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1

Simulating past and future dynamics of natural ecosystems in the United States. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 17(2)1045  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Simulations of potential vegetation distribution, natural fire frequency, carbon pools, and fluxes are presented for two DGVMs (Dynamic Global Vegetation Models) from the second phase of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project. Results link vegetation dynamics to biogeochemical cycling for the conterminous United States. Two climate change scenarios were used: a moderately warm scenario from the Hadley Climate Centre and a warmer scenario from the Canadian Climate Center. Both include sulfate aerosols and assume a gradual CO2 increase. Both DGVMs simulate a reduction of southwestern desert areas, a westward expansion of eastern deciduous forests, and the expansion of forests in the western part of the Pacific Northwest and in north-central California. Both DGVMs predict an increase in total biomass burnt in the next century, with a more pronounced increase under the Canadian scenario. Under the Hadley scenario, both DGVMs simulate increases in total carbon stocks. Under the Canadian scenario, both DGVMs simulate a decrease in live vegetation carbon. We identify similarities in model behavior due to the climate forcing and explain differences by the different structure of the models and their different sensitivity to

Dominique Bachelet; Ronald P. Neilson; Thomas Hickler; Raymond J. Drapek; James M. Lenihan; Martin T. Sykes; Benjamin Smith; Stephen Sitch; Kirsten Thonicke

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. 7, NO. 3, PAGES 557-597, SEPTEMBER 1993 GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the controls are derived from global gridded (løxl ø resolution) data basesof soil type, soil texture, NDVI uncertainty regarding the distribution and magnitude of the sourcesthemselves. For sometime it was thought #12 was combustion of fossil fuels, in particular, coalburning power plantsproducing electricity [Hao et al., 1987

Fridlind, Ann

3

NPP and the Global Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Global Carbon Cycle the Global Carbon Cycle Introduction Photosynthetic carbon fixation comprises a major component of the global carbon cycle. Data on net primary productivity (NPP) may be sparse, but a consistent NPP data set may be used to calibrate, parameterize and evaluate models of terrestrial carbon cycling, as well as for validation of remote sensing data and other applications (identifying trends, investigating biogeochemical processes, etc.). It is also useful to place such data within the context of carbon cycling and carbon storage worldwide. For example: How much carbon exists in the biosphere, and where exactly is it stored? How much is in fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), and how large are current fossil-fuel emissions? How much is in living biomass (plants/ animals/ humans)?

4

Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A proposed sensor deployment to investigate biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon, California (CON 5)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon,of UCLA, is impaired for mercury, a potent neurotoxin, whichhealth and wildlife t o Mercury methylation is the process

Sarah Rothenberg; Jenny Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE TERRESTRIAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL SILICON CYCLE AT A FORESTED WATERSHED IN NORTHERN VERMONT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of the global silicon cycle is becoming increasingly recognized because of its role in the consumption of atmospheric CO2. However, the terrestrial component (more)

Garvin, Christopher J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

FRANCIS, A.J.; GILLOW, J.P.; DODGE, C.J.

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Global Changes of the Water Cycle Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, numerical simulations of the twentieth-century climate are evaluated, focusing on the changes in the intensity of the global water cycle. A new model diagnostic of atmospheric water vapor cycling rate is developed and employed that ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Siegfried D. Schubert; Gregory K. Walker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

WATCH: Current Knowledge of the Terrestrial Global Water Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-related impacts are among the most important consequences of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Changes in the global water cycle will also impact the carbon and nutrient cycles and vegetation patterns. There is already some evidence ...

Richard Harding; Martin Best; Eleanor Blyth; Stefan Hagemann; Pavel Kabat; Lena M. Tallaksen; Tanya Warnaars; David Wiberg; Graham P. Weedon; Henny van Lanen; Fulco Ludwig; Ingjerd Haddeland

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioresources are generated in a variety of environments and each presents unique risks and benefits associated with land application. Bioresources from livestock, urban and bioenergy systems were selected and evaluated through field, greenhouse and laboratory studies of potential risk and benefits of recycling to agricultural and urban landscapes. The waste stream, including feedstock sources and treatment processes, affects composition and properties of bioresources and effects on biogeochemical cycles of amended soils. Variation of decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates among bioresources used to amend soil for turfgrass and forage reflected variation among contrasting feedstock sources and treatments prior to application. During turfgrass establishment, plant available nitrogen and nitrogen mineralized from a bioresource from livestock waste streams, (Geotube! residual solids, supplied N in excess of crop uptake potential and contributed to leaching loss of N. In contrast, N mineralization rates from bioresources generated during methane production from dairy manure (manure solids) were not sufficient to maximize crop production, necessitating N fertilizer application. In addition to variation of composition, bioresource effects on crop productivity and environmental quality vary among management practices and between forage and turfgrass cropping systems. Large application rates of bioresources increase soil nutrient concentration and potential crop productivity, but contribute to increased nutrient loss in drainage and surface runoff. Yet, incorporation or Alum treatment of bioresources will reduce runoff loss of dissolved P and protect water quality without sacrificing crop productivity. Alum treatment of bioresources prior to land application effectively reduced runoff loss of dissolved P to levels observed for control soil. For situations in which large, volume-based bioresource rates are top-dressed or incorporated, export of applied nutrients environmental impacts were compared between forage and turfgrass systems. Starting during the initial year of production, annual export of applied N and P in Tifway bermudagrass sod was greater than export through forage harvests of Tifton 85. Low forage yield limited N and P export from Tifton 85 during the year of establishment, but increased forage yield during the second year increased export of manure N and P to levels more comparable to sod. As variation between compost sources, turfgrass and forage production systems, and application methods indicated, effective management of bioresources is necessary to balance benefits and risk in cropping systems. Integrated assessment of bioresource composition and crop-specific management of application method and rate will enable sustainable bioresource cycling and crop productivity.

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Global Primary Aluminium Industry 2010 Life Cycle Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within this framework, the Primary Aluminium Industry has established a global Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data set. Inventory flows include inputs of raw materials ...

18

Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the response of global water vapor to global warming in a series of fully coupled climate model simulations. We find that a roughly 7% per Kelvin rate of increase of water vapor with global surface temperature is robust only for rapid ...

Larissa Back; Karen Russ; Zhengyu Liu; Kuniaki Inoue; Jiaxu Zhang; Bette Otto-Bliesner

19

Assessing a Satellite-Era Perspective of the Global Water Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capability of a global data compilation, largely satellite based, is assessed to depict the global atmospheric water cycles mean state and variability. Monthly global precipitation estimates from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (...

C. Adam Schlosser; Paul R. Houser

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Red waters of Myrionecta rubra are biogeochemical hotspots for the Columbia River estuary with impacts on primary/secondary productions and nutrient cycles  

SciTech Connect

The localized impact of blooms of the mixotrophic ciliate Myrionecta rubra in the Columbia River estuary during 2007-2010 was evaluated with biogeochemical, light microscopy, physiological and molecular data. M. rubra affected surrounding estuarine nutrient cycles, as indicated by high and low concentrations of organic nutrients and inorganic nitrogen, respectively, associated with red waters. M. rubra blooms also altered the energy transfer pattern in patches of the estuarine water that contain the ciliate by creating areas characterized by high primary production and elevated levels of fresh autochthonous particulate organic matter, therefore shifting the trophic status in emergent red water areas of the estuary from net heterotrophy towards autotrophy. The pelagic estuarine bacterial community structure was unaffected by M. rubra abundance, but red waters of the ciliate do offer a possible link between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes since they were associated with elevated dissolved organic matter and enhanced microbial secondary production. Taken together these findings suggest that M. rubra red waters are biogeochemical hotspots of the Columbia River estuary.

Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McCue, Lee Ann; Needoba, Joe A.; Crump, Byron C.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Campbell, Victoria; Zuber, Peter A.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Variability in a Stable, 1000-Yr Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Cycle Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 3D global coupled carbonclimate model is presented in the framework of the Community Climate System Model (CSM-1.4). The biogeochemical module includes explicit land watercarbon coupling, dynamic carbon allocation to leaf, root, and wood, ...

Scott C. Doney; Keith Lindsay; Inez Fung; Jasmin John

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

23

Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5?20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Final Project Report: "??Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "??Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."? This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also benefits efforts to trace Hg contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers, into which EFPC flows, and to distinguish Hg from the Y-12 plant from that released from a nearby coal ash accident.

Johnson, Thomas M

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multicentury Changes to the Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled climate and carbon (CO2) cycle model is used to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to the year 2300 that would occur if CO2 emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the ...

G. Bala; K. Caldeira; A. Mirin; M. Wickett; C. Delire

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Global Hydrological Cycle and Atmospheric Shortwave Absorption in Climate Models under CO2 Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spread among the predictions by climate models for the strengthening of the global hydrological cycle [i.e., the global mean surface latent heat flux (LH), or, equivalently, precipitation] at a given level of CO2-induced global warming is of ...

Ken Takahashi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Final_Updated.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Future Challenges Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nathan Rowe Chris Pickett Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Users Annual Training Meeting May 20-23, 2013 St. Louis, Missouri 2 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Introduction * Changing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities * Nuclear Security Challenges * How to Respond? - Additional Protocol - State-Level Concept - Continuity of Knowledge * Conclusion 3 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Fuel Cycle Source: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Weapons Cycle Conversion

31

Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Transferability Intercomparison: An Opportunity for New Insight on the Global Water Cycle and Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach, called transferability intercomparisons, is described for advancing both understanding and modeling of the global water cycle and energy budget. Under this approach, individual regional climate models perform simulations with all ...

E. S. Takle; W. J. Gutowski Jr.; R. W. Arritt; J. Roads; I. Meinke; B. Rockel; C. G. Jones; A. Zadra

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Monthly Mean Diurnal Cycles in Surface Temperatures over Land for Global Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean diurnal cycles (MDCs) of surface temperatures over land, represented in 3-h universal time intervals, have been analyzed. Satellite near-global data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) with a (280 km)2 ...

Alexander Ignatov; Garik Gutman

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Global p-mode oscillations throughout the complete solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parameters of the p-mode oscillations vary with solar activity. Such temporal variations provide insights for the study of the structural and dynamical changes occurring in the Sun's interior throughout the solar cycle. We present here a complete picture of the temporal variations of the global p-mode parameters (excitation, damping, frequency, peak asymmetry, and rotational splitting) over the entire solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24 as observed by the space-based, Sun-as-a-star helioseismic GOLF and VIRGO instruments onboard SoHO.

Salabert, David; Palle, Pere L; Jimenez, Antonio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Estimates of the Global Water Budget and Its Annual Cycle Using Observational and Model Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief review is given of research in the Climate Analysis Section at NCAR on the water cycle. Results are used to provide a new estimate of the global hydrological cycle for long-term annual means that includes estimates of the main reservoirs ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Lesley Smith; Taotao Qian; Aiguo Dai; John Fasullo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

22nd Conference on Hydrology A Satellite View of Global Water and Energy Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water and Energy Cycling (2008 - 88Annual_22hydro) 2/6/2008http://ams.confex.com/ams/88Annual22nd Conference on Hydrology 8.1 A Satellite View of Global Water and Energy Cycling Paul R. Houser in modeling capability, satellite observations have great potential to make huge advances in water and energy

Houser, Paul R.

37

Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle Hanqin on the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and monsoon Asian ecosystems. During 1860­1990, modeled results suggest that monsoon Asia as a whole released 29.0 Pg C, which represents 50% of the global carbon release

38

and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North America is currently a net source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, contributing to the global buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and associated changes in the earths climate. In 2003, North America emitted nearly two billion metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. North Americas fossil fuel emissions in 2003 (1856 million metric tons of carbon 10 % with 95 % certainty) were 27 % of global emissions. Approximately 85 % of those emissions were from the United States, 9 % from Canada and 6 % from Mexico. The conversion of fossil fuels to energy (primarily electricity) is the single largest contributor, accounting for approximately 42 % of North American fossil emissions in 2003. Transportation is the second largest, accounting for 31 % of total emissions. There are also globally important carbon sinks in North America. In 2003, growing vegetation in North America removed approximately 530 million tons of carbon per year ( 50%) from the atmosphere and stored it as plant material and soil organic matter. This land sink is equivalent to approximately 30 % of the fossil fuel emissions from North America. The imbalance between the fossil fuel source and the sink on land is a net release to the atmosphere of 1335 million metric tons of carbon per year ( 25%). Approximately 50 % of North Americas terrestrial sink is due to the regrowth of forests in the United

Lisa Dilling (co-lead; David M. Fairman; Richard A. Houghton; Gregg H. Marl; Adam Z. Rose; Thomas J. Wilbanks

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

David Archer; Bruce Buffett

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

The CharXive Challenge. Regulation of global carbon cycles by vegetation fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an open, but not unanswerable, question as to how much atmospheric CO2 is sequestered globally by vegetation fires. In this work I conceptualise the question in terms of the general CharXive Challenge, discuss a mechanism by which thermoconversion of biomass may regulate the global distribution of carbon between reservoirs, show how suppression of vegetation fires by human activities may increase the fraction of carbon in the atmospheric pool, and pose three specific CharXive Challenges of crucial strategic significance to our management of global carbon cycles.

Ball, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium. Mainly due to the growing demand for lightweight and powerful batteries, lithium has become such a metal. While supplies of lithium have historically been mined from pegmatites, brine extraction from salars

42

Sensitivity of the Global Water Cycle to the Water-Holding Capacity of Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the global water cycle to the water-holding capacity of the plant-root zone of continental soils is estimated by simulations using a mathematical model of the general circulation of the atmosphere, with prescribed ocean surface ...

P. C. D. Milly; K. A. Dunne

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar Cycles in 150 Years of Global Sea Surface Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the present work is to demonstrate that a solar cycle response exists in surface temperature using the longest global dataset available, which is in the form of 18542007 sea surface temperature (SST), with an emphasis on methods ...

Jiansong Zhou; Ka-Kit Tung

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

On the relationship between uncertainties in tropical divergence and the hydrological cycle in global models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of tropical divergence from three GCMs, three global reanalyses and four insitu soundings from field campaigns shows the existence of large uncertainties in the ubiquity of shallow divergent circulation as well as the depth and strength of the deep divergent circulation. More specifically, only two GCMs out of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses show significant shallow divergent circulation, which is present in all in-situ soundings, and of the three GCMs and three global reanalyses, only two global reanalyses have deep divergence profiles that lie within the range of uncertainty of the soundings. The relationships of uncertainties in the shallow and deep divergent circulation to uncertainties in present day and projected strength of the hydrological cycle from the GCMs are assessed. In the tropics and subtropics, deep divergent circulation is the largest contributor to moisture convergence that balances the net precipitation, and inter-model differences in the present day simulations carry over onto the future projections. In comparison to the soundings and reanalyses, the GCMs are found to have deeper and stronger divergent circulation. While these two characteristics of GCM divergence affect the strength of the hydrological cycle, they tend to compensate for each other so that their combined effect is relatively modest.

Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

46

Why Sequence Biogeochemically Important Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? Biogeochemically Important Bacteria? DOE-JGI will be sequencing three biogeochemically important bacteria, Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002 and Azospira suillum strain PS. These organisms represent diverse genera capable of anaerobically oxidizing both iron(II) and humic acids by using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Two of these organisms, strain 2002 and strain TPSY, are also capable of the anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation of uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). Left to right, Azospira suillum PS, Ferrutens nitratireducens 2002, and Diaphorobacter TPSY. Nitrate-dependent microbial metal oxidation is of critical importance because of its potential effect on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminants. Nitrate-dependent Iron(II) oxidation by organisms such as

47

Simulations of the global carbon cycle and anthropogenic CO{sub 2} transient. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on improving the understanding of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide transient using observations and models of the past and present. In addition, an attempt is made to develop an ability to predict the future of the carbon cycle in response to continued anthropogenic perturbations and climate change. Three aspects of the anthropogenic carbon budget were investigated: (1) the globally integrated budget at the present time; (2) the time history of the carbon budget; and (3) the spatial distribution of carbon fluxes. One of the major activities of this study was the participation in the model comparison study of Enting, et al. [1994] carried out in preparation for the IPCC 1994 report.

Sarmiento, J.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Numerical evaluation of mechanisms driving Early Jurassic changes in global carbon cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, ca. 183 Ma) carbon cycle perturbation is characterized by aabout -5 parts per thousand {delta} {sup 13}C excursion in the exogenic carbon reservoirs, a 1000 ppm rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and a 6-7 degrees warming. Two proposed explanations for this presumed global carbon cycle perturbation are the liberation of massive amounts of isotopically light CH4 from (1) Gondwanan coals by heating during the intrusive eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) or (2) the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates. Carbon cycle modeling indicates that the release of CH4 from Gondwanan coals synchronous with the eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar LIP fails to reproduce the magnitude or timing of the CO{sub 2} and {delta} {sup 13}C excursions. However, sensitivity analyses constrained by a marine cyclostratigraphically dated {delta}{sup 13}C record indicate that both features of geologic record can be explained with the huge input of about 15,340-24,750 Gt C over about 220 k.y., a result possibly pointing to the involvement of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin. The simulated release of > 6000 Gt C from gas hydrates also reproduces aspects of the early Toarcian rock record, but the large mass involved raises fundamental questions about its formation, storage, and release.

Beerling, D.J.; Brentnall, S.J. [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the sedimentary column, and diagenetic alteration of Ca isotope signals over geologic time scales. The overallThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Fantle, Matthew

50

Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Post, W.M. III

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

ORNL DAAC for Biogeochemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Welcome about us image About Us Provides detailed information about the ORNL DAAC. projects image About Data Lists the data products available from the ORNL DAAC. access image Get Data Guides you through the steps needed to acquire the data. tools image Data Tools Some tools to help you work with the data. uso image Help Need assistance? Our staff is happy to help. ORNL DAAC The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information

53

Experiences from Simulating the Global Carbon Cycle in a Grid Computing Environment, The Fourteenth Global Grid Forum (GGF 14),Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We discuss our software development experiences with Grid-BGC, a gridenabled terrestrial carbon cycle modeling environment. Grid-BGC leverages grid computing technologies to create a secure, reliable and easy to use distributed computational environment for climate modeling. The goal is to develop a system which insulates the scientists from tedious configuration details thereby increasing scientific productivity. This project is part of a collaborative effort between the

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Sean Mccreary; Peter Thornton; Henry M. Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Index Cycles in the Northern Hemisphere during the Global Weather Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An index cycle occurring in the Northern Hemisphere during the late winter and spring of 1979 has been examined in detail using the ECMWF Level IIIb data set.

John W. Kidson

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A generic reaction-based biogeochemical simulator  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a generic biogeochemical simulator, BIOGEOCHEM. The simulator can read a thermodynamic database based on the EQ3/EQ6 database. It can also read user-specified equilibrium and kinetic reactions (reactions not defined in the format of that in EQ3/EQ6 database) symbolically. BIOGEOCHEM is developed with a general paradigm. It overcomes the requirement in most available reaction-based models that reactions and rate laws be specified in a limited number of canonical forms. The simulator interprets the reactions, and rate laws of virtually any type for input to the MAPLE symbolic mathematical software package. MAPLE then generates Fortran code for the analytical Jacobian matrix used in the Newton-Raphson technique, which are compiled and linked into the BIOGEOCHEM executable. With this feature, the users are exempted from recoding the simulator to accept new equilibrium expressions or kinetic rate laws. Two examples are used to demonstrate the new features of the simulator.

Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Yeh, Gour T.; C.T. Miller, M.W. Farthing, W.G. Gray, and G.F. Pinder

2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part II: System-Scale and Mesoscale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel was simulated reasonably well in the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model. The evolution of the large-scale circulation and the storm-scale structure ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Prediction of the Life Cycle of a Supertyphoon with a High-Resolution Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Supertyphoon Hope (1979) from a tropical depression stage to intensification and its eventual weakening after land-fall, some 6 days later, is followed in a real-data numerical prediction experiment. The predictions are carried ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; D. Oosterhof

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part I: Global Mean and LandOcean Exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean and annual cycle of energy flowing into the climate system and its storage, release, and transport in the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface are estimated with recent observations. An emphasis is placed on establishing internally ...

John T. Fasullo; Kevin E. Trenberth

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Institutions, public policy and the product life cycle : the globalization of biomanufacturing and implications for Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization has brought about a major shift in our understanding of how companies organize themselves and how they compete. The fragmentation of firms in their scope and structure, the vertical disintegration of firms ...

Reynolds, Elisabeth B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Global Impact of the Systemic Economies and MENA Business Cycles ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes spillovers from macroeconomic shocks in systemic economies (China, the Euro Area, and the United States) to the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region as well as outward spillovers from a GDP shock in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and MENA oil exporters to the rest of the world. This analysis is based on a Global Vector Autoregression (GVAR) model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2 to 2011Q2. Spillovers are transmitted across economies via trade, financial, and commodity price linkages. The results show that the MENA countries are becoming more sensitive to developments in China than to shocks in the Euro Area or the United States, in line with the direction of evolving trade patterns and the emergence of China as a key driver of the global economy. Outward spillovers from the GCC region and MENA oil exporters are likely to be stronger in their immediate geographical proximity, but also have global implications.

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Mehdi Raissi A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

65

Global analysis of the transcriptional regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle progression and study of cell cycle regulation during symbiosis with Medicago sativa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex [alpha]-proteobacterial cell cycle regulatory network is essential not only for faithful replication and segregation of the genome, but also to coordinate unique cellular differentiation events that have evolved ...

De Nisco, Nicole J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

The nitrogen cycle and ecohydrology of seasonally dry grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes and, specifically, the organization of ecosystem traits with the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles. Observations from a factorial irrigation- ...

Parolari, Anthony Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Phosphate-mineral interactions and potential consequences for nutrient cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeochemical cycling of phosphate is a key component in the overall production rate of coastal ecosystems. Mineral phases in the near-shore sediments play a significant role in the return of phosphate remineralized in ...

Oates, Richard Hunter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part I: Large-Scale and Storm-Scale Evolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model, successfully simulated the life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel that formed over the Timor Sea in the austral summer of 2006. The multiscale ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Influence of the Realistic Description of Soil Water-Holding Capacity on the Global Water Cycle in a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the hydrological cycle to soil water-holding capacity (WHC) is investigated using the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique General Circulation Model (LMD GCM) coupled to a land surface model (LSM). A reference simulation (REF),...

Agns Ducharne; Katia Laval

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Simulation of the Global Hydrological Cycle in the CCSM Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3): Mean Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal and annual climatological behavior of selected components of the hydrological cycle are presented from coupled and uncoupled configurations of the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Community ...

James J. Hack; Julie M. Caron; Stephen G. Yeager; Keith W. Oleson; Marika M. Holland; John E. Truesdale; Philip J. Rasch

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EVALUATING THE LAND AND OCEAN COMPONENTS OF THE GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE IN THE CMIP5 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We assess the ability of 18 Earth System Models to simulate the land and ocean carbon cycle for the present climate. These models will be used in the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) for climate ...

A. Anav; P. Friedlingstein; M. Kidston; L. Bopp; P. Ciais; P. Cox; C. Jones; M. Jung; R. Myneni; Z. Zhu

73

Evaluating the Land and Ocean Components of the Global Carbon Cycle in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors assess the ability of 18 Earth system models to simulate the land and ocean carbon cycle for the present climate. These models will be used in the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) for ...

A. Anav; P. Friedlingstein; M. Kidston; L. Bopp; P. Ciais; P. Cox; C. Jones; M. Jung; R. Myneni; Z. Zhu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Penetration of hydrogen-based energy system and its potential for causing global environmental change: Scoping risk analysis based on life cycle thinking  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-based economy seems superficially to be environmentally friendly, and many people have worked toward its realization. Today hydrogen is mainly produced by decarbonizing fossil fuels (e.g. natural gas), and in the future decarbonization of both fossil fuels and biomass will play a leading role in the production of hydrogen. The main purpose of this paper is to suggest the identification of potential environmental risks in terms of 'life cycle thinking' (which considers all aspects from production to utilization) with regard to the hydrogen-based economy to come. Hydrogen production by decarbonization results in CO{sub 2} emissions. The final destination of the recovered CO{sub 2} is uncertain. Furthermore, there is a possibility that hydrogen molecules will escape to the atmosphere, posing risks that could occasion global environmental changes such as depletion of stratospheric ozone, temperature change in the stratosphere and change of the hydrides cycle through global vaporization. Based on the results of simulation, requirements regarding the following items are proposed to minimize potential risks: hydrogen source, production and storage loss.

Kikuchi, Ryunosuke [Department of Basic Science and Environment (CERNAS), ESAC, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Bencanta, 3040-316 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: kikuchi@mail.esac.pt

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

1994 PROPOSED EXECUTION PHASE BUDGET1994 PROPOSED EXECUTION PHASE BUDGET CHANGES IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLESCHANGES IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux tower site (42.54jN and 72.18jW, 340 m elevation) is located within Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA

New Hampshire, University of

76

Hydrological Cycle in the Danube basin in present-day and XXII century simulations by IPCCAR4 global climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of 20 GCMs included in the 4th IPCC assessment report regarding their representation of the hydrological cycle on the Danube river basin for 1961-2000 and for the 2161-2200 SRESA1B scenario runs. The basin-scale properties of the hydrological cycle are computed by spatially integrating the precipitation, evaporation, and runoff fields using the Voronoi-Thiessen tessellation formalism. The span of the model simulated mean annual water balances is of the same order of magnitude of the observed Danube discharge of the Delta; the true value is within the range simulated by the models. Some land components seem to have deficiencies since there are cases of violation of water conservation when annual means are considered. The overall performance and the degree of agreement of the GCMs are comparable to those of the RCMs analyzed in a previous work, in spite of the much higher resolution and common nesting of the RCMs. The reanalyses are shown to feature severa...

Lucarini, Valerio; Kriegerova, Ida; Speranza, Antonio; 10.1029/2007JD009167

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biogeochemical Controls | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Biogeochemical Biogeochemical Controls Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Biogeochemical Controls Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Savannah River National Laboratory researches long-term economic in-situ remediation of sites with mixed contaminants

78

Ewing Symposium in Honor of Taro Takahashi: The controversial aspects of the contemporary [carbon] cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Ewing Symposium in honor of Taro Takahashi's work on the carbon cycle was held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York, on October 26-27, 2000. A program and set of abstracts are appended to this report. A summary of the meeting (included in this report) will be published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The theme of the symposium was the magnitude and cause of excess carbon storage on the north temperate continents. Disagreement exists on the relative roles of forest regrowth and fertilization by excess fixed nitrogen and carbon dioxide, as well as the distribution of this storage. Phenomena playing important roles include pre-anthropogenic gradients in carbon dioxide, the so-called rectification effect, uptake and release of carbon dioxide by the ocean, soil nitrogen dynamics, atmospheric carbon-13 gradients, and the role of fire.

Broecker, Wallace Smith

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cycles in fossil diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transitions in Global Marine Diversity, Science 281, 1157-know if this cycle is a variation in true diversity or onlyin observed diversity, but either case requires explanation

Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Biogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogeochemical redox processes is crucial for predicting and protecting environmental health and can provide new the chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of many major and trace elements including Fe, and mobility of these elements in the environment are directly affected by reduction and oxidation. In addition

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Grid-BGC: a grid-enabled terrestrial carbon cycle modeling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is ...

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

83

Combined Climate and Carbon-Cycle Effects of Large-Scale Deforestation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prevention of deforestation and promotion of afforestation have often been cited as strategies to slow global warming. Deforestation releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, which exerts a warming influence on Earth's climate. However, biophysical effects of deforestation, which include changes in land surface albedo, evapotranspiration, and cloud cover also affect climate. Here we present results from several large-scale deforestation experiments performed with a three-dimensional coupled global carbon-cycle and climate model. These are the first such simulations performed using a fully three-dimensional model representing physical and biogeochemical interactions among land, atmosphere, and ocean. We find that global-scale deforestation has a net cooling influence on Earth's climate, since the warming carbon-cycle effects of deforestation are overwhelmed by the net cooling associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Latitude-specific deforestation experiments indicate that afforestation projects in the tropics would be clearly beneficial in mitigating global-scale warming, but would be counterproductive if implemented at high latitudes and would offer only marginal benefits in temperate regions. While these results question the efficacy of mid- and high-latitude afforestation projects for climate mitigation, forests remain environmentally valuable resources for many reasons unrelated to climate.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Wickett, M; Phillips, T J; Lobell, D B; Delire, C; Mirin, A

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Structural insight into SoxC and SoxD interaction and their role in electron transport process in the novel global sulfur cycle in Paracoccus pantotrophus  

SciTech Connect

Microbial oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds mainly sulfur anions in the environment is one of the major reactions of the global sulfur cycle mediated by phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes. The sulfur oxidizing gene cluster (sox) of {alpha}-Proteobacteria comprises of at least 16 genes, which form two transcriptional units, viz., soxSRT and soxVWXYZABCDEFGH. Sequence analysis reveals that soxD gene product (SoxD) belongs to the di-heme cytochrome c family of electron transport proteins whereas soxC gene product (SoxC) is a sulfur dehydrogenase. We employed homology modeling to construct the three-dimensional structures of the SoxC and SoxD from Paracoccus pantotrophus. SoxD protein is known to interact with SoxC. With the help of docking studies we have identified the residues involved in the interaction of SoxC and SoxD. The putative active site geometries of these two proteins as well as the structural basis of the involvements of these proteins in electron transport process during the oxidation of sulfur anions are also investigated.

Bagchi, Angshuman [Bioinformatics Center, Bose Institute, AJC Bose Centenary Building, P1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700 054 (India)]. E-mail: angshu@bic.boseinst.ernet.in; Roy, Pradosh [Department of Microbiology, Bose Institute, AJC Bose Centenary Building, P1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700 054 (India)]. E-mail: prodosh@bic.boseinst.ernet.in

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

86

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

87

Global Trends and Variability in Soil Moisture and Drought Characteristics, 19502000, from Observation-Driven Simulations of the Terrestrial Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global and regional trends in drought for 19502000 are analyzed using a soil moisturebased drought index over global terrestrial areas, excluding Greenland and Antarctica. The soil moisture fields are derived from a simulation of the ...

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An Investigation of Linked Physical And Biogeochemical Processes In Heterogeneous Soils In The Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding contaminant fate and transport. This work explored the effects of soil structure (i.e. layers, lenses) on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes under changing hydrologic conditions (e.g. rainfall, introduction of groundwater, and fluctuating water table heights). A homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam and a sand-over-loam layered column were constructed for the first series of experiments. The second series of experiments employed two soil columns with lenses that were packed identically with sterilized and untreated sediments. Each consisted of two lenses of organic-rich loam in a medium-grained sand matrix. Lenses were located at different vertical depths and were horizontally offset. In-situ collocated probes collected soil hydrologic and chemical data. In the layered column, enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of Fe(III) and SO42- reducing microorganisms also show 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. The greatest concentrations of aqueous FeS clusters (FeSaq) were observed in close proximity to the soil interface. To our knowledge, this was the first documentation of FeSaq in partially saturated sediments. Mineral and soil aggregate composite layers were also most abundant near the soil layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an order of magnitude decrease of hydraulic conductivity. In the live lens column, Fe-oxide bands formed at the fringes of the lenses that retarded water flow rates by an order of magnitude compared to the sterilized column. Microbial activity also produced insoluble gases and that led to the creation of a separate gas phase that reduced hydraulic conductivity. This limited the interaction between groundwater with soil-pore waters that led to the formation of geochemically distinct water masses in relatively close proximity to one another. No such changes were observed in the sterilized column. When compared to homogenous columns, the presence of soil heterogeneities altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes considerably which highlights the need to consider soil heterogeneity in contaminant fate and transport models. These findings suggest that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale.

Hansen, David Joseph

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Are Refiners Entering a Golden Age or a Short Cycle?  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Are Refiners Entering a Golden Age or a Short Cycle? Global Refining Strategies 2007 Barcelona, Spain

90

Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1 Brian C. Jackman (2005), Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L14808, doi:10.1029/2005GL023073. 1. Terrestrial Implications of Gamma Ray Bursts in Our Galaxy [2

Jackman, Charles H.

91

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Estimated Global Hydrographic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is made of the three-dimensional global oceanic temperature and salinity variability, omitting the seasonal cycle, both as a major descriptive element of the ocean circulation and for use in the error estimates of state estimation. ...

Gal Forget; Carl Wunsch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts  

SciTech Connect

We used molecular techniques to analyze basalts of varying ages that were collected from the East Pacific Rise, 9 oN, from the rift axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and from neighboring seamounts. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA Terminal Restriction Fragment Polymorphism data revealed that basalt endoliths are distinct from seawater and that communities clustered, to some degree, based on the age of the host rock. This age-based clustering suggests that alteration processes may affect community structure. Cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed twelve different phyla and sub-phyla associated with basalts. These include the Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, the candidate phylum SBR1093 in the c, andin the Archaea Marine Benthic Group B, none of which have been previously reported in basalts. We delineated novel ocean crust clades in the gamma-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria that are composed entirely of basalt associated microflora, and may represent basalt ecotypes. Finally, microarray analysis of functional genes in basalt revealed that genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane-oxidation, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation are present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. These novel processes could exert a profound influence on ocean chemistry.

Mason, Olivia U.; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Fisk, Martin R.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Urban Sodicity in a Humid Subtropical Climate: Impact on Biogeochemical Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the mechanisms of non-point source carbon and nutrients in urban watersheds will help to develop policies to maintain surface water quality and prevention of eutrophication. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the impact of sodium on carbon and nutrient leaching from the two main contributors; soil and leaf litter, and calculate the sodium exports in a humid subtropical urban river basin. The first chapter reviews the current literature on urbanization in watersheds. Chapter II quantifies the carbon and nutrient in intact soil core leachates and in water extractable solution from urban soils collected from 33 towns and cities across the state of Texas. Chapter III investigates the impact of sodicity and salinity on water extractable organic carbon and nitrogen from vegetation. Chapter IV investigates the export of sodium and chloride from the upper Trinity River basin. The results derived from this study indicate that sodium exports are elevated in urban watersheds and further that sodium in irrigation water elevates the loss of carbon and nutrients from both watershed soil and senesced vegetation and that this may contribute to high concentrations in urban freshwaters.

Steele, Meredith Kate

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

97

A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

Stephen C. Piper

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the earths surface are investigated by use of the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget Dataset. Principal component analysis is used to quantify ...

Pamela E. Mlynczak; G. Louis Smith; Anne C. Wilber; Paul W. Stackhouse

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

An offline unstructured biogeochemical model (UBM) for complex estuarine and coastal environments  

SciTech Connect

Due to increased pollutant loads and water use from coastal development and population growth, occurrences of low-dissolved oxygen and "hypoxic zones" have increased. Reports of fish kills and water quality impairment are also becoming more frequent in many coastal waters. Water quality managers and regulatory agencies rely on numerical modeling tools to quantify the relative contributions of anthropogenic and "natural" pollutant loads (nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand) on dissolved oxygen levels and use the results for remedial activities and source control. The ability to conduct seasonlong simulations with sufficient nearshore resolution is therefore a key requirement. Mesh flexibility and the ability to increase site specific resolution without disturbing the larger domain setup and calibration are critical. The objective of this effort was to develop a robust biogeochemical model suitable for simulation of water quality dynamics including dissolved oxygen in complex coastal environments with multiple tidal channels, tidal flats, and density-driven circulation using unstructured-grid formulation. This paper presents an offline unstructured biogeochemical model that uses the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) discretization of the study domain and the corresponding hydrodynamic solution to drive biogeochemical kinetics based on a water quality model CE-QUAL-ICM. In this paper, the linkage between selected hydrodynamic and water quality models is subjected to several scalar transport and biogeochemical module tests (plume transport and dilution, BOD/DO sag, and phytoplankton/nutrients reaction), and results are compared to their analytical solutions as part of model validation. A preliminary application of the biogeochemical model with a year-long simulation of Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound, USA, is presented as an example and a test of the tool in a real estuary setting. The model reproduced the dynamics and seasonal variations in the biogeochemical state variables and was used to test short-term wind-driven dynamics that could influence dissolved oxygen concentrations in Hood Canal.

Kim, Tae Yun; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon Cycle 2.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Cycle 2.0 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Pioneering science for sustainable energy solutions Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Storage Combustion Carbon Capture & Storage Developing World Efficiency Photovoltaics Biofuels Energy Analysis Climate Modeling Carbon Cycle 2.0 is... 1. A vision for * a global energy system integrated with the Earth's natural carbon cycles * an interactive Berkeley Lab environment with a shared sense of purpose 2. A program development plan that will allow us to deepen our capabilities and provide more opportunities to have impact 3. An attempt to integrate our basic research with applications using models of technology deployment constraints 4. Set of internal activities aimed at priming the effort

102

BNL | Carbon Cycle Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding of the impacts of global change on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and improve knowledge of possible global change mitigation approaches. The group has three main focus areas. FACE Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management The CCS&T group is an internationally recognized leader in the development of Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) research facilities. We are interested in the design and management of manipulative experiments that examine the effects of carbon dioxide, ozone, other atmospheric pollutants, temperature and precipitation on natural and managed ecosystems. FACE Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping At FACE facilities we have studied the mechanisms that underlie the

103

"The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their field at the ESA 2010 General Meeting. However, more importantly, the session will provide for a broad range of interests for ecosystem ecologists, theoretical ecologists, and global change biologists, and will foster communication between these groups to generate informative microbial community data in the future.

Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angstrom exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they overestimate the AOD and they transport too fine particles. The models also reproduce the dust transport across the Atlantic in the summer in terms of both AOD and AE but not so well in winter-spring nor the southward displacement of the dust cloud that is responsible of the dust transport into South America. Based on the dependency of AOD on aerosol burden and size distribution we use model bias with respect to AOD and AE to infer the bias of the dust emissions in Africa and the Middle East. According to this analysis we suggest that a range of possible emissions for North Africa is 400 to 2200 Tg yr?1 and in the Middle East 26 to 526 Tg yr?1.

Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, Stefan; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginnoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M.; Landing, W.; Liu, Xiaohong; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

105

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

106

Regional and Global Data in Mercury, December 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional and Global Data in Mercury Regional and Global Data in Mercury Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can now be located and acquired through a metadata search system at the ORNL DAAC. Climate, hydroclimatology, soil, and vegetation data held by data centers around the world are available through a Web-based system called "Mercury." Mercury allows users to search metadata files to identify data sets of interest, and it directs the users to the data. The data sets indexed in Mercury were chosen by the ORNL DAAC's User Working Group as important to the global change research community for understanding the function of terrestrial ecosystems and for examining patterns across temporal and spatial scales. The following types of regional and global data are currently indexed in

107

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Impacts of increasing anthropogenic soluble iron and nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sulfur deposition on ocean acidification and thethe tropical North Atlantic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 105,and iron inputs to the ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 19,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mineral ecophysiological evidence for biogeochemical cycles in 2461-2495 million year old banded iron formations (BIF).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

Li, Y [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Konhauser, Dr, Kurt [University of Alberta; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Mildner, David [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life Cycles of Moist Baroclinic Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between moisture and baroclinic eddies was examined through eddy life-cycle experiments using a global, primitive equation model. How condensation affects the structural evolution of eddies, their fluxes of heat, moisture, and ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Lee E. Branscome; Douglas A. Stewart

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two main kinds of bio-optical models of primaryof statistical biogeochemical/bio- optical trends, withusing a non intrusive bio-optical method. Biogeosciences, 4,

Claustre, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

114

Understanding the petrochemical cycle: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fitness in the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) arena involves understanding and coping with business cycles: supply and demand. This becomes increasingly more important as the industry globalizes and matures. Competitive-edge thinking needs to look hard at the forces that influence business cycles. Recognition of potential pitfalls is very important when considering: future capacity expansion, mergers and acquisitions, market departure, plant closure, potential product substitution, etc. Understanding pricing mechanisms and the workings of hockey-stick profitability profiles help HPI operators endure cycle downturns and prepare plants to maximize profits for the next upswing. The paper discusses characteristic trends, cycles in the hydrocarbon processing industry, current conditions, and mitigating cycle effects.

Sedriks, W. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth`s radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. [Physics Today, New York, NY (United States); Hafemeister, D. [Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States); Scribner, R. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. (Physics Today, New York, NY (United States)); Hafemeister, D. (Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States)); Scribner, R. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)) (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Diabatic Heating Profiles in Recent Global Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diabatic heating profiles are extremely important to the atmospheric circulation in the tropics and therefore to the earths energy and hydrological cycles. However, their global structures are poorly known because of limited information from in ...

Jian Ling; Chidong Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Do Global Models Properly Represent the Feedback between Land and Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment/Climate Variability and Predictability (GEWEX/CLIVAR) Global LandAtmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) has provided an estimate of the global distribution of landatmosphere coupling strength during ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

120

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Implementation of variably saturated flow into PHREEQC for the simulation of biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software tool for the simulation of one-dimensional unsaturated flow and solute transport together with biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone was developed by integrating a numerical solution of Richards' equation into the geochemical modelling ... Keywords: Cation exchange, Geochemical modelling, Hydraulic properties, Reactive transport, Surface complexation, Unsaturated flow

L. Wissmeier; D. A. Barry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Biogeochemical studies of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trace and major elemental composition were determined in the organs of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys of California, and in soils, sediments, and agricultural fertilizer that constitute the various sources of elements in the waterfowl. These data provide a biogeochemical baseline for waterfowl populations wintering in an area being developed for geothermal power. This baseline in the Imperial Valley is affected by soil and sediment composition, agricultural effluents in irrigation and stream water, and spent shot deposited by hunters in waterfowl habitats. The waterfowl acquire a set of trace elements from these sources and concentrations increase in their organs over the wintering period. Nickel, arsenic, selenium, bromine, and lead are the primary elements acquired from soil sources, agricultural effluents, and spent shot in the Imperial Valley. The assessment of effects from geothermal effluents on waterfowl populations in complex because there are large influxes of materials into the Imperial Valley ecosystem that contain trace elements, i.e., irrigation water, phosphatic fertilizers, pesticides, and lead shot. Multiple sources exist for many elements prominent in the expected geothermal effluents. The relationships between the two California valleys, the Imperial and Sacramento, are apparent in the trace element concentrations in the organs of waterfowl obtained in those two valleys. Arsenic is absent in the waterfowl organs obtained in the Sacramento Valley and relatively common in the Imperial Valley waterfowl. The effect of any release of geothermal effluent in the Imperial Valley waterfowl habitats will be difficult to describe because of the complexity of the biogeochemical baseline and the multiple sources of trace and major elements in the ecosystem.

Koranda, J.J.; Stuart, M.; Thompson, S.; Conrado, C.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Metrics-Based Feedback Cycles for Software Life-Cycle Management and Process Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a global organizational feedback cycle, composed of four component feedback cycles, by which the COCOMO II cost estimation model [Boehm et al., 2000] can be used for (1) project or product line scoping; (2) project or product line management; (3) model recalibration to changing circumstances; and (4) evaluation project, product line, or organizational continuous process improvement initiatives

Barry Boehm

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

125

Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Graph Invariants and Large Cycles - a Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graph invariants are the best and single tools for investigation of abstract structures of graphs. They, combined in convenient relations, carry global and general information about a graph and its various substructures (cycle structures, factors, colorings, coverings, and so on). In this survey paper we have attempted to bring together all direct (pure) relations between basic invariants of a graph and its large cycle structures, perhaps the most important cycle structures, namely Hamilton, longest, dominating and some generalized cycles including Hamilton and dominating cycles as special cases. These very few relations actually form a source (basis) from which nearly all possible hamiltonian results can be developed further based on generalized and extended invariants, extended list of path or cycle structures and additional structural limitations.

Nikoghosyan, Zh G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment. A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models. This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on Large scale fertilization, has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on patch fertilization discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on model development summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

An Economic Analysis of Select Fuel Cycles Using the Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycles Schemes (SMAFS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is currently considering alternatives to the current U.S. once-through fuel cycle. This report evaluates the relative economics of three alternative fuel cycles to determine those cost components important to overall fuel cycle costs and total generation costs. The analysis determined that the unit cost of nuclear reactors is the most important nuclear generation cost parameter in future fuel cycles. The report also evaluates ...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UA; Belnap, Jayne [NON LANL; Breshears, David D [UA; Neff, Jason [CU; Okin, Gregory S [UCLA; Painter, Thomas H [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Ravi, Sujith [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Reheis, Marith C [UCLA; Reynolds, Richard L [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved combined cycle power plant performance continue to grow as the cost of fuel rises and international concerns over global warming increase.This guideline provides a framework for performance monitoring, assessment, recovery and optimization of combined cycle power plants. The guideline distills existing experience and documents on heat rate recovery and capacity improvement into a comprehensive manual for plant implementation and training applications. The purpose ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies  

SciTech Connect

An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to determine the 'age' and rate of change of carbon stocks or as a biogeochemical tracer to elucidate processes and pathways. It is this dual nature that can be exploited across scales in space (individual plant, plot or research site, ecosystem, regional, and global) and time (days to millennia). For example, across regional scales, {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements of atmosphere CO{sub 2} can be used to attribute carbon dioxide to sources (e.g., respiration vs. fossil fuel emissions) or sinks ( e.g,. photosynthesis), which cannot be readily inferred from concentration, net flux measurements, or {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} [eg. Graven et al., 2009; Levin and Hessheimer, 2000; Turnbull et al., 2007]. At smaller scales, similar analyses can be used to elucidate the source, and 'age' of the below ground component undergoing heterotrophic respiration. Net (biome or ecosystem) uptake of carbon is the difference of two large fluxes: photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon fixation by photosynthesis is, to a large extent, a single process with theoretical underpinnings. On the other-hand, net ecosystem or biome respiration integrates microbial (heterotrophic) and plant (autotrophic) respiration. Eddy covariance methods can be used to estimate bulk CO{sub 2} fluxes but they cannot discriminate the process nor the source of the respired CO{sub 2}. It is these processes that are parameterized in predictive models and contribute to the uncertainty in the climate forcing effect of the carbon cycle in the future [Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Heimann and Reichstein, 2008].

Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership: An Example of Science Applied to Societal Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern Eurasia, the largest land-mass in the northern extratropics, accounts for 20% of the global land area. However, little is known about how the biogeochemical cycles, energy and water cycles, and human activities specific to this carbon-...

Pavel Ya Groisman; Elizabeth A. Clark; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Vladimir M. Kattsov; Irina N. Sokolik; Vladimir B. Aizen; Oliver Cartus; Jiquan Chen; Christiane C. Schmullius; Susan Conard; John Katzenberger; Olga Krankina; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mikhail A. Sofiev; Toshinobu Machida; Shamil Maksyutov; Dennis Ojima; Jiaguo Qi; Vladimir E. Romanovsky; Donald Walker; Maurizio Santoro; Alexander I. Shiklomanov; Charles Vrsmarty; Kou Shimoyama; Herman H. Shugart; Jacquelyn K. Shuman; Anatoly I. Sukhinin; Eric F. Wood

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: Theorganic nitrogen to the oceans, Nature, 376, 243 246.trace species to the world ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,

Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles S; Luo, Chao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy and Water Cycles in a High-Latitude, North-Flowing River System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MacKenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study, Phase 1, seeks to improve understanding of energy and water cycling in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) and to initiate and test atmospheric, hydrologic, and coupled models that ...

W. R. Rouse; E. M. Blyth; R. W. Crawford; J. R. Gyakum; J. R. Janowicz; B. Kochtubajda; H. G. Leighton; P. Marsh; L. Martz; A. Pietroniro; H. Ritchie; W. M. Schertzer; E. D. Soulis; R. E. Stewart; G. S. Strong; M. K. Woo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle technologies. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale

137

Projected Changes in the Seasonal Cycle of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When forced with increasing greenhouse gases, global climate models project a delay in the phase and a reduction in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of surface temperature, expressed as later minimum and maximum annual temperatures and greater ...

John G. Dwyer; Michela Biasutti; Adam H. Sobel

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Environmental Data from ORNL's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tThe Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) The ORNL DAAC also provides access to data for many regional and global projects and to a model archive. (Specialized Interface)(Registration Required)

140

Global climate change and pedogenic carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Global Climate Change summarizes what is known about soil inorganic carbon and develops strategies that could lead to the retention of more carbon in the soil. It covers basic concepts, analytical methods, secondary carbonates, and research and development priorities. With this book one will get a better understanding of the global carbon cycle, organic and inorganic carbon, and their roles, or what is known of them, in the greenhouse effect.

Lal, R.; Kimble, J.M.; Stewart, B.A.; Eswaran, H. [eds.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the global energy and hydrological cycles from eight current atmospheric reanalyses and their depiction of changes over time. A brief evaluation of the water and energy cycles in the latest version of the NCAR climate ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jessica Mackaro

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Global Multimodel Analysis of Drought in Runoff for the Second Half of the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decades large-scale models have been developed to simulate global and continental terrestrial water cycles. It is an open question whether these models are suitable to capture hydrological drought, in terms of runoff, on a global ...

M. H. J. van Huijgevoort; P. Hazenberg; H. A. J. van Lanen; A. J. Teuling; D. B. Clark; S. Folwell; S. N. Gosling; N. Hanasaki; J. Heinke; S. Koirala; T. Stacke; F. Voss; J. Sheffield; R. Uijlenhoet

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 199293 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Strategy (Vision) for Integrated Water Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resource applications. What are the observation and accuracy needs for global water and energy cycle, to provide enhanced information? #12;---- Initially Close Energy/WaterInitially Close Energy/Water Budgets at ContinentalBudgets at Continental--ScaleScale ---- Couple (land/hydroCouple (land/hydro -- atmosatmos) at the

Houser, Paul R.

145

E h iE h iEnhancingEnhancing Water & Energy CycleWater & Energy Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, Page 10 based studies using satellite data for applications such as Hydro- energy management. #12E h iE h iEnhancingEnhancing Water & Energy CycleWater & Energy Cycle R h & A li tiR h & A li ti, AMS Panel, 6 February 2008, Page 1http://crew.iges.org #12;TheThe Global WaterGlobal Water and Energy

Houser, Paul R.

146

Life Cycle Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for green manufacturing and construction applications; conduct life cycle engineering assessments for energy efficiency and environmental ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

On the Global Variation of Precipitating Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study (GCSS) is to promote the description and understanding of key cloud system processes, with the aim of developing and improving the representation of cloud processes in ...

B. F. Ryan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Prognostic Cloud Water Parameterization for Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient new prognostic cloud water parameterization designed for use in global climate models is described. The scheme allows for life cycle effects in stratiform clouds and permits cloud optical properties to be determined interactively. ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Mao-Sung Yao; William Kovari; Kenneth K-W. Lo

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Organochlorine Turnover in Forest Ecosystems: The Missing Link in the Terrestrial Chlorine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Research in the last 20 years has shown that chlorine undergoes transformations between inorganic and organic forms as part of a complex biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial systems. Natural organochlorine production appears to be associated with the decomposition of plant material on the soil surface, though the chlorine cycle budget implies that a proportion of natural organochlorine enters soil through plant litter and atmospheric deposition as well. Organochlorine compounds may form through biotic and abiotic pathways, but the rates and magnitude of production in the field remain undefined. We have performed a time-dependent trace of chlorine concentration through forest ecosystems, revealing distinct fractions of naturally produced organochlorine in plant biomass. Aliphatic organochlorine constitutes an intrinsic component of healthy leaves that persists through senescence and humification of the plant material, making a substantial contribution to the pool of soil organochlorine. Plant leaves also contain soluble aromatic organochlorine compounds that leach from leaf litter during early decay stages. As decay progresses, high concentrations of insoluble aromatic organochlorine accrue in the humus, through de novo production as well as adsorption. The rates of aromatic organochlorine production and degradation vary seasonally and conversely. This study presents the first unambiguous evidence that there exist multiple pools of chlorinated organic matter in the soil environment and that leaf litter deposition makes a significant and refractory contribution to the soil organochlorine pool, providing key insights into the biogeochemical chlorine cycle.

A Leri; S Myneni

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Biogeochemical Evolution of the Western Interior Basin of North America during a Kasimovian Highstand and Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the geochemical facies of the Hushpuckney Shale using XRF scanning data and the bioturbation indices, which will contribute to a better understanding of the biogeochemical environment prevalent during the deposition of the Hushpuckney Shale. The Hushpuckney Shale Member of the Swope Formation (Kasimovian Stage) preserved in KGS Spencer core 2 - 6, consists of a black shale submember overlain by bioturbated gray shale. Millimeter-scale core description and analysis of XRF scanning data enables identification of geochemical facies within the study core and contributes to understanding the environment of shale deposition. The XRF spectrometer produces X-ray image of the core and abundance values of selected major and trace elements, including iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), titanium (Ti), zircon (Zr), potassium (K) and phosphorous (P). Canfield and Thamdrup's (2009) classification of geochemical environments is used to recognize oxic/aerobic, manganous-nitrogenous, ferruginous and sulfidic facies within the black shale submember. A modification of Droser and Bottjer's (1986) semi-quantitative field classification of bioturbation is used to identify facies variations within the gray shale submember. Abundance of apatite nodules and lamina in the black shale submember of the study core suggest that black shale sediments accumulated slowly in a sediment-starved basin. A high abundance of sulfide-scavenged elements, including Mo, Zn, V, Ni and Cr, identifies the sulfidic facies in the black shale submember, and indicates deposition in an oxygen-depleted environment with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide. The overlying ferruginous facies has lower abundances of sulfide-scavenged elements and lacks cryptic Fe-laminations. The uppermost black shale submember facies, the manganous-nitrogenous facies, has cryptic Fe laminations and a relatively high P/Ca ratio. Abundance of cryptic iron laminations and apatite nodules and lamina indicates the syngenetic deposition of iron and phosphate due to Fe-P coupling mechanism. The gray shale submember is burrowed, indicating deposition under oxygenated conditions. Bioturbation indices reveal the variations in the intensity and nature of burrows within the gray shale, which corresponds to the changes in the depositional environment that may be related to the rise and fall of sea-level.

Banerjee, Sikhar

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Edgeworth cycles revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some gasoline markets exhibit remarkable price cycles, where price spikes are followed by a series of small price declines: a pattern consistent with a model of Edgeworth cycles described by Maskin and Tirole. We extend ...

Doyle, Joseph J.

153

Cosmic global strings  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

Sikivie, P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cycle to Cycle Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most manufacturing processes produce parts that can only be correctly measured after the process cycle has been completed. Even if in-process measurement and control is possible, it is often too expensive or complex to ...

Hardt, David E.

155

THE CARBON CYCLE FROM NORTH TO SOUTH ALONG THE GALATHEA 3 ROUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CARBON CYCLE FROM NORTH TO SOUTH ALONG THE GALATHEA 3 ROUTE Merete Bruun Christiansen (1 in the Galathea 3 expedition. Among the larger projects is `The marine carbon cycle from north to south along in the global carbon cycle. The World's open oceans are considered to be net absorbers of carbon dioxide (CO2

156

Global multi-model analysis of drought in runoff for the second half of the 20th century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decades large-scale models have been developed to simulate global and continental terrestrial water cycles. It is an open question whether these models are suitable to capture hydrological drought, in terms of runoff, on global ...

M. H. J. van Huijgevoort; P. Hazenberg; H. A. J. van Lanen; A. J. Teuling; D. B. Clark; S. Folwell; S. N. Gosling; N. Hanasaki; J. Heinke; S. Koirala; T. Stacke; F. Voss; J. Sheffield; R. Uijlenhoet

157

Comparative Global Warming Impacts of Electric Vapor-Compression and Direct-fired Absorption Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the global warming impacts of electric vapor-compression and gas-fired absorption-cycle equipment for commercial cooling applications. Absorption chillers do not use ozone depleting refrigerants but substitution of alternative refrigerants in electrically driven vapor-compression cycle equipment also offers radically reduced or eliminated potential for stratospheric ozone depletion. Therefore, when comparing absorption-cycle and vapor-compression equipment, net global warming impacts...

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

Trond Bjornard; Humberto Garcia; William Desmond; Scott Demuth

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Klking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schngel; Jrg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Inverse estimates of anthropogenic CO2 uptake, transport, and storage by the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 inventory of the Indian Ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,of carbon dioxide: Key ocean/atmosphere/land ana- lyses,in the upper Pacific Ocean, Nature, 415, 603 608. Mikaloff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during transit through the ocean water column Geophys. Res.hydrate in the world's oceans. Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 8,of methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy and Fuels, 19,

Reagan, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the PlanetsAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planets140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Duty Cycle Software  

Duty cycles capture the influence of one variable in relations to the whole system. This allows for analysis in determining the impact of new ...

164

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Global Energy Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global Energy Perspectives: Supply Security, Economic Development and Sustainability The Annual Energy Policy Conference of the National Capital Area ...

166

Global Security 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security *Intelligence *Hyper Innovation Global Security Weapons & Complex Integration NIF Office of Strategic Outcomes Operations & Business Lawrence Livermore National...

167

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services GNEP would build and strengthen a reliable international fuel services consortium under which "fuel supplier nations" would choose to operate both nuclear power plants and fuel production and handling facilities, providing reliable fuel services to "user nations" that choose to only operate nuclear power plants. This international consortium is a critical component of the GNEP initiative to build an improved, more proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel, while Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services More Documents & Publications

168

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Selected papers for global `95 concerning plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This report contains selected papers from the Global `95 Conference ``Evaluation of Emerging Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems,`` held in Versailles, Sept. 11-14, 1995. The 11 papers in Part I are from ``Benefits and Risks of Reprocessing`` sessions. The 7 papers in Part II are some of the more interesting poster papers that relate to the use of Pu for power generation. Finally, the 3 papers are on the topic of management and disposition of Pu from retired nuclear weapons.

Sutcliffe, W.G. [ed.

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

171

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

173

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel fuel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle. Over the past 10...

176

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle.

177

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

178

Application of chemical kinetics to mercury cycling in the aquatic environment: Photoreduction of mercury(II) and binding of mercury(II) and methylmercury(+) to natural ligands .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis comprises four main chapters on chemical reactions and kinetics of some of the processes involved in the global mercury cycle. In the first (more)

Ababneh, Fuad A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

180

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Secular Cycles and Millennial Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both secular cycles and millennial up- ward trend dynamics.Cycles and Millennial Trends by Andrey Korotayev, ArtemySecular Cycles and Millennial Trends 1 Initially, we want to

Korotayev, Andrey V; Malkov, Artemy S; Khaltourina, Daria A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Tensions in Global Power and Fuel Sector Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world has been through its steepest ever commodity cycle in the past year. The current study attempts to make sense of the dramatic swings in the energy markets by closely examining market fundamentals and identifying the critical considerations and constraints that explain their progression. The study builds on a foundation of EPRI studies conducted in 2007-2008 on global generation decisions and global natural gas and coal markets. It offers timely reassessments of natural gas and coal, adds a disc...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood and magnitude of the impacts of climate change on potential vegetation and the water cycle in Mesoamerica is evaluated. Mesoamerica is a global biodiversity hotspot with highly diverse topographic and climatic conditions and is ...

Pablo Imbach; Luis Molina; Bruno Locatelli; Olivier Roupsard; Gil Mah; Ronald Neilson; Lenin Corrales; Marko Scholze; Philippe Ciais

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part II: Meridional Structures and Poleward Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meridional structure and transports of energy in the atmosphere, ocean, and land are evaluated holistically for the mean and annual cycle zonal averages over the ocean, land, and global domains, with discussion and assessment of uncertainty. At ...

John T. Fasullo; Kevin E. Trenberth

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of the Arctic System for Freshwater Cycle Intensification: Observations and Expectations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic cycle intensification is an expected manifestation of a warming climate. Although positive trends in several global average quantities have been reported, no previous studies have documented broad intensification across elements of the ...

Michael A. Rawlins; Michael Steele; Marika M. Holland; Jennifer C. Adam; Jessica E. Cherry; Jennifer A. Francis; Pavel Ya Groisman; Larry D. Hinzman; Thomas G. Huntington; Douglas L. Kane; John S. Kimball; Ron Kwok; Richard B. Lammers; Craig M. Lee; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Kyle C. McDonald; Erika Podest; Jonathan W. Pundsack; Bert Rudels; Mark C. Serreze; Alexander Shiklomanov; ystein Skagseth; Tara J. Troy; Charles J. Vrsmarty; Mark Wensnahan; Eric F. Wood; Rebecca Woodgate; Daqing Yang; Ke Zhang; Tingjun Zhang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

187

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative The GPPDI Workshop was held in Cincinnati, U.S.A., December 1996 (Olson et al., 1997). Summary (September 1996) by Dick Olson and Steve Prince from Global Change Newsletter No. 27; International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme: A Study of Global Change (IGBP) of the International Council of Scientific Unions Global modelling and monitoring of net primary production (NPP) is being given high priority in IGBP owing to increasing concern over issues such as the consequences of perturbations in the carbon cycle, the impacts of global land-use change, global climate change, and global food security. Significant advances have been made in process modelling and in the use of remote sensing to monitor global vegetation. The advances in modelling and remote sensing of NPP have highlighted the lack of readily available, reliable information from field studies with which to parameterise and validate the models. The Global Primary Production Data Initiative (GPPDI) is intended to remedy this problem by identifying existing field data sets of primary production and associated environmental data. The programme is using data sets for representative sites, and extrapolating or regionalising the better data sets to grid cells sizes of up to 0.5º x 0.5º. Emphasis is on variables needed to parameterise and validate primary production models, including above and below ground NPP, standing crop, LAI, climate data, site data and landscape variability.

188

Feedbacks in Emission-Driven and Concentration-Driven Global Carbon Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere affect the carbon budgets of the land and ocean as biogeochemical processes react to increased CO2 concentrations. Biogeochemical processes also react to changes in temperature and other climate parameters. ...

G. J. Boer; V. K. Arora

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Helium process cycle  

SciTech Connect

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

TITAN'S TRANSPORT-DRIVEN METHANE CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms behind the occurrence of large cloud outbursts and precipitation on Titan have been disputed. A global- and annual-mean estimate of surface fluxes indicated only 1% of the insolation, or {approx}0.04 W m{sup -2}, is exchanged as sensible and/or latent fluxes. Since these fluxes are responsible for driving atmospheric convection, it has been argued that moist convection should be quite rare and precipitation even rarer, even if evaporation globally dominates the surface-atmosphere energy exchange. In contrast, climate simulations indicate substantial cloud formation and/or precipitation. We argue that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance is diagnostic of horizontal heat transport by Titan's atmosphere, and thus constrains the strength of the methane cycle. Simple calculations show the TOA radiative imbalance is {approx}0.5-1 W m{sup -2} in Titan's equatorial region, which implies 2-3 MW of latitudinal heat transport by the atmosphere. Our simulation of Titan's climate suggests this transport may occur primarily as latent heat, with net evaporation at the equator and net accumulation at higher latitudes. Thus, the methane cycle could be 10-20 times previous estimates. Opposing seasonal transport at solstices, compensation by sensible heat transport, and focusing of precipitation by large-scale dynamics could further enhance the local, instantaneous strength of Titan's methane cycle by a factor of several. A limited supply of surface liquids in regions of large surface radiative imbalance may throttle the methane cycle, and if so, we predict more frequent large storms over the lakes district during Titan's northern summer.

Mitchell, Jonathan L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Advanced Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP will develop and demonstrate Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) that consume transuranic elements (plutonium and other long-lived radioactive material) while extracting their energy. The development of ABRs will allow us to build an improved nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel. Accordingly, the U.S. will work with participating international partners on the design, development, and demonstration of ABRs as part of the GNEP. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste

194

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

195

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a cryogenic refrigerator which cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a cryogenic refrigerator which cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of {sup 3}He in a single phase {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He solution. The {sup 3}He in superfluid {sup 4}He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid {sup 3}He at an initial concentration in superfluid {sup 4}He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of {sup 4}He while restricting passage of {sup 3}He. The {sup 3}He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Kotsubo, Vincent Y. (La Canada, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NOAA's Second-Generation Global Medium-Range Ensemble Reforecast Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multidecadal ensemble reforecast database is now available that is approximately consistent with the operational 0000 UTC cycle of the 2012 NOAA Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS). The reforecast dataset consists of an 11-member ensemble run once ...

Thomas M. Hamill; Gary T. Bates; Jeffrey S. Whitaker; Donald R. Murray; Michael Fiorino; Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Yuejian Zhu; William Lapenta

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advancing Global-and Continental-Scale Hydrometeorology: Contributions of GEWEX Hydrometeorology Panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 9 years, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), has coordinated the activities of the Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) and other related research ...

R. G. Lawford; R. Stewart; J. Roads; H-J. Isemer; M. Manton; J. Marengo; T. Yasunari; S. Benedict; T. Koike; S. Williams

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

On Numerical Simulation of the Global Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol Produced by a Large Volcanic Eruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the earth's atmosphere and have a relatively big influence on potential fluctuations of the atmospheric variables on both subclimatic and climatic scales. The objective of ...

J. A. Pudykiewicz; A. P. Dastoor

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The CALIPSO Mission: A Global 3D View of Aerosols and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols and clouds have important effects on Earth's climate through their effects on the radiation budget and the cycling of water between the atmosphere and Earth's surface. Limitations in our understanding of the global distribution and ...

D. M. Winker; J. Pelon; J. A. Coakley Jr.; S. A. Ackerman; R. J. Charlson; P. R. Colarco; P. Flamant; Q. Fu; R. M. Hoff; C. Kittaka; T. L. Kubar; H. Le Treut; M. P. McCormick; G. Mgie; L. Poole; K. Powell; C. Trepte; M. A. Vaughan; B. A. Wielicki

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Signature of ENSO in Global Temperature and Precipitation Fields Derived from the Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global temperature anomalies associated with ENSO are investigated, making use of a 13-year record of gridded temperature and precipitation data from the microwave sounding unit (MSU). The warm phase of the ENSO cycle during this period was ...

Elena Yulaeva; John M. Wallace

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Regional business cycles in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is clear evidence for differences in the structure of the Italian regional business cycle in the period 1951-2004: the relationship with the national business cycle is closer in the North than in the South. The interaction between regional cycles ... Keywords: Regional business cycles, Spectral analysis, Stylized facts

Camilla Mastromarco; Ulrich Woitek

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RPI) Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia and Chile. References Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI)1...

208

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

209

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Gran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

KRFTWRK Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating airsea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

213

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When President Bush announced his Global Climate Change Initiative in February 2002, he committed the United States to a new strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next...

215

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. Chinas Global Hunt for Energy.

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Under GNEP, the U.S. will work with GNEP partners to demonstrate the capability to safely recycle used nuclear fuel using more proliferation resistant separation processes. In support of this effort, the U.S and its international partners would conduct an Engineering-Scale Demonstration (ESD) of a process that would separate the usable components in used commercial fuel from its waste components, without separating pure plutonium. An Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF) would be a multi-purpose research and development laboratory that can serve fuel cycle testing needs

219

Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management - Preliminary Concepts -  

SciTech Connect

Approach to Connect Global Objectives and Local Actions: (1) Articulate global objectives into a hierarchy of subsystem requirements and local attributes and measures; (2) Establish a baseline system and viable alternatives through the interactions and relationships (e.g., networks) of local system elements and their options; (3) Evaluate performance of system alternatives and develop improved nuclear material management strategies and technologies; and (4) The need to address greatest concerns first (prioritized or graded approach) and to make tradeoffs among implementation options and competing objectives entails a risk-based approach. IGNMM could provide a systematic understanding of global nuclear materials management and evolutionarily improve and integrate the management through an active architecture, using for example, situation awareness, system models, methods, technologies, and international cooperation. Different tools would be used within the overall framework to address individual issues on the desired geographic scale that could be easily linked to broader analyses. Life-cycle system analyses would allow for evaluating material path alternatives on an integrated global scale. Disconnects, overlaps, technical options, and alternatives for optimizing nuclear materials processes could be evaluated in an integrated manner.

Dreicer, M; Jones, E; Richardson, J

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report to NEAC Report to NEAC Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Meeting of April 23, 2013 Washington D.C. June 13, 2013 Burton Richter (Chair), Margaret Chu, Darleane Hoffman, Raymond Juzaitis, Sekazi K Mtingwa, Ronald P Omberg, Joy L Rempe, Dominique Warin 2 I Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC met in Washington on April 23, 2013. The meeting focused on issues relating to the NE advanced reactor program (sections II, III, and IV), and on storage and transportation issues (section V) related to a possible interim storage program that is the first step in moving toward a new permanent repository as recommended by the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) and discussed in the recent response by DOE to Congress on the BRC report 1 . The agenda is given in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stirling cycle engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a Stirling cycle engine having a plurality of working gas charges separated by pistons reciprocating in cylinders, the total gas content is minimized and the mean pressure equalization among the serial cylinders is improved by using two piston rings axially spaced at least as much as the piston stroke and by providing a duct in the cylinder wall opening in the space between the two piston rings and leading to a source of minimum or maximum working gas pressure.

Lundholm, Gunnar (Lund, SE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Energy Strategy Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective long-range energy planning begins with a reflective analysis that encompasses the complexity of today's energy reality and sets a course for activity to achieve long-range continuing advancement. This strategy approach involves an interrelated 'cycle' that once started and controlled in the proper direction is almost self-building in improvement. Energy conservation is the driving force to create additive progress involving system flexibility, process integration, and less energy dependence.

Korich, R. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

USCEA fuel cycle '93  

SciTech Connect

The US Council for Energy Awareness sponsored the Fuel Cycle '93 conference in Dallas, Texas, on March 21-24, 1993. Over 250 participants attended, numerous papers were presented, and several panel discussions were held. The focus of most industry participants remains the formation of USEC and the pending US-Russian HEU agreement. Following are brief summaries of two key papers and the Fuel Market Issues panel discussion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The DOE water cycle pilot study.  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) formed a Water Cycle Study Group (Hornberger et al. 2001) to organize research efforts in regional hydrologic variability, the extent to which this variability is caused by human activity, and the influence of ecosystems. The USGCRP Water Cycle Study Group was followed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Water Cycle Research Plan (Department of Energy 2002) that outlined an approach toward improving seasonal-to-interannual hydroclimate predictability and closing a regional water budget. The DOE Water Cycle Research Plan identified key research areas, including a comprehensive long-term observational database to support model development, and to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the components of local water budgets and large scale processes. In response to this plan, a multilaboratory DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) demonstration project began with a focus on studying the water budget and its variability at multiple spatial scales. Previous studies have highlighted the need for continued efforts to observationally close a local water budget, develop a numerical model closure scheme, and further quantify the scales in which predictive accuracy are optimal. A concerted effort within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-funded Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-scale International Project (GCIP) put forth a strategy to understand various hydrometeorological processes and phenomena with an aim toward closing the water and energy budgets of regional watersheds (Lawford 1999, 2001). The GCIP focus on such regional budgets includes the measurement of all components and reduction of the error in the budgets to near zero. To approach this goal, quantification of the uncertainties in both measurements and modeling is required. Model uncertainties within regional climate models continue to be evaluated within the Program to Intercompare Regional Climate Simulations (Takle et al. 1999), and model uncertainties within land surface models are being evaluated within the Program to Intercompare Land Surface Schemes (e.g., Henderson-Sellers 1993; Wood et al. 1998; Lohmann et al. 1998). In the context of understanding the water budget at watershed scales, the following two research questions that highlight DOE's unique water isotope analysis and high-performance modeling capabilities were posed as the foci of this pilot study: (1) Can the predictability of the regional water budget be improved using high-resolution model simulations that are constrained and validated with new hydrospheric water measurements? (2) Can water isotopic tracers be used to segregate different pathways through the water cycle and predict a change in regional climate patterns? To address these questions, numerical studies using regional atmospheric-land surface models and multiscale land surface hydrologic models were generated and, to the extent possible, the results were evaluated with observations. While the number of potential processes that may be important in the local water budget is large, several key processes were examined in detail. Most importantly, a concerted effort was made to understand water cycle processes and feedbacks at the land surface-atmosphere interface at spatial scales ranging from 30 m to hundreds of kilometers. A simple expression for the land surface water budget at the watershed scale is expressed as {Delta}S = P + G{sub in} - ET - Q - G{sub out}, where {Delta}S is the change in water storage, P is precipitation, ET is evapotranspiration, Q is streamflow, G{sub in} is groundwater entering the watershed, and G{sub out} is groundwater leaving the watershed, per unit time. The WCPS project identified data gaps and necessary model improvements that will lead to a more accurate representation of the terms in Eq. (1). Table 1 summarizes the components of this water cycle pilot study and the respective participants. The following section provides a description of the surface observation and modeling sit

Miller, N. L.; King, A. W.; Miller, M. A.; Springer, E. P.; Wesely, M. L.; Bashford, K. E.; Conrad, M. E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P. N.; Gibbs, H. K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B. M.; Machavaram, M. V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washngton-Allen, R. A.; Environmental Research; LBNL; ORNL; BNL; LANL

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

226

I N V I T E D R E V I E W Methane emissions from wetlands: biogeochemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Methane is responsible for about 18% of human- induced radiative forcing, making it the second most) with their large areal extent and high CH4 fluxes per area. However, the dominant research effort has focused on CH- tries at northern latitudes with their greater research (a) (b) Fig. 2 Global methane sources in (a

227

global | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global global Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

228

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes the status of activities to upgrade the Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM), an EPRI simulation model that predicts mercury cycling and bioaccumulation in lakes.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

231

Sunday, June 13, 2010 Arrival and hotel check-in (Shilla Hotel and The Suites Hotel)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midzyzdroje, Island of Wolin, Poland 14 - 18 June 2010 Changing water, energy and biogeochemical cycles) of the Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project (CEOP) within the Global Energy and Water Cycle has been on various aspects of regional climate change and its effects on water, energy

232

Global Hunger Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of halving the proportion of hungry people between 1990 and 2015, we are nowhere near meeting that target. The percentage of undernourished people fell from 20 percent in 199092 to 16 percent in 200406. In recent years, however, the number of hungry people has actually been increasing. In 2009, on the heels of a global food price

Heidi Fritschel; Yisehac Yohannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optimum cycle parameters of coal fired closed cycle gas turbine in regenerative and combined cycle configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology developed for the estimation of thermodynamic performance and reports the optimum cycle parameters of coal fired CCGT in regenerative and combined cycle configurations using air, helium and carbon dioxide as working gases. A rigorous approach has been followed for the determination of the cycle efficiency by assuming the specific heat of working gases as a continuous function of temperature for accurate estimation of cycle parameters. 14 refs.

Rao, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Consequences of Considering CarbonNitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of carbonnitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ENSO Warm (El Nio) and Cold (La Nia) Event Life Cycles: Ocean Surface Anomaly Patterns, Their Symmetries, Asymmetries, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies by the authors have described the composite global marine surface anomalies of ENSO warm (El Nio) events and cold (La Nia) events. Here the similarities and differences in these life cycles are examined. Qualitatively different ...

Narasimhan K. Larkin; D. E. Harrison

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On behalf of the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program managers in the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD), Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcome to the 2011 SBR Principal Investigators meeting. Thank you in advance for your attendance and your presentations at this year's meeting. As the events in Japan continue to unfold, we are all reminded that the research we perform on radionuclide behavior in the environment has implications beyond legacy waste cleanup and in fact has its place in the discussion on the expanded use of nuclear power. As in the past, there are three broad objectives to the Principal Investigators meeting: (1) to provide opportunities to share research results and promote interactions among the SBR scientists and other invited guests; (2) to evaluate the progress of each project within the program; and (3) to showcase the scientific expertise and research progress over the past year to senior managers within the DOE Office of Science, the technology offices within DOE, and other invited attendees from other Federal Agencies. This past year has seen a few significant changes within BER and within the SBR program. In November, our Associate Director for BER, Anna Palmisano, retired from Federal service. Just this month, Dr. Sharlene Weatherwax (Division Director for Biological Systems Sciences) has been named as the new Associate Director for BER. In August, BER welcomed Dr. Gary Geernaert as the new Division Director for CESD. Gary joins the division from Los Alamos National Laboratory with a background in atmospheric science. Within the SBR program, a new Strategic Plan was completed last June (currently posted on the SBR and the Office of Science website). The new strategic plan is intended to foster integration within the Environmental Systems Science portion of the BER budget that includes both SBR and Terrestrial Ecosystem Sciences (TES). Both these programs share a goal of advancing a predictive understanding of environmental processes and utilizing iterative, multidisciplinary approaches to understand complex environmental systems of relevance to DOE. CESD in general is undergoing continued discussions on integration among its programs in an effort to develop a new strategic plan for the division. This effort also includes identifying opportunities for integration with BER's Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD). The program this year includes three poster presentation sessions, six plenary sessions, and three breakout sessions. The plenary session on Tuesday morning will feature introductory presentations by BER program staff and three keynote addresses from Dr. Ken Bencala (USGS), Dr. Michael (Mick) Follows (MIT) and Dr. Sue Brantley (PSU) that will lead into three breakout sessions Tuesday afternoon. The breakout sessions are intended to highlight key developments in SBR research and foster a dialog among session participants on scientific paths forward in each particular area. The SBR program managers are asking for input from the SBR community at these sessions to help guide future efforts and/or identify areas of integration within BER programs. On Wednesday, plenary sessions will continue in the morning, followed by an early afternoon poster session. After an extended break for lunch, plenary sessions will continue in the afternoon, followed by an evening poster session. Thursday's plenary session will focus on selected highlights of research efforts at the IFRC sites and on a new potential TES field effort in the Arctic. This new field site is an obvious point of integration between the SBR and TES programs.

Hazen Ed., T.C.

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Joint Variability of Global Runoff and Global Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 19052002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly ...

Gregory J. McCabe; David M. Wolock

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

POSSIBLE SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS IN THE CONVECTION ZONE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Using data from the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) that covers the period from 1995 to 1998 we study the change in frequencies of solar oscillations with solar activity. From these frequencies we attempt to determine any possible variation in solar structure with solar activity. We do not find any evidence of a change in the convection zone depth or extent of overshoot below the convection zone during the solar cycle.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Kalina cycle and similar cycles for geothermal power production  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a brief discussion of the mechanics of the Kalina cycle and ideas to extend the concept to other somewhat different cycles. A modified cycle which has a potential heat rejection advantage but little or no performance improvement is discussed. Then, the results of the application of the Kalina cycle and the modified cycle to a geothermal application (360/degree/F resource) are discussed. The results are compared with published results for the Kalina cycle with high temperature sources and estimates about performance at the geothermal temperatures. Finally, the conclusions of this scoping work are given along with recommendations of the direction of future work in this area. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nutrient Cycling Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The particular goal of this study is to develop measurement techniques for understanding how consortia of organisms from geothermal facilities utilize sulfur and iron for metabolic activity; and in turn, what role that activity plays in initiating or promoting the development of a biofilm on plant substrates. Sulfur cycling is of interest because sulfur is produced in the resource. Iron is found in some of the steel formulations used in plant components and is also added as chemical treatment for reducing sulfide emissions from the plants. This report describes the set-up and operation of a bioreactor for evaluating the response of colonies of geothermal organisms to changes in nutrient and environmental conditions. Data from initial experiments are presented and plans for future testing is discussed.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Direct fired power cycle  

SciTech Connect

A method for implementing a thermodynamic cycle is described comprising the steps of: expanding a gaseous working stream to transform its energy into usable form; removing from the expanded gaseous working stream a withdrawal stream; combining the withdrawal stream with a lean stream, having a higher content of a higher-boiling component than is contained in the withdrawal stream, to form a composite stream; condensing the composite stream to provide heat; separating the composite stream to form a liquid stream; forming an oncoming liquid working stream that evaporates at a temperature lower than the temperature at which the composite stream condenses; and evaporating the oncoming liquid working stream, using the heat produced by condensing the composite stream, to form the gaseous working stream.

Kalina, A.I.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

243

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

244

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

245

Evaluation of Biases in JRA-25/JCDAS Precipitation and Their Impact on the Global Terrestrial Carbon Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a modeled precipitation field and examines how its bias affects the modeling of the regional and global terrestrial carbon cycle. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation produced by the Japanese 25-yr reanalysis (JRA-...

Makoto Saito; Akihiko Ito; Shamil Maksyutov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Orogenic Propagating Precipitation Systems over the United States in a Global Climate Model with Embedded Explicit Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the lee of major mountain chains worldwide, diurnal physics of organized propagating convection project onto seasonal and climate time scales of the hydrologic cycle, but this phenomenon is not represented in conventional global climate models (...

Michael S. Pritchard; Mitchell W. Moncrieff; Richard C. J. Somerville

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A New Absorption Cycle: The Single-Effect Regenerative Absoprtion Refrigeration Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGENERATIVE ABSORPTION REFRIGERATION CYCLE ABSTRACT A new absorption cycle , using heat as the energy

Dao, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Life Cycle Analysis: Power Studies Compilation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour LC Life Cycle LCA Life Cycle Analysis LCC Life Cycle Costing LCI Life Cycle Inventory LCOE Levelized Cost of Delivered Electricity LNB Low NO x Burner LNG Liquefied...

251

Butterfly Diagram and Activity Cycles in HR 1099  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze photometric data of the active RS CVn--type star HR 1099 for the years 1975--2006 with an inversion technique and reveal the nature of two activity cycles of 15--16 yr and 5.3$\\pm$0.1 yr duration. The 16 yr cycle is related to variations of the total spot area and is coupled with the differential rotation, while the 5.3 yr cycle is caused by the symmetric redistribution of the spotted area between the opposite stellar hemispheres (flip-flop cycle). We recover long-lived active regions comprising two active longitudes that migrate in the orbital reference frame with a variable rate because of the differential rotation along with changes in the mean spot latitudes. The migration pattern is periodic with the 16 yr cycle. Combining the longitudinal migration of the active regions with a previously measured differential rotation law, we recover the first stellar butterfly diagram without an assumption about spot shapes. We find that mean latitudes of active regions at opposite longitudes change antisymmetrically in the course of the 16 yr cycle: while one active region migrates to the pole, the other approaches the equator. This suggests a precession of the global magnetic field with respect to the stellar rotational axis.

S. V. Berdyugina; G. W. Henry

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Terrestrial carbon cycle dynamics under recent and future climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When forced by historical emissions of CO 2 from fossil fuels and land-use change, the coupled climatecarbon cycle model accurately reproduces historical atmospheric CO 2 trends, as well as terrestrial and oceanic uptake for the past two decades. Under six twenty-first-century CO 2 emissions scenarios, both terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks continue to increase, though terrestrial uptake slows in the latter half of the century. Climatecarbon cycle feedbacks are isolated by comparing a coupled model run with a run where climate and the carbon cycle are uncoupled. The modeled positive feedback between the carbon cycle and climate is found to be relatively small, resulting in an increase in simulated CO 2 of 60 ppmv at the year 2100. Including non-CO 2 greenhouse gas forcing and increasing the models climate sensitivity increase the effect of this feedback to 140 ppmv. The UVic model does not, however, simulate a switch from a terrestrial carbon sink to a source during the twenty-first century, as earlier studies have suggested. This can be explained by a lack of substantial reductions in simulated vegetation productivity due to climate changes. 1.

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin; J. Meissner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

GoGlobal Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy and Social Welfare at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, and Visiting Professor of Global & International

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

Dao, Kim (14 Nace Ave., Piedmont, CA 94611)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Closed-cycle Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is investigating implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking that would establish "Best Technology Available" (BTA) based on closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling. This report focuses on estimated costs associated with closed-cycle cooling system retrofits that include: 1) capital costs, 2) energy required to operate the closed-cycle system, 3) heat rate penalty, and 4) extended downtime required to retrof...

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Co-Investigators:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our Interdisciplinary Science investigation addresses the primary biogeochemical cycles of planet Earth and considers, in particular, how they are being changed by humans. The efforts focus on the cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and selected trace gases. Process-based models are developed as modules, in concert with database management techniques which synthesize the in-situ and remote sensing data needed to characterize regional and global scales. Models of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles are a central theme. They provide a rigorous means for developing quantitative projections of the interactions of atmospheric composition, climate, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, ocean circulation and sea level, and the effects of human activities. The family of models being developed in this investigation provide the predictive link between the physical and biological Earth system and the human dimensions of global change. The long-term goal of our IDS research is to understand the primary biogeochemical cycles of the planet, the nature of the coupling between the Biogeochemical Subsystem and the Physical-Climate Subsystem, and the characteristics of the human forcing of the Biogeochemical Subsystem and hydrological cycle. Our strategy is to study how element cycles function in natural systems where perturbations in biogeochemical states are driven primarily by climate variability

John D. Aber; William R. Emanuel; Leonard A. Fisk; Barrett N. Rock; David L. Skole

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optimization of Air Conditioning Cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Systems based on the vapor compression cycle are the most widely used in a variety of air conditioning applications. Despite the vast growth of modern (more)

Seshadri, Swarooph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Award Cycle at a Glance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Award Cycle at a Glance. 2013. Eligibility Certification February 19 (with a nomination to the Board of Examiners). April 2 (without a nomination). ...

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

Multivariable cycle-to-cycle of an injection molding process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cycle-to-Cycle (CtC) feedback control has been studied extensively with increasing demands on the precision and quality of manufactured parts. Single input-Single output has been studied as the basis of CtC feedback control. ...

Vanderpuije, Curtis N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The closed fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The fast growth of the world's economy coupled with the need for optimizing use of natural resources, for energy security and for climate change mitigation make energy supply one of the 21. century most daring challenges. The high reliability and efficiency of nuclear energy, its competitiveness in an energy market undergoing a new oil shock are as many factors in favor of the 'renaissance' of this greenhouse gas free energy. Over 160,000 tHM of LWR1 and AGR2 Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) have already been unloaded from the reactor cores corresponding to 7,000 tons discharged per year worldwide. By 2030, this amount could exceed 400,000 tHM and annual unloading 14,000 tHM/year. AREVA believes that closing the nuclear fuel cycle through the treatment and recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel sustains the worldwide nuclear power expansion. It is an economically sound and environmentally responsible choice, based on the preservation of natural resources through the recycling of used fuel. It furthermore provides a safe and secure management of wastes while significantly minimizing the burden left to future generations. (authors)

Froment, Antoine; Gillet, Philippe [AREVA NC (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Arrhenius and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Although concern about global atmospheric warming has intensified in recent decades, research into the greenhouse effect actually began in the 19th century. Fourier and other scientists appreciated that without heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere, the temperature on the ground would be considerably lower, making life as we know it impossible. In 1896, the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius was the first to make a quantitative link between changes in carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Publication of his paper was celebrated at a recent Swedish workshop. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Uppenbrink, J.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION PUBLIC RESPONSES GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits the additional information requested in the November 19, 2009 letter. Enclosure 1 of this letter contains the responses the questions. A separate letter has been submitted that contains a non-public version of these responses, which contains Export-Controlled and Security-Related Information. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact myself, or Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799 or at Julie.Olivier@ge.com.

Uranium Enrichment Branch; Albert E. Kennedy; Albert E. Kennedy; Tammy Orr (gle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLIC VERSION GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits revision 2 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 1 contains revised Request for Additional Information responses. Enclosure 2 contains revised chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 3 contains the revised pubic version of the Decommissioning Funding Plan. Non-Public versions of the revised License Application and the Decommissioning Funding Plan have been prepared and will be submitted under separate enclosure. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact me at 910-819-4799 or at

Julie Olivier; Brian Smith Chief; Uranium Enrichment Branch; Julie Olivier; Tim Johnson (nrc; Tammy Orr (gle; Lori Butler (geh; Jerry Head (geh; Patricia Campbell (geh; Bob Crate (gle; Ken Givens (gle; Tom Owens (gle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Grid-BGC: A Grid-Enabled Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Modeling System, Euro-Par 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is to utilize Globus Grid technology to integrate inexpensive commodity cluster computational resources at CU with the mass storage system at NCAR while hiding the logistics of data transfer and job submission from the scientists. We describe a typical process for simulating the terrestrial carbon cycle, present our solution architecture and software design, and describe our implementation experiences with Grid technology on our systems. By design the Grid-BGC software framework is extensible in that it can utilize other grid-accessible computational resources and can be readily applied to other climate simulation problems which have similar workflows. Overall, this project demonstrates an end-to-end system which leverages Grid technologies to harness distributed resources across organizational boundaries to achieve a cost-effective solution to a computeintensive problem. 1

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry M. Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

269

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Scratch Gets Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global scratch remains flexible and paves the way for PDSF to eventually use the file system Because of the upgrade, users will also be able to better access their temporary data files or "scratch data" from any NERSC system, not just the one that generated it. Prior to the upgrade, Global scratch typically

270

Evaluating the Carbon Cycle of a Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate how well a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, CCM3-IBIS, can simulate the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the carbon cycling through it. The simulated climate is compared to observations, while the vegetation cover and the carbon cycle are compared to an offline version of the biosphere model IBIS forced with observed climatic variables. The simulated climate presents some local biases that strongly affect the vegetation (e.g., a misrepresentation of the African monsoon). Compared to the offline model, the coupled model simulates well the globally averaged carbon fluxes and vegetation pools. The zonal mean carbon fluxes and the zonal mean seasonal cycle are also well represented except between 0{sup o} and 20{sup o}N due to the misrepresentation of the African monsoon. These results suggest that, despite regional biases in climate and ecosystem simulations, this coupled atmosphere-biosphere model can be used to explore geographic and temporal variations in the global carbon cycle.

Delire, C; Foley, J A; Thompson, S

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reading Comprehension - The Water Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Water Cycle The Water Cycle Evaporation, Condensation and Precipitation The _________ moon sun water clouds evaporates _________ fish oceans rain water from lakes and oceans. As the air rises, it cools. The water vapor condenses into tiny droplets of _________ evaporation clouds water sunshine . The droplets crowd together and form a _________ cloud lake storm precipitation . Wind blows the _________ rain sun droplet cloud towards the land. The tiny droplets join together and fall as precipitation to the _________ river lake ground cloud . The water soaks into the ground and collects in _________ rivers and lakes oceans and clouds jars and cups plants and animals . The _________ storm cycle river house that never ends has started again! A water cycle diagram. Use the diagram to identify the different parts of the water cycle:

273

CMVRTC: Heavy Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project was initiated in 2004 and is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies Program. ORNL designed the research program to generate real-world-based duty cycle data from trucks operating in long-haul operations and was designed to be conducted in three phases: identification of parameters to be collected, instrumentation and pilot testing, identification of a real-world fleet, design of the data collection suite and fleet instrumentation, and data collection, analysis, and development of a duty cycle generation tool (DCGT). ANL logo dana logo michelin logo Schrader logo This type of data will be useful for supporting energy efficiency

274

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

275

Global petrochemical industry experiencing cyclic downturn  

SciTech Connect

The current deterioration of the petrochemical industry-particularly in the U.S. and Western Europe-is a cause of great concern to operators and analysts alike. Although the rapidly developing Asian market will continue to be a major factor into the next century, the immediate global outlook is for a weak market. Chem Systems Inc., Tarrytown, N.Y., discussed these issues at its annual petrochemical conference, held Jan. 13-14 in Houston. One of the few optimistic predictions of the meetings gas that the harbingers of the next industry cycle already can be seen in the U.S. economic recovery, and slow-down in new project planning, and a reduction in fixed costs. The paper describes the US market; market structure; the trend toward capacity integration; product forecasts; factors affecting the prices of propylene, aromatics, and benzene; the Asian market (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Asian countries); regional trade; and the European market.

1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Global Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energy Inc Place Cincinnati, Ohio Zip 45202-4048 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Gasification technology and engineering firm, with activities in hydrogen production and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) facilities. Coordinates 39.106614°, -84.504552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.106614,"lon":-84.504552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

BBSLA Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION ??????????? ???????? ????????????? ...

278

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version 031010) 1 ???????????? ?????????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ...

279

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

280

Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)]|[Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle October 29, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research expedition off the coast of northeastern Alaska involving the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Link to the project web siteThe Beaufort Sea expedition, which included research partners from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, gathered a wealth of data to help understand "fluxes," or changes in the concentration of methane within and

282

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle October 29, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research expedition off the coast of northeastern Alaska involving the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Link to the project web siteThe Beaufort Sea expedition, which included research partners from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, gathered a wealth of data to help understand "fluxes," or changes in the concentration of methane within and

283

Limit Cycle and Conserved Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a potential coexists with limit cycle. Here the potential determines the final distribution of population. Our demonstration consists of three steps: We first show the existence of limit from a typical physical sciences setting: the potential is a type of Mexican hat type, with the strength of a magnetic field scale with the strength the potential gradient near the limit cycle, and the friction goes to zero faster than the potential near the limit cycle. Hence the dynamics at the limit cycle is conserved. The diffusion matrix is nevertheless finite at the limit cycle. Secondly, we construct the potential in the dynamics with limit cycle in a typical dynamical systems setting. Thirdly, we argue that such a construction can be carried out in a more general situation based on a method discovered by one of us. This method of dealing with stochastic differential equation is in general different from both Ito and Stratonovich calculus. Our result may be useful in many related applications, such as in the discussion of metastability of limit cycle and in the construction of Hopfield potential in the neural network computation.

X. -M. Zhu; L. Yin; P. Ao

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

285

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Global Hydrologic and Energy Cycles: Suggestions for Studies in the Pre-Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the importance of a quantitative understanding of the way in which water and energy are moved from place to place and from component to component of the earth's climate system, it is necessary to obtain reliable estimates of the hydrologic ...

J. L. Kinter; J. Shukla

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NIST Global Standards Information Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ileana Martinez. Global standards & trade, Europe, Americas, e-Accessibility, biofuels, accreditation. ileana.martinez@nist.gov 301-975-2766. ...

290

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach for global optimization in which machine learning is used to predict ..... In Figure 1 we show the level curves of the 2dimensional Rastrigin function.

291

Global energy for the next millennium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public demand for cleaner air; an ever-growing need for electricity; rising standards of living; convenience of use and reliability of supply--these are the global forces that are accelerating the demand for natural gas today, from Thailand to Brazil, and the gas industry worldwide is moving fast to meet this growing need. Changes--in the regulatory environment, physical infrastructure, and technology--are coming at an unprecedented rate. These changes in turn are exerting a strong influence on the structuring of new gas industries, and the restructuring of existing ones, around the world. The most dramatic increase in gas use, in recent years, was in the Asia-Pacific region and South America, but the expansion is virtually universal. The widespread availability of more efficient gas-fired, combined-cycle power plants are playing a major role in this expansion, but changing trends in demand, regulatory policy, infrastructure development, and technology all contribute to structural change in the industry. In the broadest sense, these are all global issues, transcending national and even regional boundaries. When one looks more closely at exactly how demand growth or regulatory change, for example, is acting as a catalyst for industry restructuring, one can still see significant regional and national differences. A brief overview of these trends is presented.

Jacobs, R.H. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

CMVRTC: Medium Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

medium truck duty cycle (MTdc) project medium truck duty cycle (MTdc) project OVERVIEW The Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) project involves efforts to collect, analyze and archive data related to medium-truck operations in real-world driving environments. Such data and information will be useful to support technology evaluation efforts and to provide a means of accounting for real-world driving performance within medium-class truck analyses. The project involves private industry partners from various truck vocations. The MTDC project is unique in that there currently does not exist a national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. This project involves the collection of data from multiple vocations (four vocations) and multiple vehicles within these vocations (three vehicles per

293

Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alternative Cycles for Power Converters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expansion in the high pressure turbine by passing it through an additional lead-to-steam heat exchanger (HX). This can be a complication relative to the superheated steam cycle....

295

Deoxygenation in Cycling Fossil Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimizing shutdown oxygen levels at a cycling fossil plant can reduce corrosion product transport to the boilers. In this study two forms of activated carbon were used to catalyze the oxygen/hydrazine reaction and minimize oxygen levels.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ammonium generation during SRAT cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the IDMS noble-metal demonstration runs ammonium nitrate deposition was found in the vessel vent system of the feed preparation area. In the bench-scale experiments of studying the hydrogen generation during the sludge treatment cycle, ammonium ion production was also monitored. It was found that: During a simulation of the DWPF Cold Chemical Runs SRAT cycle no detectable amount of ammonium ions was generated when treating a non-noble-metal containing sludge simulant according to the nitric acid flowsheet. Ammonium ions were generated during the SRAT-SME cycle when treating the noble-metal containing sludge with either formic acid or nitric acid/late-washing PHA. This is due to the reaction between formic acid and nitrate catalyzed by the noble metals in the sludge simulant. Ammonium ion production closely followed the hydrogen evolution from the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. This report summarizes the results of the production of ammonia during the SRAT cycle.

Hsu, C.W.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

299

Nonlinearity of Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled climatecarbon models have shown the potential for large feedbacks between climate change, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and global carbon sinks. Standard metrics of this feedback assume that the response of land and ocean carbon uptake ...

Kirsten Zickfeld; Michael Eby; H. Damon Matthews; Andreas Schmittner; Andrew J. Weaver

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

American business cycles and innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economists have long studied innovation and its effects on business cycles. Economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter (1883-1950) was the first economist to thoroughly discuss these ideas in his Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, published in 1911 (English translation: The Theory of Economic Development, 1934). This paper focuses on three issues: defining innovation, defining and identifying business cycles, and determining which innovations caused which business cycles. The first section introduces the concepts of innovation and invention. The second section discusses the business cycles and highlights general causes of business cycles. The final section details the history of the iron, steel, aluminum, and pharmaceutical industries and incorporates the available business and economic data (output, productivity, inventories, and capital investment) required to answer the central question: which innovations caused which business cycles? The iron industry, examined over the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, reveals that its relationship to the business cycle is likely significant but was difficult to quantify because of limited data. An examination of the steel industry from the post-Civil War period to the early twentieth century follows. The steel industry had a significant effect on the business cycle and seemed to direct the business cycle during the growth in railroad mileage. Steel was a huge and indispensable industry for most of the 20[th] century so it makes a very important case to study. The aluminum industry is relevant to examine because the process for making aluminum has remained the same since the American inventor, Charles Hall, patented his method in 1889. The contribution of aluminum was significant because of the introduction of the large-scale electrical generators needed to produce aluminum. Finally, the paper focuses on the contribution of the pharmaceutical industry to the business cycle. The pharmaceutical industry is important to this study because it has already proved to be a major source of innovation and is an industry that will continue to play a significant role in the American economy. The findings reveal the contribution from this industry was most significant in the post-World War II era of research and development. The paper concludes with suggestions for improving and expanding this innovation and business cycle study.

Hood, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reichl, H. Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study N.L. Miller 1 *, A.W. KingCycle Research Strategy, DOE SC-0043, Office of BiologicalLBNL Report LBNL-53826. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study is

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Damage of Land Biosphere due to Intense Warming by 1000-Fold Rapid Increase in Atmospheric Methane: Estimation with a ClimateCarbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal-time-scale responses of climate and the global carbon cycle to warming associated with rapid increases in atmospheric methane from a massive methane release from marine sedimentary methane hydrates are investigated with a coupled climate...

Atsushi Obata; Kiyotaka Shibata

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) inviting universities, national laboratories, and industry to compete for up to $15 million to advance nuclear technologies closing the nuclear fuel cycle. These projects will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, as part of the Department's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the domestic technology R&D component of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Studies resulting from this FOA will

307

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) inviting universities, national laboratories, and industry to compete for up to $15 million to advance nuclear technologies closing the nuclear fuel cycle. These projects will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, as part of the Department's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the domestic technology R&D component of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Studies resulting from this FOA will

308

Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program  

SciTech Connect

The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) and Carbon Cycle 2.0 are honored to host Profs. Fujii, Sugiyama, and Bagheri from the University of Tokyo. They will be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy cycle driver (Bagheri) The Global Solar + Initiative (GS+I) at the University of Tokyo When's new Global Solar + Initiative (GS+I). Started in November 2010, GS+I is addressing challenges in shifting to a sustainable global energy system which suppresses the emission of greenhouse gases. GS

310

Statistical global metabolic control analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work introduces the concept of global sensitivity based on simultaneous variation of a complete set of enzymes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactors in finite ranges of concentrations. Perturbations are defined by finite ranges of concentrations ... Keywords: MCA metabolic control analysis, flux control coefficients, global sensitivity, homeostasis

Zelimir Kurtanjek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global and Regional Solutions Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

Homes, Christopher C.

312

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Müller, Jens-Dominik

313

NETL Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets Life Cycle Analysis Role of Alternative Energy Sources - Wind Technology Assessment PDF-372KB (Sept 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources -...

314

Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Life...

315

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

317

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

318

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

319

System dynamics modelling of product carbon footprint life cycles for collaborative green supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments, environmental groups and industry associations are reducing greenhouse gas emissions to insure environmental sustainability. Manufacturing plays an important role in economic development but is a main cause of global warming since production ... Keywords: economic inputoutput life cycle assessment, mass customisation, product carbon footprint, system dynamics

AmyJ. C. Trappey; CharlesV. Trappey; Chih-Tung Hsiao; JerryJ. R. Ou; Chin-Tsung Chang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Implementation of GOES-based land surface temperature diurnal cycle D. SUN*{ and R. T. PINKER{  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Scientific Conference on the Global Energy and Water Cycle, Washington, DC, 17­21 June 1996, pp. 284­285 (Washington, DC: International GEWEX Office). 3984 Implementation of GOES-based LSTD to AVHRR. In this paper we use a new split-window LST algorithm based on radiative transfer calculations, as well

Sun, Donglian

322

Observed Tropospheric Temperature Response to 11-yr Solar Cycle and What It Reveals about Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 54 yr of NCEP reanalysis global data from 1000 to 10 hPa, this study establishes the existence and the statistical significance of the zonal-mean temperature response to the 11-yr solar cycle throughout the troposphere and parts of the lower ...

Jiansong Zhou; Ka-Kit Tung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geothermal heat cycle research: Supercritical cycle with horizontal counterflow condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting the improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. To meet this objective, the program has as one of its goals to improve the performance of geothermal binary cycles to levels approaching the practicable thermodynamic maximum. In pursuit of this goal, tests are being conducted at the Heat Cycle Research Facility located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California. The current testing involves the investigation of binary power cycle performance utilizing mixtures of non-adjacent hydrocarbons as the working fluids, with supercritical vaporization and in-tube condensation of the working fluid. In addition to the present test program, preparations are being made to investigate the binary cycle performance improvements which can be achieved by allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine. These efforts are anticipated to verify that through the utilization of these advanced power cycle concepts and allowing the supersaturated turbine expansions, improvements of up to 28% in the net geofluid effectiveness (net watt hours plant output per pound of geofluid) over conventional binary power plants can be achieved. Results are presented for the recent testing including those tests examining the performance of the countercurrent condenser at different tube inclinations. Performance of the heaters and the condenser in a vertical orientation can be predicted well with existing methods and data. The condenser in its near horizontal orientation performs slightly worse than in its vertical orientation. Some problems have been encountered in predicting the performance in the horizontal orientation. There is no evidence of departure from integral condensation in either orientation.

Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.; Bliem, C.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the range of fuel cycle goals and criteria, and the wide range of fuel cycle options, how can the set of options eventually be narrowed in a transparent and justifiable fashion? It is impractical to develop all options. We suggest an approach that starts by considering a range of goals for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and then posits seven questions, such as whether Cs and Sr isotopes should be separated from spent fuel and, if so, what should be done with them. For each question, we consider which of the goals may be relevant to eventually providing answers. The AFCI program has both ''outcome'' and ''process'' goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geologic repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are rea diness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties.

Piet, S.J.; Dixon, B.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Smith, J.D.; Hill, R.N.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

Delayed Seasonal Cycle and African Monsoon in a Warmer Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing greenhouse gases will change many aspects of the Earth's climate, from its annual mean to the frequency of extremes such as heat waves and droughts. Here we report that the current generation of climate models predicts a delay in the seasonal cycle of global rainfall and ocean temperature in response to increasing greenhouse gases, with important implications for the regional monsoons. In particular, the rainy season of the semi-arid African Sahel is projected to start later and become shorter: an undesirable change for local rainfed agriculture and pastoralism. Previous work has highlighted the uncertainty in this region's response to anthropogenic global warming: summer rainfall is predicted either to decrease or increase by up to 30% depending which model is used. The robust agreement across models on the seasonal distribution of rainfall changes signifies that the onset date and length of the rainy season should be more predictable than annual mean anomalies.

Biasutti, Michela

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Creation of the WATCH Forcing Data and Its Use to Assess Global and Regional Reference Crop Evaporation over Land during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water and Global Change (WATCH) project evaluation of the terrestrial water cycle involves using land surface models and general hydrological models to assess hydrologically important variables including evaporation, soil moisture, and runoff. ...

G. P. Weedon; S. Gomes; P. Viterbo; W. J. Shuttleworth; E. Blyth; H. sterle; J. C. Adam; N. Bellouin; O. Boucher; M. Best

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Assessment of Hatch 1, Cycle 21 Fuel Failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 19 October 2003, Hatch Unit One located near Baxley, Georgia, experienced six duty-related fuel failures following a control blade notching adjustment. The Hatch 1 reactor was shut down for the End of Cycle 21 refueling outage on 14 February 2004. The duty associated with the Hatch 1 notching event was analyzed in detail and found to be relatively high. Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF), in collaboration with EPRI Fuel Reliability Program and Southern Nuclear Company, sponsored a hot cell examination to estab...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ultrafast thermal cycling of solar panels  

SciTech Connect

Two new cyclers that utilize a novel hybrid approach to perform fast thermal cycling of solar panels have been built and are now operational in the Mechanics and Materials Technology Center at The Aerospace Corporation. These cyclers are part of a continuing effort to minimize solar cell life test durations by accelerating the cycling rates. These fully automated cyclers, which provide continuous unmanned cycling in a gaseous nitrogen atmosphere, can execute 5 min cycles, thus yielding in excess of 100,000 cycles per year. They also have a unique capability of verifying solar panel functionality without interruption of cycling, so that cycling doesn`t continue on nonfunctioning panels.

Wall, T.S.; Valenzuela, P.R.; Sue, C.

1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Marine Ecosystem Dynamics and Biogeochemical Cycling in the Community Earth System Model [CESM1(BGC)]: Comparison of the 1990s with the 2090s under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare Community Earth System Model results to marine observations for the 1990s, and examine climate change impacts on biogeochemistry at the end of the 21st century under two future scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways, RCP 4.5 ...

J. Keith Moore; Keith Lindsay; Scott C. Doney; Matthew C. Long; Kazuhiro Misumi

332

BPL Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BPL Global BPL Global Jump to: navigation, search Name BPL Global Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Product BPL Global is a Pittburgh based company that uses broadband over powerline (BPL) to intergrate offerings of advanced metering infrastructure and broadband internet. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endeavor Global Endeavor Global Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Endeavor Global Name Endeavor Global Address 900 Broadway Place New York, New York Zip 10003 Coordinates 40.7391824°, -73.9897252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7391824,"lon":-73.9897252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Puzzles from the First Globalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

Berger, Suzanne

336

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

337

The Psychology of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence in support of global warming and the lack of significant published evidence to the contrary provides an extraordinarily strong foundation for the scientific community's call for action on greenhouse gas emissions. However, public ...

Ben R. Newell; Andrew J. Pitman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

340

A Global Chance-Constraint for Stochastic Inventory Systems Under Service Level Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a class of production/inventory control problems that has a single product and a single stocking location, for which a stochastic demand with a known non-stationary probability distribution is given. Under the widely-known replenishment cycle ... Keywords: Global chance-constraints, Non-stationary (R,S) policy, Stochastic inventory control, Uncertainty

Roberto Rossi; S. Armagan Tarim; Brahim Hnich; Steven Prestwich

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sequestration as natural gas prices rise. INTRODUCTION Heightened concerns about global climate change have were added to EPPA for 1) coal power generation with CCS (coal capture), 2) natural gas combined cycle pulverized coal technology and the 3 #12;advanced natural gas technology. Compared with the pulverized coal

342

Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 published by Elsevier BIOMASS ENERGY PRODUCTION: THE GLOBAL POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9th Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 ­ published by Elsevier 1 BIOMASS ENERGY disturbance of the natural global carbon cycle. The "carbon-neutral" renewable energy carrier biomass seems of biomass for energy purposes. The CEBM comprises a biospheric part being based on the "Osnabrück Biosphere

Keeling, Stephen L.

343

Development of global hourly 0.5-degree land surface air temperature datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface air temperature (SAT) is one of the most important variables in weather and climate studies, and its diurnal cycle and day-to-day variation are also needed for a variety of applications. Global long-term hourly SAT observational data, ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng

344

Development of Global Hourly 0.5 Land Surface Air Temperature Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface air temperature (SAT) is one of the most important variables in weather and climate studies, and its diurnal cycle is also needed for a variety of applications. Global long-term hourly SAT observational data, however, do not exist. ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

LDPC codes from Singer cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of coding theory is to devise efficient systems to exploit the full capacity of a communication channel, thus achieving an arbitrarily small error probability. Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes are a family of block codes-characterised ... Keywords: LDPC Codes, Projective spaces, Singer cycles

Luca Giuzzi; Angelo Sonnino

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Characteristics of the Limit Cycle of a Reciprocating Quantum Heat Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a reciprocating heat engine is started it eventually settles to a stable mode of operation. The approach of a first principle quantum heat engine toward this stable limit cycle is studied. The engine is based on a working medium consisting of an ensemble of quantum systems composed of two coupled spins. A four stroke cycle of operation is studied, with two {\\em isochore} branches where heat is transferred from the hot/cold baths and two {\\em adiabats} where work is exchanged. The dynamics is generated by a completely positive map. It has been shown that the performance of this model resembles an engine with intrinsic friction. The quantum conditional entropy is employed to prove the monotonic approach to a limit cycle. Other convex measures, such as the quantum distance display the same monotonic approach. The equations of motion of the engine are solved for the different branches and are combined to a global propagator that relates the state of the engine in the beginning of the cycle to the state after one period of operation of the cycle. The eigenvalues of the propagator define the rate of relaxation toward the limit cycle. A longitudinal and transverse mode of approach to the limit cycle is identified. The entropy balance is used to explore the necessary conditions which lead to a stable limit cycle. The phenomena of friction can be identified with a zero change in the von Neumann entropy of the working medium.

Tova Feldmann; Ronnie Kosloff

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

349

The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ameliorate the negative social impacts of global markets isenvironmental and social impacts and the royalty paymentscriticisms of the social impact of economic globalization

Vogel, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

351

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Environment Facility (GEF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Facility Address...

352

Global Energias Renovables SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovables SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energias Renovables SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind power developer. References Global...

353

Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celsius SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Celsius SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind project developer. References Global Celsius SL1...

354

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

355

Global Green Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Green Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Green Partners Place Los Altos,...

356

Sunrise Global Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sunrise Global Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunrise Global Solar Energy Place Taoyuan County, Taiwan Zip...

357

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

358

Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles from satellite remote sensing of the global ocean.Breon F. M. (2005). Remote sensing of phytoplankton groupsWITH OCEAN COLOR REMOTE SENSING. Herv Claustre (1) , Jim

Claustre, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon may be a significant carbon reservoir that persists over geological time scales.

Ball, Rowena

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications A sampling of what CDIAC staff members have been following: Extreme summer weather in northern mid-latitudes linked to a vanishing cryosphere. Tang, Q., X. Zhang, and J.A. Francis, 2013, Nature Climate Change DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2065. Uncertainty in annual aankings from NOAA's global temperature time series. Arguez A., T.R. Karl, M.F. Squires, and R.S. Vose, 2013, Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2013GL057999. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle. Reichstein, M., et al.., 2013, Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature12350. Anatomy of an extreme event. Hoerling, M., et al., 2013, J. Climate DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00270.1. Australia's unique influence on global sea level in 2010-2011. Fasullo, J.T., C. Boening, F.W. Landerer, and R.S. Nerem, 2013, Geophysical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) An article that examines the global nuclear energy partnership. The Global Nuclear Energy...

362

Using a Bayesian framework and global sensitivity analysis to identify strengths and weaknesses of two process-based models differing in representation of autotrophic respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-based models are powerful tools for sustainable and adaptive forest management. Bayesian statistics and global sensitivity analysis allow to reduce uncertainties in parameters and outputs, and they provide better insight of model behaviour. In ... Keywords: 3-PG, Bayesian calibration, Bayesian model comparison, Carbon cycle, Global sensitivity analysis, Morris screening, Net primary production, Respiration, Uncertainty analysis

F. Minunno; M. Van Oijen; D. R. Cameron; S. Cerasoli; J. S. Pereira; M. Tom

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Definition: Rankine cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rankine cycle Rankine cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rankine cycle Sometimes referred to as the steam cycle. Fuel is used to heat a liquid to produce a high pressure gas that expands and produces work, such as turning a turbine; when the turbine is connected to a generator, it produces electricity. Usually water is the liquid used in the Rankine cycle (to produce steam), but other liquids can also be used. The exhaust vapor expelled from the turbine condenses and the liquid is pumped back to the boiler to repeat the cycle.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Rankine cycle is a mathematical model that is used to predict the performance of steam engines. The Rankine cycle is an idealised thermodynamic cycle of a heat engine that converts heat into mechanical

364

Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interfaces and their Impacts on Metal Biogeochemical Cycling and Contaminant Remediation, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 7, 2013. oral Giammar, D.E.. "Biogeochemical processes...

365

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

366

Making Global Illumination User Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Global Illumination User Friendly Making Global Illumination User Friendly Title Making Global Illumination User Friendly Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37860 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Ward, Gregory J. Conference Name 6th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering Date Published 06/1995 Conference Location Dublin, Ireland Call Number LBL-37860 Abstract Global illumination researchers tend to think in terms of mesh density and sampling frequency, and their software reflects this in its user interface. Advanced rendering systems are rife with long command lines and parameters for tuning the sample densities, thresholds and other algorithm-specific variables, and the novice user is quickly lost in a sea of possibilities. This paper details a successful effort of making one such global illumination system usable by people who understand their problems, even if they do not understand the methods needed to solve them, through an assisted oracle approach. A single program is introduced to map a small set of intuitive control variables to the rendering commands and parameter settings needed to produce the desired output in a reasonable time. This new executive program then serves as the basis for a graphical user interface that is both friendly in its appearance and reliable in its performance. Finally, we conclude with some future directions for improving this interface.

367

Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Routes Data Acquisition System Setup Routes Data Acquisition System Setup Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Objective This Department of Energy project focuses on the collection and analysis medium truck (Class-6 and -7) duty cycle data from real-world operations. Analysis of this data will provide information pertaining to the fuel efficiencies and performance of medium trucks in several vocations. Outcomes Rich source of data and information that can contribute to the development of new tools Sound basis upon which DOE can make technology investment decisions A national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data that will support medium-duty vehicle energy efficiency research Collected Data Speed & Acceleration Fuel Consumption GPS Location Road Grade

368

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

BBSLA Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

375

BBSLA Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version 031010) CONTRATO DE LICENCIA DE SOLUCIN BLACKBERRY FAVOR LEER ESTE ...

376

BBSLA Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

377

BBSLA Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

378

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

379

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Global warming: A Northwest perspective  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A. (eds.)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations  

SciTech Connect

This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Global Scratch File System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scratch Scratch Global Scratch File System Overview The global scratch file system (or "global scratch") can be accessed by multiple NERSC systems. Its default quota is much larger than the Global Home quota, so it can be used to temporarily store large amounts of data. This file system is periodically purged. Platforms Using Global Scratch The global scratch file system is available on all NERSC systems except PDSF. Quotas Default global scratch quotas are 20 TB and 2,000,000 inodes. If you need more than that, fill out the Disk Quota Change Request Form. Purging Yes, files in global scratch file system are subject to purging. Backup No, Files in global scratch file system are not backed up. Environment Variable You can reference your personal scratch directory in global scratch as

383

The Global Impact of the Systemic Economies and MENA Business Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the MENA Region We extend the country coverage of the GVAR dataset used in Dees et al. (2007) by adding 14 countries located in the Middle East and North Africa region as well as three other Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) members... model and provide justi?cation for our modelling speci?cation. For various data sources used to build the quarterly GVAR dataset, covering 1979Q2 to 2011Q2, see the Data Appendix. 3.1.1 Domestic Variables Real GDP, yit, the rate of in?ation, #25;it...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venting in the eastern Aleutian subduction zone, J. Geophys.Northern California Aleutians, Bering slope California Bight

Elliott, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Associations between the Global Energy Cycle and Regional Rainfall in South Africa and Southwest Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale atmospheric processes in the Southern Hemisphere are examined on both seasonal and daily time scales in order to seek associations between these and regional rainfall variability in the summer rainfall areas of South Africa and the ...

Warren J. Tennant; Chris J. C. Reason

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Characterization of the Global Hydrologic Cycle from a Back-Trajectory Analysis of Atmospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional precipitation recycling may constitute a feedback mechanism affecting soil moisture memory and the persistence of anomalously dry or wet states. Bulk methods, which estimate recycling based on time-averaged variables, have been applied ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Kaye L. Brubaker

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a hydrate based marine desalination technology on marineentirely here. The slight desalination imparted by clathrate

Elliott, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Landfill CH sub 4 : Rates, fates, and role in global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Published estimates for worldwide landfill methane emissions range from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup {minus}1}. Field and laboratory studies suggest that maximum methane yields from lanfilled refuse are about 0.06 to 0.09 m{sup 3} (dry Kg){sup {minus}1} refuse, depending on moisture content and other variables, such as organic loading, buffering capacity, and nutrients in landfill microevnironments. Methane yields may vary by more than an order of magnitude within a given site. Fates for landfill methane include (1) direct or delayed emission to the atmosphere through landfill cover materials or surface soils; (2) oxidation by methanotrophs in cover soils, with resulting emission of carbon dioxide; or (3) recovery of methane followed by combustion to produce carbon dioxide. The percent methane assigned to each pathway will vary among field sites and, for individual sites, through time. Nevertheless, a general framework for a landfill methane balance can be developed by consideration of landfill age, engineering and management practices, cover soil characteristics, and water balance. Direct measurements of landfill methane emissions are sparse, with rates between 10{sup {minus}6} and 10{sup {minus}8} g cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}; very high rates of 400 kg m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} have been measured at a semiarid unvegetated site. The proportion of landfill carbon that is ultimately converted to methane and carbon dioxide is problematical; the literature suggests that, at best, 25% to 40% of refuse carbon can be converted to biogas carbon. Cellulose contributes the major portion of the methane potential. Routine excavation of nondecomposed cellulosic materials after one or two decades of landfill burial suggests that uniformly high conversion rates are rarely attained at field sites.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Landfill CH{sub 4}: Rates, fates, and role in global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Published estimates for worldwide landfill methane emissions range from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup {minus}1}. Field and laboratory studies suggest that maximum methane yields from lanfilled refuse are about 0.06 to 0.09 m{sup 3} (dry Kg){sup {minus}1} refuse, depending on moisture content and other variables, such as organic loading, buffering capacity, and nutrients in landfill microevnironments. Methane yields may vary by more than an order of magnitude within a given site. Fates for landfill methane include (1) direct or delayed emission to the atmosphere through landfill cover materials or surface soils; (2) oxidation by methanotrophs in cover soils, with resulting emission of carbon dioxide; or (3) recovery of methane followed by combustion to produce carbon dioxide. The percent methane assigned to each pathway will vary among field sites and, for individual sites, through time. Nevertheless, a general framework for a landfill methane balance can be developed by consideration of landfill age, engineering and management practices, cover soil characteristics, and water balance. Direct measurements of landfill methane emissions are sparse, with rates between 10{sup {minus}6} and 10{sup {minus}8} g cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}; very high rates of 400 kg m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} have been measured at a semiarid unvegetated site. The proportion of landfill carbon that is ultimately converted to methane and carbon dioxide is problematical; the literature suggests that, at best, 25% to 40% of refuse carbon can be converted to biogas carbon. Cellulose contributes the major portion of the methane potential. Routine excavation of nondecomposed cellulosic materials after one or two decades of landfill burial suggests that uniformly high conversion rates are rarely attained at field sites.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Toward single-cycle optical pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-cycle optical pulses, the never-before-achieved regime, have a great potential for attosecond science and phase-sensitive nonlinear optics. To achieve single-cycle optical pulses by active synchronization, three ...

Kim, Jung-Won, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

WEB RESOURCES: The Nuclear Fuel Cycle - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... A compilation of links to websites describing the nuclear fuel cycle. A link to a short overview of the entire cycle is included as well as a...

392

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Profit cycle dynamics by Kawika Pierson.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My thesis consists of three essays investigating the existence, causes, and mitigation of profit cycles at an industry level. The first essay examines profit cycles by proposing that the industry-specific features of how ...

Pierson, Kawika (Kawika Paul)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Application of the thorium fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis of the application of the thorium fuel cycle to thermal reactors is presented. (JWR)

Kasten, P.R.; Tobias, M.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Political Cycles and the Stock Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecast the stock market as controls for business cycle ?uctuations. After controlling for the dividend-price

Santa-Clara, Pedro; Valkanov, Rossen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Combined Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline (EPRI report 1023971) was developed in 2012 to provide plant owners and operators with a comprehensive guideline for identifying and quantifying combined-cycle performance losses and appropriate recovery activities for a generic F-Class combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). This report, Combined-Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline, has been developed as an adjunct ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

398

Search for relationship between duration of the extended solar cycles and amplitude of sunspot cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duration of the extended solar cycles is taken into the consideration. The beginning of cycles is counted from the moment of polarity reversal of large-scale magnetic field in high latitudes, occurring in the sunspot cycle n till the minimum of the cycle n+2. The connection between cycle duration and its amplitude is established. Duration of the "latent" period of evolution of extended cycle between reversals and a minimum of the current sunspot cycle is entered. It is shown, that the latent period of cycles evolution is connected with the next sunspot cycle amplitude and can be used for the prognosis of a level and time of a sunspot maximum. The 24-th activity cycle prognosis is done. Long-term behavior of extended cycle's lengths is considered.

Tlatov, A G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Search for relationship between duration of the extended solar cycles and amplitude of sunspot cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duration of the extended solar cycles is taken into the consideration. The beginning of cycles is counted from the moment of polarity reversal of large-scale magnetic field in high latitudes, occurring in the sunspot cycle n till the minimum of the cycle n+2. The connection between cycle duration and its amplitude is established. Duration of the "latent" period of evolution of extended cycle between reversals and a minimum of the current sunspot cycle is entered. It is shown, that the latent period of cycles evolution is connected with the next sunspot cycle amplitude and can be used for the prognosis of a level and time of a sunspot maximum. The 24-th activity cycle prognosis is done. Long-term behavior of extended cycle's lengths is considered.

A. G. Tlatov

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Carbon Cycling and Biosequestration Integrating Biology and Climate Through Systems Science Report from the March 2008 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most daunting challenges facing science in the 21st Century is to predict how Earth's ecosystems will respond to global climate change. The global carbon cycle plays a central role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and thus Earth's climate, but our basic understanding of the myriad of tightly interlinked biological processes that drive the global carbon cycle remains limited at best. Whether terrestrial and ocean ecosystems will capture, store, or release carbon is highly dependent on how changing climate conditions affect processes performed by the organisms that form Earth's biosphere. Advancing our knowledge of biological components of the global carbon cycle is thus crucial to predicting potential climate change impacts, assessing the viability of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and informing relevant policy decisions. Global carbon cycling is dominated by the paired biological processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthetic plants and microbes of Earth's land-masses and oceans use solar energy to transform atmospheric CO{sub 2} into organic carbon. The majority of this organic carbon is rapidly consumed by plants or microbial decomposers for respiration and returned to the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Coupling between the two processes results in a near equilibrium between photosynthesis and respiration at the global scale, but some fraction of organic carbon also remains in stabilized forms such as biomass, soil, and deep ocean sediments. This process, known as carbon biosequestration, temporarily removes carbon from active cycling and has thus far absorbed a substantial fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

Graber, J.; Amthor, J.; Dahlman, R.; Drell, D.; Weatherwax, S.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Motor vehicles and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in transportation is one of the contributors to the concern over global warming. The primary greenhouse gases released by the transportation sector are carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons. When all greenhouse gases are considered, CO{sub 2} emissions from the operation of highway vehicles worldwide represent about 4.7% of global warming enhancement. CO{sub 2} emissions from U.S. highway vehicles along represent about 2 to 2.5% of worldwide greenhouse gases. The use of CFCs in automotive air conditioning, in blowing foams for seats and padding and in the manufacture of electronic circuit boards accounted for 15% of the global usage of CFC-12 in 1985 according to the U.S. EPA. The Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association supports the phase-out of CFC use provided that safe substitutes are available and that adequate lead time is allowed for.They suggest that reduction of greenhouse gases would require planning on a global scope to be effective. One alternative they suggest for further study is a carbon fee for reducing emissions of carbon dioxide. This fee would be levied on each type of fossil fuel, proportional to its carbon content per unit of energy.

Halberstadt, M.L.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy EnvironmentRENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT Paper prepared for the REN21 Network by The Worldwatch Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

Kammen, Daniel M.

403

On globally Symmetric Finsler spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper consider the symmetric of Finsler spaces. We give some conditions about globally symmetric Finsler spaces. Then we prove that these spaces can be written as a coset space of Lie group with an invariant Finsler metric. Finally, we prove that such a space must be Berwaldian

Khatamy, R Chavosh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Computer demonstration of an interactive modeling system for the study of global change and biogeochemistry  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for visually oriented materials to aid in the study of global ecological science. Analysis of the carbon cycle is key to understanding Potential climate change. We have used satellite imagery along with global climate and soil texture data sets to simulate seasonal patterns in net carbon fixation and soil CO[sub 2] production. An interactive computer system is used to illustrate graphical results from various model scenarios of climate warming and land use change. These include global animations of monthly gridded CO[sub 2] exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. This modeling demonstration highlights the importance of annual CO[sub 2] fluxes in tropical forests (40% of global totals) and the large carbon storage potential in boreal and arctic soils.

Klooster, S.A.; Potter, S. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Current Forecast for Sunspot Cycle 24 Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our prediction for the development of sunspot cycle 23 activity came true; one of the very few to have attained this status. We use the 3?cycle quasi?periodicity observed in the planetary index Ap. We improve our method by including data for 150 years and draw inferences as to what to expect for the development phase of cycle 24. Our forecast for the smoothed sunspot number at cycle 24 peak 785 in June 2013; the possibility that next three cycles may be progressively less active cannot be ruled out; the trend may possibly continue for the rest of the 21st century.

H. S. Ahluwalia; R. C. Ygbuhay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The FIT Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the system losses study team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010] are an initial step by the FCR&D program toward a global analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. The question originally posed to the system losses study was the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, waste management, etc. versus the separation efficiency. In other words, are the costs associated with marginal reductions in separations losses (or improvements in product recovery) justified by the gains in the performance of other systems? We have learned that that is the wrong question. The right question is: how does one adjust the compositions and quantities of all mass streams, given uncertain product criteria, to balance competing objectives including cost? FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles using common bases to determine how chemical performance changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say used fuel cooling times or separation efficiencies) affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT estimates impurities in fuel and waste via a rough estimate of physics and mass balance for a set of technologies. If feasibility is an issue for a set, as it is for minimum fuel treatment approaches such as melt refining and AIROX, it can help to make an estimate of how performances would have to change to achieve feasibility.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Meliisa C Teague; Gregory M Teske; Kurt G Vedros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

410

Anthropogenic impacts on global storage and emissions of mercury from terrestrial soils: Insights from a new global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We develop a mechanistic global model of soil mercury storage and emissions that ties the lifetime of mercury in soils to the lifetime of the organic carbon pools it is associated with. We explore the implications of considering terrestrial mercury cycling in the framework of soil carbon cycling and suggest possible avenues of future research to test our assumptions and constrain this type of model. In our simulation, input of mercury to soil is by atmospheric deposition, in part through leaf uptake and subsequent litter fall, and is moderated by surface photoreduction and revolatilization. Once bound to organic carbon, mercury is transferred along a succession of short?lived to long?lived carbon pools and is ultimately reemitted by respiration of these pools. We examine the legacy of anthropogenic influence on global mercury storage and emissions and estimate that storage of mercury in organic soils has increased by ?20 % since preindustrial times, while soil emissions have increased by a factor of 3 (2900 Mg yr ?1 versus 1000 Mg yr ?1). At steady state, mercury accumulates in the most recalcitrant soil carbon pools and has an overall lifetime against respiration of 630 years. However, the impact of anthropogenic emissions since preindustrial times has been concentrated in more labile pools, so that the mean lifetime of present?day anthropogenic mercury in all pools is ?80 years. Our analysis suggests that reductions in anthropogenic emissions would lead to immediate and large reductions in secondary soil mercury emissions.

Nicole V Smith?downey; Elsie M. Sunderl; Daniel J. Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Conceptual design of an advanced absorption cycle: the double-effect regenerative absorption refrigeration cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced absorption refrigeration cycle was proposed as a heat-activated refrigeration system. Referred to as the double-effect regenerative absorption cycle of cycle 2R, it improves the performance of the conventional single-effect absorption cycle at high heat source temperatures. The performance of cycle 2R continually improves as input temperatures rise, in contrast to the conventional double-effect absorption cycle that has a sharp cut-off temperature below which it ceases to operate. Cycle 2R operates with two subcycles, the first-effect and the second-effect subcycles.

Dao, K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CrossCut Group CrossCut Group 1 NERAC Briefing: Assessment of Dose of Closed vs Open Gen-IV Fuel Cycles David Wade NERAC Meeting September 30, 2002 Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group 2 Public Dose and Worker Dose Comparison of Open vs Closed Fuel Cycles * Gen-IV fuel cycle options are meant to address all stated Gen-IV Goals - Dose to workers and to the public is one of the numerous elements to be evaluated by Gen-IV R&D - The Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group was assigned to take an early look at dose implication tradeoffs of open and closed fuel cycles * FCCG Interpretation of Assignment: - Collect already-existing evaluations and prepare a briefing on what is currently known Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group 3 Approach * Look at Actual Historical Doses Based on Operational Experience - Data compiled by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic

416

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Definition: Brayton cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Brayton cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Brayton cycle A thermodynamic cycle using constant pressure, heat addition and rejection. Fuel and a compressor are used to heat and increase the pressure of a gas; the gas expands and spins the blades of a turbine, which, when connected to a generator, generates electricity.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Brayton cycle is a thermodynamic cycle that describes the workings of a constant pressure heat engine. Gas turbine engines and airbreathing jet engines use the Brayton Cycle. Although the Brayton cycle

418

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Program Presentation to Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline Fuel Cycle R&D Mission Changes from the Former Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative The Science-Based Approach Key Collaborators Budget History Program Elements Summary July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 3 Fuel Cycle R&D Mission The mission of Fuel Cycle Research and Development is to develop options to current fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while reducing proliferation risks by conducting

419

partnership profile: the global fund | 1 About the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Malaria The Global Fund to Fight aIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) is a global public-private international disbursements in 2010. as a public-private partnership representing governments, civil society

Derisi, Joseph

420

Development and application of the EPIC model for carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the EPIC model in relation to carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel applications. From its original capabilities and purpose (i.e., quantify the impacts or erosion on soil productivity), the EPIC model has evolved into a comprehensive terrestrial ecosystem model for simulating with more or less process-level detail many ecosystem processes such as weather, hydrology, plant growth and development, carbon cycle (including erosion), nutrient cycling, greenhouse-gas emissions, and the most complete set of manipulations that can be implemented on a parcel of land (e.g. tillage, harvest, fertilization, irrigation, drainage, liming, burning, pesticide application). The chapter also provides details and examples of the latest efforts in model development such as the coupled carbon-nitrogen model, a microbial denitrification model with feedback to the carbon decomposition model, updates on calculation of ecosystem carbon balances, and carbon emissions from fossil fuels. The chapter has included examples of applications of the EPIC model in soil carbon sequestration, net ecosystem carbon balance, and biofuel studies. Finally, the chapter provides the reader with an update on upcoming improvements in EPIC such as the additions of modules for simulating biochar amendments, sorption of soluble C in subsoil horizons, nitrification including the release of N2O, and the formation and consumption of methane in soils. Completion of these model development activities will render an EPIC model with one of the most complete representation of biogeochemical processes and capable of simulating the dynamic feedback of soils to climate and management in terms not only of transient processes (e.g., soil water content, heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions) but also of fundamental soil properties (e.g. soil depth, soil organic matter, soil bulk density, water limits).

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Mcgill, William B.; Williams, J.R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Open-cycle OTEC system performance analysis. [Claude cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An algorithm developed to calculate the performance of Claude-Cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems is described. The algorithm treats each component of the system separately and then interfaces them to form a complete system, allowing a component to be changed without changing the rest of the algorithm. Two components that are subject to change are the evaporator and condenser. For this study we developed mathematical models of a channel-flow evaporator and both a horizontal jet and spray director contact condenser. The algorithm was then programmed to run on SERI's CDC 7600 computer and used to calculate the effect on performance of deaerating the warm and cold water streams before entering the evaporator and condenser, respectively. This study indicates that there is no advantage to removing air from these streams compared with removing the air from the condenser.

Lewandowski, A.A.; Olson, D.A.; Johnson, D.H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Diurnal Cycle of Water Vapor as Documented by a Dense GPS Network in a Coastal Area during ESCOMPTE IOP2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global positioning system (GPS) data from a dense network have been used for the analysis of the diurnal cycle of water vapor over Marseille, France, during the second intensive observation period (IOP2; 2126 June 2001) of the Exprience sur ...

Sophie Bastin; Cdric Champollion; Olivier Bock; Philippe Drobinski; Frdric Masson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the Presidents Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cyclein which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repositoryto a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

R.A. Wigeland

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

A. Bershadskii

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Global Change Research: Summaries of research in FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities and products of the Global Research Program in FY 1993. This publication describes all of the projects funded by the Environmental Sciences Division of DOE under annual contracts, grants, and interagency agreements in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; its 3-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than 1 year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: climate modeling, quantitative links, global carbon cycle, vegetation research, ocean research, economics of global climate change, education, information and integration, and NIGEC. Within these categories, the descriptions are grouped alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Global Warming: some back-of-the-envelope calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We do several simple calculations and measurements in an effort to gain understanding of global warming and the carbon cycle. Some conclusions are interesting: (i) There has been global warming since the end of the "little ice age" around 1700. There is no statistically significant evidence of acceleration of global warming since 1940. (ii) The increase of CO_2 in the atmosphere, beginning around 1940, accurately tracks the burning of fossil fuels. Burning all of the remaining economically viable reserves of oil, gas and coal over the next 150 years or so will approximately double the pre-industrial atmospheric concentration of CO_2. The corresponding increase in the average temperature, due to the greenhouse effect, is quite uncertain: between 1.3 and 4.8K. This increase of temperature is (partially?) offset by the increase of aerosols and deforestation. (iii) Ice core samples indicate that the pre-historic CO_2 concentration and temperature are well correlated. We conclude that changes in the temperatures o...

Fabara, C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Global warming continues in 1989  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen eight-nine ranks as one of the warmest years on record despite the chill of unusually cool water in the tropical Pacific. The continued robustness of the warming trend that began in the mid-1970s lends support to claims that an intensifying greenhouse effect is behind it all, although that case has not yet been made definitively. Even at the current rate of global warming it will take another 10 years or so to be confident that the greenhouse effect is with us. Although the global warming trend is consistent with an increasing contribution by the greenhouse effect, direct signs that the greenhouse effect is intensifying are still hard to come by in the temperature record. Greenhouse models agree that if that is happening, the temperature increase should be most pronounced around the Arctic. Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Siberia warmed sharply in the 1980s, but the region from eastern Canada through Greenland and into Scandinavia cooled markedly.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Carbon dioxide and global change  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an analysis and review of the many potential consequences of the rapidly rising CO{sub 2} content of Earth's atmosphere. Covering both the physical (climatic) and biological effects of atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment, the book presents an overview of the interrelated aspects of this complex and demanding subject. Focus is on the search for evidence of global warming (the highly speculative climatic greenhouse effect) and global vegetative stimulation (the well established biological greenhouse effect). The pros and cons of all issues related to these phenomena are discussed. The author's estimate of where the world is headed as a result of mankind's great geophysical experiments is offered.

Idso, S.B. (Arizona State Univ. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

global horizontal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87 87 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278787 Varnish cache server global horizontal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Documentation of the satellite-based high resolution solar resource assessment for Ghana provided by DLR. The high resolution solar data (10kmx10km) provide country maps of the annual and monthly sums of hourly global horizontal and direct normal irradiance (GHI and DNI) for the year 2000, 2001 and 2002. Additionally, for selected sites hourly values of GHI and DNI are provided.The Documentation gives an overview about the used input data and used methodology, shows example maps and describes a comparison with ground data (if provided by the country)

430

Global Technology Regulation and Potentially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000 Bill Joy proposed that the best way to prevent technological apocalypse was to "relinquish " emerging bio-, info- and nanotechnologies. His essay introduced many watchdog groups to the dangers that futurists had been warning of for decades. One such group, ETC, has called for a moratorium on all nanotechnological research until all safety issues can be investigated and social impacts ameliorated. In this essay I discuss the differences and similarities of regulating bio- and nanotechnological innovation to the efforts to regulate nuclear and biological weapons of mass destruction. I then suggest the creation of a global technology regulatory regime to ensure the safe and equitable diffusion of genetic, molecular and information technologies, and point out the principal political obstacles to implementing such a regime. Global Technology Regulation James J. Hughes 2

Fritz Allhoff; Patrick Lin; James Moor; John Weckert; J. Hughes Ph. D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Answering Key Fuel Cycle Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has both outcome and process goals because it must address both waste already accumulating as well as completing the fuel cycle in connection with advanced nuclear power plant concepts. The outcome objectives are waste geological repository capacity and cost, energy security and sustainability, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and safety. The process objectives are readiness to proceed and adaptability and robustness in the face of uncertainties. A classic decision-making approach to such a multi-attribute problem would be to weight individual quantified criteria and calculate an overall figure of merit. This is inappropriate for several reasons. First, the goals are not independent. Second, the importance of different goals varies among stakeholders. Third, the importance of different goals is likely to vary with time, especially the energy future. Fourth, some key considerations are not easily or meaningfully quantifiable at present. Instead, at this point, we have developed 16 questions the AFCI program should answer and suggest an approach of determining for each whether relevant options improve meeting each of the program goals. We find that it is not always clear which option is best for a specific question and specific goal; this helps identify key issues for future work. In general, we suggest attempting to create as many win-win decisions (options that are attractive or neutral to most goals) as possible. Thus, to help clarify why the program is exploring the options it is, and to set the stage for future narrowing of options, we have developed 16 questions, as follows: What are the AFCI program goals? Which potential waste disposition approaches do we plan for? What are the major separations, transmutation, and fuel options? How do we address proliferation resistance? Which potential energy futures do we plan for? What potential external triggers do we plan for? Should we separate uranium? If we separate uranium, should we recycle it, store it or dispose of it? Is it practical to plan to fabricate and handle hot fuel? Which transuranic elements (TRU) should be separated and transmuted? Of those TRU separated, which should be transmuted together? Should we separate and/or transmute Cs and Sr isotopes that dominate near-term repository heating? Should we separate and/or transmute very long-lived Tc and I isotopes? Which separation technology? What mix of transmutation technologies? What fuel technology best supports the above decisions?

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; J. Stephen Herring; David E. Shropshire; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty diagrams, which show at a glance combined uncertainty information, section 9.2 has a new set of simpler graphs that show the impact on fuel cycle costs for once through, 1-tier, and 2-tier scenarios as a function of key input parameters.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 18502000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We-related combustion, 1850­2000, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB2018, doi:10.1029/2006GB002840. 1. Importance

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

436

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

437

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

438

Implementation of global energy sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments  

SciTech Connect

In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

COREY,GARTH P.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Business cycles in oil economies  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the impact of oil price shocks on output fluctuations of several oil-exporting economies. In most studies of business cycles, the role of oil price is ignored; the few studies that use oil price as one of the variables in the system focus on modeling oil-importing economies. The vector autoregression (VAR) technique is used to consider the cases of Norway, Nigeria, and Mexico. Both atheoretical and structural' VARs are estimated to determine the importance of oil price impulses on output variations. The study reports two types of results: variance decomposition and impulse response functions, with particular emphasis on the issues of stationarity and co-integration among the series. The empirical results suggest that shocks to oil price are important in explaining output variations. In most cases, shocks to oil price are shown to explain more than 20% of the forecast variance of output over a 40-quarter horizon.

Al-Mutairi, N.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Global Change Research Act of 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was established by Presidential initiative in 1989 and mandated by Congress in the Global Change Research Act (GCRA) of 1990 in order to "assist the nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change." In consultation with White House officials and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research (SGCR), USGCRP's Executive Director ensures that the Program meets all mandated requirements which are summarized in the table below. Global Change Research Act of 1990 Requirements Please click on the buttons below for further details about the Global Change Research Act of 1990. Public Law 101-606(11/16/90) 104 Stat. 3096-3104

445

Change in Global Temperature: A Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates several issues relating to global climatic change using statistical techniques that impose minimal restrictions on the data. The main findings are as follows: 1) The global temperature increase since the last century is a ...

Gordon R. Richards

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Human Footprints on the Global Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Footprints on the Global Environment. By Rosa A. Eugene,Footprints on the Global Environment. MIT Press, 2010. xi +of its own impact on the environment that surrounds its

Ferrara, Enzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ardour Global Indexes LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 10016 Product New-York based company that manages the Ardour Global Indexes, a set of alternative energy financial indicators. References Ardour Global Indexes LLC1 LinkedIn...

448

A Multinational Course on Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel multinational course on global climate change was developed by East Carolina University in collaboration with five international universities and the U.S. Department of State. This course was developed to help foster the global conversation needed ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Andrew Herdman; Scott Curtis; Rosina Chia; Elmer Poe; Robert Thompson; Biwu Yang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A University Perspective on Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric models are proliferating, in part because of the widespread availability of powerful computers. There are about two dozen global modeling groups at work in the United States today. These groups are put into four categories, ...

David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Re-embedding the global soul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes to "re-embed" the "global nomad" into the context of an increasingly globalized world at the room scale. I define re-embedding as the "plugging in" of social relationships to local contexts and their ...

Wang, Joy (Joy Yuk-Hwa), 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Defining and Estimating Global Mean Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods used to quantify temperature changes of the earth must he assessed relative to an appropriate definition of global mean temperature. In this paper, global mean temperature is defined and the adequacy of using weighted average anomalies to ...

Richard F. Gunst; Sabyasachi Basu; Robert Brunell

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 M. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ 1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing Stephanie S. Shipp, Project Leader Nayanee Gupta Bhavya Lal ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic Programming Problems via ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2011 ... ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY. 9700 South Cass Avenue. Argonne, Illinois 60439. Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic...

455

The Seasonal Cycle over the United States and Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycle occupies a unique position in the spectra of meteorological time series. This cycle and its first three harmonics are extracted from the series as a seasonal cycle. The distributions of the annual and seasonal cycles are studied ...

Vernon E. Kousky; S. Srivatsangam

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy-Optimal Scheduling in Low Duty Cycle Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption of a wireless sensor node mainly depends on the amount of time the node spends in each of the high power active (e.g., transmit, receive) and low power sleep modes. It has been well established that in order to prolong node's lifetime the duty-cycle of the node should be low. However, low power sleep modes usually have low current draw but high energy cost while switching to the active mode with a higher current draw. In this work, we investigate a MaxWeightlike opportunistic sleep-active scheduling algorithm that takes into account time- varying channel and traffic conditions. We show that our algorithm is energy optimal in the sense that the proposed ESS algorithm can achieve an energy consumption which is arbitrarily close to the global minimum solution. Simulation studies are provided to confirm the theoretical results.

Aydin, Nursen; Ercetin, Ozgur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cycle Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. The mission of NE-54 is primarily focused on activities related to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle which includes mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment. Uranium Mining Both "conventional" open pit, underground mining, and in situ techniques are used to recover uranium ore. In general, open pit mining is used where deposits are close to the surface and underground mining is used

458

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation factsheet Download the Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy enlisted NREL to review and "harmonize" life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Hundreds of assessments have been published, often with considerable variability in results. These variations in approach, while usually legitimate, hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Learn more about life cycle assessments of energy technologies. By harmonizing this data, NREL seeks to reduce the uncertainty around estimates for environmental impacts of renewables and increase the value of

459

Definition: Thermodynamic cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermodynamic cycle Thermodynamic cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermodynamic cycle A process in which a fluid (water, air, ammonia, etc) successively changes state (from a liquid to a gas and back to a liquid) for the purpose of producing or transferring energy.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A thermodynamic cycle consists of a collection of thermodynamic processes transferring heat and work, while varying pressure, temperature, and other state variables, eventually returning a system to its initial state. In the process of going through this cycle, the system may perform work on its surroundings, therefore acting as a heat engine. State quantities depend only on the thermodynamic state, and cumulative variation of such properties adds up to zero during a cycle. Process quantities (or

460

Proceedings: 1990 Fossil Plant Cycling Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the prospect of much new baseload generation from independent power producers and other qualifying facilities, the cycling capability of utility fossil-fired units originally designed for baseload operation is an ongoing concern. The 30 papers presented at EPRI's fourth cycling conference offer new insights into unit condition and life assessment, conversion, operation, and control as well as some storage-based alternatives to cycling.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global biogeochemical cycles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

On the cycle structure of permutation polynomials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any permutation of a finite field F"q can be represented by a polynomial P"n(x)=(...+((a"0x+a"1)^q^-^2+a"2)^q^-^2+...+a"n)^q^-^2+a"n"+"1, for some n>=0. P"0 is linear and the cycle structure of P"1 is known. In this work we present the cycle structure ... Keywords: Cycle structure, Inversive generators, Permutation polynomials of finite fields

AyA E?Melio?Lu; Wilfried Meidl; Alev Topuzo?Lu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Why sequence microbes integral to the cycling of sulfur and iron?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

microbes integral to the cycling of sulfur and iron? microbes integral to the cycling of sulfur and iron? Ten percent of the Earth's surface is subglacial and holds a quarter of the world's soil carbon. The environment was long thought to be incapable of supporting life, but recent studies have revealed that microbes thrive in these cold, dark regions though the processes that enable them to do so remain poorly understood. Researchers are studying the subglacial environment below Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys Antarctica to better understand how carbon is sequestered here and how this impacts the global carbon cycle. The project calls for sequencing five bacteria from this Blood Falls ecosystem to answer questions such as how they tolerate the cold, providing further publicly accessible insight on psychrophiles, and what organic material

464

ARM - PI Product - ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle ProductsARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases Site(s) SGP General Description Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2

465

A Global Climatology of Surface Wind and Wind Stress Fields from Eight Years of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global seasonal cycles of the wind and wind stress fields estimated from the 8-yr record (September 1999August 2007) of wind measurements by the NASA Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) are presented. While this atlas, referred to here as the ...

Craig M. Risien; Dudley B. Chelton

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Simulation of the Stable Water Isotopes in Precipitation over South America: Comparing Regional to Global Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation of the stable water isotope cycle over South America by the regional circulation model REMOiso is discussed. The performance of the regional model, with a resolution of 0.5 (55 km), is compared to simulations by the global ...

Christophe Sturm; Georg Hoffmann; Brbel Langmann

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

VEMAP 2: Selected Model Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Results Model Results The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two data sets from Phase 2 of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP). The two data sets contain monthly and annual results, respectively, from experiments conducted to compare the ecological responses of the suite of VEMAP models to projected transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide for the period 1994 to 2100. The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), which combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation. VEMAP was an international project studying the response of biogeochemical

468

Trends, Cycles, and Kinks - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Historical trends Recent cycle Kinks or shifts in trends Refinery Utilization Grew with Demand ... Across the year, ... Costs for construction were ...

469

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana. (Photos courtesy of Duke Energy.) Gasification...

470

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named the (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separations and Waste Form. Campaign Objectives. ?Develop the next generation of fuel cycle separation and waste management technologies that enable a.

472

Variable pressure power cycle and control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

2012 Fuel Cycle MPACT Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meeting is to review findings and help advance research and development in the Fuel Cycle Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies area. It will include a campaign...

474

Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the consumption cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.6 Optimal consumption, expenditures and1.3.2 Optimal nondurable consumption and durable

Issler, Paulo Floriano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

476

Automotive Magnesium Applications and Life Cycle Environmental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 22, 2008 ... Life cycle energies and emissions are compared for steel, aluminum and ... 3rd International Conference on SF6 and the Environment, 2004.

477

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~Iilora and J. W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source ofpresented at the Susanville Geothermal Energy Converence,of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Humidification Processes in Gas Turbine Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global climate change caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from combustion processes has been recognized as a continuously growing problem and much research focuses (more)

Thern, Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Seeking to Better Understand the Carbon Cycle  

Office of Science (SC) Website

the biology involved in global climate change as possible to gives us more predictive and management capabilities." Part of the mission of the Department of Energy's Office of...

480

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components Sustainable Building Design, Life Cycle Cost Analysis, Green Building Certification and Natural Resources Management. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a buildings life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. Sustainable Building Design comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. Life Cycle Cost Analysis comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy at an early planning stage. Green Building Certification is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program Natural Resources Management rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu