelf margin by a basin of hyperextended crust. Oligocene-Early Miocene rifting was followed by mild compression

  17. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 429438 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01

    Geophysical Society 2001 Mesoscale predictability under various synoptic regimes W. A. Nuss and D. K. Miller slightly ro- tated terrain are compared to gauge the sentivity of mesoscale forecasts to small forecast errors on the mesoscale in both wind and precipitation. The largest mesoscale errors occur when

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-PREVIEW, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (s) 2010 Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization. Gilles Grandjean, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical

  19. Recent advances in optimized geophysical survey design Hansruedi Maurer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    method. In contrast, an underdetermined 2D seismic traveltime tomog- raphy design study indicates subsurface information as the full bandwidth.Anon- linear experimental design for a seismic amplitudeRecent advances in optimized geophysical survey design Hansruedi Maurer1 , Andrew Curtis2

  20. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1, London, SW7 2BZ, UK 2.1 Introduction Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is a vast subject that has several journals partly, or primarily, dedicated to its investigation (Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics