National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for global biogeochemical dynamics

  1. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  2. Global Biogeochemical Cycles Global biogeochemical cycles can be defined as any of the natural circulation pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    Global Biogeochemical Cycles Global biogeochemical cycles can be defined as any of the natural of the atmosphere. Incoming solar radiation is partly absorbed and reflected in the atmosphere. The remaining part-wave radiation and serve as a blanket for the lower atmosphere. The potential for two-way interactions

  3. in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaja, Arnaud

    in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes College, London, UK Abstract. We analyze the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM), known to impact the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide, is also

  4. Biogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , * , , R U B E N K R E T Z S C H M A R , § A N D R E A S K A P P L E R , | P H I L I P P E V A N C A P P E L L E N , M A T T H E W G I N D E R - V O G E L , # A N D R E A S V O E G E L I N , § , A N D KBiogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics T H O M A S B O R C H

  5. Natural biogeochemical cycle of mercury in a global three-dimensional ocean tracer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyatt Jaeglé

    (HgP aq). Our Hg parameterization takes into account redox chemistry in ocean waters, air-sea exchange global mean concentrations of 0.16 pM for total Hg, partitioned as 80% HgII aq, 14% Hg0 aq, and 6% HgP aq

  6. Environmental Data from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    •\tThe Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) The ORNL DAAC also provides access to data for many regional and global projects and to a model archive. (Specialized Interface)(Registration Required)

  7. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Jorge L. Sarmiento and Nicolas Gruber: Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    of carbon between the two other important reservoirs of the global carbon cycle: the terrestrial biosphere that substantial changes must have occured in the distribution of carbon between the different reservoirs. Several with the oceanic carbon cycle, since this reservoir controls atmospheric CO2 on any timescale longer than a few

  8. Spatial and temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the Fraser River, Canada : a coupled organic-inorganic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voss, Britta Marie

    2014-01-01

    The great geologic and climatic diversity of the Fraser River basin in southwestern Canada render it an excellent location for understanding biogeochemical cycling of sediments and terrigenous organic carbon in a relatively ...

  9. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Global Dynamic Optimization Adam Benjamin Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Chemical Engineering Abstract My thesis focuses on global optimization of nonconvex integral objectiveGlobal Dynamic Optimization by Adam Benjamin Singer Submitted to the Department of Chemical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical

  11. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  12. Empirical Dynamical System Reduction I: Global Nonlinear Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Rick

    Empirical Dynamical System Reduction I: Global Nonlinear Transformations Michael Kirby and Rick (CNLKL) for the data reduction and semi­analytical remodeling of dynamical systems. The unconstrained­Lo`eve (CNLKL) 12 5. Reduction and Semi­analytic Remodeling of Dynamical Systems 17 6. Summary and Directions

  13. Validated global multiobjective optimization of trajectories in nonlinear dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffee, Thomas Merritt

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new approach for global multiobjective optimization of trajectories in continuous nonlinear dynamical systems that can provide rigorous, arbitrarily tight bounds on the objective values and state paths ...

  14. Quantification of Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics in the Conterminous United States Combining a Process-Based Biogeochemical Model and MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Cook, David R.; Coulter, Richard L.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Scott, Russell L.; Munger, J. W.; Bible, Ken

    2011-09-21

    Satellite remote sensing provides continuous temporal and spatial information of terrestrial 24 ecosystems. Using these remote sensing data and eddy flux measurements and biogeochemical 25 models, such as the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), should provide a more adequate 26 quantification of carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use Moderate Resolution 27 Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Land Surface Water Index 28 (LSWI) and carbon flux data of AmeriFlux to conduct such a study. We first modify the gross primary 29 production (GPP) modeling in TEM by incorporating EVI and LSWI to account for the effects of the 30 changes of canopy photosynthetic capacity, phenology and water stress. Second, we parameterize and 31 verify the new version of TEM with eddy flux data. We then apply the model to the conterminous 32 United States over the period 2000-2005 at a 0.05o ×0.05o spatial resolution. We find that the new 33 version of TEM generally captured the expected temporal and spatial patterns of regional carbon 34 dynamics. We estimate that regional GPP is between 7.02 and 7.78 Pg C yr-1 and net primary 35 production (NPP) ranges from 3.81 to 4.38 Pg C yr-1 and net ecosystem production (NEP) varies 36 within 0.08-0.73 Pg C yr-1 over the period 2000-2005 for the conterminous United States. The 37 uncertainty due to parameterization is 0.34, 0.65 and 0.18 Pg C yr-1 for the regional estimates of GPP, 38 NPP and NEP, respectively. The effects of extreme climate and disturbances such as severe drought in 39 2002 and destructive Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were captured by the model. Our study provides a 40 new independent and more adequate measure of carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, 41 which will benefit studies of carbon-climate feedback and facilitate policy-making of carbon 42 management and climate.

  15. Quantification of terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the conterminous United States combining a process-based biogeochemical model and MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Cook, D.; Coulter, Richard L.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Scott, Russell L.; Munger, J. W.; Bible, Ken

    2011-08-31

    Satellite remote sensing provides continuous temporal and spatial information of terrestrial ecosystems. Using these remote sensing data and eddy flux measurements and biogeochemical models, such as the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), should provide a more adequate quantification of carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Land Surface Water Index (LSWI) and carbon flux data of AmeriFlux to conduct such a study. We first modify the gross primary production (GPP) modeling in TEM by incorporating EVI and LSWI to account for the effects of the changes of canopy photosynthetic capacity, phenology and water stress. Second, we parameterize and verify the new version of TEM with eddy flux data. We then apply the model to the conterminous United States over the period 2000-2005 at a 0.05-0.05 spatial resolution. We find that the new version of TEM made improvement over the previous version and generally captured the expected temporal and spatial patterns of regional carbon dynamics. We estimate that regional GPP is between 7.02 and 7.78 PgC yr{sup -1} and net primary production (NPP) ranges from 3.81 to 4.38 Pg Cyr{sup -1} and net ecosystem production (NEP) varies within 0.08- 0.73 PgC yr{sup -1} over the period 2000-2005 for the conterminous United States. The uncertainty due to parameterization is 0.34, 0.65 and 0.18 PgC yr{sup -1} for the regional estimates of GPP, NPP and NEP, respectively. The effects of extreme climate and disturbances such as severe drought in 2002 and destructive Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were captured by the model. Our study provides a new independent and more adequate measure of carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, which will benefit studies of carbon-climate feedback and facilitate policy-making of carbon management and climate.

  16. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters, Global Biogeochem

  17. Dynamics of a global string with large Higgs boson mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Charmousis; B. Boisseau; B. Linet

    1998-01-12

    We consider a self-gravitating string generated by a global vortex solution in general relativity. We investigate the Einstein and field equations of a global vortex in the region of its central line and at a distance from the centre of the order of the inverse of its Higgs boson mass. By combining the two we establish by a limiting process of large Higgs mass the dynamics of a self-gravitating global string. Under our assumptions the presence of gravitation restricts the world sheet of the global string to be totally geodesic.

  18. The role of global dynamics on gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Escape flux is inferred for each gas under given eddy coefficient Global winds can locally considerably affect gas distributions How would winds affect inferred escape fluxes? Tuesday, 28 February 12 #12 structure (from GCM) and zero winds (only molecular & eddy diffusion) Upper boundary condition: Lower

  19. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF AN SEIR EPIDEMIC MODEL WITH VERTICAL TRANSMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Michael

    GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF AN SEIR EPIDEMIC MODEL WITH VERTICAL TRANSMISSION MICHAEL Y. LI, HAL L. SMITH population through both horizontal and vertical transmission. The total host population is assumed to have at an endemic equilibrium state if it initially exists. The contribution of the vertical transmission

  20. "The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their field at the ESA 2010 General Meeting. However, more importantly, the session will provide for a broad range of interests for ecosystem ecologists, theoretical ecologists, and global change biologists, and will foster communication between these groups to generate informative microbial community data in the future.

  1. Global Biogeochemical Cycles and Biological Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    II. Biological Metabolism A. Redox reactions: basis of metabolism B. The metabolic pathways C. Microbial Habits rate of 90-140 Tg N/yr): No place on earth (terrestrial) 80 to 90 Tg Vitousek et al., 1997 earth;4 Atmospheric N2: 3.9 x 109 Reactive N (NOx, NH3) Note big difference in N turnover times in terrestrial vs

  2. 3, 13131354, 2006 biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Yool5 , and A. Watson4 1 Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, USA 2 Frontier Research Center for Global Change, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama. Here we describe the ocean carbon5 cycle, which is based around a simple single nutrient (phosphate

  3. Reassessing thermodynamic and dynamic constraints on global wind power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Li, B L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of the power output of moist atmospheric air. It is shown to be represented as a sum of terms with different physical meanings and uncertainties. We demonstrate that using a thermodynamic approach to constrain the global power output as a whole, e.g. by considering the entropy budget (Lalibert\\'e et al., 2015), results in a loss of information concerning the rate of kinetic energy generation. We discuss why it is important to find dynamic constraints on wind power and emphasize the role of condensation in the generation of atmospheric circulation.

  4. Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-04-12

    Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

  5. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, A. E.

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical–ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer ...

  6. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 169. Outcrop fracture mapping, drilling and monitoring well installation, borehole geophysical surveys, pumping in monitoring wells near the injection point. #12;Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718

  7. New dynamics of the Sun convection zone and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bershadskii, A

    2008-01-01

    Solar activity is studied using cluster analysis of the sunspot number time-fluctuations. It is shown that for a Historic period (1850-1932yy) the cluster exponent $\\alpha \\simeq 0.37$ (strong clustering) for the high activity components of the solar cycles, whereas for a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) the cluster exponent $\\alpha \\simeq 0.50$ (random, white noise-like situation). Then, comparing these results with the corresponding data from the classic laboratory convection experiments it is shown, that for the Historic period emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. For the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics in the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had clear detectable impact on the global Earth climate at this period. Name...

  8. GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL PAUL GEORGESCU AND YING-HEN HSIEH Abstract. Global dynamics of a compartmental model which describes virus and the removal rate of the virus are assumed to be nonlinear. In the case where the functional quotient between

  9. Global Biogeochemical Cycles Global biogeochemical cycles can be defined as any of the natural circulation pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    gases such as water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, and nitrogen oxides absorb the long and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and the climate system comes from the radiative properties of CO2 into the deep sea feed back on the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. #12;Several studies indicate

  10. VIRUS DYNAMICS: A GLOBAL ANALYSIS PATRICK DE LEENHEER AND HAL L. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leenheer, Patrick

    VIRUS DYNAMICS: A GLOBAL ANALYSIS PATRICK DE LEENHEER AND HAL L. SMITH SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2003 and Nelson [SIAM Rev., 41 (1999), pp. 3­44] and Nowak and May [Virus Dynamics, Oxford University Press, New of their dynamics. If the basic reproduction number R0 virus is cleared and the disease dies out; if R0 > 1

  11. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  12. A Dynamic Critical Path Algorithm for Scheduling Scientific Workflow Applications on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    A Dynamic Critical Path Algorithm for Scheduling Scientific Workflow Applications on Global Grids for the execution of performance driven Grid applications. In this paper, we propose a Dynamic Critical Path (DCP the critical path in the workflow task graph at every step. It assigns priority to a task in the critical path

  13. Presidential address Geomycology: biogeochemical transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Corresponding Editor: David L. Hawksworth Keywords: Carbonates Clay minerals Environmental biotechnology Lichens, and it is hoped that this review will serve to catalyse further research, as well as stimulate interest in an area of mycology of global significance. ª 2007 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. The dynamics of interfirm networks along the industry life cycle: The case of the global video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balland, Pierre-Alexandre

    firms along the life cycle of a creative industry. We focus on three mechanisms that drive networkThe dynamics of interfirm networks along the industry life cycle: The case of the global video game, industry life cycle, proximity, creative industry, video game industry, stochastic actor-oriented model JEL

  15. Marine Ecosystem Dynamics and Biogeochemical Cycling in the Community Earth System Model [CESM1(BGC)]: Comparison of the 1990s with the 2090s under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. Keith; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C; Long, Matthew C; Misumi, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    2013: The Community Earth System Model: A Framework forcurrent system in an earth system model. Geophys. Res.global warming in an Earth System Model. Bio- geosciences,

  16. Global dynamics and inflationary center manifold and slow-roll approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur Alho; Claes Uggla

    2015-01-15

    We consider the familiar problem of a minimally coupled scalar field with quadratic potential in flat Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology to illustrate a number of techniques and tools, which can be applied to a wide range of scalar field potentials and problems in e.g. modified gravity. We present a global and regular dynamical systems description that yields a global understanding of the solution space, including asymptotic features. We introduce dynamical systems techniques such as center manifold expansions and use Pad\\'e approximants to obtain improved approximations for the `attractor solution' at early times. We also show that future asymptotic behavior is associated with a limit cycle, which shows that manifest self-similarity is asymptotically broken toward the future, and give approximate expressions for this behavior. We then combine these results to obtain global approximations for the attractor solution, which, e.g., might be used in the context of global measures. In addition we elucidate the connection between slow-roll based approximations and the attractor solution, and compare these approximations with the center manifold based approximants.

  17. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, S.

    2011-01-01

    aspects of atmospheric methane, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 2,Budeus, Fate of vent derived methane in seawater above theHanfland, Pathways of methane in seawater: Plume spreading

  18. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Ding, A.; Wang, H.; Zhang, K.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, T.; et al

    2015-09-02

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (?500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascendmore »(?500 ?1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm d?1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.« less

  19. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  20. Coordinated Approaches to Quantify Long-Term Ecosystem Dynamics in Response to Global Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Many serious ecosystem consequences of climate change will take decades or even 50 centuries to emerge. Long-term ecological responses to global change are strongly regulated by 51 slow processes, such as changes in species composition, carbon dynamics in soil and by long-52 lived plants, and accumulation of nutrient capitals. Understanding and predicting these processes 53 requires experiments on decadal time scales. But decadal experiments by themselves may not be 54 adequate because many of the slow processes have characteristic time scales much longer than 55 experiments can be maintained. This article promotes a coordinated approach that combines 56 long-term, large-scale global change experiments with process studies and modeling. Long-term 57 global change manipulative experiments, especially in high-priority ecosystems such as tropical 58 forests and high-latitude regions, are essential to maximize information gain concerning future 59 states of the earth system. The long-term experiments should be conducted in tandem with 60 complementary process studies, such as those using model ecosystems, species replacements, 61 laboratory incubations, isotope tracers, and greenhouse facilities. Models are essential to 62 assimilate data from long-term experiments and process studies together with information from 63 long-term observations, surveys, and space-for-time studies along environmental and biological 64 gradients. Future research programs with coordinated long-term experiments, process studies, 65 and modeling have the potential to be the most effective strategy to gain the best information on 66 long-term ecosystem dynamics in response to global change. 67 68

  1. The Stabilizing Role of Global Alliances in the Dynamics of Coalition Forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinogradova, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Coalition forming is investigated among countries, which are coupled with short range interactions, under the influence of external fields produced by the existence of global alliances. The model rests on the natural model of coalition forming inspired from Statistical Physics, where instabilities are a consequence of decentralized maximization of the individual benefits of actors within their long horizon of rationality as the ability to envision a way through intermediate loosing states, to a better configuration. The effects of those external incentives on the interactions between countries and the eventual stabilization of coalitions are studied. The results shed a new light on the understanding of the complex phenomena of stabilization and fragmentation in the coalition dynamics and on the possibility to design stable coalitions. In addition to the formal implementation of the model, the phenomena is illustrated through some historical cases of conflicts in Western Europe.

  2. Nonlocal and global dynamics of cellular automata: A theoretical computer arithmetic for real continuous maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Garcia-Morales

    2015-02-03

    A digit function is presented which provides the $i$th-digit in base $p$ of any real number $x$. By means of this function, formulated within $\\mathcal{B}$-calculus, the local, nonlocal and global dynamical behaviors of cellular automata (CAs) are systematically explored and universal maps are derived for the three levels of description. None of the maps contain any freely adjustable parameter and they are valid for any number of symbols in the alphabet $p$ and neighborhood range $\\rho$. A discrete general method to approximate any real continuous map in the unit interval by a CA on the rational numbers $\\mathbb{Q}$ (Diophantine approximation) is presented. This result leads to establish a correspondence between the qualitative behavior found in bifurcation diagrams of real nonlinear maps and the Wolfram classes of CAs. The method is applied to the logistic map, for which a logistic CA is derived. The period doubling cascade into chaos is interpreted as a sequence of global cellular automata of Wolfram's class 2 leading to Class 3 aperiodic behavior. Class 4 behavior is also found close to the period-3 orbits.

  3. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  4. Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

  5. BULK POWER SYSTEM DYNAMICS AND CONTROL V, AUGUST 26-31, 2001, ONOMICHI, JAPAN Global Hybrid Control of Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    BULK POWER SYSTEM DYNAMICS AND CONTROL V, AUGUST 26-31, 2001, ONOMICHI, JAPAN Global Hybrid Control| This paper presents an overview of recent results on an ap- proach to total control of power systems con- trol for voltage security of power systems, and same ideas for general control [1{6]. In arriving

  6. Globally Distributed Engineering Teams in Computational Fluid Dynamics and in Product Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Susanne R.

    2010-10-12

    Globally distributed engineering teams are a reality in globally operating companies. However, research on teams is often done by psychologists, with a focus on general team building and working processes, and seldom on engineering teams...

  7. Dynamically and Observationally Constrained Estimates of Water-Mass Distributions and Ages in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Lumpkin, R. , and K. Speer, 2007: Global ocean meridionalStammer 2004; Lumpkin and Speer 2007), but, in an advective–

  8. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  9. The dynamics of technology diffusion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F; Foley, A M; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of possible uses of climate policy instruments for the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector in a non-equilibrium economic and technology innovation-diffusion perspective. Emissions reductions occur through changes in technology and energy consumption; in this context, investment decision-making opportunities occur periodically, which energy policy can incentivise in order to transform energy systems and meet reductions targets. Energy markets are driven by innovation, dynamic costs and technology diffusion; yet, the incumbent systems optimisation methodology in energy modelling does not address these aspects nor the effectiveness of policy onto decision-making since the dynamics modelled take their source from the top-down `social-planner' assumption. This leads to an underestimation of strong technology lock-ins in cost-optimal scenarios of technology. Our approach explores the global diffusion of low carbon technology in connection to a highly disaggregated sector...

  10. DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT, AND COMMERCIALIZATION OF A BIOGEOCHEMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    -optical sensors (both active and passive) onto profiling floats, deployed and tested the floats in interesting for the evaluation of the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. The work is a collaborative project between of opportunity for deployment and evaluation of the float and is shar- ing expertise on calibration

  11. Global Warming and Marine Carbon Cycle Feedbacks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    Global Warming and Marine Carbon Cycle Feedbacks on Future Atmospheric CO2 Fortunat Joos,* Gian-biogeochemical climate model was used to project at- mospheric carbon dioxide and global warming for scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation weakens in all global warming

  12. The role of plants in the Hg biogeochemical cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Biogeochemical Cycle Hg0RGM Hgp Sources Natural: · Soils G th l A ti Z Anthropogenic: · Coal fired power plants W Cycle Hg0RGM Hgp Factors that control Hg release from soils ­ Light TemperatureTemperature Precipitation ­ Anthropogenic emission sources and secondary formation by id ti f H 0oxidation of Hg0 · Particulate mercury (Hgp

  13. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria Robert E. Available online 14 August 2007. Abstract Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect

  14. Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    representations of Earth System Models have included the carbon (C) cycle (Friedlingstein et al., 2006

  15. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  16. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  17. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    concerns about energy security and environ- mental sustainability have prompted development of renewable energy. Currently, global energy supplies are dominated by fossil fuels, with very limited renewable, only a very small proportion of the world energy supply came from renewable energy sources like hydro

  18. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  19. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  20. Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

  1. Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1 Brian C. Jackman (2005), Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L14808, doi:10.1029/2005GL023073. 1. Terrestrial Implications of Gamma Ray Bursts in Our Galaxy [2

  2. Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claustre, H.; Bishop, J.; Boss, E.; Bernard, S.; Berthon, J.-F.; Coatanoan, C.; Johnson, K.; Lotiker, A.; Ulloa, O.; Perry, M.J.; D'Ortenzio, F.; D'andon, O.H.F.; Uitz, J.

    2009-10-01

    Profiling floats now represent a mature technology. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has begun to benefit from the increase in observational capacities by developing profiling floats that allow the measurement of key biooptical variables and subsequent products of biogeochemical and ecosystem relevance like Chlorophyll a (Chla), optical backscattering or attenuation coefficients which are proxies of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). Thanks to recent algorithmic improvements, new bio-optical variables such as backscattering coefficient or absorption by CDOM, at present can also be extracted from space observations of ocean color. In the future, an intensification of in situ measurements by bio-optical profiling floats would permit the elaboration of unique 3D/4D bio-optical climatologies, linking surface (remotely detected) properties to their vertical distribution (measured by autonomous platforms), with which key questions in the role of the ocean in climate could be addressed. In this context, the objective of the IOCCG (International Ocean Color Coordinating Group) BIO-Argo working group is to elaborate recommendations in view of a future use of bio-optical profiling floats as part of a network that would include a global array that could be 'Argo-relevant', and specific arrays that would have more focused objectives or regional targets. The overall network, realizing true multi-scale sustained observations of global marine biogeochemistry and biooptics, should satisfy the requirements for validation of ocean color remote sensing as well as the needs of a wider community investigating the impact of global change on biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems. Regarding the global profiling float array, the recommendation is that Chla as well as POC should be the key variables to be systematically measured. A first target would be to implement 20% of the Argo floats with these measurements within a five-year term. The yearly additional cost is estimated to 1.5 M$, including additional management structure in each of the two Global Data Assembly Centers.

  3. An Ecological and Biogeochemical Characterization of a Subterranean Estuary in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haukebo, Sepp Leif

    2014-01-16

    Subterranean estuaries are biogeochemical reactors within the coastal aquifer and represent a processing zone of dissolved chemical constituents prior to submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Highly stratified hydrologic layers and sharp...

  4. SWS 5182: Earth System Analysis Catalogue Description: Analysis of global-scale interdependences between climate, biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and Energy Budget Rahmstorf et al., 2006, Chapter 4 Set up Earth system model Lag in the climate system 6-atmosphere carbon balance Chapter 8 in Sarmiento and Gruber Add ocean carbon cycle to your Earth system model Friedlingstein et al., 2006 Quantify carbon cycle climate feedback in Earth system models 13 - 14 Th

  5. SWS4180: Earth System Analysis Catalogue Description: Analysis of global-scale interdependences between climate, biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Quantify carbon cycle climate feedback in Earth system models 13 - 14 The fate of anthropogenic greenhouse

  6. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    of the ocean, ultraviolet light penetration, and photochemical reactions that influence the cycling) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found encompass all three ocean basins transecting the subtropics where satelliteretrieved surface ocean CDOM

  7. Single-cell and population level viral infection dynamics revealed by phageFISH, a method to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Microbiology, Celsiusstr. 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany. Summary Microbes drive the biogeochemical cycles that fuel the biogeochemical cycles that fuel our planet (Falkowski et al., 2008), and their viruses (phages) impact microbesSingle-cell and population level viral infection dynamics revealed by phageFISH, a method

  8. Continuous improvement at a multinational company : dealing with uncertainty in the global supply chain and analyzing implementation dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochoa Gonzalez, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the problem of global supply chain flexibility in the context of a multinational commonly that we refer to as Company X. Company X faces competitive markets, increasingly demanding customers, and ...

  9. Turning quicksand into bedrock : understanding the dynamic effects of disease-focused global health aid on health systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newkirk, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    This thesis asks one basic question: how do "vertical" disease- or intervention-focused global health programs impact the underlying health systems of the nations they serve? Vertical programs-health aid focused on a ...

  10. Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

  11. USELESS ARITHMETIC? LESSONS LEARNT FROM AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    ...Most frightening at all, our complacent acceptance of this approach shows that mathematics has become a substitute to accept absurdity" James O'Malley, former member of the New England Fisheries Management Council), land use planning, climate change on global, regional and local scales, and system adaptation. In all

  12. On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

  13. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  14. Biogeochemical variability in the southern Ross Sea as observed by a glider deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Biogeochemical variability in the southern Ross Sea as observed by a glider deployment Daniel E­2011 austral summer identified variations in phytoplankton biomass along two glider sections near 761400 S. Sea In situ observations and satellite-derived data from the Ross Sea have revealed high phytoplankton biomass

  15. Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea Peng Xiu1 and Fei Chai1] Mesoscale eddies are observed each year in the South China Sea (SCS); however, their contributions physicalbiogeochemical model to evaluate the eddy impact. We first track the modeled mesoscale eddies in the SCS

  16. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    of industrial7 processes, e.g., lime production waste, steelworks slags, coal combustion residues, Solvay8ForPeerReview Only Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil profile1 2 Ian T. Burke1* , Robert J.G. Mortimer1

  17. Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential could threaten those services, with unknown environmental consequences. The outbreak of emerald ash borer is an imminent threat to the ash population in North America. In the Minneapolis­Saint Paul

  18. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  19. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Zhang, P. Y.; Han, K. L.

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +} by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH{sup +}(X{sup 1}?{sup +})+H({sup 2}S)?C{sup +}({sup 2}P)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +}) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C{sup +}/H containing systems.

  20. Goldschmidt 2012 Abstract Template (maximum: 1 column) Biogeochemical Dynamics of Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    -CZO), located in the Piedmont region of Southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware, is a partnership a high capacity to complex carbon (C), reducing susceptibility of C to microbial degradation. At the same over a 9 month-period with respect to the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC

  1. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  2. Global patterns and controls of soil organic carbon dynamics as simulated by multiple terrestrial biosphere models: Current status and future directions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Michalak, Anna M.; Cook, Robert; Ciais, Philippe; Hayes, Daniel; et al

    2015-06-05

    Soil is the largest organic carbon (C) pool of terrestrial ecosystems, and C loss from soil accounts for a large proportion of land-atmosphere C exchange. Therefore, a small change in soil organic C (SOC) can affect atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO?) concentration and climate change. In the past decades, a wide variety of studies have been conducted to quantify global SOC stocks and soil C exchange with the atmosphere through site measurements, inventories, and empirical/process-based modeling. However, these estimates are highly uncertain, and identifying major driving forces controlling soil C dynamics remains a key research challenge. This study has compiled century-longmore »(1901–2010) estimates of SOC storage and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from 10 terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project and two observation-based data sets. The 10 TBM ensemble shows that global SOC estimate ranges from 425 to 2111 Pg C (1 Pg = 10¹? g) with a median value of 1158 Pg C in 2010. The models estimate a broad range of Rh from 35 to 69 Pg C yr?¹ with a median value of 51 Pg C yr?¹ during 2001–2010. The largest uncertainty in SOC stocks exists in the 40–65°N latitude whereas the largest cross-model divergence in Rh are in the tropics. The modeled SOC change during 1901–2010 ranges from –70 Pg C to 86 Pg C, but in some models the SOC change has a different sign from the change of total C stock, implying very different contribution of vegetation and soil pools in determining the terrestrial C budget among models. The model ensemble-estimated mean residence time of SOC shows a reduction of 3.4 years over the past century, which accelerate C cycling through the land biosphere. All the models agreed that climate and land use changes decreased SOC stocks, while elevated atmospheric CO? and nitrogen deposition over intact ecosystems increased SOC stocks—even though the responses varied significantly among models. Model representations of temperature and moisture sensitivity, nutrient limitation, and land use partially explain the divergent estimates of global SOC stocks and soil C fluxes in this study. In addition, a major source of systematic error in model estimations relates to nonmodeled SOC storage in wetlands and peatlands, as well as to old C storage in deep soil layers.« less

  3. 4 GLOBAL DYNAMICS Applied Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    , and the rate of convergence is exponential. The linear spaces are spanned by the rele- vant eigenvectors

  4. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-18

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr?1, with wetlandmore »methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr?1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 were in the range of 14.6–30.4 Tg yr?1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr?1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr?1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.« less

  5. GLOBALIZATION HAS EXISTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -tech and social spheres. Leading in our highly connected, dynamic and fast-changing world takes special skills that you will consider joining us in expanding and strengthening Darden's global community and impact. MARC countries with active alumni chapters around the globe. EXAMPLES India Mexico Brazil PARTNER SCHOOLS Darden

  6. Global Inflation Dynamics: regularities & forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akaev, Askar; Korotayev, Andrey V; Fomin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    countries   Data source: World Bank 2012: NY.GDP.DEFL.KD.ZG. This diagram demonstrates that the oil price

  7. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  8. Biogeochemical Changes at Early Stage After the Closure of Radioactive Waste Geological Repository in South Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Choi, Seho; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Kim, Sungpyo; Park, Jin beak; Kim, Suk-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the subterranean environment has been the preferred method of many countries, including Korea. A safety issue after the closure of a geological repository is that biodegradation of organic materials due to microbial activities generates gases that lead to overpressure of the waste containers in the repository and its disintegration with the release of radionuclides. As part of an ongoing large-scale in situ experiment using organic wastes and groundwater to simulate geological radioactive waste repository conditions, we investigated the geochemical alteration and microbial activities at an early stage (~63 days) intended to be representative of the initial period after repository closure. The increased numbers of both aerobes and facultative anaerobes in waste effluents indicate that oxygen content could be the most significant parameter to control biogeochemical conditions at very early periods of reaction (<35 days). Accordingly, the values of dissolved oxygen and redox potential were decreased. The activation of anaerobes after 35 days was supported by the increased concentration to ~50 mg L-1 of ethanol. These results suggest that the biogeochemical conditions were rapidly altered to more reducing and anaerobic conditions within the initial 2 months after repository closure. Although no gases were detected during the study, activated anaerobic microbes will play more important role in gas generation over the long term.

  9. Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

    Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

  10. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  11. Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 30173039 Biogeochemical impacts due to mesoscale eddy activity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 3017­3039 Biogeochemical impacts due to mesoscale eddy activity of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA d of an eddy. Primary production nearly as high as the spring bloom maximum was observed in two mode-water

  12. Data-driven approach to identify field-scale biogeochemical transitions using geochemical and geophysical data and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    developed to quantify the biogeochemical evolution of subsurface systems associated with bioremediation for evaluating the effectiveness of bioremediation, such as the probability of being in specific redox stages models: Development and application at a uranium-contaminated aquifer, Water Resour. Res., 49, 6412

  13. Data-driven approach to identify field-scale biogeochemical transitions using geochemical and geophysical data and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    the biogeochemical evolution of subsurface systems associated with bioremediation, it is difficult in practice of bioremediation, such as the probability of being in specific redox stages following biostimulation where: Development and application at a uranium-contaminated aquifer, Water Resour. Res., 49, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20524

  14. Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    groundwater spring flows northwards out of the waste filling the entire valley with pH 12-13.5 leachate. This leachate has reacted rapidly with atmospheric CO2 producing a large thickness of a custard-like carbonate hazard, the leachate has greatest biogeochemical impact by completely altering the soil environment

  15. Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean Data and a PARADIGM Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean compare 34 locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with respect to key upper ocean ecological by SeaWiFS mean chlorophyll: low chlorophyll ocean gyres, comparatively high chlorophyll ocean margin

  16. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  17. The dynamics of technology di?usion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J.-F.; Pollitt, H.; Chewpreecha, U.; Salas, P.; Foley, A. M.; Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.

    2014-07-16

    20 30?9% 0 10 20 30 40 Subsidies + FiT 0 10 20 30+276% Nuclear Oil Coal Coal+CCS Gas Gas+CCS Biomass Biomass+CCS Hydro Wind Solar Geothermal Ocean 20201980 2000 2040 1980 2000 2020 20402020 a f b g c h d i e j Fig. 2. Electricity generation... Mercure and Salas (2012). In FTT:Power, this model is used to determine fuel costs for fossil fuel and nuclear based power technologies in global markets. 2.6. Modelling the global economy: E3MG E3MG (and variant E3ME11) is an out-of-equilibrium macro...

  18. On Integrating Theories of International Economics in the Strategic Planning of Global Supply Chains and Dynamic Supply Chain Reconfiguration with Capacity Expansion and Contraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chaehwa

    2012-02-14

    supply chain design, since it has a rich history within the OR/MS community and since it is central to strategic planning in the global economy. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has increased trade among member countries (Canada, Mexico... and economic gains that improve income and living standards. A number of free trade agreements have been initiated around the world (e.g. regional and bilateral free trade agreements (FTA); the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (1994), the Central...

  19. Global Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security

  20. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1 Global

  1. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabalka, J R [ed.

    1985-12-01

    This state-of-the-art volume presents discussions on the global cycle of carbon, the dynamic balance among global atmospheric CO2 sources and sinks. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  2. The Interdisciplinary Global Change Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foundation · Michigan Space Grant Consortium Program Characteristics and GCminor ·Three core courses and two, Oceanography, Climatology, Geochemistry, Hydrology, Surficial processes Sociosphere Urban planning, Population, tree of life Natural selection, speciation Ecosystems Cells and energy transformations Biogeochemical

  3. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  4. Global environmental change: Its nature and impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidore, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    This book is intended as an entry-level textbook on environmental science for nonscience majors. Twenty chapters address topics from historical geology and climatic change to population dynamics, land-use, water pollution, ozone depletion and biodiversity, global warming.

  5. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  6. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  7. Modelling climate-related variability of tuna populations from a coupled ocean-biogeochemical-populations dynamics model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    pelamis) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) had higher recruitments during El Niño events, the sub of skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) population (Lehodey, 1997). However, the run represented a short time

  8. Three-Year Global Survey of Coronal Null Points from Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) Modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Michael; McKenize, David

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles and examines a comprehensive coronal magnetic-null-point survey created by potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observations. The locations of 582 potential magnetic null points in the corona were predicted from the PFSS model between Carrington Rotations (CR) 2098 (June 2010) and 2139 (July 2013). These locations were manually inspected, using contrast-enhanced SDO/AIA images in 171 angstroms at the east and west solar limb, for structures associated with nulls. A Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K--S) test showed a statistically significant difference between observed and predicted latitudinal distributions of null points. This finding is explored further to show that the observability of null points could be affected by the Sun's asymmetric hemisphere activity. Additional K--S tests show no effect on observability related to eigenvalues associated with the fan and spine structure surrounding null points or to the orie...

  9. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5?20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  10. Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Abigail Emery

    2012-01-01

    Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

  11. A Global Optimization Approach to Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofei Huang

    2006-05-25

    This paper presents a global optimization approach to quantum mechanics, which describes the most fundamental dynamics of the universe. It suggests that the wave-like behavior of (sub)atomic particles could be the critical characteristic of a global optimization method deployed by nature so that (sub)atomic systems can find their ground states corresponding to the global minimum of some energy function associated with the system. The classic time-independent Schrodinger equation is shown to be derivable from the global optimization method to support this argument.

  12. Two Phase Dynamics as the Origin to: 0.25 keV and 0.1 keV X-ray Diffuse Backgrounds, CMB, Global Quantized Redshift, 10 Mpc Space distributions and 30 Myr Cycles at Earth Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo del Pozo Garcia

    2015-02-25

    An Alternative to explain the origin of matter-background connections from the paper "Do Cosmic Backgrounds Cyclical Renew by Matter and Quanta Emissions?..." proposed: A sequence of discontinuous small changes of light speed in time as the cause, which provoke that criticality processes take place every 26-30 million years. Then, matter particles and quanta reach at one threshold value, and are compelled to reorganize their internal energy and make emissions that later becomes in current cosmic backgrounds. The small discontinues relative decreasing of c of about 10 -5) should do some small effects on planet and living bodies. Cyclic small reorganization of matter particles is consider as the astrophysical origin of Earth cyclic catastrophes. And at space global distribution: quantized redshift, change of galaxy fractal distribution at 10 Mpc scale, galaxy average luminosity and the luminosity fluctuation of galaxy pairs are enhanced out to separations near 10 Mpc. Also proposed: Like the Universe is observed flat in distance and time, the gravitational constant G might decrease with time, which may originate the Earth orbit eccentricity cycle of 100000 yr and, provoke the former mentioned sequence of c decrease in time. And, every 6 million years, the accumulation of G relative decrease of about 10-5 in G compelled space-time to reach at one threshold value that, trigger small relative decrease of light speed c of about 10-5 cyclically. This is interpreted as the Universe has two dynamical phases following one each other cyclically with intervals of 26-30 million years respectively: One of about 0.1 million years, called "activation phase", at which the critical processes take place, follows by longer "inhibition phase". The present approach indicates the existence of a subtle non linear dynamics, which could also contribute to the origin of galaxy fractal distribution.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Earth: Exploration of Atmospheric, Biological, Climatic and Biogeochemical Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Thomas; Adrian L. Melott; Charles H. Jackman; Claude M. Laird; Mikhail V. Medvedev; Richard S. Stolarski; Neil Gehrels; John K. Cannizzo; Daniel P. Hogan; Larissa M. Ejzak

    2005-08-04

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are likely to have made a number of significant impacts on the Earth during the last billion years. We have used a two-dimensional atmospheric model to investigate the effects on the Earth's atmosphere of GRBs delivering a range of fluences, at various latitudes, at the equinoxes and solstices, and at different times of day. We have estimated DNA damage levels caused by increased solar UVB radiation, reduction in solar visible light due to $\\mathrm{NO_2}$ opacity, and deposition of nitrates through rainout of $\\mathrm{HNO_3}$. For the ``typical'' nearest burst in the last billion years, we find globally averaged ozone depletion up to 38%. Localized depletion reaches as much as 74%. Significant global depletion (at least 10%) persists up to about 7 years after the burst. Our results depend strongly on time of year and latitude over which the burst occurs. We find DNA damage of up to 16 times the normal annual global average, well above lethal levels for simple life forms such as phytoplankton. The greatest damage occurs at low to mid latitudes. We find reductions in visible sunlight of a few percent, primarily in the polar regions. Nitrate deposition similar to or slightly greater than that currently caused by lightning is also observed, lasting several years. We discuss how these results support the hypothesis that the Late Ordovician mass extinction may have been initiated by a GRB.

  14. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  15. Global Energy Management System Implementation: General Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Erie I Furnace 19 BBtu, 20,000 GJ 175,000 1.0M Heat Treat Furnace Holcroft 1 BurnersRecoup 14 BBtu, 15,000 GJ 132,000 276,000 Boiler Systems Installed new 500 HP...

  16. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  17. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  18. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore »from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1?;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004–2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr?¹,ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr?¹. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr?¹. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004–2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3–3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr?¹), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870–2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).« less

  19. Global Focus Microscope The Global Health Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To address this need, we developed the Global Focus Microscope (GFM): a portable, battery- powered, inverted digi- tal images, the Global Focus Microscope comes with shelf for an iPhone 4. Figure 1. From left to right: Malaria parasites imaged at 1000x in bright field mode, tuberculosis imaged at 400x in bright

  20. The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain Adaptive Webs for Heterarchies Luis Mateus Rocha-organism or a global brain? The Global Brain Is Neither Global nor a Brain #12;!Disembodied Brain Disembodied brains on symbol-matter requirements for open-ended evolution) The Global Brain Is Neither Global Nor a Brain #12

  1. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  2. A Globally Unevolving Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meir Shimon

    2015-09-30

    A scalar-tensor theory of gravity is formulated in which $G$ and particle masses are allowed to vary. The theory yields a globally static cosmological model with no evolutionary timescales, no cosmological coincidences, and no flatness and horizon `problems'. It can be shown that the energy densities of dark energy ($\\rho_{DE}$) and non-relativistic baryons and dark matter ($\\rho_{M}$) are related by $\\rho_{DE}=2\\rho_{M}$, in agreement with current observations, if DE is associated with the canonical kinetic and potential energy densities of the scalar fields. Under general assumptions, the model favors light fermionic dark matter candidates (e.g., sterile neutrinos). The main observed features of the CMB are naturally explained in this model, including the spectral flatness of its perturbations on the largest angular scales, and the observed adiabatic and gaussian nature of density perturbations. More generally, we show that many of the cosmological observables, normally attributed to the dynamics of expanding space, could be of kinematic origin. In gravitationally bound systems, the values of G and particle masses spontaneously freeze out by a symmetry breaking of the underlying conformal symmetry, and the theory reduces to standard general relativity (with, e.g., all solar system tests satisfied).

  3. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health,...

  4. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  5. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  6. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  7. STRUCTURAL VALIDATION OF SYSTEM DYNAMICS AND AGENT-BASED SIMULATION MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    , population dynamics, energy systems, and urban planning. The usefulness of these models is predicated including global warming, population dynamics, energy systems, and urban planning simply defy a face

  8. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz http IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al 1000-1850) 1998 THE TEMPERATURE'S RISING #12;GLOBAL ANNUAL TEMPERATURE ANOMALY, 1880-2008 0.8 0.6 0.4 0

  9. SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE FOR GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Jefferson's Ferry Public Affairs century. The warmest year of the millennium was 1998. #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed significantly since the late 1940s: more than half

  10. Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool of Marine anD atMospheriC s , organic carbon, and other chemicals that contribute to global warming in a variety of studies. DownCienCe 4600 rickenbacker Causeway Miami, florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu the Chemistry of Global

  11. Global Information Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications Felix B. Tan in the United States of America by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden London WC2E 8LU Tel: 44 20 7240 0856 Fax

  12. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  13. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has endorsed a GlobalTaxonomy Initiative (GTI workshop, The Global Taxonomy Initiative: Shortening the Distance between Discovery and Delivery, made

  14. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  15. Relationships between daytime carbon dioxide uptake and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation for three different mountain/plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    Relationships between daytime carbon dioxide uptake and absorbed photosynthetically active and Atmospheric Dynamics: Boundary layer processes; KEYWORDS: CO2 flux, absorbed PAR, carbon cycle, remote sensing Change: Biogeochemical processes (4805); 1640 Global Change: Remote sensing; 3307 Meteorology

  16. Host/virus interactions in the marine cyanobacterium prochlorococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frois-Moniz, Katya

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial viruses shape the diversity, metabolic function, and community dynamics of their microbial hosts. As microbes drive many major biogeochemical cycles, viral infection is therefore a phenomenon of global significance. ...

  17. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07

    Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer – a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  18. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  19. Born Again: Globalization’s Sixteenth-Century Origins (Asian/Global versus European Dynamics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Dennis O; Giraldez, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Britain, the Industrial Revolution, and China, Leiden, CNWSevolved along with the Industrial Revolution some 250 yearsChina before the Industrial Revolution, by way of contrast,

  20. GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT AND ITS DYNAMICAL CAUSES Alexey separate the mesoscale variability of sea surface heights into its spatial and temporal components of mesoscale variability in different areas to dynamical causes. Major portion of it can be explained

  1. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  2. Response of the Indian Ocean Basin Mode and Its Capacitor Effect to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Response of the Indian Ocean Basin Mode and Its Capacitor Effect to Global Warming* XIAO-TONG ZHENG under global warming are in- vestigated using a pair of integrations with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics itself weakens in response to global warming. In the prior spring, an antisymmetric pattern of rainfall

  3. Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Forward to AddressMcGuire AFB, Mayak,

  4. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  5. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen Ed., T.C.

    2011-04-11

    On behalf of the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program managers in the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD), Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcome to the 2011 SBR Principal Investigators meeting. Thank you in advance for your attendance and your presentations at this year's meeting. As the events in Japan continue to unfold, we are all reminded that the research we perform on radionuclide behavior in the environment has implications beyond legacy waste cleanup and in fact has its place in the discussion on the expanded use of nuclear power. As in the past, there are three broad objectives to the Principal Investigators meeting: (1) to provide opportunities to share research results and promote interactions among the SBR scientists and other invited guests; (2) to evaluate the progress of each project within the program; and (3) to showcase the scientific expertise and research progress over the past year to senior managers within the DOE Office of Science, the technology offices within DOE, and other invited attendees from other Federal Agencies. This past year has seen a few significant changes within BER and within the SBR program. In November, our Associate Director for BER, Anna Palmisano, retired from Federal service. Just this month, Dr. Sharlene Weatherwax (Division Director for Biological Systems Sciences) has been named as the new Associate Director for BER. In August, BER welcomed Dr. Gary Geernaert as the new Division Director for CESD. Gary joins the division from Los Alamos National Laboratory with a background in atmospheric science. Within the SBR program, a new Strategic Plan was completed last June (currently posted on the SBR and the Office of Science website). The new strategic plan is intended to foster integration within the Environmental Systems Science portion of the BER budget that includes both SBR and Terrestrial Ecosystem Sciences (TES). Both these programs share a goal of advancing a predictive understanding of environmental processes and utilizing iterative, multidisciplinary approaches to understand complex environmental systems of relevance to DOE. CESD in general is undergoing continued discussions on integration among its programs in an effort to develop a new strategic plan for the division. This effort also includes identifying opportunities for integration with BER's Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD). The program this year includes three poster presentation sessions, six plenary sessions, and three breakout sessions. The plenary session on Tuesday morning will feature introductory presentations by BER program staff and three keynote addresses from Dr. Ken Bencala (USGS), Dr. Michael (Mick) Follows (MIT) and Dr. Sue Brantley (PSU) that will lead into three breakout sessions Tuesday afternoon. The breakout sessions are intended to highlight key developments in SBR research and foster a dialog among session participants on scientific paths forward in each particular area. The SBR program managers are asking for input from the SBR community at these sessions to help guide future efforts and/or identify areas of integration within BER programs. On Wednesday, plenary sessions will continue in the morning, followed by an early afternoon poster session. After an extended break for lunch, plenary sessions will continue in the afternoon, followed by an evening poster session. Thursday's plenary session will focus on selected highlights of research efforts at the IFRC sites and on a new potential TES field effort in the Arctic. This new field site is an obvious point of integration between the SBR and TES programs.

  7. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  8. Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    commitment to Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). The overarching goal of this program is the accelerated development of commercially viable energy technologies that can substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a...

  9. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  10. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

  11. Global Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Global Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission..........................................................................................................9 Director, North America Office, German Research Foundation (Deutsch Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) International Research Collaboration: Just Nice to Have or Necessary? Panel 1: Research Administrators Prem

  12. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    footprinting of global biofuel production. Appl. Energy 112,tion research because biofuel production and consumption as90% of the global biofuel production of 105 billion liters

  13. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  14. North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change Julien Cattiaux1 with Christophe Cassou2 weather and global warming J. Cattiaux - North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change AMA & LEFE the climate change affect the dynamics? The midlatitude dynamics is driven by the equator-to-pole T gradient

  15. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, S.R.

    1997-05-13

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers is disclosed. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated. 13 figs.

  16. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, Stephen R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated.

  17. Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in Drosophila subobscura" Francisco in response to global warming. However, that conclusion is not adequately buttressed by their data, because that chromosomal inversion polymorphisms of Drosophila subobscura are evolving in response to global warming. (2

  18. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  19. Global synchronization of bursting neurons in clustered networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. S. Batista; R. V. Nunes; A. M. Batista; R. L. Viana; S. R. Lopes; T. Pereira

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the collective dynamics of bursting neurons on clustered network. The clustered network is composed of subnetworks each presenting a small-world property, and in a given subnetwork each neuron has a probability to be connected to the other subnetworks. We give bounds for the critical coupling strength to obtain global burst synchronization in terms of the network structure, i.e., intracluster and intercluster probabilities connections. As the heterogeneity in the network is reduced the network global synchronization is improved. We show that the transitions to global synchrony may be abrupt or smooth depending on the intercluster probability.

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AIR POLLUTION DYNAMICS DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    spots. ­ Global weather patterns effected. ­ CO2 and other pollutant emissions contributing to globalNUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AIR POLLUTION DYNAMICS DUE TO POINT SOURCE EMISSIONS FROM AN INDUSTRIAL, and ultimately effects the global climate balance. · About 60% of emissions from point sources · Major pollutants

  1. The State and the Global Ecological Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    acknowledges that global environmental governance oftenforms of global environmental governance” sitting between

  2. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    issue annual reports Can Forest Certification Fill Gaps in the Global Forest Regime” Global Environmental Politics

  3. Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture About Global Health Student Interest Group Contact) Leadership Electives (overview) PTGH Conversations in Global Health OHSU Global Health Grants Concentration in Global Health Studies Scholarship · Information · Awards · Reports News & Events Donate to the Center

  4. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  5. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  6. Global Change at Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    at Edinburgh | 2 The Global Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice and to the CarboEurope programme. Cryosphere: field & remote observations & experiments on glacial erosion Biodiversity and the carbon cycle in Peru 10 Radiation penetration in forest stands 12 Genetics and Past

  7. Enterprise design for dynamic complexity : architecting & engineering organizations using system & structural dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepenbrock, Theodore F. (Theodore Frederick), 1965-

    2004-01-01

    As the business world is neither linear nor static, the mastery of its "chaotic" nonlinear dynamics lies at the heart of finding high-leverage policies that return uncommon benefits for marginal costs. Today's global ...

  8. Investigation of coastal dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet using sequential Radarsat SAR images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Sheng-Jung

    2009-05-15

    Increasing human activities have brought about a global warming trend, and cause global sea level rise. Investigations of variations in coastal margins of Antarctica and in the glacial dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet provide useful diagnostic...

  9. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  10. Integrated land ecosystem-atmosphere processes study (iLEAPS) assessment of global observational networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, AB

    2011-01-01

    insights into carbon, water, and energy dynamics have beenThe global CO 2 , water, and energy flux measurement networknetworks beyond CO 2 , water, and energy Water vapor, CO 2 ,

  11. Refugee Rights and Wrongs: Global Cultural Diffusion among the Congolese in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Peggy

    Every day the media is filled with examples of the ways in which contemporary social, economic, and political life transcends national borders. Some researchers argue that these dynamics attest to the emergence of a global ...

  12. Globalization and the Middle Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    of Liberal Trade on the Middle Class There is considerableGlobalization and the Middle Class Katherine V.W. StoneGlobalization and the Middle Class ? Katherine V.W. Stone

  13. International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

  14. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: GREENHOUSE GASES, AEROSOLS, RADIATIVE FORCING dioxide increase: sources, mixing ratio, forcing Global temperature change Climate sensitivity and time;#12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL

  16. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Ethical Culture Society of Suffolk;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390

  17. Forecasting phenology under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Forecasting phenology under global warming Ine´s Iba´n~ez1,*, Richard B. Primack2, Abraham J in phenology. Keywords: climate change; East Asia, global warming; growing season, hierarchical Bayes; plant is shifting, and these shifts have been linked to recent global warming (Parmesan & Yohe 2003; Root et al

  18. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  19. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  20. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  1. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01

    Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandyby George Lakoff Yes, global warming systemically causedExplain to others why global warming systemically caused the

  2. Global warming from HFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.

    1998-11-01

    Using a variety of public sources, a computer model of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant emissions in the UK has been developed. This model has been used to estimate and project emissions in 2010 under three types of scenarios: (1) business as usual; (2) voluntary agreements to reduce refrigerant leakage; and (3) comprehensive regulations to reduce refrigerant leakage. This resulting forecast is that UK emissions of HFC refrigerants in 2010 will account for 2% to 4% of the UK`s 1990 baseline global warming contribution.

  3. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-01-08

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  4. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergy PolicyLeaks inGlobal Home Analysis

  5. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland(GTO)GetSafeguards |Global

  6. Global Home Filesystem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC Getting Started at NERSCGitGlennGlobalofGlobal

  7. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  8. Dynamical Yukawa Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso

    2013-07-07

    The matter content of the Standard Model admits a global symmetry due to the generational structure of the spectrum respected by all interactions except for fermion couplings to the Higgs doublet. This symmetry is identified as the largest possible global symmetry of the free theory and extended to the case of massive neutrinos. The violation of such symmetry is then assumed dynamical and the value of the Yukawa couplings is fixed by a variational principle. This ansatz yields compelling results: Quark Yukawas naturally accommodate hierarchical masses and small mixing whereas Lepton Yukawas exhibit a hierarchical pattern for charged leptons and simultaneously degeneracy in the neutrino sector correlated with large mixing and Majorana phases. The difference in the mixing patterns of Quark and Leptons in this scheme stem from the Dirac vs Majorana nature of fermions.

  9. Sandia Energy - Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Scattering Dynamics Scattering DynamicsAshley...

  10. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  11. Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Field line resonances driven by dynamic pressure fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Field line resonances driven by dynamic pressure observational studies suggest that solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations can drive magnetosphericFedderMobarry (LFM) global, threedimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind

  12. The Business of Global Environmental Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2005-01-01

    The Business of Global Environmental Governance By David L.Business of Global Environmental Governance. Cambridge, MA :

  13. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  14. Boundaries of the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, João H; García, Emilio Hernández; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water is a major factor affecting marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent significant portions of the area and volume of the oceans and are thought to be expanding. The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone is one of the most pronounced and lies in a region of strong mesoscale activity in the form of vortices and frontal regions, whose effect in the dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone is largely unknown. Here, we study this issue from a modeling approach and a Lagrangian point of view, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical simulation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields to understand the link between mesoscale dynamics and oxygen variations. Our results show that, at depths between 380 and 600 meters, mesoscale structures have a relevant dual role. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high frequency fluctuations entrain oxygen across t...

  15. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  16. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    air pollution, and energy security policy. Energy Policy 38,Mima, European climate–energy security nexus: A model based16). Coupling global energy security policy with climate

  17. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews...

  18. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  19. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  20. Successive Modulation of ENSO to the Future Greenhouse Warming Department of Atmospheric Sciences/Global Environmental Laboratory, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    . In most coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) a dominant warming trend of the global-mean troposphere temperature, but also robust response patterns to global warming have been identi- fied (Cubasch et al. 2001), dynamical understanding of ENSO responses to global warming is still in a toddling stage. The early low

  1. Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Tapio

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus ...

  2. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  3. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    PercentofTotal US China Russia Japan Germany ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION Total Global Consum ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390 RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;Everybody talks

  4. Dynamics of Evolution in the Global Fuel-Ethanol Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Jin Hooi; Reiner, David

    for fuel-ethanol. 5% v/v Directive 98/70/EC on the quality of petrol and diesel fuels. 10% v/v Directive 2009/30/EC - regards the specification of petrol, diesel and gas- oil and introducing a mechanism to monitor and reduce greenhouse gas emissions... million tonnes by 2020. The 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-05): target 1 million tonnes by 2015 (expected). Pegged fuel-ethanol price to retail gasoline price and subsiding producers for losses. Import tax reduced from 30% to 5% in 2010. E10 Trial...

  5. ORNL's Urban Dynamics Institute joins global fight against polio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty. In the United States, it seeks to ensure that all people-especially those with the...

  6. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  7. Scioto: A Framework for Global-ViewTask Parallelism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinan, James S.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Larkins, D. B.; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2008-09-09

    We introduce Scioto, Shared Collections of Task Objects, a framework for supporting task-parallelism in one-sided and global-view parallel programming models. Scioto provides lightweight, locality aware dynamic load balancing and interoperates with existing parallel models including MPI, SHMEM, CAF, and Global Arrays. Through task parallelism, the Scioto framework provides a solution for overcoming load imbalance and heterogeneity as well as dynamic mapping of computation onto emerging multicore architectures. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of the Scioto framework and demonstrate its effectiveness on the Unbalanced Tree Search (UTS) benchmark and two quantum chemistry codes: the closed shell Self-Consistent Field (SCF) method and a sparse tensor contraction kernel extracted from a coupled cluster computation. We explore the efficiency and scalability of Scioto through these sample applications and demonstrate that is offers low overhead, achieves good performance on heterogeneous and multicore clusters, and scales to hundreds of processors.

  8. A Description of Local and Nonlocal Eddy–Mean Flow Interaction in a Global Eddy-Permitting State Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ru

    The assumption that local baroclinic instability dominates eddy–mean flow interactions is tested on a global scale using a dynamically consistent eddy-permitting state estimate. Interactions are divided into local and ...

  9. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  10. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  11. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  12. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  13. MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook 2014-15 Institute on Globalization and the Human://globalization.mcmaster.ca Meetings and materials are available in accessible formats on request #12;Table of Contents Welcome...................................................................................................................................................3 Selecting a Topic

  14. Final Project Report: "��Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"�

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "��Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."� This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also benefits efforts to trace Hg contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers, into which EFPC flows, and to distinguish Hg from the Y-12 plant from that released from a nearby coal ash accident.

  15. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming* The Perfect Storm Jim Hansen 29 January 2008 Health Implications of Climate Change opinion #12;Perfect Storm, Perfect Disaster 1. Great Inertia of Systems - Ocean: Half of Warming still "In

  16. Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization Software This talk will present: 1. The general problem framework in optimization software. 2. An example of effectiveness of computational differentiation in optimization packages. 3. Particular importance of computational differentiation verified

  17. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  18. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the global virtual water trade network. Proc. Natl. Acad.J. Wang et al. , China’s water–energy nexus: Greenhouse-gasand future trends in grey water footprints of anthropogenic

  19. Puzzles from the First Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Suzanne

    In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

  20. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    Legitimacy in Global Environmental Governance,” Journal ofundermining of global environmental governance,” Review ofglobal scope of business activity into Robert Falkner, “Private Environmental Governance

  1. Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray A for different combustion vessels Title Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray...

  2. Energy Frontier Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include GE Global Research, Yale University-Crabtree Group, Yale University-Batista Group, Stanford University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. GE Global...

  3. Dynamical impurity problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  4. A global map of urban extent from nightlights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, Kaiguang; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Zhang, Xuesong; He, Chunyang; Elvidge, Christopher

    2015-05-13

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land-cover and land-use changes, has a profound impact on the Earth system including biodiversity, the cycling of water and carbon and exchange of energy and water between Earth’s surface and atmosphere, all affecting weather and climate. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important for scientific understanding of their contribution to the changing Earth system, and for practical management and policy decisions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable-light data atmore »the global level and derived a new global map of 1-km urban extent for year 2000. Based on this map, we found that globally, urban land area is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at regional level from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urban land area varies from lower than 0.01% to higher than 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration found between 30°N to 45°N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80°W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban area provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offer the potential of capturing more accurately their spatial and temporal dynamics.« less

  5. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore »desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  6. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Thornton, Peter E; Post, Wilfred M

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  7. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ionomer melts. Ionomers are polymers that typically have a neutral backbone with a small ... computationalfigure1 Permalink Gallery Computational Fluid Dynamics &...

  8. Seshat: The Global History Databank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    and the Dynamics of Inequality in Small-Scale Societies.1995. Foundations of Social Inequality. Springer, New York.2012. The Creation of Inequality: How Our Prehistoric

  9. Lithospheric Heat Flow and Dynamics! obvious signals!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    · $d( ) heat = flow scalar subsidence rate constant X #12;heat flow related to subsidence rate (qb ! quLithospheric Heat Flow and Dynamics! ! · obvious signals! - heat flow, depth, and geoid height?! - are transform faults thermal contraction cracks?! #12;global heat budget! 7.5 TW 44 TW 25-15 TW 3-13 TW

  10. QCD thermodynamics with dynamical overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Borsanyi; Y. Delgado; S. Durr; Z. Fodor; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Lippert; D. Nogradi; K. K. Szabo

    2012-08-02

    We study QCD thermodynamics using two flavors of dynamical overlap fermions with quark masses corresponding to a pion mass of 350 MeV. We determine several observables on N_t=6 and 8 lattices. All our runs are performed with fixed global topology. Our results are compared with staggered ones and a nice agreement is found.

  11. Symmetries and dynamics in constrained systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Bekaert; Jeong-Hyuck Park

    2009-04-03

    We review in detail the Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems. Emphasis is put on the total Hamiltonian system rather than on the extended Hamiltonian system. We provide a systematic analysis of (global and local) symmetries in total Hamiltonian systems. In particular, in analogue to total Hamiltonians, we introduce the notion of total Noether charges. Grassmannian degrees of freedom are also addressed in details.

  12. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  13. Dynamic Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold Klaus Paul

    Dynamic reconstruction is a method for generating images or image sequences from data obtained using moving radiation detection systems. While coded apertures are used as examples of the underlying information collection ...

  14. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  15. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  16. Group Work: Global warming & natural variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Group Work: Global warming & natural variability Left: Global annual temperature departure from://skepticalscience.com/foster-and-rahmstorf-measure-global-warming-signal.html 2013 2012 2011 #12;: 1963-1964, 1982-83, 1991-93 1. How do these events affect the global annual temperature and can you

  17. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2012 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  18. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2010 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  19. Race and racism: Towards a global future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, H

    2006-01-01

    accomplishment of dismantling the various colonialSingh 1998). The global dismantling of European empire was

  20. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Thursday, April 9, 2015 5 in integrated and innovative delivery, finding creative new ways to ensure solutions and products get and the Duke Global Health Institute. Sponsored by the Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH). The event

  1. Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lessonsviable and sustainable form of urbanism. Notes J. Kenworthy

  2. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Gavin Yamey, MD, MPH, MA, MRCP with featured guest: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120 A leading global health researcher and former journalist, Professor

  3. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  4. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  5. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A.

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  7. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  8. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang future sea surface temperature (SST) warming patterns. The results show that the global monsoon area. Zhao (2012), Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal

  9. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national

  10. Global visibility of naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Giambo'

    2006-03-29

    Global visibility of naked singularities is analyzed here for a class of spherically symmetric spacetimes, extending previous studies - limited to inhomogeneous dust cloud collapse - to more physical valid situations in which pressures are non-vanishing. Existence of nonradial geodesics escaping from the singularity is shown, and the observability of the singularity from far-away observers is discussed.

  11. Excellence in Public & Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    countries · A positive and constructive working environment, shared by our diverse population of staff and supportive working environment based upon an ethos of respect and rigorous scientific enquiry. We health and health equity worldwide · Global reach and partnerships across high, medium and low income

  12. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  13. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  14. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  15. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  16. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  17. Global Information for Export Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are in a draft stage and subject to revision. In this way, international free trade, international transpar- encyGlobal Information for Export Success Notify U.S. is a service for U.S. exporters and trade and regulations that impact export market access · A daily report providing U.S. trade stakeholders

  18. Topology based global crowd control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Adam

    2014-11-27

    We propose a method to determine the flow of large crowds of agents in a scene such that it is filled to its capacity with a coordinated, dynamically moving crowd. Our approach provides a focus on cooperative control ...

  19. Global optimization of hybrid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cha Kun

    2006-01-01

    Systems that exhibit both discrete state and continuous state dynamics are called hybrid systems. In most nontrivial cases, these two aspects of system behavior interact to such a significant extent that they cannot be ...

  20. Twelve thousand years of dust: the Holocene global dust cycle constrained by natural archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albani, S.

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the climate system by interacting with radiation, clouds, and biogeochemical cycles. In addition, natural archives show that the dust cycle experienced variability in the past in ...

  1. Malaria and global change: Insights, uncertainties and possible surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.H.; Steel, A.

    1996-12-31

    Malaria may change with global change. Indeed, global change may affect malaria risk and malaria epidemiology. Malaria risk may change in response to a greenhouse warming; malaria epidemiology, in response to the social, economic, and political developments which a greenhouse warming may trigger. To date, malaria receptivity and epidemiology futures have been explored within the context of equilibrium studies. Equilibrium studies of climate change postulate an equilibrium present climate (the starting point) and a doubled-carbon dioxide climate (the end point), simulate conditions in both instances, and compare the two. What happens while climate changes, i.e., between the starting point and the end point, is ignored. The present paper focuses on malaria receptivity and addresses what equilibrium studies miss, namely transient malaria dynamics.

  2. Expanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue is preparing for the 21st century global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges ­ global health, global competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, global with the Bayero University, Nigeria (K. Beaver) Frontiers in applications of carbon nanotubes and graphene

  3. How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    currents, attracting set, basin of attraction, almost-invariant set, Markov chain, transfer operator OceanHow well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1 Robyn M. Stuart,1 and Erik dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic

  4. DISCRETE-TIME ROBUST POLE-PLACEMENT DESIGN THROUGH GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    DISCRETE-TIME ROBUST POLE-PLACEMENT DESIGN THROUGH GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION Miguel Ayala Botto ,1 Robert-mail: r.babuska@its.tudelft.nl Abstract: A robust pole placement controller design method is presented Keywords: robust control, pole assignment, uncertainty, genetic algorithms, helicopter dynamics. 1

  5. Low Dimensional Behavior of Large Systems of Globally Coupled Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Ott; Thomas M. Antonsen

    2008-06-02

    It is shown that, in the infinite size limit, certain systems of globally coupled phase oscillators display low dimensional dynamics. In particular, we derive an explicit finite set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the macroscopic evolution of the systems considered. For example, an exact, closed form solution for the nonlinear time evolution of the Kuramoto problem with a Lorentzian oscillator frequency distribution function is obtained. Low dimensional behavior is also demonstrated for several prototypical extensions of the Kuramoto model, and time-delayed coupling is also considered.

  6. Global structure and geodesics for Koenigs superintegrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galliano Valent

    2015-10-28

    Starting from the framework defined by Matveev and Shevchishin we derive the local and the global structure for the four types of super-integrable Koenigs metrics. These dynamical systems are always defined on non-compact manifolds, namely $\\,{\\mb R}^2\\,$ and $\\,{\\mb H}^2$. The study of their geodesic flows is made easier using their linear and quadratic integrals. Using Carter (or minimal) quantization we show that the formal superintegrability is preserved at the quantum level and in two cases, for which all of the geodesics are closed, it is even possible to compute the discrete spectrum of the quantum hamiltonian.

  7. Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

  8. Global Superdiffusion of Weak Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2003-10-20

    A class of kicked rotors is introduced, exhibiting accelerator-mode islands (AIs) and {\\em global} superdiffusion for {\\em arbitrarily weak} chaos. The corresponding standard maps are shown to be exactly related to generalized web maps taken modulo an ``oblique cylinder''. Then, in a case that the web-map orbit structure is periodic in the phase plane, the AIs are essentially {\\em normal} web islands folded back into the cylinder. As a consequence, chaotic orbits sticking around the AI boundary are accelerated {\\em only} when they traverse tiny {\\em ``acceleration spots''}. This leads to chaotic flights having a quasiregular {\\em steplike} structure. The global weak-chaos superdiffusion is thus basically different in nature from the strong-chaos one in the usual standard and web maps.

  9. Value of global weather sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-23

    Long-range weather predictions have great scientific and economic potential, but require precise global observations. Small balloon transponders could serve as lagrangian trace particles to measure the vector wind, which is the primary input to long-range numerical forecasts. The wind field is difficult to measure; it is at present poorly sampled globally. Distance measuring equipment (DME) triangulation of signals from roughly a million transponders could sample it with sufficient accuracy to support {approximately} two week forecasts. Such forecasts would have great scientific and economic potential which is estimated below. DME uses small, low-power transmitters on each transponder to broadcast short, low-power messages that are detected by several small receivers and forwarded to the ground station for processing of position, velocity, and state information. Thus, the transponder is little more than a balloon with a small radio, which should only weigh a few grams and cost a few dollars.

  10. On global warming T. C. Dorlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorlas, Teunis C.

    On global warming T. C. Dorlas Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies School of Theoretical Physics- ature curve The ongoing debate about global warming prompted me to have a look at the physics myself

  11. Climate Whiplash: What Happens AFTER Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Climate Whiplash: What Happens AFTER Global Warming? with Dr. Curt Stager Author and Professor, Paul Smith's College Department of Natural Sciences Most debate over global warming looks only as far

  12. Digest of Global Initiatives (June 16, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    it comes to clean energy, energy security, environmental stabilitDigest of Global Initiatives (June 16, 2011) Active or Pending: Active Title: Eco, and practical protocols for the best solutions for global energy, climate, and environmental problems. More than

  13. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jørgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  14. Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: Observing, Understanding Observing System for Climate #12;Performance 4 Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: A coordinated multi-national effort to develop and sustain moored buoy observing systems for climate research

  15. Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, Jack T.; Saier, Milton H.

    2009-01-01

    009-0252-0 Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much? Jack T.1) How much global pollution can our planet tolerate andThere is already more pollution on our planet than we can

  16. Global Migration and Regionalization, 1840-1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Thousands Sources: See McKeown, "Global Migration," 188-9.Figure 4: Indian Migration, 1842-1937 Burma, Ceylon, Malayaof India, 100; McKeown, "Global Migrations," 186-9.

  17. Risk in the Global Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon footprints are not on the priority list of risk analysts in operations management for at least half or more of global businesses. What are the other risks in the global supply chain?

  18. Global Supply Chains and Wage Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costinot, Arnaud

    A salient feature of globalization in recent decades is the emergence of "global supply chains" in which different countries specialize in different stages of a sequential production process. In Costinot, Vogel and Wang ...

  19. Global Warming: the Sacrificial Temptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galam, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The claimed unanimity of the scientific community about the human culpability for global warming is questioned. Up today there exists no scientific proof of human culpability. It is not the number of authors of a paper, which validates its scientific content. The use of probability to assert the degree of certainty with respect the global warming problem is shown to be misleading. The debate about global warming has taken on emotional tones driven by passion and irrationality while it should be a scientific debate. The degree of hostility used to mull any dissonance voice demonstrates that the current debate has acquired a quasi-religious nature. Scientists are behaving as priests in their will "to save the planet". We are facing a dangerous social phenomenon, which must be addressed from the social point of view. The current unanimity of citizens, scientists, journalists, intellectuals and politicians is intrinsically worrying. The calls to sacrifice our way of life to calm down the upset nature is an emotio...

  20. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  1. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  2. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3ºC - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1ºC - Likely Extinctions

  3. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  4. Global Warming Hole 31 March 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming Hole 31 March 2015 James Hansen Sorry to have disappeared for two months. I-thirds of North America know that global warming is really happening. In fact, 2015 should be the year that stifles discussion of a warming hiatus. A substantial developing El Nino will add to the global warming

  5. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    © 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming make Triton blush? Neptune's largest moon (refs 5,6), and global warming has now been observed7 . We obtained four spectra of Triton between 0. Both the spectral changes and the global warming may have been caused by a triggering event

  6. Wildfires ignite debate on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    Wildfires ignite debate on global warming Astemperaturessoar. Is there a link with global warming? We have good reason to think so, and not taking the link seriously could have on climate change and global fire predictions last month, and I have been in my own media storm ever since

  7. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course Spring 2014 Instructors: Peter Huybers and Eli Tziperman of global warming", please prepare by reading "the climate of man", IPCC introduction, and Lindzen article. background basics. l 1. Mountain Glaciers: Are mountain glaciers melting? Due to global warming? First, see

  8. Global Warming and the Free State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland of the report. Citation Boesch, D.F. (editor). 2008. Global Warming and the Free State: Comprehensive AssessmentJuskelis,MarylandSierraClub Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland Report

  9. CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    45 CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate during the Cenozoic SARAH J. FEAKINS AND PETER by significant climate change. Major global changes included massive tectonic reorganization, a reduction in atmospheric pCO2 (Pagani et al., 1999; Pearson and Palmer, 2000), and a dramatic cooling of global climate

  10. Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Center for International: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): 1993 - 1998 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Global Poverty Mapping Project seeks to enhance current understanding of the global distribution of poverty

  11. The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 Broad view of sustainability of global transportation...

  12. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    national Climate Governance. Global Environmental Politicsof Global Climate Governance change and other environmentalenvironmental foreign policymakers in responding to global climate governance

  13. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership An article describing the small scale reactors in the GNEP. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership More...

  14. About GE Global Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery ActARM OverviewAbout GE Global Research

  15. Global Research on On The Verge | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn The Verge

  16. Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming forecasts of how global warming will affect polar icepacks. See also: Earth & Climate q Global Warming q the effects of climate warming, and its presence greatly reduces solar heating of the polar oceans." "Sea ice

  17. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  18. Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 1 Global Warming Politics in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 1 Global Warming Politics in a Post Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 3 Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World Worry About Global Warming.. 14 Everybody Loses on Fuel Efficiency

  19. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  20. Dynamical Bounds for Sturmian Schrödinger Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Marin

    2009-06-10

    The Fibonacci Hamiltonian, that is a Schr\\"{o}dinger operator associated to a quasiperiodical sturmian potential with respect to the golden mean has been investigated intensively in recent years. Damanik and Tcheremchantsev developed a method and find a non trivial dynamical upper bound for this model. In this paper, we use this method to generalize to a large family of Sturmian operators dynamical upper bounds and show at sufficently large coupling anomalous transport for operators associated to irrational number with a generic diophantine condition. As a counter example, we exhibit a pathological irrational number which do not verify this condition and show its associated dynamic exponent only has ballistic bound. Moreover, we establish a global lower bound for the lower box counting dimension of the spectrum that is used to obtain a dynamical lower bound for bounded density irrational numbers.

  1. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  2. Hierarchical Dynamic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Embedding OU(2) process Dynamic Models Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny 26th May 2011 #12;Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Embedding OU(2) process Dynamic Models Generalised coordinates

  3. Are we seeing global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselmann, K.

    1997-05-09

    Despite considerable progress, the question of whether the observed gradual increase in global mean temperature over the last century is indeed caused by human activities or is simply an expression of natural climate variation on a larger spatial and temporal scales remains a controversial issue. To answer this question three things are needed: prediction of the anthropogenic climate change signal; determination of the natural climate variability noise; and computation of the signal-to-noise ratio and test of whether the ratio exceeds some predefined statistical detection threshold. This article discusses all these issues and the uncertainties involved in getting definitive answers. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Non-Abelian Global Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Eiji Nakano; Muneto Nitta

    2009-03-09

    We study topologically stable non-Abelian global vortices in the U(N) linear sigma model. The profile functions of the solutions are numerically obtained. We investigate the behaviour of vortices in two limits in which masses of traceless or trace parts of massive bosons are much larger than the others. In the limit that the traceless parts are much heavier, we find a somewhat bizarre vortex solution carrying a non-integer U(1) winding number 1/\\sqrt{N} which is irrational in general.

  5. Global Collaboration on Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.

    2015-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-15-06-36.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 16268 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-15-06-36.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 June 4, 2015 IETC? slide 1... ENERGY MANAGEMENT WORKING GROUP (EWMG) Global Collaboration on Energy Management Industrial Energy Technology Conference June 3, 2015 Sabine Brueske, Energetics Incorporated; presenting on behalf of Graziella Siciliano, U.S. Department of Energy ESL...

  6. Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, New York:Corporation JumpEncap DevelopmentOpenGlobal

  7. Solar Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery TechnologySocovoltaic SystemsInternationalGlobal Jump to:

  8. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1

  9. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global Warming vs. Climate Change 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global

  10. Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    -of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR1 Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global2Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

  11. Engineering change in global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}With increased public focus on global warming and in the wake of the intense heat waves, drought, fires, and super-hurricanes that occurred in 1988 and 1989, interest in geoengineering has surged,{close_quotes} says Stephen H. Schneider, professor of biological science at Stanford University in Stanford, California. One scheme set forth in a National Research Council report proposes using 16-inch naval guns to fire aerosol shells into the stratosphere in hopes of offsetting {open_quotes}the radiative effects of increasing carbon dioxide,{close_quotes} Schneider says. Schneider, however, would prefer that we {open_quotes}seek measures that can cure our global {open_quote}addiction{close_quote} to polluting practices.{close_quotes} Rather than playing God, he says we should {open_quotes}stick to being human and pursue problem - solving methods currently within our grasp.{close_quotes} Such strategies include efforts to promote energy efficiency and reduce our reliance on automobiles.

  12. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  13. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Consumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andenergy consumption scenarios. In applying this approach to global

  14. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  15. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01

    stream_size 21847 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text.... This study will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare...

  16. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  17. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  18. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, T

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  19. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-01-24

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  20. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  1. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  2. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 22952312, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/2295/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of A new model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbonyl sulfide ­ Part 1: Assessment of direct

  3. Dr J Michael Kuperberg | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities...

  4. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 50% compared to today's best common practice - Alternative refrigerants with low global warming potential (GWP) are needed to achieve these goals - Provide guidance to the...

  5. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01

    impacts and responses to environmental change making it anhuman security or environmental change if the lecturer isReview: Global Environmental Change and Human Security By

  6. Social Movements and the Problem of 'Globalization'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, C

    1998-01-01

    Special issue, “Social Movements,” Social Research 52, no.effort. Magnusson, “Social Movements and the Global City,”Special Issue: “Social Movements and World Politics”) 23,

  7. Plenia Locatel Group: Globalizing from Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Cyrus

    2009-05-01

    In 2009 the founders and top executives of Plenia Locatel Group, a retail business in Venezuela specializing in health care products and services, were planning a global

  8. Globalization of Innovation: The Personal Computing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L

    2007-01-01

    1990. Architectural innovation: the reconfiguration of2006. Global sourcing in innovation: theory and evidenceM. 1990. Radical innovation and corporate regeneration.

  9. Pax Global: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1413)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and Pax Global, Inc., entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

  10. Susan Murabana - Astronomer, Global Hands On Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murabana, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Susan Murabana is working to bring astronomy education to Africa through Global Hands-On Universe, a program founded by Berkeley Lab astronomer Carl Pennypacker.

  11. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  12. Business Requirements Global Office Knowledge Repository (GOKR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    .................................................................................................4 3.3.2 Logistics................................................................................................10 5.1 GLOBAL OFFICE ACCOUNT MAINTENANCE.................................................................................11 5.2 EQUIPMENT SUPPLIER ACCOUNT MAINTENANCE

  13. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  14. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team : 1995/1996 Scientific Report February 1997 CERFACS ACTIVITY REPORT 1 #12; Contents 1 Climate Modelling) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2

  15. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  16. Sandia Energy - Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Chemical DynamicsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:37+00:00...

  17. Selection of a Global Set of GMPEs for the GEM-PEER Global GMPEs Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    motion prediction equations for subduction earthquakes,prediction equations in engineering practice, Earthquakeprediction equations, attenuation relations, Global Earthquake

  18. Nitrogen isotope dynamics of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Robert C. Thunell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Nitrogen isotope dynamics of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Robert C. Thunell,1 Daniel M. Sigman,2 of Venezuela. Water column denitrification occurring in the basin has only a very small isotopic imprint-Karger, Y. Astor, and R. Varela (2004), Nitrogen isotope dynamics of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, Global

  19. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  20. Integrated assessment of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, K.O.

    1996-12-31

    The anomalies of sea surface temperatures, which show a warming trend since the 1850s through the decade 1960/70 of {Delta}SST {approximately} 0.3 C, are complemented by changes of the ground surface temperature ({Delta}GST). The global surface temperature change, based on these data, allows an integrated assessment of the associated increase in black-body irradiance and a comparison with the enhanced greenhouse-gas back-scattering. Information on the GST history is obtained from unfolding analyses of underground temperature distributions measured in 90 boreholes in Alaskan permafrost and Canadian bedrock. These analyses show GST increases ({Delta}GST) since the 19th century through 1960/70 of 3 C on average, with standard deviations of +1.8 C and {minus}0.9 C on the high and low end respectively. The onset of the warming trend, which is uncertain in the GST data, is timed more accurately by detailed length records of large valley glaciers in the US and the Alps. Evaluation of the heat capacities and heat transfer indicates that the temperature response to an increase in radiative forcing must be much larger on land than on the sea. Conversely, the observed large ratio of {Delta}GST and {Delta}SST can only be explained by increased radiative forcing. From 1960/70 through the warmest decade on record, 1980/90, global {Delta}SST and {Delta}SAT have further increased to 0.6 C and 0.8 C respectively, But, the most recent GST data are not accurate enough to extend the comparison through 1990. Calculation of the increase of radiative forcing from back-scattering of greenhouse gases for 1850 to 1970 yields 1.3 W/cm{sup 2}. The increase in black-body irradiance from 3.6 C warming on land and 0.3 C on sea provides the required balance. The warming on land of 3.6 C is larger than the average value of 3.0 C, but well within the observed range.

  1. Patterns of Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    Patterns of Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Dynamics in Decomposing Foliar Litter in Canadian Group 1 Department of Geography and Centre for Climate and Global Change Research, McGill University, Montre´al, Quebec, Canada; 2 Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia

  2. Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulshof, Joost

    Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves C. Cuesta # , C to gravity, results in a pseudo­parabolic Burgers type equation. We give a rigorous study of global of study in this paper. We confine ourselves to the particular case of unsaturated groundwater flow, where

  3. Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness June 2011 #12;2 Materials Genome Initiative information visit www.ostp.gov. #12;3Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness EXECUTIVE OFFICE, the development of advanced materials will fuel many of the emerging industries that will address challenges

  4. Advanced Review Drought under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Advanced Review Drought under global warming: a review Aiguo Dai This article reviews recent literature on drought of the last millennium, followed by an update on global aridity changes from 1950 of the warmest SSTs in the Atlantic and warming in the Indian Ocean are responsible for the recent Sahel droughts

  5. Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo In a historic moment of Justice for the Climate) backgrounds. It aimed to establish a set of guiding global principles for a just response to climate change. The intention of the Climate Justice Dialogue was to lend new impetus to an awareness of climate change

  6. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  7. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's research group. The seminar will present the development of our U.S. monitoring and forecasting systemFrontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Towards a global drought monitoring, forecasting, activities under the Group of Earth Observations (GEO) and the World Climate Research Programme have

  8. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  9. The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    The Science of Global Warming ·Energy Balance ·Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities ·Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance ·Understand the Vocabulary ·Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

  10. Global Optimization in the COCONUT Hermann Schichl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schichl, Hermann

    Global Optimization in the COCONUT project Hermann Schichl Institut f¨ur Mathematik der Universit for global optimization is presented, as it is developed in the COCONUT project. After a short introduction the presentation. 1 Introduction The COCONUT project [2] is aimed at the integration of the ex- isting approaches

  11. Global Optimization in the COCONUT Hermann Schichl ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schichl, Hermann

    Global Optimization in the COCONUT project Hermann Schichl ? Institut fur Mathematik der Universit for global optimization is presented, as it is developed in the COCONUT project. After a short introduction the presentation. 1 Introduction The COCONUT project [2] is aimed at the integration of the ex- isting approaches

  12. Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive Worlds a publication of the National Intelligence Council #12;OFF ICEOFTHEDIRE CTOR OF NATIO NALINTELLIGE N CE Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive Worlds a publication 2030: Alternative Worlds is the fifth installment in the National Intelligence Council's series aimed

  13. Global Tectonics Lecture 8 Seismo-tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    earthquake predictor I. Browning claimed to have predicted the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, he said that near a date there would be an M6 earthquake somewhere, a prediction virtually guaranteed to be true. MagnitudeGlobal Tectonics Lecture 8 ­ Seismo-tectonics #12;Global distribution of the earthquakes #12;Focal

  14. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  15. Long-run evolution of the global economy - Part 2: Hindcasts of innovation and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Long-range climate forecasts use integrated assessment models to link the global economy to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper evaluates an alternative economic framework outlined in part 1 of this study (Garrett, 2014) that approaches the global economy using purely physical principles rather than explicitly resolved societal dynamics. If this model is initialized with economic data from the 1950s, it yields hindcasts for how fast global economic production and energy consumption grew between 2000 and 2010 with skill scores > 90 % relative to a model of persistence in trends. The model appears to attain high skill partly because there was a strong impulse of discovery of fossil fuel energy reserves in the mid-twentieth century that helped civilization to grow rapidly as a deterministic physical response. Forecasting the coming century may prove more of a challenge because the effect of the energy impulse appears to have nearly run its course. Nonetheless, an understanding of the external forces that drive ...

  16. Influences of climate change on California and Nevada regions revealed by a high-resolution dynamical downscaling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    will stress water resources, impact energy supply and demand, challenge crop and livestock pro & Forecasting) model. The dynamical downscaling was performed to both the GFS (Global forecast model) reanalysis

  17. S53juNE 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. GLOBAL OCEANS--J. M. Levy, ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  18. S53JULY 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. Global oceans--J. M. Levy, Ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies. Heat Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  19. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  20. Subarctic warming: Results from the global treeline project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siren, G.; Shen, S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors reported last year at the 6th Global Warming Science and Policy Conference (GW6), April 3--6, 1995, San Francisco USA, the Global Treeline Project (BLECSCO) has definitively established the northward movement in the 20th century of the northernmost limit for pine trees in Finland. this movement is due to climate warming. The Finnish Forest Research Institute has been working on this problem between 1951 and 1996. The authors have observed over half a century the movements of the coniferous treeline. The subarctic pine tree line is used as a permanent bioindicator of climate change. The dynamic pine tree line in the subarctic of Finland serves as a reliable indicator of expected climate change in the future as well as of climatic fluctuations in the past. The FFRI has tracked comprehensively seed year frequencies, performed dendrochronological studies, fire studies, and ecological studies since the abundant seed year of 1948--50 to the present, and discovered that climate change has favored the northward movement of the pine limit. The authors report the detailed scientific methodology, data, and conclusions.

  1. Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

    2006-04-26

    CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  2. GLOBAL DRAG-INDUCED INSTABILITIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas, E-mail: mjalali@sharif.edu [Computational Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, P.O. Box 11155-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-20

    We use the Fokker-Planck equation and model the dispersive dynamics of solid particles in annular protoplanetary disks whose gas component is more massive than the particle phase. We model particle-gas interactions as hard sphere collisions, determine the functional form of diffusion coefficients, and show the existence of two global unstable modes in the particle phase. These modes have spiral patterns with the azimuthal wavenumber m = 1 and rotate slowly. We show that in ring-shaped disks, the phase-space density of solid particles increases linearly in time toward an accumulation point near the location of pressure maximum, while instabilities grow exponentially. Therefore, planetesimals and planetary cores can be efficiently produced near the peaks of unstable density waves. In this mechanism, particles migrating toward the accumulation point will not participate in the formation of planets, and should eventually form a debris ring like the main asteroid belt or classical Kuiper Belt objects. We present the implications of global instabilities to the formation of ice giants and terrestrial planets in the solar system.

  3. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubman, S.J.; Kasting, J.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The authors look at the possibility of counteracting global warming forces by the injection of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) into the stratosphere at levels high enough to balance the impact say of a doubling of carbon dioxide concentrations, which are projected to result in a global 3{degrees} C warming. OCS injections at densities to provide such cooling will result a 30 percent impact of global ozone, whereas the carbon dioxide only made a 5% impact. In addition levels which would be found on the earths surface would be in the range 10 ppmv which is questionable as a safe exposure limit for humans, in addition to its impact on the ph of rainwater.

  4. Global warming: Science or politics? Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorweiler, V.P.

    1998-05-01

    Supplementing the conclusion that ``there has been a discernible influence of human activity on global climate`` is a set of dire consequences to the globe and human population. One consequence is the spread of tropical diseases. It has not been concluded whether the spread of disease is due to global conditions or to opening of tropical forests to commerce, allowing spread by travelers. Whether these forecasts abet the claimed relation of human activity to global warming, they are not a new phenomenon. In the space of several decades, dire consequences have been forecast in three sectors: natural resource consumption, energy resources and environmental fate. These three areas are reviewed.

  5. Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 published by Elsevier A DYNAMICS-AS-USUAL DEVELOPMENT AS BORDERCONDITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    9th Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 ­ published by Elsevier 1 A DYNAMICS-AS-USUAL DEVELOPMENT AS BORDERCONDITION FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GLOBAL BIOMASS ENERGY STRATEGIES G. AHAMER* , S.Read@massey.ac.nz ABSTRACT Before envisaging global strategies for enhanced use of biomass for energy, the present

  6. Static and dynamic properties of a reversible gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo I. Hurtado; Pinaki Chaudhuri; Ludovic Berthier; Walter Kob

    2008-11-10

    We study a microscopically realistic model of a physical gel and use computer simulations to investigate its static and dynamic properties at thermal equilibrium. The phase diagram comprises a sol phase, a coexistence region ending at a critical point, a gelation line, and an equilibrium gel phase unrelated to phase separation. The global structure of the gel is homogeneous, but the stress is supported by a fractal network. Gelation results in a dramatic slowing down of the dynamics, which can be used to locate the transition, which otherwise shows no structural signatures. Moreover, the equilibrium gel dynamics is highly heterogeneous as a result of the presence of particle families with different mobilities. An analysis of gel dynamics in terms of mobile and arrested particles allows us to elucidate several differences between the dynamics of equilibrium gels and that of glass-formers.

  7. Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    1 Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming in global temperatures between 5 and 6o C. Although he was aware that his, these were negligible: global fossil fuel consumption was less than a twentieth

  8. Practices of Ecological Citizenship: Global Dreams for a Chinese Village

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Shannon Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What WeTruth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What WeTruth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We

  9. 9 Global warming stephane.gaiffas@cmap.polytechnique.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaïffas, Stéphane

    9 Global warming stephane.gaiffas@cmap.polytechnique.fr Goal The aim of this project is to study time-series measuring the evolution of global temperature. We consider a particular global temperature

  10. Lateral stakeholder alignment in the Global Water Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrot, Katherine W

    2007-01-01

    This research evaluates stakeholder alignment in a global multi-stakeholder organization called the Global Water Partnership (GWP). The GWP represents a new breed of organization, a Global Multi-Stakeholder Network ...

  11. Global forest governance --Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global forest governance -- Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland Technical, global environmental problems are complex issues. Political decision makers increasingly depend will draw upon an alternative, broader conception of `global forest governance'. After pointing out

  12. Strategic Global Alliances in Vaccine Development and Disease Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Strategic Global Alliances in Vaccine Development and Disease Control Dr Sadhana Sharma BBSRC · UK veterinary vaccinology network · Global veterinary vaccinology alliance #12;3 COORDINATION public engagement on bioscience What we do: #12;"Global Strategic Alliances for the Coordination

  13. Needed : a realistic strategy for global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

    Through a brief look at the science and economics of climate, the authors show that if climate change turns out to be a serious threat, an effective response will require a substantial and very long-term global effort. ...

  14. HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION? bridges vol. 18, July 2008 / Pielke makers would benefit from an authoritative, independent perspective on technology assessment of renewable energy technologies; and the US Congress is considering implementing laws to regulate speculation

  15. Global environmental markets: Equity and efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chichilnisky, G.

    1997-12-31

    Global markets trading rights to emit greenhouse gases are now actively considered by the United Nations. This leads to a new phenomenon: environmental markets in a global scale. Is this new, or are these markets simply a global manifestation of a trend towards market solutions? This paper will show that there is a fundamental difference between global environmental markets and standard stock exchanges. Because the atmosphere of the planet is one and the same for all, these markets trade {open_quotes}public goods{close_quotes} which are, however, privately produced. These are different from all the goods that are traded in markets today. Efficiency in these markets dictates different rules, involving a more equitable allocation of property rights on environmental use, and this requires new institutional arrangements. There is a need for a new institution, an International Bank for Environmental Settlements (IBES), which can lead to organized trading and ensures market integrity and efficiency.

  16. Global warming: Science or politics. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorweiler, V.P.

    1998-04-01

    ``The balance of evidence suggests that there has been a discernible influence of human activity on global climate`` is a statement employed as the foundation basis to intervene on behalf of the globe and the future. That statement, as scientific evidence of human-produced greenhouse gases (primarily CO{sub 2}) having a warming effect on global climate is a political statement only. Further, the Kyoto conference to consider intervention in human activities regarding global warming was a political conference. Political and treaty issues were the focus; scientific issues were not much discussed. What change is needed then to scientifically determine global warming and to ascertain whether human activity is involved? A better understanding of the natural climate variations related to solar variation can improve understanding of an anthropogenic greenhouse effect on the climate. The purpose of this article is to pose the scientific question. Part 2 will present an answer.

  17. Sales & operations planning in a global business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honstain, Christopher Michael

    2007-01-01

    As companies become more global and begin to outsource manufacturing and other services, the uncertainty in the supply resource increases. Demand uncertainties increase as these same companies expand into new countries to ...

  18. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-08

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  19. Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler Wettervorhersagemodelle des Deutschen Wetterdienstes: Der Held-Suarez Test vorgelegt von Christiane Jablonowski Bonn, September 1998 Meteorologisches.1 Tests von globalen Zirkulationsmodellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Test von

  20. GlobalTechnicalResearch&Development FORMULATIONDEVELOPMENTANDEVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    TechnicalResearch&Development FORMULATIONDEVELOPMENTANDEVALUATION FormulationDesign ModelExpertSystem CAPEX Guo,M.,et.al.,Pharm.Tech.,26(9),2002,p.44-60 #12;Global

  1. Global Social Media Directory: A Resource Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Piatt, Andrew W.

    2014-10-23

    The Global Social Media Directory is a resource guide providing information on social networking services around the globe. This information changes rapidly, therefore, this document will be updated on a regular basis and as funding permits.

  2. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  3. An Elementary Theory of Global Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costinot, Arnaud

    This article develops an elementary theory of global supply chains. We consider a world economy with an arbitrary number of countries, one factor of production, a continuum of intermediate goods and one final good. Production ...

  4. Lorentzian Spectral Geometry for Globally Hyperbolic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Finster; Olaf Müller

    2015-07-28

    The fermionic signature operator is analyzed on globally hyperbolic Lorentzian surfaces. The connection between the spectrum of the fermionic signature operator and geometric properties of the surface is studied. The findings are illustrated by simple examples and counterexamples.

  5. End of semester project Global Optimization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyfuss, Pierre

    End of semester project Global Optimization algorithms Ecole Polytechnique de l'Université de Nice.......................................................................................................................................3 II. Simulated annealing algorithm (SA.........................................................................................................................................7 2.Principle,algorithm and choice of parameters

  6. Global manufacturing model and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

    2003-01-01

    . Second, an operational layer discusses, the general idea of what policy a company needs to develop and how a company globally manages its operations and supply chain, resources, and markets. The third layer, societal, shows the importance and the impacts...

  7. Risk management practices in global manufacturing investment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Mukesh

    2010-07-06

    This thesis explores risk management practices in global manufacturing investment. It reflects the growing internationalisation of manufacturing and the increasing complexity and fragmentation of manufacturing systems. Issues of risk management have...

  8. Globalization and Real Estate: Issues, Implications, Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok Deo; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    Markets in Asia. European Real Estate Society Conference.and Issues in Global Real Estate Investing: A Review of theResearch. Journal of Real Estate Portfolio Management, 8:38-

  9. Managing Tensions In A Globalizing Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Martha McArdell

    2010-10-12

    Globalizing processes often place the social cohesion of organizations at risk when multinational people experience and exhibit tensions from their diverse cultural and language norms. This study uses discourse analysis ...

  10. Researching NDE, Additive Manufacturing |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I never thought I would get the incredible opportunity to become a summer intern at the GE Global Research Center, amongst such brilliant and tenacious individuals. I have been...

  11. Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy Tyson Research Center and International Center et al. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice http://data, 2012 Tyson Research Center International Center for Advanced Research and Sustainability (I

  12. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  13. Evolving a global armaments logistics strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, Nathan (Nathan W.)

    2009-01-01

    Few companies globally source and manage commercial transportation for frequent and high volumes of explosive cargo for the U. S. Department of Defense. U.S. regulations are strict and economically competitive options are ...

  14. Global supply chain design and optimization methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkle, Aimee L. (Aimee Leigh), 1975-

    2004-01-01

    The work for this thesis was performed at Honeywell in the Automation and Control Solutions (ACS) division. The project focuses on ACS's manufacturing strategy regarding its global supply chain design, primarily discussing ...

  15. Global expansion strategies for software firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoden, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    The business competition in the software industry is increasingly becoming a global competition. In this era with a fast-paced innovative environment, strategy plays an important role for managers in software companies in ...

  16. Global Warming Effects on Us Hurricane Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of ...

  17. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  18. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  19. Feedstock Economics for Global Steam Crackers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, G.; Pavone, T.

    1990-01-01

    of annuunceme"ts of new global capac i ty. Many of the announcements have been made by organizations with no previous background in petrochemica Is, "'ho believe they possess strategic competit1ve advantages for success 1n the business. The choice... plants based upon five alternative feedstocks, and then modifying the data for 10 global regions in which significant new ethylene capacity has been announced. The five feedstocks considered are: ethane, propane, butane, wide range naphtha...

  20. Global evolution of random vortex filament equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Brze?niak; M. Gubinelli; M. Neklyudov

    2013-07-04

    We prove the existence of a global solution for the filament equation with inital condition given by a geometric rough path in the sense of Lyons (1998).Our work gives a positive answer to a question left open in recent publications: Berselli and Gubinelli (2007) showed the existence of global solution for a smooth initial condition while Bessaih, Gubinelli, Russo (2005) proved the existence of a local solution for a general initial condition given by a rough path.

  1. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot...

  2. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" June 7, 2015 Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" A well-known scientific principle...

  3. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

  4. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for...

  5. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Lead Performer: National Institute of Standards and Technology -...

  6. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  7. Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Addthis An error occurred. Try watching this video on www.youtube.com, or enable...

  8. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors GNEP will provide...

  9. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

  10. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress...

  11. Global High-purity Pentoxide Industry 2015 Market Research Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global High-purity Pentoxide Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 2 July, 2015 - 21:10 Global High-purity...

  12. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the NNSA Global Threat Reduction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Global Threat Reduction Initiative Office 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the NNSA Global Threat Reduction Initiative Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments...

  13. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    characterize global energy consumption and its consequencesconsumption for specific end-uses. Energy demand in the commercial sector represents 11% of total global

  14. Global Energy Efficient IT Equipment Industry 2015 Market Research...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Energy Efficient IT Equipment Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 30 June, 2015 - 20:07 Global Energy...

  15. Global Science Gateway Agreement Signed in London | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Science Gateway Agreement Signed in London Global Science Gateway Agreement Signed in London January 22, 2006 - 10:15am Addthis DOE Partners With British Library on...

  16. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dry by Global Warming" Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Climate change will challenge tall trees like California's redwoods. June 7, 2015...

  17. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training...

  18. Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate Change. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global Catastrophes in Perspective: Asteroid Impacts vs. Climate...

  19. Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Global Institute for Water Security National Hydrology Research Centre 11 Innovation Boulevard Modelling The Global Institute for Water Security (GIWS) and the School for Environment and Sustainability

  20. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  1. Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and...

  2. From pictures to 3D : global optimization for scene reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandraker, Manmohan Krishna

    2009-01-01

    SAN DIEGO From Pictures to 3D: Global Optimization for SceneOF THE DISSERTATION From Pictures to 3D: Global Optimization

  3. Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy,...

  4. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Status and Prospects of the Global...

  5. Global health response more accurate with automated influenza...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Public health officials will...

  6. Rocket Science? No, It's Harder | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    says Juan Albeniz, Business Program Manager, Oil & Gas at GE Global Research Europe. Juan Albeniz, Business Program Manager, Oil & Gas at GE Global Research, Europe Juan...

  7. The role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed climate variability and global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, A.; Manabe, Syukuro

    1999-08-01

    To understand the role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed surface temperature variability, a version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled ocean-atmosphere model is integrated for 1,000 yr in two configurations, one with water vapor feedback and one without. To understand the role of water vapor feedback in global warming, two 500-yr integrations were also performed in which CO{sub 2} was doubled in both model configurations. The final surface global warming in the model with water vapor feedback is 3.38 C, while in the one without it is only 1.05 C. However, the model`s water vapor feedback has a larger impact on surface warming in response to a doubling of CO{sub 2} than it does on internally generated, low-frequency, global-mean surface temperature anomalies. Water vapor feedback`s strength therefore depends on the type of temperature anomaly it affects. Finally, the authors compare the local and global-mean surface temperature time series from both unperturbed variability experiments to the observed record. The experiment without water vapor feedback does not have enough global-scale variability to reproduce the magnitude of the variability in the observed global-mean record, whether or not one removes the warming trend observed over the past century. In contrast, the amount of variability in the experiment with water vapor feedback is comparable to that of the global-mean record, provided the observed warming trend is removed. Thus, the authors are unable to simulate the observed levels of variability without water vapor feedback.

  8. The Impact of Global Warming and Air Pollution on Patient Visits in the Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derlet, Robert W

    2001-01-01

    Review The Impact sf Global Warming and 1 Air pollution onair pollution problems and global warming will effect thesites in the human body. Global Warming Global warming goes

  9. Handling Globalization: Labor, Capital, and Class in the Globalized Warehouse and Distribution Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struna, Jason Young

    2015-01-01

    California: Global Commodity Distribution, Land Speculation,el Socialismo and Walmart Distribution Centre Union Chile.leaders! of! the! Distribution! Centre! Walmart! Chile!

  10. Handling Globalization: Labor, Capital, and Class in the Globalized Warehouse and Distribution Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struna, Jason Young

    2015-01-01

    Francois Nielsen. 1999. "Income Inequality, Development, andand the Great U-Turn: Income Inequality Trends in 16 OECDMovement and Metropolitan Inequality: Global Restructuring,

  11. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations K. W. OLESON AND G. B. BONAN Climate and Global Dynamics... Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity studies and the model’s ability to simulate urban heat islands in different environments is evaluated. Findings show that heat storage and sensible heat flux are most sensitive...

  12. Physics results from dynamical overlap fermion simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoji Hashimoto

    2008-11-08

    I summarize the physics results obtained from large-scale dynamical overlap fermion simulations by the JLQCD and TWQCD collaborations. The numerical simulations are performed at a fixed global topological sector; the physics results in the theta-vacuum is reconstructed by correcting the finite volume effect, for which the measurement of the topological susceptibility is crucial. Physics applications we studied so far include a calculation of chiral condensate, pion mass, decay constant, form factors, as well as (vector and axial-vector) vacuum polarization functions and nucleon sigma term.

  13. The Microscopic Linear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear Dynamics Exponentials Matrix Exponential Eigendecomposition References The Microscopic Brain Will Penny 7th April 2011 #12;The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear;The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear Dynamics Exponentials Matrix Exponential Eigendecomposition

  14. Global Distributions and Natural Sources of Brominated very Short-Lived Substances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yina

    2013-07-09

    ), is required. However, BrVSLS production rates are largely controlled by other biogeochemical factors in seawater, such as DOM composition. Results from this study also suggest that V-BrPO activity not only plays an essential role in BrVSLS production...

  15. Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Byung-Jay

    Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems Symbolic Embedding Examples Results Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems Jonathan Jaquette Swarthmore College July 22, 2009 Jonathan Jaquette Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems #12;Categorical Introduction

  16. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  17. Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets ­ cost effective fuel in the energy system it is less costly to reduce CO2-emissions #12;Global energy system model #12;Global energy system model Optimisation #12;Global energy system model Optimisation Minimises the total cost under

  18. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  19. International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction (August 22 Support Digital Models GlobalGlobal RoadmapRoadmap Workshop Report and Summary of Key Findings Edited by on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction | 22-24 August, 2007 | Finland - 2

  20. DIVISION OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS The Division of Global Affairs (DGA), offering a Master's of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    @business.rutgers.edu Gabriela Kutting (Ph.D., University of Sussex) Areas of Interest: Global Environmental Politics and Global, problem-oriented approaches to transnational issues and their interaction with local issues. Degree, Berkeley) Areas of Interest: Human Rights; Genocide; Political Theory Department of Political Science

  1. Constraining global isoprene emissions with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) formaldehyde column measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Constraining global isoprene emissions with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) formaldehyde emission estimates are highly uncertain because of a lack of direct observations. Formaldehyde (HCHO the observation of this trace gas to help constrain isoprene emissions. We use HCHO column observations from

  2. Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa: Capacity Building for ElectronicCapacity Building for Electronic Geophysical YearGeophysical Year · VGMO.NET is a middleware architecture that provides a new way for the worldwide geomagnetic community

  3. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  4. Introduction Dynamical properties of (-)-transformation Dynamical properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /04/2010 Digital expansions, dynamics and tilings, Aussois Dynamical properties of the (-)-transformation 1/17 #12 of (-)-transformation Digital expansions, dynamics and tilings, Aussois Dynamical properties of the (-)-transformation 2/17 #12;Introduction Dynamical properties of (-)-transformation Introduction Digital expansions, dynamics

  5. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  6. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André

    2014-06-15

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  7. "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real or presumed developments is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real of catastrophic global warming the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" What is climate change we have ever seen" What is climate change? Lord Nicholas Stern, October 2006 #12;"Global warming

  8. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  9. BULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / De-cember 1999Byrne, Yun / EFFICIENT GLOBAL WARMING Efficient Global Warming: Contradictions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    BULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / De-cember 1999Byrne, Yun / EFFICIENT GLOBAL WARMING Efficient Global Warming: Contradictions in Liberal Democratic Responses to Global Environmental Problems democracies can be ex- pected to pursue a policy regime of "efficient global warming." Key words

  10. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  11. Stable Isotope Fractionations in Biogeochemical Reactive Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druhan, Jennifer Lea

    2012-01-01

    potential effects of carbonate TIC is lower than precipitation, anabolic metabolism and methane production.

  12. Introduction Determining the biogeochemical functions of streams,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , diel variability in reaction rates, and errors in estimating gas transfer velocity (GTV) (McCutchan et at landscape scales is improved by tech- niques that provide whole-system estimates of transport and reaction mechanisms controlling reaction rates (Bade and Cole 2006; Tobias et al. 2007). Several factors can confound

  13. Stable Isotope Fractionations in Biogeochemical Reactive Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druhan, Jennifer Lea

    2012-01-01

    framework hydraulic communication between the well bores andin hydraulic conductivity measured in injection wells. Wellshydraulic conductivity of multiple injection wells (Fig.

  14. Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlant <SilverChange AssociatesOutlookGlobalGlobal

  15. Global Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security We

  16. Global Security Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn TheGlobal

  17. Global biosurveillance: enabling science and technology. Workshop background and motivation: international scientific engagement for global security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Helen H

    2011-01-18

    Through discussion the conference aims to: (1) Identify core components of a comprehensive global biosurveillance capability; (2) Determine the scientific and technical bases to support such a program; (3) Explore the improvement in biosurveillance to enhance regional and global disease outbreak prediction; (4) Recommend an engagement approach to establishing an effective international community and regional or global network; (5) Propose implementation strategies and the measures of effectiveness; and (6) Identify the challenges that must be overcome in the next 3-5 years in order to establish an initial global biosurveillance capability that will have significant positive impact on BioNP as well as public health and/or agriculture. There is also a look back at the First Biothreat Nonproliferation Conference from December 2007. Whereas the first conference was an opportunity for problem solving to enhance and identify new paradigms for biothreat nonproliferation, this conference is moving towards integrated comprehensive global biosurveillance. Main reasons for global biosurveillance are: (1) Rapid assessment of unusual disease outbreak; (2) Early warning of emerging, re-emerging and engineered biothreat enabling reduced morbidity and mortality; (3) Enhanced crop and livestock management; (4) Increase understanding of host-pathogen interactions and epidemiology; (5) Enhanced international transparency for infectious disease research supporting BWC goals; and (6) Greater sharing of technology and knowledge to improve global health.

  18. Dynamics of multinational rivalry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Tieying

    2004-11-15

    Drawing insights from strategic management and international business literature, the present study develops an integrated model to explain the competitive actions between multinational firms in a global context. Accordingly, two research questions...

  19. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Short-lived Climate Pollutants: A Second Front in Climate, is not sufficient to ward off this near-term risk. Mitigation of four short-term climate warming pollutants has the Climate and Clean Air Coalition. The seminar will describe the recent scientific developments that led

  20. ExxonMobil Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto, F.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, ExxonMobil has undertaken voluntary actions to improve efficiency in our operations and in customer use of our products. Our Global Energy Management System (GEMS) is an important initiative that is having a positive impact at each...

  1. Constraint satisfaction and global optimization in robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Constraint satisfaction and global optimization in robotics Arnold Neumaier Universit¨at Wien and Jean-Pierre Merlet INRIA Sophia Antipolis 1 #12;The design, validation, and use of robots poses a num they are going to do. Soon they will be able to do anything they want!" Genesis 11:6. 3 #12;A robot is a machine

  2. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is helping address the global challenge of climate change by providing critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects, preventing more than 25 million metric tons of CO2 emissions to date.

  3. Global temperature deviations as a random walk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, O.

    1996-12-31

    Surface air temperature is the main parameter to represent the earth`s contemporary climate. Several historical temperature records on a global/monthly basis are available. Time-series analysis shows that they can be modelled via autoregressive moving average models closely connected to the classical random walk model. Fitted models emphasize a nonstationary character of the global/monthly temperature deviation from a certain level. The nonstationarity explains all trends and periods, found in the last century`s variability of global mean temperature. This means that the short-term temperature trends are inevitable and may have little in common with a currently increasing carbon dioxide amount. The calculations show that a reasonable understanding of the contemporary global mean climate is attainable, assuming random forcing to the climate system and treating temperature deviation as a response to it. The forcings occur due to volcanic eruptions, redistribution of cloudiness, variations in snow and ice covered areas, changes in solar output, etc. Their impact can not be directly estimated from changes of the earth`s radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, because actual measurements represent mixture of the forcings and responses. Thus, it is impossible empirically to separate the impact of one particular forcing (e.g., that due to increase of CO{sub 2} amount) from the sequence of all existing forcings in the earth climate system. More accurate modelling involving main feedback loops is necessary to ease such a separation.

  4. Self-correcting differential global positioning system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Randal Alfred

    1993-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite based system that can accurately determine a user's position in terms of latitude, longitude, and height or in terms of X, Y, and Z. The X, Y, and Z coordinate system is an Earth Centered Earth...

  5. The Trend of Global Capitalism Qiudong Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quidong

    , including Russia and east Europe countries, India, China, Mexico, South America and Africa, are relative the history, the present and the future trend of politic and economic relationship between developed and under strategic initiatives in the on-going global politic and economic game. The most serious threat

  6. The global approach to thermodynamics Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    The global statement for the second law is #12;800 400tot sys wtS S S S S For thermal reservoirs TE its entropy, therefore 0wtS . Using the information from the figure we calculate a negative value

  7. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions CarmenM. Benkovitz, Hajime inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial on emissions is also required at high resolution for the design of policies aimed at reducing emissions

  8. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7© GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Biodiversity, Ecosystems and GEO BON GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4 November 2008 Douglas M. Muchoney, Ph.D. U.S. Geological

  9. Global Performance in the Pulp & Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Performance in the Pulp & Paper Industry: An Overview Don Roberts CIBC World Markets April 4 in the Pulp & Paper Industry:in the Pulp & Paper Industry: An OverviewAn Overview Presented at: Current Status of Maine's Pulp & Paper Industry Challenges, Strengths & Opportunities April 4, 2003 Bangor, Maine #12;Don

  10. TESLA'S VISION OF THE WIRELESS GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajkovic, Ljiljana

    of Nikola Tesla #12;January 17, 2005 UBC Ljiljana Trajkovic, Simon Fraser University 9 Wireless patentsTESLA'S VISION OF THE WIRELESS GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS Ljiljana Trajkovi Communication Networks;January 17, 2005 UBC Ljiljana Trajkovic, Simon Fraser University 2 Road map Tesla in 1890's First wireless

  11. TESLA'S VISION OF THE WIRELESS GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajkovic, Ljiljana

    to align with the electric field. The Inventions, Researches and Writings of Nikola Tesla #12;March 12TESLA'S VISION OF THE WIRELESS GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS Ljiljana Trajkovi Communication Networks;March 12, 2004 Kwantlen College Ljiljana Trajkovic, Simon Fraser University 2 Road map Tesla in 1890's

  12. HOMOTOPY OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    HOMOTOPY OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION DANIEL M. DUNLAVY AND DIANNE P. O'LEARY under Grants CCR 02-04084 and CCF 05-14213. 1 #12;2 D.M. DUNLAVY AND D.P. O'LEARY point is generated

  13. Pax Global: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1413)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Pax Global, Inc. finding that freezer basic models (1) Crosley CCF51; (2) Crosley CCF69; (3) Crosley CCF106; and (4) Daewoo DCF-106W do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  14. Global and local properties of asynchronous circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global and local properties of asynchronous circuits optimized for energy efficiency Paul I. P optimized for E \\Theta t n , the relationship between energy consumption and com­ putation delay energy consumption a major concern in VLSI design. As a consequence, energy efficiency is becoming

  15. Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja Jonoski2 ; and Dimitri P. Solomatine3 Abstract: The remediation of groundwater contamination by pumping as decision variables. Groundwater flow and particle-tracking models MODFLOW and MODPATH and a GO tool GLOBE

  16. Corporate Training On-Site Online Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    MAKE THE RIGHT MOVE Corporate Training On-Site · Online · Global IMPROVE YOUR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE WITH WORLD-CLASS ON-SITE AND ONLINE SOLUTIONS TAILORED TO MEET YOUR BUSINESS AND EMPLOYEE TRAINING NEEDS a competitive advantage depends on how well your staff executes. UCIrvineExtension's Corporate Training helps

  17. Global Internet Measurement Infrastructure Paul Barford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barford, Paul

    Global Internet Measurement Infrastructure Paul Barford Computer Science Department University@cs.wisc.edu Abstract Over the past ten years, measurements of Internet behavior have been made for a range of applications: from research focused on understanding Internet behavior in the form of invariant characteristics

  18. Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE 1982-83 EL NINO 30602 ABSTRACT Duffy, D.C., 1989. Seabirds and the 1982-1984 El Nino-Southern Oscillation The 1982-1984 El Nino and associated events affected seabirds in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Effects ranged

  19. TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY Global Fee Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    1 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY Global Fee Document Effective Beginning Fall 2014 Semester Summary of Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges All tuition, fees, rentals, rates, and charges of Texas Tech University are charged and collected under specific authorization of the laws of the State of Texas, including

  20. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    and pushes the total installed capacity in the u.S. to 100 MW.2 Half of this 100-MW milestone capacity came networks, defining new market niches, and scaling up production. u.S. installed capacity increased by 15 Displaced Carbon Dioxide 17 Building-Mounted Turbines 17 Manufacturing 18 The Global Market 21 Solar

  1. Economic value of global weather measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.; Butterworth, J.

    1999-02-19

    Global sensor networks could support increased activity in a number of economic sectors. Potential benefits and the predicted time scales required to realize them are estimated. Benefits are particular compelling for fundamental reasons for aviation, hotels and restaurants, natural disasters, construction, agriculture, and apparel. These benefits can be captured by simple logistic approximations.

  2. A Global Assessment of Manufacturing: Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universit¨at, Braunschweig D-38106, Germany Annu. RevA Global Assessment of Manufacturing: Economic Development, Energy Use, Carbon Emissions, and the Potential for Energy Efficiency and Materials Recycling Timothy G. Gutowski,1 Julian M. Allwood,3 Christoph

  3. Global Futures: a multithreaded execution model for Global Arrays-based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Vishnu, Abhinav

    2012-05-31

    We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible Active Message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry application benchmark (Hartree-Fock matrix construction using the Self-Consistent Field method). Our results show how we used GF to increase the scalability of the Hartree-Fock matrix build to up to 6,144 cores of an Infiniband cluster. We also show how GF's multithreaded execution has comparable performance to the traditional process-based SPMD model.

  4. GLOBAL AND ADAPTIVE SCALING IN A SEPARABLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-19

    Differentiability of TM at z? implies differentiability of PM and QM at s? = z?+w? ..... 119–147. [SR03]. David. H Salinger and R. Tyrrel Rockafellar, Dynamic ...

  5. Experimental observation of chimeras in a minimal globally-coupled network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Hart; Kanika Bansal; Thomas E. Murphy; Rajarshi Roy

    2015-12-16

    A "chimera state" is a dynamical pattern that occurs in a network of coupled identical oscillators when the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into synchronous and asynchronous parts. We report the experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a network of four globally coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. This is the minimal network that can support chimera states, and our study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying their formation. We use a unified approach to determine the stability of all the observed partially synchronous patterns, highlighting the close relationship between chimera and cluster states as belonging to the broader phenomenon of partial synchronization. Our approach is general in terms of network size and connectivity. We also find that chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  6. Venture Global Calcasieu Pass, LLC- (Formerly Venture Global LNG, LLC)- 14-88-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on May 13, 2014, by Venture Global LNG, LLC (VGP) requesting long-term, multi-contract authority to export (in addition...

  7. New Global Oil & Gas Hub in Oklahoma City | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selects Oklahoma City Site for New Global Hub of Oil & Gas Technology Innovation Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click...

  8. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  9. Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formosa, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both accurate thermodynamic and dynamic modelling to predict its performances. The steady state behaviour of the engine partly relies on non linear dissipative phenomena such as pressure drop loss within heat exchangers which is dependant on the temperature within the associated components. An analytical thermodynamic model which encompasses the effectiveness and the flaws of the heat exchangers and the regenerator has been previously developed and validated. A semi-analytical dynamic model of FPSE is developed and presented in this paper. The thermodynamic model is used to define the thermal variables that are used in the dynamic model which evaluates the kinematic results. Thus, a coupled iterative strategy has been used to perform a global simulation. The global modelling approach has been validated using the experimental data available from the NASA RE-1000 Stirling engine prototype. The resulting coupled thermodynamic-dynamic model using a standard...

  10. Dynamic Instruction Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ian

    2012-01-01

    SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

  11. Elliptical Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1998-11-06

    A review of elliptical galaxy dynamics, with a focus on nonintegrable models. Topics covered include torus construction; modelling axisymmetric galaxies; triaxiality; collisionless relaxation; and collective instabilities.

  12. Green evolution and dynamic adaptations revealed by genomes of the marine picoeukaryotes Micromonas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Mock, Thomas; Rouze, Pierre; Simmons, Melinda P.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Cuvelier, Marie L.; Derelle, Evelyne; Everett, Meredieht V.; Foulon, Elodie; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Henrissat, Bernard; Napoli, Carolyn; McDonald, Sarah M.; Parker, Micaela S.; Rombauts, Stephane; Salamov, Asaf; von Dassow, Peter; Badger, Jonathan G,; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Demir, Elif; Dubchak, Inna; Gentemann, Chelle; Eikrem, Wenche; Gready, Jill E.; John, Uwe; Lanier, William; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Mayer, Kluas F. X.; Moreau, Herve; Not, Fabrice; Otillar, Robert; Panaud, Olivier; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Paulsen, Ian; Piegu, Benoit; Poliakov, Aaron; Robbens, Steven; Schmutz, Jeremy; Roulza, Eve; Wyss, Tania; Zelensky, Alexander; Zhou, Kemin; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Goodenough, Ursula W.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2009-10-14

    Picoeukaryotes are a taxonomically diverse group of organisms less than 2 micrometers in diameter. Photosynthetic marine picoeukaryotes in the genus Micromonas thrive in ecosystems ranging from tropical to polar and could serve as sentinel organisms for biogeochemical fluxes of modern oceans during climate change. These broadly distributed primary producers belong to an anciently diverged sister clade to land plants. Although Micromonas isolates have high 18S ribosomal RNA gene identity, we found that genomes from two isolates shared only 90percent of their predicted genes. Their independent evolutionary paths were emphasized by distinct riboswitch arrangements as well as the discovery of intronic repeat elements in one isolate, and in metagenomic data, but not in other genomes. Divergence appears to have been facilitated by selection and acquisition processes that actively shape the repertoire of genes that are mutually exclusive between the two isolates differently than the core genes. Analyses of the Micromonas genomes offer valuable insights into ecological differentiation and the dynamic nature of early plant evolution.

  13. Sequence information signal processor for local and global string comparisons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, John C. (Alta Loma, CA); Chow, Edward T. (San Dimas, CA); Waterman, Michael S. (Culver City, CA); Hunkapillar, Timothy J. (Pasadena, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A sequence information signal processing integrated circuit chip designed to perform high speed calculation of a dynamic programming algorithm based upon the algorithm defined by Waterman and Smith. The signal processing chip of the present invention is designed to be a building block of a linear systolic array, the performance of which can be increased by connecting additional sequence information signal processing chips to the array. The chip provides a high speed, low cost linear array processor that can locate highly similar global sequences or segments thereof such as contiguous subsequences from two different DNA or protein sequences. The chip is implemented in a preferred embodiment using CMOS VLSI technology to provide the equivalent of about 400,000 transistors or 100,000 gates. Each chip provides 16 processing elements, and is designed to provide 16 bit, two's compliment operation for maximum score precision of between -32,768 and +32,767. It is designed to provide a comparison between sequences as long as 4,194,304 elements without external software and between sequences of unlimited numbers of elements with the aid of external software. Each sequence can be assigned different deletion and insertion weight functions. Each processor is provided with a similarity measure device which is independently variable. Thus, each processor can contribute to maximum value score calculation using a different similarity measure.

  14. Mapping Hawking into Unruh for global embeddings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Yuan Ai; Hua Chen; Jian-Bo Deng

    2014-10-15

    We study the mechanism of global embeddings into the Minkowski spacetime(GEMS) with the Hawking into Unruh mapping. We find a constraint that the extrinsic acceleration of the static observer in the Riemann space must satisfy for such embeddings. Thus the question raised by Paston in Ref.\\cite{1}, that is, when does the Hawking into Unruh mapping for global embeddings work, is partly addressed. We also calculate the potential barrier of a scalar field to reach r $\\rightarrow\\infty$ in the ambient space. The results show that the potential barrier is finite, hence the static observer at r $\\rightarrow\\infty$ can indeed detect the radiation caused by the Unruh effect from the embedding view. However the potential barriers calculated in both the Riemann background and the Minkowski background are not coincident, therefore the GEMS approach is not complete and the Hawking effect can be distinguished from the Unruh effect of the GEMS in principle.

  15. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  16. Fermions as global correction in lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Finkenrath; Francesco Knechtli; Björn Leder

    2011-12-08

    The fermion determinant is a highly non-local object and its logarithm is an extensive quantity. For these reasons it is widely believed that the determinant cannot be treated in acceptance steps of gauge link configurations that differ in a large fraction of the links. However, for exact factorisations of the determinant that separate the ultraviolet from the infra-red modes of the Dirac operator it is known that the latter show less variation under changes of the gauge field compared to the former. Using a factorisation based on recursive domain decomposition allows for a hierarchical algorithm that starts with pure gauge updates of the links within the domains and ends after a number of filters with a global acceptance step. We find that the global acceptance rate is high on moderate lattice sizes. Whether this type of algorithm can help in curing the problem of critical slowing down is presently under study.

  17. Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

  18. Energy Secretary Chu to Tour GE Global Research Advanced Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Secretary Chu to Tour GE Global Research Advanced Manufacturing Lab Energy Secretary Chu to Tour GE Global Research Advanced Manufacturing Lab May 24, 2012 - 10:54am Addthis...

  19. Leveraging global operations innovation to create sustainable competitive advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storm, Andrew P. (Andrew Phillip)

    2008-01-01

    High fixed costs and the emergence of globalization have forced traditional domestic automotive mass producers to the brink of bankruptcy. This thesis focuses on the global growth strategy of a Tier 1 automotive supplier ...

  20. Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;3. Prospects for Electricity Development Electricity Access Projected Electrification Rates by Region globalElectricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National · Prospects for electricity development · Investment requirements · Key challenges · Final remarks #12