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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

2

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

4

Natural Aerosols in the Global Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 N?ar det kjem til stykket ?Ar ut og ?ar inn har du site bygd yver bkene, du har samla deg meir kunnskap enn du treng til ni liv. N?ar det kjem til stykket, er det so lite som skal til, og det vesle har hjarta alltid visst. I Egypt hadde guden for lrdom hovud som ei ape. Olav H. HaugeNatural aerosols in the global atmosphere

Alf Grini; Alf Grini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Assessment of the global impact of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present here a fully coupled global aerosol and chemistry model for the troposphere. The model is used to assess the interactions between aerosols and chemical oxidants in the troposphere, including (1) the conversion from gas-phase oxidants into the condensed phase during the formation of aerosols, (2) the heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosols, and (3) the effect of aerosols on ultraviolet radiation and photolysis rates. The present study uses the global three-dimensional chemical/ transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), in which aerosols are coupled with the model. The model accounts for the presence of

Xuexi Tie; Sasha Madronich; Stacy Walters; David P. Edwards; Paul Ginoux; Natalie Mahowald; Renyi Zhang; Chao Lou; Guy Brasseur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

2012-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

ARM - PI Product - Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in

8

Global and regional decreases in tropospheric oxidants from photochemical effects of aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We evaluate the sensitivity of tropospheric OH, O3, and O3 precursors to photochemical effects of aerosols not usually included in global models: (1) aerosol scattering and absorption of ultraviolet radiation and (2) reactive uptake of HO2,NO2, and NO3. Our approach is to couple a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-CHEM) with aerosol fields from a global 3-D aerosol model (GOCART). Reactive uptake by aerosols is computed using reaction probabilities from a recent review (gHO2 = 0.2, gNO2 =10 4, gNO3 =10 3). Aerosols decrease the O3! O ( 1 D) photolysis frequency by 520 % at the surface throughout the Northern Hemisphere (largely due to mineral dust) and by a factor of 2 in biomass burning regions (largely due to black carbon). Aerosol uptake of HO2 accounts for 1040 % of total HOx radical ( OH + peroxy) loss in the boundary layer over polluted continental regions (largely due to sulfate and organic carbon) and for more than 70 % over tropical biomass burning regions (largely due to organic carbon). Uptake of NO2 and NO3 accounts for 1020 % of total HNO3 production over biomass burning regions and less elsewhere. Annual mean OH concentrations decrease by 9 % globally and by 535 % in the boundary layer over the Northern

All V. Martin; Daniel J. Jacob; Robert M. Yantosca; Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

LLNL Scientists Use NERSC to Advance Global Aerosol Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While ''greenhouse gases'' have been the focus of climate change research for a number of years, DOE's ''Aerosol Initiative'' is now examining how aerosols (small particles of approximately micron size) affect the climate on both a global and regional scale. Scientists in the Atmospheric Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are using NERSC's IBM supercomputer and LLNL's IMPACT (atmospheric chemistry) model to perform simulations showing the historic effects of sulfur aerosols at a finer spatial resolution than ever done before. Simulations were carried out for five decades, from the 1950s through the 1990s. The results clearly show the effects of the changing global pattern of sulfur emissions. Whereas in 1950 the United States emitted 41 percent of the world's sulfur aerosols, this figure had dropped to 15 percent by 1990, due to conservation and anti-pollution policies. By contrast, the fraction of total sulfur emissions of European origin has only dropped by a factor of 2 and the Asian emission fraction jumped six fold during the same time, from 7 percent in 1950 to 44 percent in 1990. Under a special allocation of computing time provided by the Office of Science INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment) program, Dan Bergmann, working with a team of LLNL scientists including Cathy Chuang, Philip Cameron-Smith, and Bala Govindasamy, was able to carry out a large number of calculations during the past month, making the aerosol project one of the largest users of NERSC resources. The applications ran on 128 and 256 processors. The objective was to assess the effects of anthropogenic (man-made) sulfate aerosols. The IMPACT model calculates the rate at which SO{sub 2} (a gas emitted by industrial activity) is oxidized and forms particles known as sulfate aerosols. These particles have a short lifespan in the atmosphere, often washing out in about a week. This means that their effects on climate tend to be more regional, occurring near the area where the SO{sub 2} is emitted. To accurately study these regional effects, Bergmann needed to run the simulations at a finer horizontal resolution, as the coarser resolution (typically 300km by 300km) of other climate models are insufficient for studying changes on a regional scale. Livermore's use of CAM3, the Community Atmospheric Model which is a high-resolution climate model developed at NCAR (with collaboration from DOE), allows a 100km by 100km grid to be applied. NERSC's terascale computing capability provided the needed computational horsepower to run the application at the finer level.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C; Rotman, D

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

Single-Scattering Albedo and Radiative Forcing of Various Aerosol Species with a Global Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global distributions of the aerosol optical thickness, ngstrm exponent, and single-scattering albedo are simulated using an aerosol transport model coupled with an atmospheric general circulation model. All the main tropospheric aerosols are ...

Toshihiko Takemura; Teruyuki Nakajima; Oleg Dubovik; Brent N. Holben; Stefan Kinne

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Study of Global Aerosol Optical Climatology with Two-Channel AVHRR Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global distributions of the aerosol optical thickness and ngstrm exponent are estimated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer channel-1 and -2 radiances for four months in 1990. Global ...

Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima; Brent N. Holben; Alexander Smirnov; Robert Frouin; Bernadette Chatenet

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models  

SciTech Connect

A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 {micro}m, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to oversimplifications of the representation of sea salt emissions - sea salt emissions are only calculated for two size classes - than to inherent limitations of MATRIX.

Bauer,S.E.; Wright, D.L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E.R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S.E.; Ruedy, R.

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of a Global Validation Package for Satellite Oceanic Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrieval Based on AERONET Observations and Its Application to NOAA/NESDIS Operational Aerosol Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a global validation package for satellite aerosol optical thickness retrieval using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as ground truth is described. To standardize the validation procedure, the optimum timespace ...

Tom X-P. Zhao; Larry L. Stowe; Alexander Smirnov; David Crosby; John Sapper; Charles R. McClain

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The CALIPSO Mission: A Global 3D View of Aerosols and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols and clouds have important effects on Earth's climate through their effects on the radiation budget and the cycling of water between the atmosphere and Earth's surface. Limitations in our understanding of the global distribution and ...

D. M. Winker; J. Pelon; J. A. Coakley Jr.; S. A. Ackerman; R. J. Charlson; P. R. Colarco; P. Flamant; Q. Fu; R. M. Hoff; C. Kittaka; T. L. Kubar; H. Le Treut; M. P. McCormick; G. Mgie; L. Poole; K. Powell; C. Trepte; M. A. Vaughan; B. A. Wielicki

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol particles in the lower atmosphere exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently, there is a need to represent these influences in global climate models, and models have ...

Steven J. Ghan; Stephen E. Schwartz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Global Relationships among the Earth's Radiation Budget, Cloudiness, Volcanic Aerosols, and Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of Cess are extended to consider global relationships among the earth's radiation budget (including solar insulation and changes in optically active gass), cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature. ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle; Douglas Hoyt

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) comprise a substantial fraction of the total global aerosol budget. While laboratory studies involving smog chambers have advanced our understanding of the formation mechanisms responsible for SOA, our knowledge of the processes leading to SOA production under ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations as well as the impact these aerosol types have on climate is poorly understood. Although the majority of atmospheric aerosols scatter radiation either directly or indirectly by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, soot is thought to have a significant warming effect through absorption. Like inorganic salts, soot may undergo atmospheric transformation through the vapor condensation of non-volatile gaseous species which will alter both its chemical and physical properties. Typical smog chamber studies investigating the formation and growth of SOA as well as the soot aging process are temporally limited by the initial gaseous concentrations injected into the chamber environment. Furthermore, data interpretation from such experiments is generally restricted to the singular gaseous species under investigation. This dissertation discusses the use of a new aerosol chamber designed to study the formation and growth of SOA and soot aging under atmospherically relevant conditions. The Ambient Aerosol Chamber for Evolution Studies (AACES) was deployed at three field sites where size and hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of ammonium sulfate seed particles was monitored over time to examine the formation and growth of SOA. Similar studies investigating the soot aging process were also conducted in Houston, TX. It is shown that during the ambient growth of ammonium sulfate seed particles, as particle size increases, hygroscopic growth factors decrease considerably resulting in a significant organic mass fraction in the particle phase concluding an experiment. Observations of soot aging show an increase in measured size, HGF, mass and single scattering albedo. Ambient growth rate comparisons with chamber growth yielded similar trends verifying the use of AACES to study aerosol aging. Based on the results from this study, it is recommended that AACES be employed in future studies involving the production and growth of SOA and soot aging under ambient conditions in order to bridge the gaps in our current scientific knowledge.

Glen, Crystal

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report  

SciTech Connect

Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

On Modification of Global Warming by Sulfate Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increasing evidence that the response of climate to increasing greenhouse gases may be modified by accompanying increases in sulfate aerosols. In this study, the patterns of response in the surface climatology of a coupled ocean...

J. F. B. Mitchell; T. C. Johns

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Mechanisms of Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols and Implications for Global Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic material constitutes about 50% of global atmospheric aerosol mass, and the dominant source of organic aerosol is the oxidation of volatile hydrocarbons, to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Understanding the formation of SOA is crucial to predicting present and future climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. The goal of this program is to significantly increase our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere. Ambient measurements indicate that the amount of SOA in the atmosphere exceeds that predicted in current models based on existing laboratory chamber data. This would suggest that either the SOA yields measured in laboratory chambers are understated or that all major organic precursors have not been identified. In this research program we are systematically exploring these possibilities.

John H. Seinfeld

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Gloval Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Global Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS M.-J. Jeong and Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. A. Chu and S.-C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Eighteen years of satellite-based monthly aerosol products have been derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and total ozone mapping experiment spectrometer (TOMS) sensors. The two products differ in many regards rendering a great potential for developing an integrated product for climate studies. Presented here are some preliminary results of inter-comparison and synergy analyses. Global Aerosol Climatology

28

Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the range represented by the full set of AeroCom models. Upper tropospheric concentrations of BC mass from the aircraft measurements are suggested to provide a unique new benchmark to test scavenging and vertical dispersion of BC in global models.

Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

ARM - PI Product - Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data 2000.01.01 - 2000.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670

30

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

31

FY 2011 Second Quarter: Demonstration of New Aerosol Measurement Verification Testbed for Present-Day Global Aerosol Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The regional-scale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is being used by a DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) project titled Improving the Characterization of Clouds, Aerosols and the Cryosphere in Climate Models to evaluate the performance of atmospheric process modules that treat aerosols and aerosol radiative forcing in the Arctic. We are using a regional-scale modeling framework for three reasons: (1) It is easier to produce a useful comparison to observations with a high resolution model; (2) We can compare the behavior of the CAM parameterization suite with some of the more complex and computationally expensive parameterizations used in WRF; (3) we can explore the behavior of this parameterization suite at high resolution. Climate models like the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) being used within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) will not likely be run at mesoscale spatial resolutions (1020 km) until 510 years from now. The performance of the current suite of physics modules in CAM5 at such resolutions is not known, and current computing resources do not permit high-resolution global simulations to be performed routinely. We are taking advantage of two tools recently developed under PNNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects for this activity. The first is the Aerosol Modeling Testbed (Fast et al., 2011b), a new computational framework designed to streamline the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The second is the CAM5 suite of physics parameterizations that have been ported into WRF so that their performance and scale dependency can be quantified at mesoscale spatial resolutions (Gustafson et al., 2010; with more publications in preparation).

Koch, D

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the aerosolassociated water depends on the composition of the #12;3 particles, which is determined by gas in a three dimensional chemical transport model to understand the roles of ammonia chemistry and natural precursors among modeled aerosol species selfconsistently with ambient relative humidity and natural

Zender, Charles

33

The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products, and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASAs Terra and Aqua satellites is making near-global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range (0.4115 ?m). These measurements are used to derive spectral ...

L. A. Remer; Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanr; S. Mattoo; D. A. Chu; J. V. Martins; R.-R. Li; C. Ichoku; R. C. Levy; R. G. Kleidman; T. F. Eck; E. Vermote; B. N. Holben

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect

A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky; A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Work distribution in global product development organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolution of the internet, digital design tools, and more importantly, increasing access to global markets and workforce, has increased the interest of firms in offshoring their engineering and product development ...

Tripathy, Anshuman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of the efficacy of aerosol versus nonaerosol laundry products. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The California Air Resources Board estimates that 6.6 tons of photochemically reactive organic compounds (PROC) are released into the environment in California every day because of the use of aerosol laundry products. The project studied the efficacy, ease of product use, and PROC content for three major brands of pre-wash stain removers in available product forms and for five starch products in their available product forms. Efficacy of pre-wash products was generally found to be limited. They were particularly useful for oil and ball point ink removal. Aerosols were found to be slightly superior. PROC content varied from 16-76% on aerosols; none was found in nonaerosols. Aerosols were found to be slightly easier to use by the laboratory investigator. For starches, on synthetic fabrics Faultless aerosol was found to be superior. For natural fabrics, results were mixed. Efficacy per unit cost was found to be high for bulk starches. PROC content for the two aerosols was 5.8% for Faultless and 8.5% for Niagra. Aerosols were easiest to use and bulk products rather difficult to use.

Boggs, R.R.; Belmont, B.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Global fish production and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

Different Approaches for Constraining Global Climate Models of the Anthropogenic Indirect Aerosol Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments of the influence of aerosol emissions from human activities on the radiation budget, in particular via the modification of cloud properties, have been a challenge. In light of the variability to both aerosol properties and ...

U. Lohmann; J. Quaas; S. Kinne; J. Feichter

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of a Two-Channel Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm on a Global Scale Using NOAA AVHRR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a two-channel satellite remote sensing algorithm for retrieving the aerosol optical thickness and the ngstrm exponent, which is an index for the aerosol size distribution. An efficient lookup table method is adopted in this ...

Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.M. Forster (2004), The semi-direct aerosol effect: Impactof absorbing aerosols on marine stratocumulus. Q. J .2005), Global anthropogenic aerosol direct forcing derived

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal andof secondary organic aerosol. Part I: ?-pinene/ozone system.data when measuring ambient aerosol. Aerosol Science and

Coleman, Beverly K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Middle East leads global crude oil and condensate production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Growth in North American crude oil production (including lease condensate) contributed to record global production of 75.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2012 ...

46

AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

47

Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Ruedy, Matrix (multiconfiguration aerosol tracker ofmixing state): An aerosol microphysical module for globalAn investigative review, Aerosol Sci. Technol. , Vol. 40,

Bauer, Susanne E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)???¢????????s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9???????°????????2.5???????° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1???????° x 1???????°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 ???????µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4???????º by 5???????º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ???¢????????clean marine???¢??????? aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)???¢????????s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9???????°????????2.5???????° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1???????° x 1???????°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 ???????µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4???????º by 5???????º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ???¢????????clean marine???¢??????? aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Direct Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper results are presented from a simple offline assimilation system that uses radiances from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) channels that sense atmospheric aerosols over land and ocean. The MODIS information ...

Clark Weaver; Arlindo da Silva; Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Oleg Dubovik; Dave Flittner; Aahmad Zia; Lorraine Remer; Brent Holben; Watson Gregg

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Distinguishing Aerosols from Clouds in Global, Multispectral Satellite Data with Automated Cloud Classification Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach is presented to distinguish between clouds and heavy aerosols with automated cloud classification algorithms developed for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) program. These new ...

Keith D. Hutchison; Barbara D. Iisager; Thomas J. Kopp; John M. Jackson

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative The GPPDI Workshop was held in Cincinnati, U.S.A., December 1996 (Olson et al., 1997). Summary (September 1996) by Dick Olson and Steve Prince from Global Change Newsletter No. 27; International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme: A Study of Global Change (IGBP) of the International Council of Scientific Unions Global modelling and monitoring of net primary production (NPP) is being given high priority in IGBP owing to increasing concern over issues such as the consequences of perturbations in the carbon cycle, the impacts of global land-use change, global climate change, and global food security. Significant advances have been made in process modelling and in the use of remote sensing to monitor global vegetation. The advances in modelling and remote sensing of NPP have highlighted the lack of readily available, reliable information from field studies with which to parameterise and validate the models. The Global Primary Production Data Initiative (GPPDI) is intended to remedy this problem by identifying existing field data sets of primary production and associated environmental data. The programme is using data sets for representative sites, and extrapolating or regionalising the better data sets to grid cells sizes of up to 0.5º x 0.5º. Emphasis is on variables needed to parameterise and validate primary production models, including above and below ground NPP, standing crop, LAI, climate data, site data and landscape variability.

53

Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II CD-ROM Atlas of Global Monthly Aerosols, Ozone, NO2, Water, Vapor, and Relative Humitidy (19851993)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite have been used to create latitude-longitude maps of monthly mean aerosols, ozone, water vapor, ...

D. Rind; X. Liao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimations in global aerosol models, Atmos. Chem. Phys. ,Cloud mi- crophysics and aerosol indirect efefcts in theuncertainties in assessing aerosol effects on climate, Ann.

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over Global Oceans from Merged CERES and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA) is defined as the difference between radiative fluxes in the absence and presence of aerosols. In this study, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is estimated for 46 months (March 2000December ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Effects of Clouds on Aerosol and Chemical Species Production and Distribution. Part III: Aerosol Model Description and Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modeling study of the effects of clouds on the evolution and redistribution of aerosol particles in the troposphere is presented. A two-mode, two-moment aerosol evolution model is coupled with a two-dimensional, mixed-phase, two-moment ...

Yiping Zhang; Sonia Kreidenweis; Gregory R. Taylor

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present an intercomparison of several aerosol modules, sectional and modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acidwater aerosols in this study. Three versions of the sectional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the prescribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs. 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sectional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all situations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signficant impact on modelcalculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol extinction and surface area density calculated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability, with a 20-bin sectional model performing much better than any of the modal models. 1

D. K. Weisenstein; J. E. Penner; M. Herzog; X. Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Constraining the Influence of Natural Variability to Improve Estimates of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects in a Nudged Version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5  

SciTech Connect

Natural modes of variability on many timescales influence aerosol particle distributions and cloud properties such that isolating statistically significant differences in cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations (indirect effects) typically requires integrating over long simulations. For state-of-the-art global climate models (GCM), especially those in which embedded cloud-resolving models replace conventional statistical parameterizations (i.e. multi-scale modeling framework, MMF), the required long integrations can be prohibitively expensive. Here an alternative approach is explored, which implements Newtonian relaxation (nudging) to constrain simulations with both pre-industrial and present-day aerosol emissions toward identical meteorological conditions, thus reducing differences in natural variability and dampening feedback responses in order to isolate radiative forcing. Ten-year GCM simulations with nudging provide a more stable estimate of the global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing than do conventional free-running simulations. The estimates have mean values and 95% confidence intervals of -1.54 0.02 W/m2 and -1.63 0.17 W/m2 for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively. Nudging also substantially increases the fraction of the worlds area in which a statistically significant aerosol indirect effect can be detected (68% and 25% of the Earth's surface for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively). One-year MMF simulations with and without nudging provide global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing estimates of -0.80 W/m2 and -0.56 W/m2, respectively. The one-year nudged results compare well with previous estimates from three-year free-running simulations (-0.77 W/m2), which showed the aerosol-cloud relationship to be in better agreement with observations and high-resolution models than in the results obtained with conventional parameterizations.

Kooperman, G. J.; Pritchard, M. S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C.; Russell, Lynn

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

Global Water Availability and Requirements for Future Food Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares, spatially explicitly and at global scale, per capita water availability and water requirements for food production presently (19712000) and in the future given climate and population change (207099). A vegetation and ...

D. Gerten; J. Heinke; H. Hoff; H. Biemans; M. Fader; K. Waha

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Global natural gas production doubled between 1980 and 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global dry natural gas production increased 110% between 1980 and 2010, from 53 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 1980 to 112 Tcf in 2010. The combined share of North ...

62

Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Main sources of information · Forest Products Annual Market Review, UNECE/FAOUNECE/FAO · Importance Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

63

Aerosol Optical Depth and the Global Brewer Network: A Study Using U.K.- and Malaysia-Based Brewer Spectrophotometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols play an important role in attenuating solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and are thus important inputs to climate models. Aerosol optical depth is routinely measured in the visible range but little data in the ultraviolet (UV) ...

Wilawan Kumharn; John S. Rimmer; Andrew R. D. Smedley; Toh Ying Ying; Ann R. Webb

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

On Numerical Simulation of the Global Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol Produced by a Large Volcanic Eruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the earth's atmosphere and have a relatively big influence on potential fluctuations of the atmospheric variables on both subclimatic and climatic scales. The objective of ...

J. A. Pudykiewicz; A. P. Dastoor

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Techniques and Methods Used to Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility C. Sivaraman, D. D. Turner, and C. J. Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Objective Profiles of aerosol optical properties are needed for radiative closure exercises such as the broadband heating rate profile (BBHRP) project (Mlawer et al. 2002) and the Shortwave Quality Measurement Experiment (QME). Retrieving cloud microphysical properties using radiation measurements in the shortwave, such as the spectral retrieval technique described in Daniel et al. (2002), also require the optical properties of the aerosols so that they can be accounted for in the retrieval process. The objective of the aerosol best estimate (ABE) value-added procedure (VAP) is to provide profiles of

66

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-115 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product C Flynn D Turner A Koontz D Chand C Sivaraman July 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

67

Innovation and production in the global solar photovoltaic industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global development of solar photovoltaic power is seen as a potentially major technology in the pursuit of alternative energy sources. Given its evolutionary nature, in terms of both technology and the market, there is some discernible divergence ... Keywords: Innovation, Patent, Production, Solar photovoltaic (PV) market

Show-Ling Jang; Li-Ju Chen; Jennifer H. Chen; Yu-Chieh Chiu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of Global Satellite Rainfall Products over Continental Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive evaluation of two global-scale high-resolution satellite rainfall products is performed using 8 yr (200310) of reference rainfall data derived from a network of rain gauges over Europe. The comparisons are performed at a daily ...

Dimitrios Stampoulis; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Radical-Initiated Reactions of Alkenes: Development of Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California duringSources of Organic Carbon Aerosols in the Free Troposphere21 co-authors), 2005. Organic Aerosol and Global Climate

Matsunaga, Aiko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Two MODIS Aerosol Products over Ocean on the Terra and Aqua CERES SSF Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the impact of aerosols on the earths radiation budget and the long-term climate record requires consistent measurements of aerosol properties and radiative fluxes. The Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) Science ...

Alexander Ignatov; Patrick Minnis; Norman Loeb; Bruce Wielicki; Walter Miller; Sunny Sun-Mack; Didier Tanr; Lorraine Remer; Istvan Laszlo; Erika Geier

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effects of cloudy/clear air mixing and droplet pH on sulfate aerosol formation in a coupled chemistry/climate global model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we will briefly describe our coupled ECHAM/GRANTOUR model, provide a detailed description of our atmospheric chemistry parameterizations, and discuss a couple of numerical experiments in which we explore the influence of assumed pH and rate of mixing between cloudy and clear air on aqueous sulfate formation and concentration. We have used our tropospheric chemistry and transport model, GRANTOUR, to estimate the life cycle and global distributions of many trace species. Recently, we have coupled GRANTOUR with the ECHAM global climate model, which provides several enhanced capabilities in the representation of aerosol interactions.

Molenkamp, C.R.; Atherton, C.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)]|[Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

75

Ultraclean Two-Stage Aerosol Reactor for Production of Oxide-Passivated Silicon Nanoparticles for Novel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an aerosol by pyrolysis of silane3 or disilane4 or by thermal evaporation of Si.5 In studies of Si

Heaton, Thomas H.

76

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

77

The radiative influence of aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus clouds based on sensitivity studies with two climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global black carbon aerosol model. J Geophys Res 101:of interactions between aerosols and cloud microphysics overby anthropogenic sulfate aerosol. J Geophys Res 106: 5279-

Menon, Surabi; Rotstayn, Leon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

80

Asia leads growth in global coal production since 1980 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal production was up about 3.8 billion short tons (91%) from 1980 through 2010. China spearheaded overall growth in coal production, increasing 415% over the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Background Stratospheric Aerosol Variations Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products from 1998 to 2004 have been analyzed for the tendency of changes in background stratospheric aerosol properties. The aerosol extinction coefficient E has apparently ...

Yu Liu; Xuepeng Zhao; Weiliang Li; Xiuji Zhou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Pacific Aerosol Survey. Part I: A Decade of Data on Particle Production, Transport, Evolution, and Mixing in the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of extensive aerosol data collected during the past decade around the Pacific basin provides a preliminary assessment of aerosol microphysics for this region and cycling of aerosol in the troposphere. These include aircraft-based data ...

Antony D. Clarke; Vladimir N. Kapustin

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sea-Salt Size Distributions from Breaking Waves: Implications for Marine Aerosol Production and Optical Extinction Measurements during SEAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors' participation in the Shoreline Environment Aerosol Study (SEAS) involved measurements focused on the coastal aerosol size distribution and related optical measurements, including aerosol light scattering, visibility, and remote ...

A. Clarke; V. Kapustin; S. Howell; K. Moore; B. Lienert; S. Masonis; T. Anderson; D. Covert

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

85

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

86

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rising crude oil production in the United States contributed to relatively stable global crude oil prices in 2013, at around the same annual average ...

87

Production of L-leucine nanoparticles under various conditions using an aerosol flow reactor method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the formation of L-leucine nanoparticles under various conditions using an aerosol flow reactor method. Temperatures and L-leucine concentrations for the experiments were selected to vary the saturation conditions for L-leucine in the ...

Anna Lhde; Janne Raula; Esko I. Kauppinen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

89

Defect detection effectiveness and product quality in global software development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global software development (GSD) has become a common practice in the software development industry. The main challenge organizations have to overcome is to minimize the effect of organizational diversity on the effectiveness of their GSD collaboration. ... Keywords: defect density, defect detection effectiveness, global software development, software quality

Tihana Galinac Grbac; Darko Huljeni?

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced skills required for engineering leaders in global product development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations from first hand experience on the Boeing 787 Program during development of perhaps the most important and exciting new commercial airplane in recent history has identified opportunities to enhance the global ...

Ayubi, Harry H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mesoscale Variations of Tropospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropospheric aerosols are calculated to cause global-scale changes in the earth's heat balance, but these forcings are space/time integrals over highly variable quantities. Accurate quantification of these forcings will require an unprecedented ...

Theodore L. Anderson; Robert J. Charlson; David M. Winker; John A. Ogren; Kim Holmn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The importance of aerosol composition and mixing state on predicted CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric processing of aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influences of atmospheric aerosols on cloud properties (i.e., aerosol indirect effects) strongly depend on the aerosol CCN concentrations, which can be effectively predicted from detailed aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using Khler theory. However, atmospheric aerosols are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of a large number of species that cannot be individually simulated in global or regional models due to computational constraints. Furthermore, the thermodynamic properties or even the molecular identities of many organic species present in ambient aerosols are often not known to predict their cloud-activation behavior using Khler theory. As a result, simplified presentations of aerosol composition and mixing state are necessary for large-scale models. In this study, aerosol microphysics, CCN concentrations, and chemical composition measured at the T0 urban super-site in Mexico City during MILAGRO are analyzed. During the campaign in March 2006, aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation as a result of both primary emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The submicron aerosol composition was ~1/2 organic species. Closure analysis is first carried out by comparing CCN concentrations calculated from the measured aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using extended Khler theory to concurrent CCN measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The closure agreement and its diurnal variation are studied. CCN concentrations are also derived using various simplifications of the measured aerosol mixing state and chemical composition. The biases associated with these simplifications are compared for different supersaturations, and the variation of the biases is examined as a function of aerosol age. The results show that the simplification of internally mixed, size-independent particle composition leads to substantial overestimation of CCN concentration for freshly emitted aerosols in early morning, but can reasonably predict the CCN concentration after the aerosols underwent atmospheric processing for several hours. This analysis employing various simplifications provides insights into the essential information of particle chemical composition that needs to be represented in models to adequately predict CCN concentration and cloud microphysics.

Wang, J.; Cubison, M.; Aiken, A.; Jimenez, J.; Collins, D.; Gaffney, J.; Marley, N.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

95

The CALIPSO Automated Aerosol Classification and Lidar Ratio Selection Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptions are provided of the aerosol classification algorithms and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) selection schemes for the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) aerosol products. One ...

Ali H. Omar; David M. Winker; Mark A. Vaughan; Yongxiang Hu; Charles R. Trepte; Richard A. Ferrare; Kam-Pui Lee; Chris A. Hostetler; Chieko Kittaka; Raymond R. Rogers; Ralph E. Kuehn; Zhaoyan Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of TechnologyGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The CALIPSO Lidar Cloud and Aerosol Discrimination: Version 2 Algorithm and Initial Assessment of Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CloudAerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite was launched in April 2006 to provide global vertically resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols. Correct discrimination between clouds and aerosols ...

Zhaoyan Liu; Mark Vaughan; David Winker; Chieko Kittaka; Brian Getzewich; Ralph Kuehn; Ali Omar; Kathleen Powell; Charles Trepte; Chris Hostetler

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison, Validation, and Transferability of Eight Multiyear Global Soil Wetness Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of eight global soil wetness products, three produced by land surface model calculations, three from coupled landatmosphere model reanalyses, and two from microwave remote sensing estimates, have been examined. The goal of ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Zhichang Guo; Xiang Gao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Aerosol Data Sources and Their Roles within PARAGON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We briefly but systematically review major sources of aerosol data, emphasizing suites of measurements that seem most likely to contribute to assessments of global aerosol climate forcing. The strengths and limitations of existing satellite, ...

Ralph A. Kahn; John A. Ogren; Thomas P. Ackerman; Jens Bsenberg; Robert J. Charlson; David J. Diner; Brent N. Holben; Robert T. Menzies; Mark A. Miller; John H. Seinfeld

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Volcanoes and Climate Effects of Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTENTS 8.1 Importance of volcanoes, natural aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols 341 8.2 Major scientific questions and hypotheses 342 8.2.1 Stratospheric volcanic aerosols and climate 342 8.2.1.1 Source gases for stratospheric aerosols 342 8.2.1.2 Explosiveness and plume history during individual eruptions 343 8.2.1.3 Frequency of eruptions, tectonic setting, rock/ash vs. SO 2 343 8.2.1.4 Gas-to-particle conversion and removal mechanisms 343 8.2.1.5 Radiative properties and climatic effects of stratospheric aerosols 345 8.2.1.6 Needed satellite and in situ measurements 347 8.2.1.6.1 Global observations of stratospheric aerosol optical properties 347 8.2.1.6.2 Lidar measurements of aerosols 347 8.2.2 Volcanic aerosols and stratospheric ozone depletion 349 8.2.3 Climatic effects of t

Hartmann And Mouginis-Mark; Volcanoes; D. L. Hartmann; P. Mouginis-mark; G. J. Bluth; J. A. Coakley; J. Crisp; R. E. Dickinson; P. W. Francis; J. E. Hansen; P. V. Hobbs; B. L. Isacks; Y. J. Kaufman; M. D. King; W. I. Rose; S. Self; L. D. Travis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impact of Future Climate and Emission Changes on Stratospheric Aerosols and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climatological distributions of key aerosol quantities (extinction, optical depth, mass, and surface area density) are shown in comparison with results from a three-dimensional global model including stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol ...

G. Pitari; E. Mancini; V. Rizi; D. T. Shindell

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

104

Global product development in semiconductor industry : Intel -- Tick-Tock product development cadence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates on changes in semiconductor industry's product development methodology by following Intel's product development from year 2000. Intel was challenged by customer's preference change, competitors new ...

Park, Cheolmin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging problems will be identified and research priorities will be recommended.

Yu, Xiao-Ying

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of Satellite Aerosol Retrievals: Methodology for INDOEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper, and the modeled distribution of aerosols for the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) is presented by Rasch et al. [this issue]. The system generated aerosol forecasts to guide deployment of ships and aircraft during INDOEX. The system consists of the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) combined with an assimilation package developed for applications in atmospheric chemistry. MATCH predicts the evolution of sulfate, carbonaceous, and mineral dust aerosols, and it diagnoses the distribution of sea salt aerosols. The model includes a detailed treatment of the sources, chemical transformation, transport, and deposition of the aerosol species. The aerosol forecasts involve a two-stage process. During the assimilation phase the total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is estimated from the model aerosol fields. The model state is then adjusted to improve the agreement between the simulated AOD and satellite retrievals of AOD. During the subsequent integration phase the aerosol fields are evolved using meteorological fields from an external model. Comparison of the modeled AOD against estimates of the AOD from INDOEX Sun photometer data show that the differences in daily means are #0.03 # 0.06. Although the initial application is limited to the Indian Ocean, the methodology could be extended to derive global aerosol analyses combining in situ and remotely sensed aerosol observations.

William D. Collins; Phillip J. Rasch; Brian E. Eaton; Boris V. Khattatov; Jean-francois Lamarque; C. Zender

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GLiPHA Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: kids.fao.org/glipha/ GLiPHA Screenshot References: GLiPHA[1] About "GLiPHA is a highly interactive electronic atlas that provides a scaleable overview of spatial and temporal variation in quantitative information related to animal production and health. Against a back-drop of selected maps of livestock densities, land-use or elevation, sub-national statistics relating to the livestock sector can be mapped, or displayed as tables and

108

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer RL : Raman Lidar Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments AEROSOL-TOWER-EML :...

110

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments IAP : In-situ Aerosol...

111

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. Tiny Specks with Large Effects Most people equate aerosols with hairspray and household cleaning products, but a large portion of these microscopic particles floating...

113

Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols on the Indian Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-member ensemble of twentieth-century simulations with changes to only time-evolving global distributions of black carbon aerosols in a global coupled climate model is analyzed to study the effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the Indian ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster; William D. Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Sources and production of organic aerosol in Mexico City: insights from the combination of a chemical transport model (PMCAMx-2008) and measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban areas are large sources of organic aerosols and their precursors. Nevertheless, the contributions of primary (POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the observed particulate matter levels have been difficult to ...

Tsimpidi, A. P.

115

Variability of Absorption and Optical Properties of Key Aerosol Types Observed in Worldwide Locations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol radiative forcing is a critical, though variable and uncertain, component of the global climate. Yet climate models rely on sparse information of the aerosol optical properties. In situ measurements, though important in many respects, ...

Oleg Dubovik; Brent Holben; Thomas F. Eck; Alexander Smirnov; Yoram J. Kaufman; Michael D. King; Didier Tanr; Ilya Slutsker

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Speciation of Organic Aerosols in the Tropical Mid-Pacific and Their Relationship to Light Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the importance of the aerosol contribution to the global radiative budget has been recognized, the forcings of aerosols in general, and specifically the role of the organic component in these forcings, still contain large uncertainties. ...

Kathleen K. Crahan; Dean A. Hegg; David S. Covert; Haflidi Jonsson; Jeffrey S. Reid; Djamal Khelif; Barbara J. Brooks

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Shepard and Hardy Multiquadric Interpolation Methods for Multicomponent AerosolCloud Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel method based on the application of interpolation techniques to the multicomponent aerosolcloud parameterization for global climate modeling. Quantifying the aerosol indirect effect still remains a difficult task, and ...

Alexandru Rap; Satyajit Ghosh; Michael H. Smith

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Multisensor Perspective on the Radiative Impacts of Clouds and Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The launch of CloudSat and CloudAerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in 2006 provided the first opportunity to incorporate information about the vertical distribution of cloud and aerosols directly into global ...

David S. Henderson; Tristan LEcuyer; Graeme Stephens; Phil Partain; Miho Sekiguchi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing Uncertainty Based on a Radiative Perturbation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide a lower bound for the uncertainty in measurement-based clear- and all-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), a radiative perturbation analysis is performed for the ideal case in which the perturbations in global mean aerosol ...

Norman G. Loeb; Wenying Su

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE BY AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nonbelievers. #12;Level of Scientific Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) Cooling scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects is highly sensitive to modest aerosol loadings. Global-average AOT 0.1 corresponds to global-average forcing

Schwartz, Stephen E.

122

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identified strategic process-science foci: aerosol nucleation and growth and aerosol aging and mixing state. BNL is the lead laboratory responsible for the design and...

123

Aerosol Can Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aerosol Can Failure ... Abstract Scope, A three-piece, welded seam aerosol can of liquid undercoating material failed catastrophically,...

124

The importance of aerosol mixing state and size-resolved composition on CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric aging of aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN concentrations were measured at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City during Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) in March 2006. The aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation associated with traffic emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. CCN concentrations (N{sub CCN}) are derived using Kohler theory from the measured aerosol size distribution and various simplified aerosol mixing state and chemical composition, and are compared to concurrent measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The influence of assumed mixing state on calculated N{sub CCN} is examined using both aerosols observed during MILAGRO and representative aerosol types. The results indicate that while ambient aerosols often consist of particles with a wide range of compositions at a given size, N{sub CCN} may be derived within {approx}20% assuming an internal mixture (i.e., particles at a given size are mixtures of all participating species, and have the identical composition) if great majority of particles has an overall {kappa} (hygroscopicity parameter) value greater than 0.1. For a non-hygroscopic particle with a diameter of 100 nm, a 3 nm coating of sulfate or nitrate is sufficient to increase its {kappa} from 0 to 0.1. The measurements during MILAGRO suggest that the mixing of non-hygroscopic primary organic aerosol (POA) and black carbon (BC) particles with photochemically produced hygroscopic species and thereby the increase of their {kappa} to 0.1 take place in a few hours during daytime. This rapid process suggests that during daytime, a few tens of kilometers away for POA and BC sources, N{sub CCN} may be derived with sufficient accuracy by assuming an internal mixture, and using bulk chemical composition. The rapid mixing also indicates that, at least for very active photochemical environments such as Mexico City, a substantially shorter timescale during daytime for the conversion of hydrophobic POA and BC to hydrophilic particles than the 1-2 days used in some global models. The conversion time scale is substantially longer during night. Most POA and BC particles emitted during evening hours likely remain non-hygroscopic until efficiently internally mixed with secondary species in the next morning. The results also suggest that the assumed mixing state strongly impacts calculated N{sub CCN} only when POA and BC represent a large fraction of the total aerosol volume. One of the implications is that while physically unrealistic, external mixtures, which are used in many global models, may also sufficiently predict N{sub CCN} for aged aerosol, as the contribution of non-hygroscopic POA and BC to overall aerosol volume is often substantially reduced due to the condensation of secondary species.

Wang, J.; Cubison, M. J.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Collins, D. R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

127

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesia since 1960,variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toand Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Creating ladders out of chains : China's technological development in a world of global production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of economic globalization, the terms of debate over the political and social conditions necessary to foster development in the Global South have shifted. Examining technological development, one important ...

Fuller, Douglas Brian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 199293 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Monuments for capital : the production of urban centralities for a global economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: Monument, CBD, Office tower, Podium, Global economy, China. The Central Business District (CBD) is the monument of the regional urban condition. A monument, which is expressive of financial competence and global ...

Ruthenberg, Yaacov Eyal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mass yields of secondary organic aerosols from the oxidation of alpha-pinene and real plant emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a significant source of global secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, quantifying their aerosol forming potential remains a challenge. This study presents smog chamber ...

Kroll, Jesse

133

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Tropical Tropospheric-Only Responses to Absorbing Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorbing aerosols affect the earths climate through direct radiative heating of the troposphere. This study analyzes the tropical tropospheric-only response to a globally uniform increase in black carbon, simulated with an atmospheric general ...

Geeta G. Persad; Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Influence of Urban Aerosol on Spectral Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a dataset of spectral distribution of global and disuse solar irradiances measured in Barcelona during the last three years, the influence of turbidity caused by urban aerosol on spectral composition of solar radiation and transmissivity of ...

J. Lorente; A. Reda; X. De Cabo

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

137

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

138

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

139

Climate impacts of carbonaceous and other non-sulfate aerosols: A proposed study  

SciTech Connect

In addition to sulfate aerosols, carbonaceous and other non-sulfate aerosols are potentially significant contributors to global climate change. We present evidence that strongly suggests that current assessments of the effects of aerosols on climate may be inadequate because major aerosol components, especially carbonaceous aerosols, are not included in these assessments. Although data on the properties and distributions of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols are insufficient to allow quantification of their climate impacts, the existing information suggests that climate forcing by this aerosol component may be significant and comparable to that by sulfate aerosols. We propose that a research program be undertaken to support a quantitative assessment of the role in climate forcing of non-sulfate, particularly carbonaceous, aerosols.

Andreae, M.O.; Crutzen, P.J. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Cofer, W.R. III; Hollande, J.M. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Division] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An analysis of factors affecting the global location of pork production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The pork sector of the agricultural industry is a valuable contributor to the global food supply. Competitiveness considerations and technological change have contributed to the (more)

Park, Hongsin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

China dominates global coal production - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... moving it from 10th globally to overtake Russia as the fifth largest producer. China also saw strong growth, ...

142

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China accounted for almost one-third of growth in global demand and surpassed the United States to become the world's largest importer of crude oil.

143

Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

144

Atmospheric Teleconnection over Eurasia Induced by Aerosol Radiative Forcing during Boreal Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct effects of aerosols on global and regional climate during boreal spring are investigated based on numerical simulations with the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM) with ...

Maeng-Ki Kim; William K. M. Lau; Mian Chin; Kyu-Myong Kim; Y. C. Sud; Greg K. Walker

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar Irradiance: Introducing the Glory Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Glory mission is intended to facilitate and improve upon long-term monitoring of two key forcings influencing global climate. One of the mission's principal objectives is to determine the global distribution of detailed aerosol and cloud ...

Michael I. Mishchenko; Brian Cairns; James E. Hansen; Larry D. Travis; Greg Kopp; Carl F. Schueler; Bryan A. Fafaul; Ronald J. Hooker; Hal B. Maring; Tom Itchkawich

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Integrating and Interpreting Aerosol Observations and Models within the PARAGON Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the breadth and complexity of available data, constructing a measurement-based description of global tropospheric aerosols that will effectively confront and constrain global three-dimensional models is a daunting task. Because data are ...

Thomas P. Ackerman; Amy J. Braverman; David J. Diner; Theodore L. Anderson; Ralph A. Kahn; John V. Martonchik; Joyce E. Penner; Philip J. Rasch; Bruce A. Wielicki; Bin Yu

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] This study simulates the direct radiative forcing of organic aerosol using the GFDL AM2 GCM. The aerosol climatology is provided by the MOZART chemical transport model (CTM). The approach to calculating aerosol optical properties explicitly considers relative humiditydependent hygroscopic growth by employing a functional group based thermodynamic model, and makes use of the size distribution derived from AERONET measurements. The preindustrial (PI) and present-day (PD) global burdens of organic carbon are 0.17 and 1.36 Tg OC, respectively. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) forcings (PI to PD) are estimated as 0.34 and 0.71 W m 2, respectively. Geographically the radiative cooling largely lies over the source regions, namely part of South America, Central Africa, Europe and South and East Asia. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky surface forcings are 0.63 and 0.98 W m 2, respectively. A series of sensitivity analyses shows that the treatments of hygroscopic growth and optical properties of organic aerosol are intertwined in the determination of the global organic aerosol forcing. For example, complete deprivation of water uptake by hydrophilic organic particles reduces the standard (total-sky) and clearsky TOA forcing estimates by 18 % and 20%, respectively, while the uptake by a highly soluble organic compound (malonic acid) enhances them by 18 % and 32%, respectively. Treating particles as non-absorbing enhances aerosol reflection and increases the total-sky and clear-sky TOA forcing by 47 % and 18%, respectively, while neglecting the scattering brought about by the water associated with particles reduces them by 24% and 7%, respectively.

Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy; Paul A. Ginoux; Larry H. Horowitz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction ...

Amit Misra; S. N. Tripathi; D. S. Kaul; Ellsworth J. Welton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The object of "Rights" : third world women and the production of global human rights discourse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

politics of fundamentalism in Iran. In Feminism and Race,M. 2002. The two faces of Iran: Womens activism, the reformin twentieth century Iran. In Global feminisms since 1945,

Hua, Julietta Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Robust Identification of Global Greening Phase Patterns from Remote Sensing Vegetation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) is an essential diagnostic variable to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere. The present study provides a new method to assess global ...

Carola Dahlke; Alexander Loew; Christian Reick

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Institutions, public policy and the product life cycle : the globalization of biomanufacturing and implications for Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization has brought about a major shift in our understanding of how companies organize themselves and how they compete. The fragmentation of firms in their scope and structure, the vertical disintegration of firms ...

Reynolds, Elisabeth B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Global Two-Channel AVHRR Retrievals of Aerosol Properties over the Ocean for the Period of NOAA-9 Observations and Preliminary Retrievals Using NOAA-7 and NOAA-11 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Described is an improved algorithm that uses channel 1 and 2 radiances of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness and ngstrm exponent over the ocean. Specifically discussed are recent ...

Igor V. Geogdzhayev; Michael I. Mishchenko; William B. Rossow; Brian Cairns; Andrew A. Lacis

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per capita production levels in 2030 similar to those of theby 14% between 2008 and 2030. Climate change is likely tocereal production by 2030. If done sustainably, raising

Funk, Chris C.; Brown, Molly E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Interannual Tropospheric Aerosol Variability in the Late Twentieth Century and Its Impact on Tropical Atlantic and West African Climate by Direct and Semidirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new high-resolution global tropospheric aerosol dataset with monthly resolution is generated using version 4 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a bulk aerosol model and forced with recent estimates of surface emissions for the ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; John E. Truesdale; James J. Hack; Jean-Franois Lamarque

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 published by Elsevier BIOMASS ENERGY PRODUCTION: THE GLOBAL POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9th Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 ­ published by Elsevier 1 BIOMASS ENERGY disturbance of the natural global carbon cycle. The "carbon-neutral" renewable energy carrier biomass seems of biomass for energy purposes. The CEBM comprises a biospheric part being based on the "Osnabrück Biosphere

Keeling, Stephen L.

160

Modeling global atmospheric CO2 with improved emission inventories and CO2 production from the oxidation of other carbon species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of global three-dimensional (3-D) models with satellite observations of CO2 in inverse modeling studies is an area of growing importance for understanding Earth s carbon cycle. Here we use the GEOS-Chem model (version 8-02-01) CO2 mode with multiple modifications in order to assess their impact on CO2 forward simulations. Modifications include CO2 surface emissions from shipping (0.19 PgC yr 1), 3-D spatially-distributed emissions from aviation (0.16 PgC yr 1), and 3-D chemical production of CO2 (1.05 PgC yr 1). Although CO2 chemical production from the oxidation of CO, CH4 and other carbon gases is recognized as an important contribution to global CO2, it is typically accounted for by conversion from its precursors at the surface rather than in the free troposphere. We base our model 3-D spatial distribution of CO2 chemical production on monthly-averaged loss rates of CO (a key precursor and intermediate in the oxidation of organic carbon) and apply an associated surface correction for inventories that have counted emissions of CO2 precursors as CO2. We also explore the benefit of assimilating satellite observations of CO into GEOS-Chem to obtain an observation-based estimate of the CO2 chemical source. The CO assimilation corrects for an underestimate of atmospheric CO abundances in the model, resulting in increases of as much as 24% in the chemical source during May June 2006, and increasing the global annual estimate of CO2 chemical production from 1.05 to 1.18 Pg C. Comparisons of model CO2 with measurements are carried out in order to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions that result when these new sources are added. Inclusion of CO2 emissions from shipping and aviation are shown to increase the global CO2 latitudinal gradient by just over 0.10 ppm (3%), while the inclusion of CO2 chemical production (and the surface correction) is shown to decrease the latitudinal gradient by about 0.40 ppm (10%) with a complex spatial structure generally resulting in decreased CO2 over land and increased CO2 over the oceans. Since these CO2 emissions are omitted or misrepresented in most inverse modeling work to date, their implementation in forward simulations should lead to improved inverse modeling estimates of terrestrial biospheric fluxes.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Wecht, K. J. [Harvard University; Yantosca, R. M. [Harvard University; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Machida, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols influence climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly through their influence on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the global radiative forcing due to aerosols is large and in general cools the planet. But the uncertainties in these estimates are also large due to our poor understanding of many of the important processes related to aerosols and clouds. To address this uncertainty an integrated strategy for addressing issues related to aerosols and aerosol processes was proposed. Using this conceptual framework, the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) is a stage 1 activity, that is, a detailed process study. The specific focus of CHAPS was to provide concurrent observations of the chemical composition of the activated [particles that are currently serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)] and nonactivated aerosols, the scattering and extinction profiles, and detailed aerosol and droplet size spectra in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during June 2007. Numerous campaigns have examined aerosol properties downwind from large pollution sources, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign and the two of the three Aerosol Characterization Experiments, ACE-2 and ACE-Asia. Other studies conducted near cities have examined changes in both aerosols and clouds downwind of urban areas. For example wintertime stratiform clouds associated with the urban plumes of Denver, Colorado, and Kansas City, Missouri, have a larger number concentration and smaller median volume diameter of droplets than clouds that had not been affected by the urban plume. Likewise, a decrease in precipitation in polluted regions along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains was discovered. In a modeling study, it was found that precipitation downwind of urban areas may be influenced by changes in aerosols as well as the convergence pattern caused by the city. Recently, the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), and the 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation, which were conducted during the summer of 2004, examined the transport of pollutants and aerosols eastward from New England over the Atlantic Ocean. The Texas Air Quality Study/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS/GoMACCS) also looked at relationships between clouds and aerosols in polluted conditions around Houston, Texas. In contrast to these recent studies near large or very dirty cities, CHAPS was conducted near a moderately sized city that is representative of a large number of cities around the United States. CHAPS was also one of the first times that a Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used in conjunction with a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet on an aircraft. The AMS provides information on the nonrefractory (i.e., materials that are chemically and physically unstable at high temperatures) composition of aerosols, while the CVI uses a counterflow relative to the main incoming airstream to exclude small droplets and nonactivated particles from the inlet, allowing only larger cloud droplets to enter the inlet. The combination of the CVI and AMS allow the examination of the chemical composition of the dried aerosol kernel from the cloud droplets. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s Atmospheric Sciences Program (ASP) is to improve the understanding of aerosol radiative effects on climate. This objective encompasses not only clear sky observations but also studies relating the effects of both aerosols on clouds and clouds on aerosols - in particular, how clouds affect the chemical and optical properties of aerosols. The latter was the science driver in the design of CHAPS. The measurement strategy for CHAPS was intended to provide measurements relevant to four questions associated with the aerosol radiative forcing issues of interest to the ASP: (1) How do the below-cloud and above-cloud aerosol optical and clou

Berg, L. K.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Dubey, M.; Andrews, E.; Coulter, R. L.; Hair, J. W.; Hubbe, J. M.Lee, Y. N.; Mazzoleni, C; Olfert, J; Springston, SR; Environmental Science Division; PNNL; NOAA Earth System Research Lab.; NASA Langley Research Center; LANL; BNL; Univ.of Alberta; Univ. of Colorado

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

164

Global Aerosol Health Impacts: Quantifying Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric fine particulate matter <2.5 ?m (PM2.5) can cause cardiovasculatory and respiratory damages and mortalities. Assessing population exposure to and damages from PM2.5 is important for policy, but measurement ...

Selin, Noelle E.

165

Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Aerosols over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of accurate polarized reflectance measurements over a broad spectral (410 -2250 nm) and angular (60 from nadir) range to the presence of aerosols over land is analyzed and the consequent ability to retrieve the aerosol burden and microphysical model is assessed. Here we present a new approach to the correction of polarization observations for the effects of the surface that uses longer wavelength observations to provide a direct estimate of the surface polarized reflectance. This approach to surface modeling is incorporated into an optimal estimation framework for retrieving the particle number density and a detailed aerosol microphysical model: effective radius, effective variance and complex refractive index of aerosols. A sensitivity analysis shows that the uncertainties in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) increase with AOT while the uncertainties in the microphysical model decrease. Of particular note is that the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is less than 0.05 by the time the AOT is greater than 0.2. We also find that calibration is the major source of uncertainty and that perfect angular and spectral correlation of calibration errors reduces the uncertainties in retrieved quantities compared with the case of uncorrelated errors. Finally, in terms of required spectral range, we observe that shorter wavelength (aerosols from polarized reflectance observations. The optimal estimation scheme is then tested on observations made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter during the Aerosol Lidar Validation experiment and over Southern California wild fires. These two sets of observations test the retrieval scheme under pristine and polluted conditions respectively. In both cases we find that the retrievals are within the combined uncertainties of the retrieval and the Aerosol Robotic Network Cimel products and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index that we are comparing to. This confirms the validity of the sensitivity analysis of the polarized reflectance observations to the aerosol number density and microphysical model and demonstrates the unique capability to accurately retrieve aerosol optical depths under pristine conditions and also the single scattering albedo of aerosols at higher optical depths.

Waquet, F.; Cairns, Brian; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Chowdhary, J.; Travis, Larry D.; Schmid, Beat; Mishchenko, M.

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

167

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

absorption absorption ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol absorption The process in which radiation energy is retained by aerosols. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) PSAP : Particle Soot Absorption Photometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer External Instruments OMI : Ozone Monitoring Instrument

168

Aerosols and solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description is presented of the involvement of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in atmospheric research, including aerosol characterization and modeling. The use of both rigorous and simple models for radiation transport is described. Modeled broadband solar irradiance data are shown to illustrate the important influence that aerosols have on the energy available to solar systems and the economics of solar systems design. Standard aerosol measurement methods for solar applications are discussed along with the need for improved instrumentation and methods.

Bird, R. E.; Hulstrom, R. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

170

Computational simulation of aerosol behaviour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, computational methods have been developed for the simulation of aerosol dynamics and transport. Two different coupled aerosol-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are (more)

Pyyknen, Jouni

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules  

SciTech Connect

This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Biofuels and their ByProducts: Global Economic and Environmental Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biofuel industry has been rapidly growing around the world in recent years. Several papers have used general equilibrium models and addressed the economy-wide and environmental consequences of producing biofuels at a large scale. They mainly argue that since biofuels are mostly produced from agricultural sources, their effects are largely felt in agricultural markets with major land use and environmental consequences. In this paper, we argue that virtually all of these studies have overstated the impact of liquid biofuels on agricultural markets due to the fact that they have ignored the role of by-products resulting from the production of biofuels. Feed by-products of the biofuel industry, such as Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) and biodiesel by-products (BDBP) such as soy and rapeseed meals, can be used in the livestock industry as substitutes for grains and oilseed meals used in this industry. Hence, their presence mitigates the price impacts of biofuel production on the livestock and food industries. The importance of incorporating by-products of biofuel production in economic models is well recognized by some partial equilibrium analyses of biofuel production. However, to date, this issue has not been tackled by those conducting CGE analysis of biofuels programs. Accordingly,

Farzad Taheripour; Thomas W. Hertel; Wallace E. Tyner; Jayson F. Beckman; Dileep K. Birur; Farzad Taheripour

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

Wang, Xiaodu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Global Trade of Wood and Paper Products Analysis by: Dr. Ed K. Pepke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wood products, such as the United States, have become major net importers. Conversely, China, a country renewable energy sources in light of escalating fossil fuel prices, have created new international trade

176

Ganges valley aerosol experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Aerosol Life Cycle IOP The primary objectives that make up the Aerosol Life Cycle IOP can be broken down into three categories: Scientific; Logistical; and GVAX preparation. Scientific Objectives The science goals are to conduct intensive aerosol observations in a region exposed to anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions with atmospheric processing times depending on air mass trajectories and time of day. Take advantage of new instruments in the MAOS (e.g., SP2, HR-PTRMS, ACSM, Trace Gas Suite, PASS-3, Aethelometer, UHSAS). Within this broad umbrella are embedded three main foci: Aerosol light absorption: How does the aerosol mass absorption coefficient (absorption per unit mass of BC) vary with atmospheric processing? Do observations agree with a shell-core model?

178

Correlation of Secondary Organic Aerosol with Odd Oxygen in Mexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data collected from a mountain location within the Mexico City limits are used to demonstrate a correlation between secondary organic aerosol and odd-oxygen (O3 + NO2). Positive matrix factorization techniques are employed to separate organic aerosol components: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol; oxidized-organic aerosol; and biomass burning organic aerosol. The measured hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol is correlated with urban CO (81) g m-3 ppmv-1. The measured oxidized-organic aerosol is associated with photochemical oxidation products and correlates with odd-oxygen with an apparent slope of (70-120) g m-3 ppmv-1. The dependence of the oxidized-organic aerosol to odd-oxygen correlation on the nature of the gas-phase hydrocarbon profile is discussed.

Herndon, Scott C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Wood, Ezra C.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Jayne, John T.; Zavala, Miguel A.; Knighton, W. Berk; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Seila, Robert; de Gouw, Joost A.; de Foy, B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Molina, Luisa T.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

180

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 18502000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We-related combustion, 1850­2000, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB2018, doi:10.1029/2006GB002840. 1. Importance

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

183

between Photolytic Aerosols and Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 70s chemistry and transport models (ChTMs) have been proposed and improved. Tropospheric ChTMs for trace species are detailed numerical formulations intended to represent the atmospheric system as a whole, accounting for all the individual processes and phenomena that influence climate changes. The development of computer resources and the retrieval of emission inventories and observational data of the species of interest have enhanced the model evolution towards three-dimensional global models that account for more complicated chemical mechanisms, wet and dry deposition phenomena, and interactions and feedback mechanisms between meteorology and atmospheric chemistry. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the sensitivity of the solar radiative field in the atmosphere to absorption and scattering by aerosols. This effort is preliminary to the study of feedback mechanisms between photolytic processes that create and destroy aerosols and the radiation field itself. In this study, a cloud of water-soluble aerosols, randomly distributed in space within hypothetical 1-cm cubes of atmosphere, is generated. A random radius is assigned to each aerosol according to a lognormal size distribution function. The radiative field characterization is analyzed using a Mie scattering code to determine the scattering phase function and the absorption and scattering coefficients of sulfate aerosols, and a Monte Carlo ray-trace code is used to evaluate the radiative exchange. The ultimate goal of the effort is to create a tool to analyze the vertical distribution of absorption by aerosols in order to determine whether or not feedback between photolytic processes and the radiation field needs to be included in a Third Generation Chemistry and Transport model. ii

Mara Santa; Mara Iruzubieta; Mara Santa; Mara Iruzubieta

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atmospheric organic aerosol formation. Envir. Sci.of secondary organic aerosol mass fraction, Atmos. Chem.composition of ambient aerosol particles. Environ. Sci.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.450.4 in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 20012004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138E & Eq. ?45N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present studys estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present studys estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

187

Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RPI) Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia and Chile. References Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI)1...

188

Aerosol Route Synthesis of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aerosol Route Synthesis of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Using Copper Nitrate Solution ... Phase Transformation Hardening by Using High -Power Direct Diode Laser ... Defect Energetics and Fission Product Transport in ZrC.

189

Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system. Analysis of the aerosol and water vapor data collected by the Raman lidar during the 2003 Aerosol IOP indicated that the sensitivity of the lidar was significantly lower than when the lidar was initially deployed. A detailed analysis after the IOP of the long-term dataset demonstrated that the lidar began degrading in early 2002, and that it lost approximately a factor of 4 in sensitivity between 2002 and 2004. We participated in the development of the remediation plan for the system to restore its initial performance. We conducted this refurbishment and upgrade from May- September 2004. This remediation lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of 10 and 30 for the Raman lidar's water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol backscatter coefficient data, respectively as compared to the signal strengths when the system was first deployed. The DOE ARM Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE), which was conducted during September 2005, evaluated the impact of these modifications and upgrades on the SGP Raman lidar measurements of aerosol extinction and optical thickness. The CARL modifications significantly improved the accuracy and temporal resolution of the aerosol measurements. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Raman lidar were also used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter-Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) (http://nansen.ipsl.jussieu.fr/AEROCOM/aerocomhome.html) project. There was a wide range in how the models represent the aerosol extinction profiles over the ARM SGP site, even though the average annual AOT represented by the various models and measured by CARL and the Sun photometer were in general agreement, at least within the standard deviations of the averages. There were considerable differences in the average vertical distributions among the models, even among models that had similar average aerosol optical thickness. Deviations between mean aerosol extinction profiles were generally small (~20-30%) for altitudes above 2 km, and grew consider

Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Influence of Absorbing Aerosols on the Inference of Solar Surface Radiation Budget and Cloud Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the impact of absorbing aerosols on the retrieval of the solar surface radiation budget (SSRB) and on the inference of cloud absorption using multiple global datasets. The data pertain to the radiation budgets at the top of ...

Zhanqing Li

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of Aerosol Particles on the Microphysics of Coastal Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei and thereby influence the number and size of droplets in clouds. Consequently, anthropogenic particles have the potential to influence global climate by increasing cloud albedo and decreasing ...

Cynthia H. Twohy; Philip A. Durkee; Barry J. Huebert; Robert J. Charlson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of biomass is a major source of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Regional and global-scale models of atmospheric chemistry and climate take estimates for these emissions and arbitrarily "mix" them into ...

Alvarado, Matthew James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

Koch, D

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size particle size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of an aerosol particle. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer CPI : Cloud Particle Imager DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments DRUM-AEROSOL : Drum Aerosol Sampler AEROSOL-TOWER-EML : EML Tower based Aerosol Measurements

197

Monodisperse aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, L.W.; Soderholm, S.C.

1988-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

RACORO aerosol data processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

Elisabeth Andrews

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cloud/Aerosol Parameterizations: Application and Improvement of General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the biggest uncertainties associated with climate models and climate forcing is the treatment of aerosols and their effects on clouds. The effect of aerosols on clouds can be divided into two components: The first indirect effect is the forcing associated with increases in droplet concentrations; the second indirect effect is the forcing associated with changes in liquid water path, cloud morphology, and cloud lifetime. Both are highly uncertain. This project applied a cloud-resolving model to understand the response of clouds under a variety of conditions to changes in aerosols. These responses are categorized according to the large-scale meteorological conditions that lead to the response. Meteorological conditions were sampled from various fields, which, together with a global aerosol model determination of the change in aerosols from present day to pre-industrial conditions, was used to determine a first order estimate of the response of global cloud fields to changes in aerosols. The response of the clouds in the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to our global aerosol model were tested by examining whether the response is similar to that of the cloud resolving model and methods for improving the representation of clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions were examined.

Penner, Joyce

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? D. D. Turner and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Low level haze is often observed during the night and early morning hours in many locations. This haze is typically formed during quiescent conditions by radiative cooling of the surface, which lowers the ambient temperature and consequently increases the near-surface relative humidity (RH). Many aerosols start to deliquesce around 75% relative humidity (RH) (depending on their chemical composition), and thus if the near surface RH increases above this level, haze will form. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's ultimate goal, stated simply, is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in global climate models. Global climate models typically do not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Extinction Coefficient for Stratospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple empirical formula for the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficient is proposed. The relationship between the constants in the formula and the variable parameter in the aerosol size distribution is explicitly expressed. ...

Glenn K. Yue

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar...

203

Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

AerosolCCN Closure at a Semi-rural Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

aerosol size distributions and size-resolved aerosol compositions measured by ... Keywords Cloud condensation nuclei, closure study, organic aerosols, Khler.

205

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

base for the global electric vehicle industry. Why is rapidThe second, the Electric Vehicle Industry Association, is aalliance, the Electric Vehicle Industry Association also

Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan LEcuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Clark, Mark L. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Aerosol Decontamination from Nuclear Containments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under assumed severe accident conditions, fission products are expected to be released to the containment environment. Small particulates, suspended in the containment atmosphere as aerosols, can leave containment through leakage pathways. These leak paths are expected to include imperfections in door or penetration seals, small weld or concrete cracks, or other capillary-type paths.One physical process that will occur during containment leakage is decontamination of the aerosol-laden ...

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Jankovic Aerosol Characterization.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization, Characterization, Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data NSRC Symposium NSRC Symposium July 8, 2008 John Jankovic, CIH CIH Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) developing Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H - The CNMS Approach * Establish Exposure Control Guideline (ECG) - Characterize Aerosol * Collect and interpret data * Assign Process to a Control Band Aerosol Particle Characterization * Size distribution (geometric mean and geometric standard deviation related to either mass, surface, or number)

212

Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

214

Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earths radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are dominated by the effects of aerosols, both in relation to the direct absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols and also with respect to aerosol-related changes in cloud formation, longevity, and microphysics (See Figure 1; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Assessment Report 4, 2008). Moreover, the Arctic region in particular is especially sensitive to changes in climate with the magnitude of temperature changes (both observed and predicted) being several times larger than global averages (Kaufman et al. 2009). Recent studies confirm that aerosol-cloud interactions in the arctic generate climatologically significant radiative effects equivalent in magnitude to that of green house gases (Lubin and Vogelmann 2006, 2007). The aerosol optical depth is the most immediate representation of the aerosol direct effect and is also important for consideration of aerosol-cloud interactions, and thus this quantity is essential for studies of aerosol radiative forcing.

C Flynn; AS Koontz; JH Mather

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Raman lidar profiling of aerosols over the central U.S.; diurnal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use profiles of aerosol extinction, water vapor mixing ratio, and relative humidity measured by the ARM SGP Raman lidar in northern Oklahoma to show how the vertical distributions of aerosol extinction and water vapor vary throughout the diurnal cycle. While significant (20-30%) variations in aerosol extinction occurred near the surface as well as aloft, smaller (~10%) variations were observed in the diurnal variability of aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The diurnal variations in aerosol extinction profiles are well correlated with corresponding variations in the average relative humidity profiles. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles and integrated water vapor amounts generally show less diurnal variability. The Raman lidar profiles are also used to evaluate the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol extinction profiles simulated by the GOCART global aerosol model. Initial comparisons show that the AOT simulated by GOCART was in closer agreement with the AOT derived from the Raman lidar and Sun photometer measurements during November 2000 than during September 2000. For both months, the vertical variability in average aerosol extinction profiles simulated by GOCART is less than the variability in the corresponding Raman lidar profiles.

Variability And Comparisons; R. A. Ferrare A; M. Chin B; M. Clayton C; D. Turner D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Observations of Surface Forcing from the Subduction Experiment: A Comparison with Global Model Products and Climatological Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable estimates of the exchange of heat, moisture, and momentum across the airsea interface are essential in assessing the local representativeness of the surface forcing fields depicted by global model and climatological datasets. The ...

K. A. Moyer; R. A. Weller

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HULIS) in biomass-burning aerosols, Atmospheric Chemistrymicroscopical and aerosol dynamical characterizationof soot aerosols, Journal of Aerosol Science , 34 , 1347-

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

EOS Terra Aerosol and Radiative Flux Validation: An Overview of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) to study global change and reduce uncertainties associated with aerosols and other key parameters controlling climate. The first EOS satellite, Terra, was launched in December 1999. The Chesapeake ...

W. L. Smith Jr.; T. P. Charlock; R. Kahn; J. V. Martins; L. A. Remer; P. V. Hobbs; J. Redemann; C. K. Rutledge

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Model Assessment of the Ability of MODIS to Measure Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Forcing from Smoke Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new generation of satellite sensors such as the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) will be able to detect and characterize global aerosols with an unprecedented accuracy. The question remains whether this accuracy will be ...

Lorraine A. Remer; Yoram J. Kaufman; Zev Levin; Steven Ghan

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, However, understanding the net effect of multi-source emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is

223

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

225

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earths radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Flagan, R.C. (1990) Aerosol Sci. and Technol. 13 , 230.and Seinfeld, J.H. (2002) Aerosol Science and Technology ,light absorption by atmospheric aerosol, in preparation for

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paulson, S. E. ; Chung, A. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007 , 41,Y. G. ; Daum, P. H. J. Aerosol Sci 2008 , 39, 974-986. (32)Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar

Kim, Hwajin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

230

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon-snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol-climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. Pairs of control(1890)-perturbation(1995) with successive aerosol effects allow isolation of each effect. The experiments are conducted both with and without concurrent changes in greenhouse gases (GHG's). A new scheme allowing dependence of snow albedo on black carbon snow concentration is introduced. The fixed GHG experiments global surface air temperature (SAT) changed -0.2, -1.0 and +0.2 C from the DE, IE, and BAE. Ice and snow cover increased 1.0% from the IE and decreased 0.3% from the BAE. These changes were a factor of 4 larger in the Arctic. Global cloud cover increased by 0.5% from the IE. Net aerosol cooling effects are about half as large as the GHG warming, and their combined climate effects are smaller than the sum of their individual effects. Increasing GHG's did not affect the IE impact on cloud cover, however they decreased aerosol effects on SAT by 20% and on snow/ice cover by 50%; they also obscure the BAE on snow/ice cover. Arctic snow, ice, cloud, and shortwave forcing changes occur mostly during summer-fall, but SAT, sea level pressure, and long-wave forcing changes occur during winter. An explanation is that aerosols impact the cryosphere during the warm-season but the associated SAT effect is delayed until winter.

Koch, Dorothy; Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony; Ruedy, Reto; Alienov, Igor; Schmidt, Gavin A.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Aerosol Metrology for Climate Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the interaction of aerosols with solar radiation ... that will accelerate the development of new ... together experts from government, industry and academia ...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May...

235

Scrubbing of Aerosols by Water Pools, Volume 3: Small-Scale Single-Orifice Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a postulated severe accident in a BWR, the pressure suppression pool provides an important barrier to the release of radioactive fission-product aerosols. Experiments have been performed in a labscale apparatus to investigate the aerosol scrubbing efficiency obtained as a function of several parameters.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

CO2 Global Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Solutions International Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Global Solutions International Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28001 Sector Carbon Product CO2 Global Solutions is a...

238

CAMSOPI: A Global SatelliteRain Gauge Merged Product for Real-Time Precipitation Monitoring Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed to produce real-time rain gaugesatellite merged analyses of global monthly precipitation. A dataset of these analyses spans the period from January 1979 to the present, which is sufficiently long to allow the ...

John E. Janowiak; Pingping Xie

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Global Energias Renovables SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovables SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energias Renovables SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind power developer. References Global...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celsius SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Celsius SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind project developer. References Global Celsius SL1...

242

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

243

Mapping the Micro-Foundations of Informational Development: Linking Software Processes, Products and Industries to Global Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

softwares evolution and social impact. III. Engineeringits uniqueness, its social impact through products and

Eischen, Kyle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Flammability and Combustion Behaviors in Aerosols Formed by Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids Produced by the Electrospray Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of flammable aerosols presents a high potential for fire hazards in the process industry. Various industrial fluids, most of which operate at elevated temperatures and pressures, can be atomized when released under high pressure through a small orifice. Because of the complexity in the process of aerosol formation and combustion, the availability of data on aerosol flammability and flame propagation behaviors is still quite limited, making it difficult to evaluate the potential fire and explosion risks from released aerosols in the process industry and develop safety measures for preventing and/or mitigating aerosol hazards. A study is needed to investigate the relationship between aerosol combustion behaviors and the properties of the aerosols. This dissertation presents research on the combustion behaviors of flammable aerosols. Monodisperse aerosols created by industrial heat transfer fluids were generated using electrospray. The characteristics of flame propagations in aerosols and the influence of the presence of fuel droplets in the system are studied in the aerosol ignition tests. Flames in aerosols are characterized by non-uniform shapes and discrete flame fronts. Flames were observed in different burning modes. Droplet evaporation was found to play an important role in aerosol burning modes. Droplet evaporation behaviors and fuel vapor distributions are further related to aerosol droplet size, droplet spacing, movement velocity, and liquid volatility. The burning mode of a global flame with rapid size expansion is considered the most hazardous aerosol combustion scenario. This burning mode requires a smaller droplet size and smaller space between droplets. Larger droplet sizes and spacing may hinder the appearance of global flames. But when the liquid fuel has a certain level of volatility, there is an uneven distribution of fuel vapor in the system and this may cause the unique phenomenon of burning mode variations combined with enhanced flame propagation speed. Using an integrated model, the minimum ignition energy values of aerosols were predicted. The aerosol minimum ignition energy is influenced by the fuel-air equivalence ratio and the droplet size. Higher equivalence ratios, up to 1.0, significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy, while larger droplet sizes result in a higher minimum ignition energy.

Lian, Peng

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Electrospray neutralization process and apparatus for generation of nano-aerosol and nano-structured materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The claimed invention describes methods and apparatuses for manufacturing nano-aerosols and nano-structured materials based on the neutralization of charged electrosprayed products with oppositely charged electrosprayed products. Electrosprayed products include molecular ions, nano-clusters and nano-fibers. Nano-aerosols can be generated when neutralization occurs in the gas phase. Neutralization of electrospan nano-fibers with molecular ions and charged nano-clusters may result in the formation of fibrous aerosols or free nano-mats. Nano-mats can also be produced on a suitable substrate, forming efficient nano-filters.

Bailey, Charles L. (Cross Junction, VA); Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA); Vsevolodov, Nikolai N. (Kensington, MD)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Organic Aerosol Partition Module Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5), data and analytical tools are needed to support their implementation. This report documents an EPRI modeling component for efficiently simulating aspects of organic aerosol formation. Without this component, simulations would tend to overestimate the contribution of power plant emissions to atmospheric aerosol mass.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOL PROGRAM, PROGRAM PLAN, MARCH 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Tropospheric Aerosol Program (TAP) will be to develop the fundamental scientific understanding required to construct tools for simulating the life cycle of tropospheric aerosols--the processes controlling their mass loading, composition, and microphysical properties, all as a function of time, location, and altitude. The TAP approach to achieving this goal will be by conducting closely linked field, modeling, laboratory, and theoretical studies focused on the processes controlling formation, growth, transport, and deposition of tropospheric aerosols. This understanding will be represented in models suitable for describing these processes on a variety of geographical scales; evaluation of these models will be a key component of TAP field activities. In carrying out these tasks TAP will work closely with other programs in DOE and in other Federal and state agencies, and with the private sector. A forum to directly work with our counterparts in industry to ensure that the results of this research are translated into products that are useful to that community will be provided by NARSTO (formerly the North American Research Strategy on Tropospheric Ozone), a public/private partnership, whose membership spans government, the utilities, industry, and university researchers in Mexico, the US, and Canada.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; LUNN,P.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arid regions in China and Africa. Such aerosol streams have been shown to travel around the globe with silica aerosols from China impacting air quality in the continental US and #12;2 alumina and titania delivery mechanisms for a variety of drugs as an alternative to injections. As delivery devices

Beaucage, Gregory

249

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

250

Aerosol Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Aerosol Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Aerosol Laboratory The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) houses equipment to measure and record the physical parameters necessary to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols. Bookmark and Share The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) has extensive analytic and experimental capabilities to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols formed from the condensation of vapors. Computer codes have been developed to

251

Internet-based 'social sharing' as a new form of global production: The case of SETI@home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benkler (Sharing nicely: on shareable goods and the emergence of sharing as a modality of economic production, Yale Law Journal, 2004, vol. 114, pp. 273-358) has argued that 'social sharing' via Internet-based distributed computing is a new, so far under-appreciated ... Keywords: Digital divide, Distributed computing, Economic production, SETI@home, Shareable goods, Social sharing

Hans-Jrgen Engelbrecht

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Will Model-based Definition replace engineering drawings throughout the product lifecycle? A global perspective from aerospace industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model-based Definition (MBD) approach is gaining popularity in various industries. MBD represents a trend in Computer-aided Design (CAD) that promises reduced time-to-market and improved product quality. Its main goal is to improve and accelerate ... Keywords: CAD, Engineering drawing, MBD, Model-based Definition, Product lifecycle

Virgilio Quintana; Louis Rivest; Robert Pellerin; Frdrick Venne; Fawzi Kheddouci

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Relating Secondary Organic Aerosol Characteristics with Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and microphysical characterization of ambient aerosols withthe aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, Mass Spectrom Rev,of secondary organic aerosol under near atmospheric

Tang, Xiaochen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ ][Dca ? ]. Figure 2. Aerosol particle size distribution ofhypergolic ionic liquid aerosols Christine J. Koh , Chen-ionization of evaporated IL aerosols Isolated ion pairs of a

Koh, Christine J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes T. Novakov, T.W.indicator of anthropogenic aerosols with observed surfacetemperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends

Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Aerosol measurements with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Tellus, Ser. A, vol. 43, p.Twomey, Atmospheric Aerosols. New York : Elsevier ScientificCo. , 45. B.A. Albrecht, Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Lithgow, Gregg Arthur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ?rst indirect aerosol effect, Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 5,Cloud susceptibility and the ?rst aerosol indirect forcing:to black carbon and aerosol concentrations, J. Geophys.

Lohmann, Ulrike

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An assessment of the radiological doses resulting from accidental uranium aerosol releases and fission product releases from a postulated criticality accident at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dose assessment for two separate normalized source terms was conducted for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The first source term consisted of the noble gas and iodine fission products emanating from a postulated criticality with a magnitude of 10{sup 19} fissions. The second postulated source term was 1 kg of respirable highly enriched uranium. The MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2 (MACCS2) (beta test) computer code was used for this assessment. Both fixed weather (e.g., constant weather assumed throughout the accident) and sampled weather cases were performed using MACCS2. The results of the analysis are summarized in terms of the effective dose equivalent as a function of distance along the downwind centerline of the plume. In addition, population doses for the workers and the public are presented. A brief code comparison between the MACCS2 and MESORAD computer codes is also presented. Modeling differences for the cloudshine and groundshine dose pathways are discussed. Finally, the dose results are summarized, and recommendations are provided that enable the reader to make quick estimates of downwind doses for different source terms that are scalable.

Fisher, S.E.; Lenox, K.E.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

GCM Aerosol Radiative Effects Using Geographically Varying Aerosol Sizes Deduced from AERONET Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical properties, and hence the direct radiative effects, are largely determined by the assumed aerosol size distribution. In order to relax the fixed aerosol size constraint commonly used in general circulation models (GCMs), ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m2.

Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Stratospheric Ion and Aerosol Chemistry and Possible Links with Cirrus Cloud MicrophysicsA Critical Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been postulated that variations in galactic cosmic rays could affect production of stratospheric aerosols which, after transport to the upper troposphere, could affect latent heat release in convective and cyclonic systems. This hypothesis ...

Volker A. Mohnen

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting ...

Cziczo, Daniel James

266

Elemental analysis of aerosol organic nitrates with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four hydroxynitrates (R(OH)R'ONO2) representative of atmospheric volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation products were synthesized, nebulized and sampled into an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass ...

Rollins, A. W.

267

Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satellite retrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud developmentclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,1014 Albrecht, B. A. , Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

269

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

270

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

An Automated Method of MFRSR Calibration for Aerosol Optical Depth Analysis with Application to an Asian Dust Outbreak over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, networks of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) and automated sun photometers have been established in the United States to monitor aerosol properties. The MFRSR alternately measures diffuse and global ...

John A. Augustine; Christopher R. Cornwall; Gary B. Hodges; Charles N. Long; Carlos I. Medina; John J. DeLuisi

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

U.K. HiGEM: Simulations of Desert Dust and Biomass Burning Aerosols with a High-Resolution Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric component of the United Kingdoms new High-resolution Global Environmental Model (HiGEM) has been run with interactive aerosol schemes that include biomass burning and mineral dust. Dust emission, transport, and deposition are ...

M. J. Woodage; A. Slingo; S. Woodward; R. E. Comer

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Accelerated melting of Greenland ice is a clear indication that consequences of global warming are real and impending. The underlying causes of global warming are well enough understood, but the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases to prevent irreversible climate change is unlikely to happen before the point of no return is reached. To reverse the impending sea level rise, geoengineering counter- measures may be required to counter the current global energy imbalance due to global warming. Of the many proposed remedies, deploying aerosols within the stratosphere offers realistic prospects. Sulfur injections in the lower stratosphere would have the cooling effect of naturally occurring volcanic aerosols. Soot at

274

The whitehouse effect: Shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols, an overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstraet--Loadings of tropospheric aerosols have increased substantially over the past 150 yr as a consequence of industrial activities. These aerosols enhance reflection of solar radiation by the Earth-atmosphere system both directly, by scattering light in clear air and, indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The magnitude of the resultant decrease in absorption of solar radiation is estimated to be comparable on global average to the enhancement in infrared forcing at the tropopause due to increases in concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases over the same time period. Estimates of the aerosol shortwave forcing are quite uncertain, by more than a factor of two about the current best estimates. This article reviews the atmospheric chemistry and microphysical processes that govern the loading and light scattering properties of the aerosol particles responsible for the direct effect and delineates the basis for the present estimates of the magnitude and uncertainty in the resultant radiative forcing. The principal sources of uncertainty are in the loading of anthropogenic aerosols, which is highly variable spatially and temporally because of the relatively short residence time of these aerosols (ca. 1 week) and the episodic removal in precipitation, and in the dependence of light scattering on particle size, and in turn on relative humidity. Uncertainty in aerosol forcing is the greatest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing of climate

Stephen E. Schwartz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80E but decreases east of it.

Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Impact of geoengineered aerosols on the troposphere and stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled chemistry climate model, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model was used to perform a transient climate simulation to quantify the impact of geoengineered aerosols on atmospheric processes. In contrast to previous model studies, the impact on stratospheric chemistry, including heterogeneous chemistry in the polar regions, is considered in this simulation. In the geoengineering simulation, a constant stratospheric distribution of volcanic-sized, liquid sulfate aerosols is imposed in the period 20202050, corresponding to an injection of 2 Tg S/a. The aerosol cools the troposphere compared to a baseline simulation. Assuming an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B emission scenario, global warming is delayed by about 40 years in the troposphere with respect to the baseline scenario. Large local changes of precipitation and temperatures may occur as a result of geoengineering. Comparison with simulations carried out with the Community Atmosphere Model indicates the importance of stratospheric processes for estimating the impact of stratospheric aerosols on the Earths climate. Changes in stratospheric dynamics and chemistry, especially faster heterogeneous reactions, reduce the recovery of the ozone layer in middle and high latitudes for the Southern Hemisphere. In the geoengineering case, the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole is delayed by about 30 years on the basis of this model simulation. For the Northern Hemisphere, a onefold to twofold increase of the chemical ozone depletion occurs owing to a simulated stronger polar vortex and colder temperatures compared to the baseline simulation, in agreement with observational estimates.

Tilmes, S.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Gettelman, A.; Rasch, Philip J.

2009-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

278

Two-Column Aerosol Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facility is conducting the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod National Seashore. From July 2012 to June 2013, the ARM Mobile Facility-a portable...

279

Method for producing monodisperse aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Near-Global Survey of Effective Droplet Radii in Liquid Water Clouds Using ISCCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global survey of cloud particle size variations can provide crucial constraints on how cloud processes determine cloud liquid water contents and their variation with temperature, and further, may indicate the magnitude of aerosol effects on ...

Qingyuan Han; William B. Rossow; Andrew A. Lacis

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emission Scenario Dependency of Precipitation on Global Warming in the MIROC3.2 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation sensitivity per 1 K of global warming in twenty-first-century climate projections is smaller in an emission scenario with larger greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol emissions, according to the Model for Interdisciplinary ...

Hideo Shiogama; Seita Emori; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Tatsuya Nagashima; Tomoo Ogura; Toru Nozawa; Toshihiko Takemura

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radioactive Aerosols as an Index of Air Pollution in the City of Thessaloniki, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study summarizes results of an investigation done in order to find out how the radioactive aerosols of {sup 7}Be could serve as indicators of air pollution conditions. Beryllium-7 is a cosmic-ray produced radionuclide with an important fraction of its production to take place in the upper troposphere. Once it is formed is rapidly associated with submicron aerosol particles and participates in the formation and growth of the accumulation mode aerosols, which is a major reservoir of pollutants in the atmosphere. In order to define any influence of AMAD of {sup 7}Be aerosols by air pollution conditions, the aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols was determined by collecting samples at different locations in the suburban area of the city of Thessaloniki, including rural areas, industrial areas, high elevations, marine environment and the airport area. The aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols in different locations was obtained by using Andersen 1-ACFM cascade impactors and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) was determined. Some dependency of the AMADs on height has been observed, while in near marine environment the {sup 7}Be activity size distribution was dominant in the upper size range of aerosol particles. Low AMADs as low as 0.62 to 0.74 {mu}m of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at locations characterized with relative low pollution, while it is concluded that in the activity size distribution of ambient aerosols, {sup 7}Be changes to larger particle sizes in the presence of pollutants, since low AMADs of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at low polluted locations. Preliminary data of simultaneous measurements of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 212}Pb with gaseous air pollutants CO, NO, NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and total suspended particulate matter (TSP) show that radon decay products near the ground could be a useful index of air pollution potential conditions and transport processes in the boundary layer.

Ioannidou, A.; Papastefanou, C. [Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particle Physics Division, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol duringA computationally efficient thermodynamic equilibrium modelurban aerosols determined by thermodynamic equilibrium? An

Fountoukis, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global tropospheric chemistry models for radiatively important trace species: Design and research recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the Earth`s climate could significantly affect regional and global concentrations of trace species that are criteria pollutants regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The policy community also needs to know how changes in global natural and anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, particulate aerosols, and aerosol precursors will affect the distribution and concentration of these pollutants. This report maps out one path for obtaining this information.

Barchet, W.R.; Brothers, A.J.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.; Ghan, S.J.; Saylor, R.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68 latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

291

SAGE I and SAM II Measurements of 1 ?m Aerosol Extinction in the Free Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SAGE-I and SAM-II satellite sensors were designed to measure, with global coverage, the 1 ?m extinction produced by the stratospheric aerosol. In the absence of high altitude clouds, similar measurements may be made for the free tropospheric ...

G. S. Kent; U. O. Farrukh; P. H. Wang; A. Deepak

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aerosol indirect effects general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (?a) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between ?a and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and ?a as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld ?a relationship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between ?a and cloud top temperature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - ?a relationship show a strong positive correlation between ?a and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of ?a, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short-wave total aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.50.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic ?a and satellite-retrieved Nd ?a regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.40.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.70.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.20.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

294

Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. ...

R. L. Miller; I. Tegen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Indirect and Semi-direct Aerosol Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Steven Ghan; Johannes Verlinde; Alexei Korolev; J. Walter Strapp; Beat Schmid; Jason M. Tomlinson; Mengistu Wolde; Sarah D. Brooks; Dan Cziczo; Manvendra K. Dubey; Jiwen Fan; Connor Flynn; Ismail Gultepe; John Hubbe; Mary K. Gilles; Alexander Laskin; Paul Lawson; W. Richard Leaitch; Peter Liu; Xiaohong Liu; Dan Lubin; Claudio Mazzoleni; Ann-Marie Macdonald; Ryan C. Moffet; Hugh Morrison; Mikhail Ovchinnikov; Matthew D. Shupe; David D. Turner; Shaocheng Xie; Alla Zelenyuk; Kenny Bae; Matt Freer; Andrew Glen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

Gurgel, Angelo C.

298

ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

Gilles, D.A.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41 ,particles from an urban aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 26 ,carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols. Journal of Aerosol

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties properties ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical properties The optical properties of aerosols, including asymmetry factor, phase-function, single-scattering albedo, refractive index, and backscatter fraction. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

302

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

303

A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to climate benefits. URL www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss....

304

Real time infrared aerosol analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of Empirical Aerosol Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the adequacy of novel scaling and correlation methods used to analyze aerosol behavior in versions 2.0 and 3.0 of the MAAP computer code. The results show that the MAAP 2.0 method suffers from inaccurate scaling. The method used in MAAP 3.0 is theoretically superior and more consistent with experimental data.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

GWPS Global Wind Power Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GWPS Global Wind Power Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name GWPS (Global Wind Power Systems) Place Hamburg, Germany Zip 20095 Sector Wind energy Product Company specialised in...

309

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

310

Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

312

2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3(1. NO. i. JANLTARY 1992 Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning spectrometer with 32 uniformly spaced (EOS) is well suited to the global monitoring of atmospheric prop- erties from space. In addition channels (250 m), will permit state-of-the-art global monitoring of atmospheric water vapor, aerosol

Christopher, Sundar A.

313

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Particles in Arctic Spring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to investigate the variability in the particle number concentration that may affect climate change assessment for Arctic regions. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) was conducted in April 2008, in the vicinities of Fairbanks and Barrow, Alaska. Measurements of particle number concentrations and size distributions were conducted using a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X) mounted under the Convair-580 aircraft wing. Total number concentration of particles (Na) with diameters in the range 0.12-3 ?m was determined for polluted and clean air masses during times when the air was free of clouds and/or precipitation. Variability in Na was considered for both vertical profiles and constant altitude (horizontal) flight legs. This variability can have important implications for estimates of particle properties used in global climate model (GCM) simulations. When aerosol particle layers were encountered, Na rapidly increased from 25 cm-3 up to 550 cm-3 within relatively clean air masses, and reached up to 2200 cm-3 within polluted air masses, dominated by biomass burning pollution. When averaging Na over different distance scales, it was found that Na=140 cm-3 represent an average value for the majority of the encountered clean cases; while Na=720 cm-3 is a mean for polluted cases dominated by biomass burning plumes. These estimates, however, would not capture the details of particle layers encountered during most of the flights. Average aerosol particle characteristics can be difficult to interpret, especially during polluted cases, due to small-scale spatial and temporal variability.

Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Liu, Peter; Earle, Michael; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ardour Global Indexes LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 10016 Product New-York based company that manages the Ardour Global Indexes, a set of alternative energy financial indicators. References Ardour Global Indexes LLC1 LinkedIn...

315

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

316

Design and Sampling Characteristics of a New Airborne Aerosol Inlet for Aerosol Measurements in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of a new submicron aerosol inlet (SMAI) for airborne sampling of aerosol particles is introduced and its performance characteristics under a range of sampling conditions are presented. Analysis of inlet performance in clear-air and cloud ...

Lucas Craig; Allen Schanot; Arash Moharreri; David C. Rogers; Suresh Dhaniyala

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A Community Tool to Objectively Evaluate Aerosol Process Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paradigm of developing and testing new aerosol process modules is haphazard and slow. Aerosol modules are often tested for short simulation periods using limited data so that their overall performance over a wide range of ...

Jerome D. Fast; William I. Gustafson Jr.; Elaine G. Chapman; Richard C. Easter; Jeremy P. Rishel; Rahul A. Zaveri; Georg A. Grell; Mary C. Barth

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Another Look at the Influence of Absorbing Aerosols in Drops on Cloud Absorption: Large Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since as early as 1969, solar absorbing aerosols inside of cloud drops have been suggested to influence cloud radiative properties. The absorbing aerosols were invoked to help explain two anomalies: 1) the maximum visible albedo of thick ...

Carynelisa Erlick; Dana Schlesinger

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assessment of Aerosol Modes Used in the MODIS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites are used to determine characteristic aerosol modes over marine environments. They are compared with the assumed modes used in the operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (...

Jiacheng Wang; Qiang Zhao; Shengcheng Cui; Chengjie Zhu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Atmospheric aerosols affect climate by scattering and absorbing sunlight and by modifying the properties of clouds. However, there are gaps in our understanding of chemical processes involving these airborne particulates, and these gaps contribute significantly to uncertainties in predicting future climate change. Developing more- accurate global climate models requires a more complete understanding of the aerosol lifecycle, from initial particle formation to loss through incorporation into precipitating clouds or dry deposition. In research published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, a team of

322

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

323

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Campaign Links TCAP website Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2013.04.15, Scott, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter Aerosol Effects on Cloud Formation 2013.02.04, Cziczo, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): CU GMAX-DOAS Deployment 2012.07.15, Volkamer, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements 2012.07.15, Dubey, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial Campaign 2012.07.07, Berg, AAF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerodynamic Particle Sizer 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): KASPRR Engineering Tests 2012.07.01, Mead, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements

324

Using MODIS and AERONET to Determine GCM Aerosol Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol size is still a poorly constrained quantity in general circulation models (GCMs). By using the modal radii of the coarse and fine mode retrieved from 103 stations in the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the fine mode aerosol optical ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Aerosol Remote Sensing over Clouds Using A-Train Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of aerosol above clouds is critical for the estimate of both the aerosol and cloud radiative impacts. In this study, the authors present a new method to retrieve the aerosol properties over clouds that uses the multiangle ...

F. Waquet; J. Riedi; L. C. Labonnote; P. Goloub; B. Cairns; J-L. Deuz; D. Tanr

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

AEROSOL ANALYSIS FOR THE REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY - FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-Gauge Methods Applied to Aerosol Samples." Submitted toHusar and B.Y.H. Liu. "The Aerosol Size Distribution of LosAngeles Smog." In: Aerosols and Atmospheric Chemistry, G.M.

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Aerosol Characteristics Species Emissions Burdenc and h), IE (d, i) and BAE (e, f). List of Tables AerosolEmission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning,

Koch, Dorothy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. ; Jimenez, J. L. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004, 38,A. G. Highly dispersed aerosols; Halsted Press, New York,highly oxidized organic aerosol Sean H. Kessler 1 , Theodora

Kessler, Sean H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessing historical global sulfur emission patterns for the period 1850--1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions from energy-producing and metal production activities have become an important factor in better understanding the relationship between humans and the environment. Concerns about (1) acid rain effects on the environment and (2) anthropogenic aerosols affecting possible global change have prompted interest in the transformation and fate of sulfur in the environment. One step in assessing the importance of sulfur emissions is the development of a reliable regional emission inventory of sulfur as a function of time. The objective of this research effort was to create a homogeneous database for historical sulfur emission estimates for the world. The time from 1850--1990 was selected to include the period of industrialization form the time the main production of fuels and minerals began until the most recent year for which complete production data exist. This research effort attempts to correct some of the deficiencies associated with previous global sulfur emission estimates by (1) identifying those production activities that resulted in sulfur emissions by country and (2) calculating historical emission trends by country across years. An important component of this study was the comparison of the sulfur emission results with those of previous studies.

Lefohn, A.S. [A.S.L. and Associates, Helena, MT (United States); Husar, J.D.; Husar, R.B. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis; Brimblecombe, P. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

332

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the southwest summer monsoon region, Meteorol. Atmos.Absorbing aerosols and summer monsoon evolution over SouthK. M. Kim (2006), Asian summer monsoon anomalies induced by

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System - Available ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System. Battelle Number(s): 15847. ...

334

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range transport of biomass combustion aerosols. Environ.6 6.1 Introduction Biomass combustion emissions contributeparticles from the combustion of biomass fuels. Environ.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electromagnetic solar radiation. The amount of atmosphericas the amount of solar radiation that aerosols scatter andbased on reflected solar radiation field measurements

Wang, Yueqing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity and black carbon fraction.

Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Evolution of the Physicochemical Properties of Aerosols in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) system was used to measure simultaneously the size distribution and hygroscopicity of the ambient aerosol population. The system was operated aboard the National Center for Atmospheric Research/National Science Foundation (NCAR/NSF) C-130 during the 2006 Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign followed by the 2006 Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) field campaign. The research flights for the MILAGRO campaign were conducted within the Mexico City basin and the region to the northeast within the pollution plume. The aerosol within the basin is dominated by organics with an average measured kappa value of 0.21 /- 0.18, 0.13 /- 0.09, 0.09 /- 0.06, 0.14 /- 0.07, and 0.17 /- 0.04 for dry particle diameters of 0.025, 0.050, 0.100, 0.200, and 0.300 mu m, respectively. As the aerosols are transported away from the Mexico City Basin, secondary organic aerosol formation through oxidation and condensation of sulfate on the aerosols surface rapidly increases the solubility of the aerosol. The most pronounced change occurs for a 0.100 mu m diameter aerosol where, after 6 hours of transport, the average kappa value increased by a factor of 3 to a kappa?of 0.29 /- 0.13. The rapid increase in solubility increases the fraction of the aerosol size distribution that could be activated within a cloud. The research flights for the INTEX-B field campaign investigated the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the Asian aerosol plume after 3 to 7 days of transport. The Asian aerosol within the free troposphere exhibited a bimodal growth distribution roughly 50 percent of the time. The more soluble mode of the growth distribution contributed between 67-80 percent of the overall growth distribution and had an average kappa?between 0.40 and 0.53 for dry particle diameters of 0.025, 0.050, 0.100, and 0.300 mu m. The secondary mode was insoluble with an average kappa?between 0.01 and 0.05 for all dry particle diameters. Cloud condensation nuclei closure was attained at a supersaturation of 0.2 percent for all particles within the free troposphere by either assuming a pure ammonium bisulfate composition or a binary composition of ammonium bisulfate and an insoluble organic.

Tomlinson, Jason

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Title THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report...

339

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient model investigation: Trends in short-lived species and climate responses Title Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate...

340

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluating the Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effect on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one of the largest uncertainties in climate forcing studies is the effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols affect the radiation budget under both clear...

342

Aerosol Jet Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide...

343

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

344

Modeling Corrosion of a Metal under an Aerosol Droplet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of aerosol droplets produced either by marine or industrial activity on the ... The atmospheric corrosion caused by aerosols is a result of a complex...

345

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton,...

346

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

347

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

348

Retrieval of Aerosol Mass Concentration from Elastic Lidar Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural aerosol sources can contribute significantly to air pollution in many regions of the country. Characterization of the aerosol emissions of agricultural operations is required (more)

Marchant, Christian C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Studies of urban atmospheric aerosols using lidar and sky radiometer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis discusses the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, the corresponding instrumental technology and inversion algorithm. The urban aerosol optical properties in Hong Kong have (more)

Yang, Xun (??)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Changes in Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent as a Result of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates changes in the types of storm events occurring in the Fertile Crescent as a result of global warming. Regional climate model [fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research ...

J. P. Evans

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven-lognormal modes (MAM7), and a three-lognormal mode version (MAM3) for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries) simulations. Major approximations in MAM3 include assuming immediate mixing of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) with other aerosol components, merging of the MAM7 fine dust and fine sea salt modes into the accumulation mode, merging of the MAM7 coarse dust and coarse sea salt modes into the single coarse mode, and neglecting the explicit treatment of ammonia and ammonium cycles. Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7 as most ({approx}90%) of these aerosol species are in the accumulation mode. Differences of POM and BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%) because of the assumed hygroscopic nature of POM, so that freshly emitted POM and BC are wet-removed before mixing internally with soluble aerosol species. Sensitivity tests with the POM assumed to be hydrophobic and with slower aging process increase the POM and BC concentrations, especially at high latitudes (by several times). The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical and temporal variations of aerosol mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and aerosol optical properties. However, there are noticeable biases, e.g., simulated sulfate and mineral dust concentrations at surface over the oceans are too low. Simulated BC concentrations are significant low in the Arctic. There is a low bias in modeled aerosol optical depth on the global scale, especially in the developing counties. There biases in aerosol simulations clearly indicate the need for improvements of aerosol processes (e.g., emission fluxes of anthropogenic aerosols and precursor gases in developing countries, boundary layer nucleation) and properties (e.g., primary aerosol emission size, POM hygroscopicity). In addition the critical role of cloud properties (e.g., liquid water content, cloud fraction) responsible for the wet scavenging of aerosol is highlighted.

Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Shi, Xiangjun; Lamarque, J.-F.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Vitt, Francis; Conley, Andrew; Park, S.; Neale, Richard; Hannay, Cecile; Ekman, A. M.; Hess, Peter; Mahowald, N.; Collins, William D.; Iacono, Michael J.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Flanner, M. G.; Mitchell, David

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the Asian Continental Outflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioavailable iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on Okinawa Island during an atmospheric pollution transport event from China were analyzed using complementary single particle techniques to determine the iron source and speciation. Comparing the spatial distribution of iron within ambient particles and standard Asian mineral dust, it was determined that field-collected atmospheric Fe-containing particles have numerous sources, including anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion. Fe-containing particles were found to be internally mixed with secondary species such as sulfate, soot, and organic carbon. The mass weighted average Fe(II) fraction (defined as Fe(II)/[Fe(II)+Fe(III)]) was determined to be 0.33 {+-} 0.08. Within the experimental uncertainty, this value lies close to the range of 0.26-0.30 determined for representative Asian mineral dust. Previous studies have indicated that the solubility of iron from combustion is much higher than that from mineral dust. Therefore, chemical and/or physical differences other than oxidation state may help explain the higher solubility of iron in atmospheric particles.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Rodel, Tobias; Henn, Tobias R.; Sprau, Peter; Laskin, Alexander; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Gilles, Marry K.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Aerosol observing system platform integration and AAF instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

As part of the federal governments 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. DOE Office of Science allocated funds for the capital upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to improve and expand observational capabilities related to cloud and aerosol properties. The ARM Facility was established as a national user facility for the global scientific community to conduct a wide range of interdisciplinary science. Part of the ARRA-funded expansion of the ARM Facility includes four new Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) to be designed, instrumented, and mentored by BNL. The enclosures will be customized SeaTainers. These new platforms ([AMF2]: ARM Mobile Facility-2; [TWP-D]: Tropical Western Pacific at Darwin; and [MAOS-A]/[MAOS-C]: Mobile Aerosol Observing System-Aerosol/-Chemistry) will provide a laboratory environment for fielding instruments to collect data on aerosol life cycle, microphysics, and optical/physical properties. The extensive instrument suite includes both established methods and initial deployments of new techniques to add breadth and depth to the AOS data sets. The platforms are designed: (1) to have all instruments pre-installed before deployment, allowing a higher measurement duty cycle; (2) with a standardized configuration improving the robustness of data inter-comparability; (3) to provide remote access capability for instrument mentors; and (4) to readily accommodate guest instrumentation. The first deployment of the AMF2 platform will be at the upcoming StormVEx campaign held at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, October 15, 2010March 31, 2011 while the TWP-D AOS will be stationed at the ARM Darwin site. The maiden deployments of the MAOS-A and MAOS-C platforms will be during the Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX) scheduled for April 2011April 2012. In addition to the ground-based AOS platforms, thee major instrument builds for the AAF are also being undertaken (new trace gas package [NO, NOx, NOy, CO, O3, and SO2]; Scanning Mobility Particle Sampler [SMPS]; and Particle into Liquid Sampler [PILS]). The current status of the AOS platforms, instrument suites, instituted QA/QC activities, projected AOS VAPs, and inlet design, as well as still-unresolved issues, will be presented.

Springston, S.; Sedlacek, A.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

Yang Q.; Lee Y.; GustafsonJr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy Options -- A Global Energy Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the projected global carbon-free energy demand; and the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbon Markets Global Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Markets Global Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW4 2HT Product Assist project originators develop and finance clean development...

357

Plenia Locatel Group: Globalizing from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009 the founders and top executives of Plenia Locatel Group, a retail business in Venezuela specializing in health care products and services, were planning a global

Gibson, Cyrus

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Classical-Theory-Based Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust, Soot, and Biological Particles in a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ice nucleation parameterization based on classical nucleation theory, with aerosol-specific parameters derived from experiments, has been implemented into a global climate modelthe Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)-Oslo. The parameterization ...

Corinna Hoose; Jn Egill Kristjnsson; Jen-Ping Chen; Anupam Hazra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

360

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) Speaker(s): Harmony Gates Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Melissa Lunden A new differential mobility classifier will be described. The instrument classifies aerosol particles in a channel flow between porous (or screen) electrodes. The aerosol enters the channel parallel to the porous electrodes, while a larger, particle-free cross-flow enters through one of the porous electrode. A potential difference between electrodes causes the charged aerosol particles to migrate upstream against the cross-flow. Only particles whose upward migration velocity balances the cross flow will be transmitted along the path of the classifier. Simulations of the OMAC show that it should give the same resolution at the traditional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

Koch, D

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Increase in background stratospheric aerosol observed with lidar at Mauna Loa Observatory and Boulder, Colorado - article no. L15808  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stratospheric aerosol layer has been monitored with lidars at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii and Boulder in Colorado since 1975 and 2000, respectively. Following the Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991, the global stratosphere has not been perturbed by a major volcanic eruption providing an unprecedented opportunity to study the background aerosol. Since about 2000, an increase of 4-7% per year in the aerosol backscatter in the altitude range 20-30 km has been detected at both Mauna Loa and Boulder. This increase is superimposed on a seasonal cycle with a winter maximum that is modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical winds. Of the three major causes for a stratospheric aerosol increase: volcanic emissions to the stratosphere, increased tropical upwelling, and an increase in anthropogenic sulfur gas emissions in the troposphere, it appears that a large increase in coal burning since 2002, mainly in China, is the likely source of sulfur dioxide that ultimately ends up as the sulfate aerosol responsible for the increased backscatter from the stratospheric aerosol layer. The results are consistent with 0.6-0.8% of tropospheric sulfur entering the stratosphere.

Hofmann, D.; Barnes, J.; O'Neill, M.; Trudeau, M.; Neely, R. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative evolution (aging) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter, but remains poorly understood, particularly for the most oxidized fraction of the aerosol. Here we measure the kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of highly oxidized organic aerosol, with an aim of better constraining such atmospheric aging processes. Submicron particles composed of model oxidized organics1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}O{sub 8}), citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}), tartaric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and Suwannee River fulvic acidwere oxidized by gas-phase OH in a flow reactor, and the masses and elemental composition of the particles were monitored as a function of OH exposure. In contrast to our previous studies of less-oxidized model systems (squalane, erythritol, and levoglucosan), particle mass did not decrease significantly with heterogeneous oxidation. Carbon content of the aerosol always decreased somewhat, but this mass loss was approximately balanced by an increase in oxygen content. The estimated reactive uptake coefficients of the reactions range from 0.37 to 0.51 and indicate that such transformations occur at rates corresponding to 1-2 weeks in the atmosphere, suggesting their importance in the atmospheric lifecycle of organic particulate matter.

Kessler, Sean H.; Nah, Theodora; Daumit, Kelly E.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

Jeppson, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Photolytically generated aerosols in the mesosphere and thermosphere of Titan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) stellar and solar occultations at Titan to date include 12 species: N$_{2}$ (nitrogen), CH$_{4}$ (methane), C$_{2}$H$_{2}$ (acetylene), C$_{2}$H$_{4}$ (ethylene), C$_{2}$H$_{6}$ (ethane), C$_{4}$H$_{2}$ (diacetylene), C$_{6}$H$_{6}$ (benzene), C$_{6}$N$_{2}$ (dicyanodiacetylene), C$_{2}$N$_{2}$ (cyanogen), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), HC$_{3}$N (cyanoacetylene), and aerosols distinguished by a structureless continuum extinction (absorption plus scattering) of photons in the EUV. The introduction of aerosol particles, retaining the same refractive index properties as tholin with radius $\\sim$125 \\AA and using Mie theory, provides a satisfactory fit to the spectra. The derived vertical profile of aerosol density shows distinct structure, implying a reactive generation process reaching altitudes more than 1000 km above the surface. A photochemical model presented here provides a reference basis for examining the chemical and physical processes leading to the distinctive atmospheric opacity at Titan. We find that dicyanodiacetylene is condensable at $\\sim$650 km, where the atmospheric temperature minimum is located. This species is the simplest molecule identified to be condensable. Observations are needed to confirm the existence and production rates of dicyanodiacetylene.

Mao-Chang Liang; Yuk L. Yung; Donald E. Shemansky

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, central Saudi Arabia and Istanbul, Turkey, respectively. A set of 24 pairs of sub-cloud aerosol and cloud penetration data are analyzed. Measurements of fine and coarse mode aerosol concentrations from 3 different instruments were combined and fitted with lognormal distributions. The fit parameters of the lognormal distributions are compared with cloud droplet effective radii retrieved from 260 cloud penetrations. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements for a subset of 10 cases from the Istanbul region are compared with concentrations predicted from aerosol size distributions. Ammonium sulfate was assumed to represent the soluble component of aerosol with dry sizes smaller than 0.5 mm and sodium chloride for aerosol larger than 0.5 mm. The measured CCN spectrum was used to estimate the soluble fraction. The correlations of the measured CCN concentration with the predicted CCN concentration were strong (R2 > 0.89) for supersaturations of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6%. The measured concentrations were typically consistent with an aerosol having a soluble fraction between roughly 0.5 and 1.0, suggesting a contribution of sulfate or some other similarly soluble inorganic compound. The predicted CCN were found to vary by +or-3.7% when the soluble fraction was varied by 0.1. Cumulative aerosol concentrations at cutoff dry diameters of 1.1, 0.1 and 0.06 mm were found to be correlated with cloud condensation nuclei concentrations but not with maximum cloud base droplet concentrations. It is also shown that in some cases the predominant mechanisms involved in the formation of precipitation were altered and modified by the aerosol properties. This study suggests that CCN-forced variations in cloud droplet number concentration can change the effective radius profile and the type of precipitation hydrometeors. These differences may have a major impact on the global hydrological cycle and energy budget.

Axisa, Duncan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing  

SciTech Connect

Some of the global warming effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases is offset by increased solar reflection from clouds with smaller droplets that form on increased numbers of cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air. The global magnitude of the resulting indirect aerosol climate forcing is estimated to be comparable (and opposed) to the anthropogenic carbon dioxide forcing, but estimates are highly uncertain because of complexities in characterizing the physical process that determine global aerosol and cloud populations and their interactions. Beyond reflecting sunlight more effectively, smaller droplets are less efficient at producing precipitation, and decreased precipitation is expected to result in increased cloud water and cloud cover, further increasing the indirect forcing. Yet polluted marine boundary-layer clouds are not generally observed to hold more water. Here we use model simulations of stratocumulus clouds to show that suppression of precipitation from increased droplet concentrations leads to increased cloud water only when sufficient precipitation reaches the surface, a condition favored when the overlying air is moist. Otherwise, aerosol induced suppression of precipitation enhances entrainment of overlying dry air, thereby reducing cloud water and diminishing the indirect climate forcing.

Ackerman, A S; Kirkpatrick, M P; Stevens, D E; Toon, O B

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Aerosol, Cloud, and Climate: From Observation to Model (457th Brookhaven Lecture)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by about 1F, glaciers and sea ice have been melting more quickly than previously, especially during the past decade, and the level of the sea has risen about 6-8 inches worldwide. Scientists have long been investigating this phenomenon of global warming, which is believed to be at least partly due to the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the air from burning fossil fuels. Funded by DOE, teams of researchers from BNL and other national labs have been gathering data in the U.S. and internationally to build computer models of climate and weather to help in understanding general patterns, causes, and perhaps, solutions. Among many findings, researchers observed that atmospheric aerosols, minute particles in the atmosphere, can significantly affect global energy balance and climate. Directly, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight. Indirectly, increased aerosol concentration can lead to smaller cloud droplets, changing clouds in ways that tend to cool global climate and potentially mask overall warming from man-made CO2.

Wang, Jian (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department)

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de [Atmospheric Optics Group (GOA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Berjon, A. J. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Sta. Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

374

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME burning events. It is found that the regional AAI data follow the regional tropospheric NO2 data well sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

375

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Seinfeld, J. H. : Organic aerosol formation from theJ. : A large organic aerosol source in the free troposphereand Worsnop, D. R. : Organic aerosol components observed in

Cappa, Christopher D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in press), Organic aerosols in the earth's atmosphere,loss, and trace gas and aerosol emissions during laboratoryproperties of biomass burn aerosols, Geophysical Research

McMeeking, Gavin R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. : A parameterization of aerosol activation - 3. Sectionalclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Primary Aliphatic Amines with Nitrate Radical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back- ground atmospheric aerosol in the UK determined inof secondary organic aerosols, Atmos. Environ. , 31, 3921et al. : Secondary organic aerosol formation from amines

Malloy, Q G J; Qi, L; Warren, B; Cocker III, D R; Erupe, M E; Silva, P J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-phase chemistry-aerosol interactions on directforcing by anthropogenic aerosols and ozone, J. Geophys.GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect, J. Geophys.

Menon, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles200 5.1v aerosol Chapter 3 Meteorological conditions during theSecondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources

Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

X-RAY METHODS FOR THE CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goulding Fine Particles: Aerosol Generation, Sampling andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic and

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud susceptibility and the first aerosol indirect forcing:Sensitivity to BC and aerosol concentrations. J. Geophys.of cloud droplet and aerosols number concentrations:

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene, Proc.biogenic secondary organic aerosol, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112(in secondary organic aerosol, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 41(

Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of ambient aerosol particles, EnvironmentalParticle Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Particles Containingfor quantifying direct aerosol forcing of climate, Bull. Am.

Moffet, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DETERMINATION OF CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deuteron irradiation of an atmospheric aerosol sample.CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEARCARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR

Clemenson, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -particulate diesel exhaust, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 25: 221-climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -

Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oscillation influence aerosol variability? , J. Geophys.clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008,H. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactionsec- ondary organic aerosol yields. Atmospheric Chemistry

Rollins, Andrew W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ryu (2004), Carbonaceous aerosol characteristics ofPM 2.5Allen (1990), Transported acid aerosols measured in southernconference international aerosol carbon round robin test

Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. llsuspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide differs2 is intrinsically coupled to production of the energy on which our industrial society relies

394

Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first part of this dissertation, we study the aging of soot, a representative type of primary aerosols, in the presence of OH-initiated oxidation products of toluene. Monodisperse soot particles are introduced into an environmental chamber where toluene is oxidized by OH radicals. The variations in soot particle properties are simultaneously monitored, including particle size, mass, organic mass faction, hygroscopicity, and optical properties. The changes in particle properties are found to be largely governed by the thickness of the organic coating that is closely related to reaction time and initial reactant concentrations. Derived from particle size and mass, the effective density increases while dynamic shape factor decreases as the organic coating grows, suggesting a compaction of the soot morphology. As the organic coating grows, the particles become more hygroscopic and have enhanced light scattering and absorption. The second part discusses the potential reactions between amines and some aerosol constituents and alteration of aerosol properties. The reactions between alkylamines and ammonium sulfate/bisulfate have been studied using a low-pressure fast flow reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer at 293 K. Alkylamines react with ammonium sulfate/bisulfate to form alkylaminium sulfates, suggesting the existence of alkylaminium salts in particle phase. We have extended our study to characterize the physicochemical properties of alkylaminium sulfates. The hygroscopicity, thermostability, and density of five representative alkylaminium sulfates have been measured by an integrated aerosol analytical system. All alkylaminium sulfate aerosols show monotonic size growth when exposed to increasing relative humidity. Mixing ammonium sulfate with alkylaminium sulfates lowers the deliquescence point corresponding to ammonium sulfate. Alkylaminium sulfates are thermally comparable to or more stable than ammonium sulfate. The densities of alkylaminium sulfate particles are lower than that of ammonium sulfate. Our results suggest that the organic compounds can effectively alter the composition and properties of atmospheric aerosols, considerably influencing the impacts of aerosols on air quality, climate forcing, and human health.

Qiu, Chong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Laboratory and with funding from the DOE STTR program. DMT is developing a new technique for measuring aerosol size distributions in the sub-0.1 um size range. The...

397

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size distribution particle size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size distribution The number of aerosol particles present in any given volume of air within a specificied size range Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer Field Campaign Instruments

398

BNL | Two-Column Aerosol Program (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) There remain many key knowledge gaps despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. Many climatically important processes depend on particles that undergo continuous changes within a size range spanning a few nanometers to a few microns, and with compositions that consist of a variety of carbonaceous materials, soluble inorganic salts and acids and insoluble mineral dust. Primary particles, which are externally-mixed when emitted, are subject to coagulation and chemical changes associated with the condensation of semi-volatile gases to their surface resulting in a spectrum of compositions or mixing-states with a range of climate-affecting optical and hygroscopic properties. The numerical treatments of aerosol transformation

399

Exploring Atmospheric Aerosols by Twilight Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instrument twilight photometer was designed, developed, and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India (1843?N, 7351?E), to monitor the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The instrument, based ...

B. Padma Kumari; S. H. Kulkarni; D. B. Jadhav; A. L. Londhe; H. K. Trimbake

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosolcloudradiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future radiative forcing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled ...

Lynn M. Russell; Armin Sorooshian; John H. Seinfeld; Bruce A. Albrecht; Athanasios Nenes; Lars Ahlm; Yi-Chun Chen; Matthew Coggon; Jill S. Craven; Richard C. Flagan; Amanda A. Frossard; Haflidi Jonsson; Eunsil Jung; Jack J. Lin; Andrew R. Metcalf; Robin Modini; Johannes Mlmenstdt; Greg Roberts; Taylor Shingler; Siwon Song; Zhen Wang; Anna Wonaschtz

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Campaign Instrument - aerosol-tower-eml  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsaerosol-tower-eml Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : EML Tower based Aerosol...

402

Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES  

SciTech Connect

One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The ...

Patrick Hamill; Eric J. Jensen; P. B. Russell; Jill J. Bauman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

On the Background Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balloonborne aerosol particle counter measurements are used in studying the stratospheric sulfate layer at Laramie, Wyoming, during 1978 and 1979, a 2-year volcanically quiescent period in which the layer appears to have been in a near ...

D. J. Hofmann; J. M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile...

406

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during SHADE: 1. Solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res . , 108(sensed data in the solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res , 106 (a scattering aerosol in the solar spectrum with a SSA=1 and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A New Method for Measuring Aerosol Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique has recently been developed to measure aerosol absorption by means of a microdensitometer. Black particulate material is collected into six spots on membrane filters by a laboratory-tested impaction/concentration technique. Follow-...

B. B. Murphey; S. I. Reynolds

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Aerosol Transport in the Southern Sierra Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol transport and meteorology were investigated during 10 days in August 1985, at three elevations in the southern Sierra. Ground weather station and pilot balloon data revealed the diurnal variation of the topographic winds to be remarkably ...

D. M. Ewell; R. G. Flocchini; L. O. Myrup; T. A. Cahill

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of urban-enhanced aerosol concentrations on convective storm development and precipitation over and downwind of St. Louis, Missouri, are investigated. This is achieved through the use of a cloud-resolving mesoscale model, in which ...

Susan C. van den Heever; William R. Cotton

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

411

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A decade long aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at the ARM SGP site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Twelve-year data of MFRSR and MWR have been used to derive aerosol and cloud optical properties at the ARM SGP. Diurnal, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol (optical depth and Angstrom coefficient) and cloud (optical depth and effective radius) have been analyzed. We specially focused on aerosol-cloud interactions. We found a signature of indirect aerosol effect for summer data: increased aerosol index has a statistically-significant anti-correlation with mean effective radius. No

412

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

413

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM MEASUREMENTS OF LIGHT TRANSMITTANCE AND SCATTERING Ernie R. Lewis and Stephen E. Schwartz Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11933 ses@bnl.gov elewis@bnl.gov MOMENTS FROM MEASUREMENTS As each of the measured quantities is linear in the size distribution dn/dr, it is possible to construct linear combinations of measurements that yield

414

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand aerosols and their interactions among gases or other aerosols in the atmosphere. Among their impacts, they influence radiative transfer in the atmosphere and contribute to cloud formation. There are many different types of aerosols, including dust particles, soot particles, and microscopic particles containing inorganic compounds such as sulfates. Most of these particles have natural origins, but many are anthropogenic. The eventual purpose of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases such as ozone, reactive nitrogen, mercury, and sulfur containing compounds. Urban areas are most impacted by these trace gases, which is a concern because ozone especially affects the health of citizens. Experiments have three basic parts. First we generate mono-disperse 3 aerosols. That aerosol is then injected into the aerosol chambers with sea salt aerosols and prescribed concentrations of trace gases to characterize relevant interactions. However, those chambers are still under construction and not used during my study. The processed aerosols are then analyzed with a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) and other equipment. Different concentrations of sea salt aerosols, Cl, NOx, and other gases were planned to be introduced during the experiments. Concentrations of other gases and intensity of solar radiation would mimic those outside. Because these reactions have proved to increase localized concentrations of ozone in other work, this could have important implications. Future work will be designed to find study these interactions. This is important because the EPA has considered tightening the standards for both ozone and particulate matter. Industries would then need to reduce emissions or move farther from current sources of Cl or NOx pollution.

Benoit, Mark David

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Contesting Governance in the Global Marketplace: A Sociological Assessment of British Efforts to Build New Markets for NGO-Certified Sustainable Wood Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards Environmentally Sound Wood Products In the Britishof the Earth. 1995. The Good Wood Guide. Friends of theRamachandra. 1990. The Unquiet Woods: Ecological Change and

McNichol, Jason

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly Large Contribution of Coarse Mode to Aerosol Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of previous studies dealing with effect of coarse-mode aerosols on the radiation budget have focused primary on polluted regions with substantial aerosol loadings. We reexamine this effect for a relatively "pristine" area using a unique 1-month dataset collected during recent Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We demonstrate that the coarse-mode (supermicron) particles can contribute substantially (more than 50%) and frequently (up to 85% of time) to the total volume. In contrast to the conventional expectations that the radiative impact of coarse-mode aerosols should be small for "pristine" regions, we find that the neglecting of the large particles may lead to significant overestimation (up to 45%) of direct aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of atmosphere despite of very small aerosol optical depth (about 0.05 at 0.5 ). Our findings highlight the potential for widespread impacts of the coarse-mode aerosols on the pristine radiative properties over land and the need for more explicit inclusion of the coarse-mode aerosols in climate-related observational and model studies.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Barnard, James C.

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characterization of an Aerosol Shock Tube Facility for Heterogeneous Combustion Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion is responsible for providing energy for many applications, especially in propulsion and rocket propellants. Shock tubes provide a controlled, repeatable means of studying combustion characteristics; although, most of these studies require the fuel in a mixture to exist in pure gas-phase. This makes it challenging to test low-vapor-pressure fuels that tend to remain in condensed form. Low-vapor-pressure fuels are commonly used in many combustion applications, making combustion studies of these fuels important. A method to study low-vapor-pressure fuels using a shock tube approach is to inject the fuel into the shock tube as tiny, uniformly-sized aerosol droplets. The sub-micron-sized aerosol droplets remain uniformly suspended in the shock tube prior to running the experiment. An incident shock wave vaporizes the liquid fuel droplets, then the reflected shock wave initiates ignition of the mixture. This study presents the characterization of an aerosol fuel injection method to the shock tube to study the combustion of low-vapor-pressure fuels. An aerosol generator was used to produce repeatable, uniformly-sized fuel droplets, and flow controllers were used to control and measure oxygen and argon dilution gas injected into the shock tube. A technique was developed to ensure consistent and repeatable aerosol fuel production rates over which calibration curves were found. This study presents the ignition delay times for C7H16 (? = 1.0) at a pressure of 2.0 atm for temperatures from 1220 - 1427 K, C7H8 (? = 1.0) at 1.9 atm over a temperature range of 1406 1791 K, and C12H26 (? = 0.3) at 3.0 atm for the temperature range of 1293 1455 K. The ignition delay times for heptane and toluene were compared to the literature values at the same conditions and were found to be in good agreement. Laser extinction (visible laser at 632nm) was used to verify the presence of aerosol fuel droplets inside the shock tube for dodecane, but showed the heptane aerosol vaporized upon injection into the shock tube. Initial laser absorption (3.39 m) measurements were also taken. This aerosol technique was found to successfully evaluate combustion effects of low-vapor-pressure fuels; however, was limited by the range of possible fuel concentrations. Further work needs to be performed on the verification of aerosol spatial uniformity and obtaining higher fuel concentrations.

Sandberg, Lori Marie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influence their climate impacts through optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that were internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most predominant in each region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more accurate predictions of the climate impacts of aerosol in California.

Cahill, John F.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Seinfeld, John H.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

The whitehouse effect: shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Increases in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other infrared active gases over the industrial period are thought to have increased the average flux of longwave (thermal infrared) radiation between the surface of the earth and the lower atmosphere, leading to an increase in global mean temperature. Over the same period it is though that concentrations of aerosol particles in the troposphere have similarly increased as a consequence of industrial emissions and that these increased concentrations of particles have increased the earth`s reflectivity of shortwave (solar) radiation incident on the planet both directly, by scattering radiation, and indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The term ``whitehouse effect`` is introduced to refer to this increased scattering of shortwave radiation by analogy to the term ``greenhouse effect,`` which refers to the enhanced trapping of longwave radiation resulting from increased concentrations of infrared active gases. Each of these phenomena is referred to as a ``forcing`` of the earth`s climate, that is a secular change imposed on the system; such a forcing is to be distinguished from a ``response`` of the system, such as a change in global mean temperature or other index of global climate. The forcing due to the direct and indirect effects induced by anthropogenic aerosols has been estimated to be comparable in global- average magnitude to that due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, but it is of opposite direction, that is exerting a cooling influence. The shortwave radiative influence of anthropogenic aerosols may thus be considered to be offsetting some, perhaps a great fraction, of the longwave radiative influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases.

Schwartz, S.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation that aerosol impacts on clouds (known as "aerosol indirect climatic effects") have a net cooling effect

424

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOEs high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

A. M. Selvam

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling A NOAA of the NWS's forecast products, even its regional forecast products, are constrained by the limitations of NOAA's global forecast model. Unfortunately, our global forecasts are less accurate than those from

Hamill, Tom

428

RFID-driven global supply chain and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global supply chain and management has become an important issue. It involves a company's worldwide interests and the coordination of production, inventory, location, and transportation in the entire supply chain. In a global business environment, ... Keywords: EPC, EPCglobal Network, RFID, SCM, database, electronic product code, global supply chains, information security, interoperability, radio frequency identification, real-time information, supply chain management

L. Wang; G. Wang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Possible Change of Extratropical Cyclone Activity due to Enhanced Greenhouse Gases and Sulfate AerosolsStudy with a High-Resolution AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the possible impacts of enhanced greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols on extratropical cyclone activity, two 20-yr time-slice experimentsthe control run and the global warming runare performed with a high-resolution AGCM (T106) ...

Quanzhen Geng; Masato Sugi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A new climatology of aerosols in the middle and upper stratosphere by alternative analysis of GOMOS observations during 20022006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent works have shown how the study of stratospheric background aerosol i.e. in periods uninfluenced by major volcanic eruption seems more complex as it is now performed by more accurate means. We propose a re-analysis of Global Ozone Monitoring by ...

Vernica Salazar, Jean-Baptiste Renard, Alain Hauchecorne, Slimane Bekki, Gwenal Berthet

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

On the Insignificance of Photochemical Hydrocarbon Aerosols in the Atmospheres of Close-in Extrasolar Giant Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) reside in irradiated environments much more intense than that of the giant planets in our solar system. The high UV irradiance strongly influences their photochemistry and the general current view believed that this high UV flux will greatly enhance photochemical production of hydrocarbon aerosols. In this letter, we investigate hydrocarbon aerosol formation in the atmospheres of CEGPs. We find that the abundances of hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of CEGPs are significantly less than that of Jupiter except for models in which the CH$_4$ abundance is unreasonably high (as high as CO) for the hot (effective temperatures $\\gtrsim 1000$ K) atmospheres. Moreover, the hydrocarbons will be condensed out to form aerosols only when the temperature-pressure profiles of the species intersect with the saturation profiles--a case almost certainly not realized in the hot CEGPs atmospheres. Hence our models show that photochemical hydrocarbon aerosols are insignificant in the atmospheres of CEGPs. In contrast, Jupiter and Saturn have a much higher abundance of hydrocarbon aerosols in their atmospheres which are responsible for strong absorption shortward of 600 nm. Thus the insignificance of photochemical hydrocarbon aerosols in the atmospheres of CEGPs rules out one class of models with low albedos and featureless spectra shortward of 600 nm.

Mao-Chang Liang; Sara Seager; Christopher D. Parkinson; Anthony Y. -T; . Lee; Yuk L. Yung

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

432

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and MFRSR Measurements ARM STM 2008 Norfolk, VA Connor Flynn 1 , Annette Koontz 1 , Anne Jefferson 2 , Jim Barnard 1 , Sally McFarlane 1 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder Progress towards ARM DOE 2008 Performance Metric 3 & 4 * Produce and make available new continuous time series of aerosol total column depth, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. * Produce and make available new continuous time series of retrieved dust properties, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. 0 100 200 300 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 ITF movement and surface RH % RH day of year (2006) 0 100 200 300 400 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 day of year wind direction (N = 0, E = 90) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Wind speed m/s 0 100 200 300 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 MFRSR Vo for filter2, Niamey

433

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Optical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol in Maritime Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic characterization of aerosol over the oceans is needed to understand the aerosol effect on climate and on transport of pollutants between continents. Reported are the results of a comprehensive optical and physical characterization of ...

Alexander Smirnov; Brent N. Holben; Yoram J. Kaufman; Oleg Dubovik; Thomas F. Eck; Ilya Slutsker; Christophe Pietras; Rangasayi N. Halthore

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ARM - Field Campaign - Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Campaign Links CARES Website Related Campaigns Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) - Surface Meteorological Sounding 2010.05.26, Zaveri, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) Photo-Acoustic Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering 2010.05.26, Arnott, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES): SMPS & CCN counter deployment during CARES/Cal-NEx 2010.05.04, Wang, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Ground Based Instruments 2010.04.01, Cziczo, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

437

Optical Properties of Aerosol Particles over the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 2002, atmospheric aerosol measurements were conducted over the northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enhancement Study (SERIES). The following aerosol quantities were measured: particle number size ...

Julia Marshall; Ulrike Lohmann; W. Richard Leaitch; Nicole Shantz; Lisa Phinney; Desiree Toom-Sauntry; Sangeeta Sharma

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Title Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Publication Type...

439

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) will be deployed on Cape Cod (MA) for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol...

440

Dynamical Effects of Aerosol Perturbations on Simulated Idealized Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical effects of increased aerosol loading on the strength and structure of numerically simulated squall lines are explored. Results are explained in the context of RKW theory. Changes in aerosol loading lead to changes in rain drop size ...

Zachary J. Lebo; Hugh Morrison

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Light Extinction by Aerosols during Summer Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to utilize satellite measurements of optical thickness over land for estimating aerosol properties during air pollution episodes the optical thickness was measured from the surface and investigated. Aerosol optical thicknesses have been ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate over the Past Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbonsnow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosolclimate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model ...

Dorothy Koch; Surabi Menon; Anthony Del Genio; Reto Ruedy; Igor Alienov; Gavin A. Schmidt

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Quantifying and Minimizing Uncertainty of Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic aerosols are composed of a variety of aerosol types and components including water-soluble inorganic species (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), condensed organic species, elemental or black carbon, and mineral dust. Previous ...

J. E. Penner; R. J. Charlson; S. E. Schwartz; J. M. Hales; N. S. Laulainen; L. Travis; R. Leifer; T. Novakov; J. Ogren; L. F. Radke

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols below, within, and above fields of cumuli, and to study changes to the cloud microphysical structure within these ...

Larry K. Berg; Carl M. Berkowitz; John M. Hubbe; John A. Ogren; Chris A. Hostetler; Richard A. Ferrare; Johnathan W. Hair; Manvendra K. Dubey; Claudio Mazzoleni; Elisabeth Andrews; Richard L. Coulter; Yin-Nan Lee; Jasono Olfert; Stephen R. Springston

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Aerosol Impacts on the Microphysical Growth Processes of Orographic Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System was used to simulate four winter snowfall events over the Park Range of Colorado. For each event, three hygroscopic aerosol sensitivity simulations were performed with initial aerosol profiles representing ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton; Douglas Lowenthal; Joe Messina

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Aerosol Impacts on the Diurnal Cycle of Marine Stratocumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent large-eddy simulation (LES) studies of the impact of aerosol on the dynamics of nocturnal marine stratocumulus revealed that, depending on the large-scale forcings, an aerosol-induced increase of the droplet concentration can lead to ...

Irina Sandu; Jean-Louis Brenguier; Olivier Geoffroy; Odile Thouron; Valery Masson

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Critical Examination of the Observed First Aerosol Indirect Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative change in cloud droplet number concentration with respect to the relative change in aerosol number concentration, ?, is an indicator of the strength of the aerosol indirect effect and is commonly used in models to parameterize this ...

Hongfei Shao; Guosheng Liu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

BPL Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BPL Global BPL Global Jump to: navigation, search Name BPL Global Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Product BPL Global is a Pittburgh based company that uses broadband over powerline (BPL) to intergrate offerings of advanced metering infrastructure and broadband internet. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crutzen, P. : Atmospheric Aerosols: Biogeochemical sourcesof optically active aerosol particles over the Amazonproperties of Amazonian aerosol particles: Rev. Geophys. ,

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Sensitivity of aerosol radiative forcing calculations to spectral resolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential impacts of aerosol radiative forcing on climate have generated considerable recent interest. An important consideration in estimating the forcing from various aerosol components is the spectral resolution used for the solar radiative transfer calculations. This paper examines the spectral resolution required from the viewpoint of overlapping spectrally varying aerosol properties with other cross sections. A diagnostic is developed for comparing different band choices, and the impact of these choices on the radiative forcing calculated for typical sulfate and biomass aerosols was investigated.

Grant, K.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from ...

Y. Fouquart; B. Bonnel; M. Chaoui Roquai; R. Santer; A. Cerf

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Possible Aerosol Effects on Ice Clouds via Contact Nucleation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The indirect effect of aerosols on water clouds, whereby aerosol particles change cloud optical properties, is caused by aerosol-induced changes of the size and number of cloud droplets. This affects the lifetime of the water clouds as well as ...

Ulrike Lohmann

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including ... Keywords: Aerosols, Aggregation, Particle adhesion, Particulate flow

J. S. Marshall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Global Green Energy ApS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ApS Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Green Energy ApS Place Aarhus C, Denmark Zip DK- 8000 Sector Wind energy Product Wind farm project developer. References Global Green...

456

Home Page > Business > Industrial > Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009 As Pulpmills Reduce Production Worldwide, Reports Wood Resources International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poster Explore Strategies in Technical Analysis from Experienced Brokers. www.Lind-Waldock.com , USA financial crises and the reduced demand for paper products worldwide. This year, only an estimated 25 worldwide, European demand for pellets and biomass chips, outlook for plantation wood chip supply, ocean

457

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campaign Campaign For the month of April, researchers are descending on and above Barrow, Alaska, to obtain data from the atmosphere that will help them understand the impacts that aerosols have on Arctic clouds and climate. Scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are using a heavily instrumented aircraft to collect data from the sky, while instruments based at surface sites in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, are obtaining measurements from the ground. Information obtained during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, will help scientists analyze the role of aerosols in climate, and represents a key contribution to Arctic climate research during International Polar Year.

458

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

459

Morphology effects on polydispersed aerosol deposition rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the analysis of severe nuclear accidents, accurate prediction of aerosol deposition is important since, among other things, this influences the distribution of radioactive decay heat within the primary system and containment compartments. The fact that the aerosol cloud is not comprised of dense isolated spherical particles of only one size inevitably complicates such calculations but must be taken into account. Some particle deposition mechanisms are more sensitive to particle size and morphology than others so that simplifying assumptions valid for one mechanism [such as particle thermophoresis (notoriously size and morphology insensitive)] may be seriously in error for others (e.g., convective Brownian diffusion or eddy impaction). This paper deals with aggregate aerosol deposition.

Rosner, D.E.; Tandon, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Khalil, Y.F. [Northeast Utilities Service Co., Berlin, CT (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Can aerosols be trapped in open flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of aerosols in open flows is relevant in a variety of physical contexts. Previous results are consistent with the assumption that such finite-size particles always escape in open chaotic advection. Here we show that a different behavior is possible. We analyze the dynamics of aerosols both in the absence and presence of gravitational effects, and both when the dynamics of the fluid particles is hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic. Permanent trapping of aerosols much heavier than the advecting fluid is shown to occur in all these cases. This phenomenon is determined by the occurrence of multiple vortices in the flow and is predicted to happen for realistic particle-fluid density ratios.

Rafael D. Vilela; Adilson E. Motter

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global aerosol products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Global Industry Analysts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Industry Analysts Address 6150 Hellyer Avenue Place San Jose, California Zip 95138 Product Market research services Year founded 1987 Number of employees 501-1000 Phone number (408) 528-9966 Website http://www.strategyr.com/ Region Bay Area References Global Industry Analysts[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts, Inc., (GIA) offers one of the world's largest portfolios of research reports in terms of topics covered, geographic regions analyzed, companies profiled, and pages published. The company's current portfolio consists of more than 900 Global Strategic Business Reports (large multi-client research programs); 45,000+ Market Trend

462

Think Green Global Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Think Green Global Inc Think Green Global Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Think Green Global, Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10010 Sector Renewable Energy Product New York-based investment bank and strategic development firm that is dedicated to enhancing the growth of renewable energy and clean technology companies. References Think Green Global, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Think Green Global, Inc. is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Think Green Global, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Think_Green_Global_Inc&oldid=352225" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

463

Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different parcels, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing in summer 2006: 2. Local and column aerosol optical properties  

SciTech Connect

Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-chem model calculations were conducted to study aerosol optical properties around Beijing, China, during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) period. In this paper, we interpret aerosol optical properties in terms of aerosol mass concentrations and their chemical compositions by linking model calculations with measurements. In general, model calculations reproduced observed features of spatial and temporal variations of various surface and column aerosol optical parameters in and around Beijing. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and extinction coefficient corresponded well to those of elemental carbon (primary aerosol), sulfate (secondary aerosol), and the total aerosol mass concentration, respectively. These results show that spatial and temporal variations of the absorption