Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Glenwood Springs Amendments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amendments Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Land Use Plan: Glenwood Springs Amendments Organization BLM Published Publisher Not Provided, 2002 DOI...

2

Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

3

Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

4

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

5

Decay Properties of Pu235, Pu237, and a New Isotope Pu233  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron-capture and alpha-decay properties of Pu237, Pu235, and the new isotope Pu233 have been measured. The over-all half-lives are 442 days for Pu237, 262 minutes for Pu235, and 202 minutes for Pu233. Two alpha groups, one of 5.650.02 Mev and one of 5.360.02 Mev, were detected in the decay of Pu237, one group of 5.850.02 Mev in the decay of Pu235, and one of 6.300.02 Mev in the decay of Pu233. The partial alpha half-lives corresponding to these alpha groups are, for Pu237, (1.70.4)104 years and (4.60.6)103 years, respectively; for Pu235, (1.70.4) years; and for Pu233, 114 days. On the basis of the experimental data it has been possible to calculate hindrance factors for the alpha decay and logft values for the electron-capture decay of the three isotopes and to correlate their properties with the alpha and electron-capture systematics.

T. Darrah Thomas, Robert Vandenbosch, Richard A. Glass, and Glenn T. Seaborg

1957-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Pu-238 Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Determination for and Determination for Pu-238 Production Radioisotope power systems enable space exploration and national security missions. T he Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have pro- vided radioisotope power systems that have safely enabled deep space exploration and national security missions for five decades. Radioisotope power systems (RPSs) convert the heat from the decay of the plutonium-238 (Pu-238) isotope into electricity. RPSs are capable of producing heat and electricity under the harsh conditions encountered in deep space for decades. They have proven safe, reliable, and maintenance-free in missions to study the moon and all of the planets in the solar system except Mer- cury. Recent missions include the Mars Science Laboratory rover,

7

Biodegradation of PuEDTA and Impacts on Pu Mobility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contamination of many DOE sites by Pu presents a long-term problem because of its long half-life (240,000 yrs) and the low drinking water standard (<10{sup -12} M). EDTA was co-disposed with radionuclides (e.g., Pu, {sup 60}Co), formed strong complexes, and enhanced radionuclide transport at several DOE sites. Biodegradation of EDTA should decrease Pu mobility. One objective of this project was to determine the biodegradation of EDTA in the presence of PuEDTA complexes. The aqueous system investigated at pH 7 (10{sup -4} M EDTA and 10{sup -6} M Pu) contained predominantly Pu(OH){sub 2}EDTA{sup 2-}. The EDTA was degraded at a faster rate in the presence of Pu. As the total concentration of both EDTA and PuEDTA decreased (i.e., 10{sup -5} M EDTA and 10{sup -7} M PuEDTA), the presence of Pu decreased the biodegradation rate of the EDTA. It is currently unclear why the concentration of Pu directly affects the increase/decrease in rate of EDTA biodegradation. The soluble Pu concentration decreased, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions, as the EDTA was biodegraded, indicating that biodegradation of EDTA will decrease Pu mobility when the Pu is initially present as Pu(IV)EDTA. A second objective was to investigate how the presence of competing metals, commonly encountered in geologic media, will influence the speciation and biodegradation of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Studies on the solubilities of Fe(OH){sub 3}(s) and of Fe(OH){sub 3}(s) plus PuO{sub 2}(am) in the presence of EDTA and as a function of pH showed that Fe(III) out competes the Pu(IV) for the EDTA complex, thereby showing that Pu(IV) will not form stable complexes with EDTA for enhanced transport of Pu in Fe(III) dominated subsurface systems. A third objective is to investigate the genes and enzymes involved in EDTA biodegradation. BNC1 can use EDTA and another synthetic chelating agent nitrilotriacetate (NTA) as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. The same catabolic enzymes are responsible for both EDTA and NTA degradation except that additional enzymes are required for EDTA degradation. When the catabolic genes were cloned and sequenced, the gene cluster also contained genes encoding a hypothetical ABC-type transporter. RT-PCR analysis showed that the transporter genes and EDTA monooxygenase gene (emoA) are co-transcribed. EppA is one of the transporter genes, and it codes for a periplasmic binding protein responsible for binding to the substrate before transport across the membrane can occur. EppA was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli and found to bind, MgEDTA, CaEDTA, Fe(III)EDTA, MgNTA, CaNTA, and Fe(III)NTA. Our data also suggest that BNC1 uses the same ABC-type transporter for both EDTA and NTA uptake. Results from these studies can provide mechanistic understanding and approaches to assist in the bioremediate PuEDTA and other radionuclide-EDTA complexes at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and (more)

Stone, Joseph C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first...

Stone, Joseph C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sources for Pu in near surface air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

Tobin, J G

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

13

Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of Pu241  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy distribution of prompt neutrons resulting from the thermal-neutron-induced fission of Pu241 is measured. Fast time-of-flight techniques are employed in the neutron energy range 0.3 to 6.0 Mev. Proton recoils in emulsions are utilized for the measurement of neutron energies from 1.6 to 7.0 Mev. The experimentally determined Pu241 fission neutron spectrum is well represented by the Maxwellian distribution, N(E)?E12e-ET, where E is the neutron energy in Mev, N(E) the number of neutrons per unit energy interval, and T=1.3350.034 Mev. The measured average Pu241 fission neutron energy is 2.0020.051 Mev.

A. B. Smith; R. K. Sjoblom; J. H. Roberts

1961-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

15

Antineutrino spectra from 241Pu and 239Pu thermal neutron fission products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The antineutrino spectrum of fission products from thermal neutron induced fission of 241Pu was derived from a measurement of the correlated beta spectrum. The energy range 1.5 MeV to 9 MeV was covered and a precision of 4% was achieved at 4 MeV. A revised version of the antineutrino spectrum from 239Pu fission is also presented.

A.A. Hahn; K. Schreckenbach; W. Gelletly; F. von Feilitzsch; G. Colvin; B. Krusche

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Glenwood, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49°, -87.6022658° 49°, -87.6022658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5425349,"lon":-87.6022658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

Glenwood, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9437°, -95.7425056° 9437°, -95.7425056° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0469437,"lon":-95.7425056,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Complementary Pu Resuspension Study at Palomares, Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil in an area near Palomares, Spain, was contaminated with plutonium as a result of a mid-air collision of U.S. military aircraft in January 1966. The assessment for potential inhalation dose can be found in Iranzo et al., (1987). Long-term monitoring has been used to evaluate remedial actions (Iranzo et al., 1988) and there are many supporting studies of the Pu contamination at Palomares that have been carried out by the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT) in Madrid. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the resuspension of Pu from the soil in terms of Pu-concentrations in air and resuspension rates in a complementary investigation to those of CIEMAT but in an intensive short-term field effort. This study complements the resuspension studies of CIEMAT at Palomares with additional information, and with confirmation of their previous studies. Observed mass loadings (M) were an average of 70 mg/m{sup 3} with peaks in the daytime of 130 mg/m{sup 3} and low values at night below 30 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The Pu-activity of aerosols (A) downwind of plot 2-1 was 0.12 Bq/g and the enhancement factor (E{sub f}) had a value of 0.3, which is low but similar to a typical value of 0.7 for other undisturbed sites. This E{sub f} value may increase further away from ground zero. The particle size distribution of the Pu in air measured by cascade impactors was approximately lognormal with a median aerodynamic diameter of 3.7 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 3.5 in the respirable range. This peak midway between 1 ? m and 10 {micro}m in the respirable range is commonly observed. Daily fluctuations in the Pu concentration in air (C) detected by the UHV were lognormally distributed with a geometric standard deviation of 4.9 indicating that the 98th percentile would be 24 times as high as the median. Downwind of plot 2-1 the mean Pu concentration in air, C, was 8.5 {micro}Bq/m{sup 3}. The resuspension factor (Sf) was 2.4 x 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and agrees very well with the values between 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and 10{sup -9} m{sup -1} previously reported. We observed a mean Pu/Am ratio of 7.1 with a relative variation of 30%, which compares well with a mean value of 6.5 for nearby plot 2-2. The resuspension rate (R) was in the middle of the range, 10{sup -11} s{sup -1} to 10{sup -12} s{sup -1} as observed in other stable sites, and indicates low potential for Pu redistribution.

Shinn, J

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 May 29, 2012 Nuclear magnetic signal of plutonium 239's unique nuclear magnetic resonance signature has been detected by scientists on the subject, "Observation of 239 Pu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance," was published in the May 18 issue of Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pu-238 production at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pu-238 production capability at SRP is dependent on the availability of Np-237 feed material. With continuing operation of three production reactors at SRP, production of 46 kg Pu-238 per year can be sustained. Capacity of auxiliary facilities is adequate to support the production rates.

Roggenkamp, P.L.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Internal Corrosion Analysis of Model 9975 Packaging Containing Pu or PuO{sub 2} During Shipping and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed an internal corrosion analysis of the Model 9975 packaging assembly containing either Pu or PuO2 for storage in K Reactor under ambient conditions for a period of 12 years. The 12-year storage period includes two years for shipping and up to ten years for storage.

Vormelker, P.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

Joyce, John J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beaux, Miles F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, Paul H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pu Glass Fabrication and Product Consistency Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers testing to support a near term data need regarding glass dissolution performance. Separate task plans will be developed for testing to address the degree of macroscopic cracking and the development of alternative frit formulations. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was identified as a means to provide some of the near term performance data. The PCT is a static test method in which known masses of crushed glass and demineralized water are reacted for a desired duration [1]. There are two reasons to perform the PCT. The first is that the results are used as a measure of acceptance in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications Document (WAPS) [2]. The second is the need for long-term static test results that can be used to verify the applicability of the degradation model. Thus, the primary focus will be on the use of the PCT Method B (PCT-B) to study the formation and stability of colloids and to study alteration phases formed on the glass surface. The standard 7-day PCT in demineralized water (PCT-A) will be included to demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criterion and determine the value of the k{sub E} rate parameter for comparison with the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model [3].

Marra, James

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assessment of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) Production Alternatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plutonium-238 Plutonium-238 Production Alternatives Briefing for Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee April 21, 2008 Dennis Miotla Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Power Deployment Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (2) Statement of Work Desired end state: - Reliable, sustainable, affordable supply of Pu-238 suitable for NASA applications Assumptions: - NASA obtains funding for planned missions - Russia is out of material to sell to US - DOE maintains balance of radioisotope power source infrastructure during period of depleted supply Independently evaluate the Pu-238 heat source requirements for NASA's mission projections and assess Pu-238 production assumptions, strategy and alternatives for meeting those requirements Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (3)

26

Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Search for the double beta decay of sup 244 Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have searched for the ingrowth of {sup 244}Cm in a 1.45-g sample of {sup 244}Pu. We isolated a curium fraction after an ingrowth period of 1.03 yr; during this time the {sup 244}Pu sample produced {le}0.24 alpha disintegrations per day of {sup 244}Cm (95% C.L.), corresponding to a half-life for the double beta decay of {sup 244}Pu of {ge}1.1{times}10{sup 18} yr.

Moody, K.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Hulet, E.K. (Nuclear Chemistry Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

Leal, Luiz C [ORNL] [ORNL; Noguere, G [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; De Saint Jean, C [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Kahler, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

An Alternative Model for Electron Correlation in Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a density functional theory based approach that treats the 5f electrons relativistically, a Pu electronic structure with zero net magnetic moment is obtained, where the 5f orbital and 5f spin moments cancel each other. By combining the spin and orbital specific densities of states with state, spin and polarization specific transition moments, it is possible to reconstruct the experimentally observed photoemission spectra from Pu. Extrapolating to a spin-resolving Fano configuration, it is shown how this would resolve the extant controversy over Pu electronic structure.

Yu, S; Tobin, J; Soderlind, P

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in offgas system design and tests of simple impingement devices for particle collection are also recommended for tests in the near future.

Marra, J

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed Matter & Magnet Science Email Professor Hiroshi Yasuoka Japan Atomic Energy Agency "This discovery of the plutonium 239 magnetic resonance promises to revolutionize our understanding of plutonium solid state physics, chemistry, biology and materials science."

32

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Pyrochlore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments on titanate ceramics were performed to verify whether certain assumptions are valid regarding the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur as 239Pu decays. Titanate ceramics are the material of choice for the immobilization of surplus weapons-grade Pu. The short-lived isotope, 238Pu, was incorporated into the ceramic formulation to accelerate the effects of radiation induced damage. We report on the effects of this damage on the density (volumetric swelling <6%), crystal structure of pyrochlore-bearing specimens (amorphous after about 2?1018 ?/g), and dissolution (no change from fully the crystalline specimen). Even though the specimens became amorphous during the tests, there was no evidence for microcracking in the photomicrographs from the scanning electron microscope. Thus, although pyrochlore is susceptible to radiation-induced damage, the material remains chemically and physically viable as a material for immobilizing surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Re-publication of the data from the BILL magnetic spectrometer: The cumulative $?$ spectra of the fission products of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the 1980s, measurements of the cumulative $\\beta$ spectra of the fission products following the thermal neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu were performed at the magnetic spectrometer BILL at the ILL in Grenoble. This data was published in bins of 250 keV. In this paper, we re-publish the original data in a binning of 50 keV for $^{235}$U and 100 keV for $^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu.

N. Haag; W. Gelletly; F. von Feilitzsch; L. Oberauer; W. Potzel; K. Schreckenbach; A. A. Sonzogni

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Variability in PuO2 Intake by Inhalation: Implications for Worker Protection at the US Department of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with emphasis on possible DOE worker exposures at the Rocky Flats facility near Denver, Colorado. The alpha-emitting isotopes 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 242Pu are found at Rocky Flats. Although 238Pu is thought to be present in relatively......

B.R. Scott; A.F. Fencl

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimens of titanate ceramics containing approximately 10 mass% 238Pu were tested to determine the long-term effects of radiation-induced damage from the ? decay of 239Pu that would have been disposed of in the nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. These tests provided information on the changes in bulk properties such as dimensions, densities, and chemical durability. Although these materials become amorphous at low doses, the specimens remained physically strong. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, in combination with results reported previously on similar materials, the material remains a physically viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

On244Pu in lunar rocks from Fra Mauro and implications regarding their origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evidence forin situ produced fission xenon from244Pu in rock 14321 is presented. The inferred abundance ratio244Pu/238U is found to be consistent with values observed in a meteorite. Data from a stepwise rele...

K. Marti; B. D. Lightner; G. W. Lugmair

39

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Santschi, Peter H.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Atomic Structure and Phase Transformations in Pu Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium and plutonium-based alloys containing Al or Ga exhibit numerous phases with crystal structures ranging from simple monoclinic to face-centered cubic. Only recently, however, has there been increased convergence in the actinides community on the details of the equilibrium form of the phase diagrams. Practically speaking, while the phase diagrams that represent the stability of the fcc {delta}-phase field at room temperature are generally applicable, it is also recognized that Pu and its alloys are never truly in thermodynamic equilibrium because of self-irradiation effects, primarily from the alpha decay of Pu isotopes. This article covers past and current research on several properties of Pu and Pu-(Al or Ga) alloys and their connections to the crystal structure and the microstructure. We review the consequences of radioactive decay, the recent advances in understanding the electronic structure, the current research on phase transformations and their relations to phase diagrams and phase stability, the nature of the isothermal martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, and the pressure-induced transformations in the {delta}-phase alloys. New data are also presented on the structures and phase transformations observed in these materials following the application of pressure, including the formation of transition phases.

Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Moore, K T; Evans, W J; Farber, D L; Jeffries, J R; Massalski, T B

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The delayed neutron emission rates of U-235 and Pu-239 samples were measured accurately from a thermal fission reaction. A Monte Carlo calculation using the Geant4 code was used to demonstrate the neutron energy independence of the detector used...

Chen, Yong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Observation of the negative ions: Ra-, Pa-, and Pu-  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The negative ions of the isotopes Ra226, Pa231, and Pu244 have been observed by means of accelerator mass spectrometry and their properties compared with the negative ions of Th and U. The electron affinities of all these elements have been estimated to be similar and greater than 50 meV.

X.-L. Zhao; M.-J. Nadeau; M. A. Garwan; L. R. Kilius; A. E. Litherland

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A theoretical study of the ground state and lowest excited states of PuO0/+/+2 and PuO20/+/+2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ground and excited states of neutral and cationic PuO and PuO2 have been studied with multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods followed by second order perturbation theory, the CASSCF/CASPT2 method. Scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling have been included in the treatment. As literature values for the ionization energy of PuO2 are in the wide range of ~;;6.6 eV to ~;;10.1 eV, a central goal of the computations was to resolve these discrepancies; the theoretical results indicate that the ionization energy is near the lower end of this range. The calculated ionization energies for PuO, PuO+ and PuO2+ are in good agreement with the experimental values.

Gibson, John K.; La Macchia, Giovanni; Infante, Ivan; Gagliardi, Laura; Raab, Juraj

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEAC Pu-238 Briefing.PPT [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pu Pu 238 Supply Recent Pu-238 Supply Developments Briefing for N l E Ad i C itt Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee J 9 2009 June 9, 2009 Alice Caponiti Office of Radioisotope Power Systems Status Update on Pu-238 Supply ● DOE's FY 2010 Congressional budget request includes $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu-238 production $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu 238 production capability ▬ NE is making plans for FY2010 should the project get funded g p p j g ● Russian fuel shipment received in December 2008 ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ● National Research Council study concluded that need to reestablish Pu-238 production is urgent p g ▬ Specific findings and recommendations follow 2

49

Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.

Richardson Ii, P D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thronas, D L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, J P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, F E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Neuman, A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duncan, W S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 610 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 78.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116C) to 95C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 610 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.050.2 M KF (with 02 g/L B) at 95C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Glenwood Springs, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5505376°, -107.3247762° 5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5505376,"lon":-107.3247762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations": The following error has been detected in your syntax: * Display map Temperature No Data Listed...

53

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii [Internet]. 2012. USGS. [cited 06/26/2013]. Available from: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/summary/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Summary_of_Pu_u_O_o_-_Kupaianaha_Eruption,_Kilauea_Volcano,_Hawaii&oldid=682513" Categories: References Uncited References

54

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-06_ Marra Pu solubility Tech Exchange - 1.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Solubility and Homogeneity the Solubility and Homogeneity of Plutonium in an Alkali Borosilicate Glass Jim Marra, Charles Crawford and Kevin Fox Savannah River National Laboratory EM Tech Exchange - Atlanta, GA Print Close 2 Outline * Background * Glass composition options * Vitrification processes * Hf as a surrogate for Pu in borosilicate glasses * Lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass * Alkali borosilicate glass * Initial studies * Present study - Pu behavior in HLW glass * Pu behavior in the DWPF melter * Summary Print Close 3 Background * U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 1994 * U.S. and Russian surplus weapons Pu is a "clear and present danger" * U.S. to disposition up to 50 metric tons of surplus Pu * Protect surplus Pu from theft or diversion and reintroduction into nuclear arsenals * Bulk of U.S. material to be dispositioned by fabrication in

55

Photoemission and the Electronic Structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the first Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa5 is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy and a novel theoretical scheme. Exceptional agreement between calculation and experiment defines a path forward for understanding the electronic structure aspects of Pu-based materials. The photoemission results show two separate regions of 5f electron spectral intensity, one at the Fermi energy and another centered 1.2eV below the Fermi level. The results for PuCoGa5 clearly indicate 5f electron behavior on the threshold between localized and itinerant. Comparisons to delta phase Pu metal show a broader framework for understanding the fundamental electronic properties of the Pu5f levels in general within two configurations, one localized and one itinerant.

J. J. Joyce, J. M. Wills, T. Durakiewicz, M. T. Butterfield, E. Guziewicz, J. L. Sarrao, L. A. Morales, A. J. Arko, and O. Eriksson

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bacterial Pu(V) reduction in the absence and presence of Fe(III)?NTA: modeling and experimental approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium (Pu), a key contaminant at sites associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and with nuclear-energy wastes, can be precipitated to 'immobilized' plutonium phases in systems that promote bioreduction. Ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) is often present in contaminated sites, and its bioreduction to ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) may be involved in the reduction of Pu to forms that precipitate. Alternately, Pu can be reduced directly by the bacteria. Besides Fe, contaminated sites often contain strong complexing ligands, such as nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). We used biogeochemical modeling to interpret the experimental fate of Pu in the absence and presence of ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) and NTA under anaerobic conditions. In all cases, Shewanella alga BrY (S. alga) reduced Pu(V)(PuO{sub 2}{sup +}) to Pu(III), and experimental evidence indicates that Pu(III) precipitated as PuPO{sub 4(am)}. In the absence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA, reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} was directly biotic, but modeling simulations support that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction in the presence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA was due to an abiotic stepwise reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} to Pu{sup 4+}, followed by reduction of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+}, both through biogenically produced Fe{sup 2+}. This means that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction was slowed by first having Fe{sup 3+} reduced to Fe{sup 2+}. Modeling results also show that the degree of PuPO{sub 4(am)} precipitation depends on the NTA concentration. While precipitation out-competes complexation when NTA is present at the same or lower concentration than Pu, excess NTA can prevent precipitation of PuPO{sub 4(am)}.

Deo, Randhir P.; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Reed, Donald T. (AZU); (Guam); (LANL)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Removal of Pu238 from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new anion flowsheet for use in HB-Line was tested in the lab with Reillex{trademark} HPQ for removal of Pu{sup 238} contamination from Np. Significant rejection of Pu{sup 238} was observed by washing with 6 to 12 bed volumes (BV) of reductive wash containing reduced nitric acid concentration along with both ferrous sulfamate (FS) and hydrazine. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 1500 to 2200 g Np were observed with modest losses for up-flow washing. Down-flow washing was observed to have high losses. The following are recommended conditions for removing Pu{sup 238} from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: Up-flow 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: Up-flow 6-12 BV of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS, 0.05 M hydrazine. 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: Up-flow 1-2 BV of 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (4) Elution conditions: Down-flow 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Reductive Dissolution of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

238,239,240Pu (gross alpha activity 1.7 105?pCi/L) isotopes were detected in leachate samples collected from the low-level radioactive-waste disposal sites at West Valley, NY and Maxey Flats, KY (3-5). ... Pu in trench leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved species, primarily Pu(IV) complexes with strong org. ... The SIT is used for ionic strength corrections. ...

Arokiasamy J. Francis; Cleveland J. Dodge; Jeffrey B. Gillow

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nanofibers (PU and PAN) and nanoparticles (Nanoclay and MWNTs) simultaneous effects on polyurethane foam sound absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research, simultaneous effects of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polyurethane (PU) nanofibers, multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and nanoclay incorporation on sound absorption behavior of polyurethane ... ...

Hossein Bahrambeygi; Niloufar Sabetzadeh; Amir Rabbi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Pb-210 and Pu-239,240 in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sediment resuspension and allows for additional scavenging of Pb-210 and Pu from overlyi. ng waters. Mixing of sediment at depths below the rapidly mixed surface layer also may play a role in increasing sediment inventories of Pb-210 and Pu... Redistribution of Pb-210 and Pu within the Sediment. . . . 17 SAMPLING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO. 19 SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES. 25 Sedi. ment Sampling Pb-210 Analysis 25 25 Pu Analysis 27 Ra-226 Analysis 28 Mn and Al Analysis 29 Carbonate Analysis...

Rotter, Richard Joseph

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, J.M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reaction of plutonium with water kinetic and equilibrium behavior of binary and ternary phases in the Pu + O + H system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetic and equilibrium behavior of the Pu + O + H system has been studied by measuring the production of hydrogen gas formed by a sequence of hydrolysis reactions. The kinetic dependence of the Pu + H/sub 2/O reaction on salt concentration and temperature has been defined. The metal is quantitatively converted to a fine black powder which has been identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride, PuOH. Other hydrolysis products formed in aqueous media include a second oxide hydride, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 9/H/sub 3/, and the oxides Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 12/, Pu/sub 9/O/sub 16/, Pu/sub 10/O/sub 18/, Pu/sub 12/O/sub 22/, and PuO/sub 2/. Thermal decomposition products of PuOH include Pu/sub 2/O/sub 2/H and PuO. A tentative phase diagram for Pu + O + H is presented and structural relationships of the oxide hydrides and oxides are discussed. 10 figures, 5 tables.

Haschke, J.M.; Hodges, A.E. III; Bixby, G.E.; Lucas, R.L.

1983-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiation damage effects in candidate titanates for Pu disposition: Zirconolite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of radiation-induced damage from the alpha decay of 238Pu on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics are discussed. Macro and micro swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. Approximately 2.6נ1018?/g were needed to render the specimens X-ray amorphous more to saturate the swelling. Unlike pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4)נ10?3g/(m2d) with very little pH dependence and no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

D.M. Strachan; R.D. Scheele; E.C. Buck; A.E. Kozelisky; R.L. Sell; R.J. Elovich; W.C. Buchmiller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high ?-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.1651011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.741010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

P. Salvador-Castieira; T. Bry?; R. Eykens; F.-J. Hambsch; A. Moens; S. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali; C. Pretel

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities 3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities August 7, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: SEARCH-LAB has reported some vulnerabilities in PuTTY PLATFORM: PuTTY 0.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to potentially compromise a user's system. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54354 http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2013-3520 CVE-2013-4206 CVE-2013-4207 CVE-2013-4208 CVE-2013-4852 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerabilities are caused due to some integer overflow errors when handling the SSH handshake and can be exploited to cause heap-based buffer overflows via a negative handshake message length. IMPACT: Successful exploitation of may allow execution of arbitrary code

66

Hydrogen trapping in ?-Pu: insights from electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density functional theory calculations have been performed to provide details of the structural and charge-transfer details related to the solid solution of hydrogen in (?)-plutonium. We follow the Flanagan model that outlines the process by which hydrogen interacts with a metal to produce hydride phases, via a sequence of surface, interstitial and defect-bound (trapped) states. Due to the complexities of the electronic structure in plutonium solid-state systems, we take the pragmatic approach of adopting the 'special quasirandom structure' to disperse the atomic magnetic moments. We find that this approach produces sound structural and thermodynamic properties in agreement with the available experimental data. In ?-Pu, hydrogen has an exothermic binding energy to all of the states relevant in the Flanagan model, and, furthermore, is anionic in all these states. The charge transfer is maximized (i.e.most negative for hydrogen) in the hydride phase. The pathway from surface to hydride is sequentially exothermic, in the order surface

Christopher D Taylor; Sarah C Hernandez; Michael F Francis; Daniel S Schwartz; Asok K Ray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second of two papers on the results of radiation-induced damage accumulation in titanate ceramics that potentially could be used for weapons grade plutonium disposition. In the first paper we discussed the results from pyrochlore (betafite) based ceramics. In this paper, we discuss the effects of radiation-induced damage on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics from the alpha decay of 238Pu. Macro (bulk) and micro (X-ray diffraction) swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. It took approximately 740 days (2.6?1018 ?/g) for the specimens to become X-ray amorphouslonger for the swelling to saturate. Unlike what we observed for the pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4)?10-3 g/(m2?d). Very little pH dependence was observed for zirconolite specimens and, like we observed for the pyrochlore-bearing ceramics in this study, there was no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. As with the pyrochlore, these materials did not become substantially friable with increasing radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: Non-linear effects Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections Multi-isotope consistent assimilation Consistency between differential and integral experiments

G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Criticality Safety Controls for 55-Gallon Drums with a Mass Limit of 200 grams Pu-239  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following 200-gram Pu drum criticality safety controls are applicable to RHWM drum storage operations: (1) Mass (Fissile/Pu) - each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be limited to 200 gram Pu or Pu equivalent; (2) Moderation - Hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density greater than that (0.133 g H/cc) of polyethylene and paraffin are not allowed and hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density no greater than that of polyethylene and paraffin are allowed with unlimited amounts; (3) Interaction - a spacing of 30-inches (76 cm) is required between arrays and 200-gram Pu drums shall be placed in arrays for 200-gram Pu drums only (no mingling of 200-gram Pu drums with other drums not meeting the drum controls associated with the 200-gram limit); (4) Reflection - no beryllium and carbon/graphite (other than the 50-gram waiver amount) is allowed, (note that Nat-U exceeding the waiver amount is allowed when its U-235 content is included in the fissile mass limit of 200 grams); and (5) Geometry - drum geometry, only 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be used and array geometry, 55-gallon drums are allowed for 2-high stacking. Steel waste boxes may be stacked 3-high if constraint.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effect of Coulomb Correlations on the Electronic Structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of strong Coulomb correlations on the electronic structure of the Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa5 by employing the relativistic local spin density approximation+ Hubbard U (LSDA+U) method. The inclusion of intra-atomic Coulomb U and exchange J parameters leads to a significant reconstruction of the f states electronic structure over that given by the LSDA approach. At variance with the LSDA, the LSDA+U suggests jj-like coupling for the Pu 5f manifold.

Alexander B. Shick, Vclav Jani, and Peter M. Oppeneer

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

Isochronal annealing of radiation damage in (alpha)- and (delta)-Pu alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic isochronal annealing curves were measured on specimens of self damaged {alpha}-Pu and several {delta}-Pu alloys stabilized by Ga and Am. These results are compared to one another and to isochronal resistivity annealing curves, where distinct differences are observed between the magnetic and resistive annealing for the case of {delta}-Pu. The first stage of annealing observed in the resistivity measurements is largely missing from the magnetic measurements, indicating that interstitials contribute little if any signal to the magnetization, while the onset of vacancy migration is strongly reflected in the magnetization signal.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; Haire, R G

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

RAPID DETERMINATION OF 237 NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in water samples was developed for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via peak tailing. The method provide enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then moving Pu to DGA resin for additional removal of uranium. The decontamination factor for uranium from Pu is almost 100,000 and the decontamination factor for U from Np is greater than 10,000. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation method. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long and short-lived Pu isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 20 samples (including QC samples) in 4 to 6 hours, and can also be used for emergency response. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.; Culligan, B.; Nichols, S.; Noyes, G.

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

Rigid foam polyurethane (PU) derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) for thermal insulation in roof systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the response of the thermal insulation lining of rigid foam polyurethane (PU) derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) in heat conditions, based on dynamic climate approach. Liners have been widely used, because the coverage of buildings is responsible for the greatest absorption of heat by radiation, but the use of PU foam derived from this vegetal oil is unprecedented and has the advantage of being biodegradable and renewable. The hot wire parallel method provided the thermal conductivity value of the foam. The thermogravimetric analysis enabled the study of the foam decomposition and its lifetime by kinetic evaluation that involves the decomposition process. The PU foam thermal behavior analysis was performed by collecting experimental data of internal surface temperature measured by thermocouples and assessed by representative episode of the climatic fact. The results lead to the conclusion that the PU foam derived from castor oil can be applied to thermal insulation of roof systems and is an environmentally friendly material.

Grace Tibrio Cardoso; Salvador Claro Neto; Francisco Vecchia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The influence of defects on magnetic properties of fcc-Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of vacancies and interstitial atoms on magnetism in Pu is considered in the framework of the density functional theory. The crystal structure relaxation arising due to various types of defects is calculated using the molecular dynamics method with a modified embedded atom model. The local density approximation with explicit inclusion of Coulomb and spin-orbit interactions is applied in matrix invariant form to describe correlation effects in Pu with these types of defects. The calculations show that both vacancies and interstitials give rise to local moments in the f-shell of Pu in good agreement with experimental data for aged Pu. Magnetism appears due to the destruction of a delicate balance between spin-orbit and exchange interactions.

Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.; Korotin, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics (Russian Federation); Dremov, V. V., E-mail: vvd0531@mail.ru; Sapozhnikov, Ph. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'Institute of Technical Physics,' (Russian Federation)] [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'Institute of Technical Physics,' (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermophysical properties of ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}: A new potential model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an important material among plutonium based materials in nuclear industry. Pure plutonium surfaces quickly oxidizes into ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and PuO{sub 2} which are in the form of layers one on another. Here we have investigated thermal properties of ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} by molecular dynamics simulation by using a partially ionic semi-empirical rigid ion potential. Mechanical properties, thermal expansion, and heat capacity are calculated. Results were compared with available experimental data and quantum calculation [2]. Due to the experimental limitations such as toxicity and radiation effects, studying the physical properties of such materials from molecular dynamics simulations have vital importance.

Gnay, S. D., E-mail: sdgunay@gmail.com; Akdere, .; Ta?seven, . [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpaa Campus, Esenler, 34210, Istanbul (Turkey); Akgen, B., E-mail: berna.akgenc@kirklareli.edu.tr [Krklareli University Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kavakl, 39060, Krklareli (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Methylbutylmalonamide as an extractant for U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unsymmetrical diamide methylbuthylmalonamide has been synthesized and used in the extraction of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) in benzene medium. The distribution ratio for the three cations was found to increa...

G. M. Nair; D. R. Prabhu; G. R. Mahajan

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO ADDRESS PU-FE EUTECTICISSUE IN 3013 STORAGE VESSEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 22, 2005, the Manager of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in Richland, WA issued an Occurrence Report involving a potential Pu-Fe eutectic failure mechanism for the stainless steel (SS) 3013 cans containing plutonium (Pu) metal. Four additional reports addressed nuclear safety concerns about the integrity of stainless steel containers holding plutonium during fire scenarios. The reports expressed a belief that the probability and consequences of container failure due to the formation of a plutonium-iron eutectic alloy had been overlooked. Simplified thermal model to address the Pu-Fe eutectic concerns using axisymmetric model similar to the models used in the 9975 SARP were performed. The model uses Rocky Flats configuration with 2 stacked Pu buttons inside a 3013 assembly. The assembly has an outer can, an inner can, and a convenience can, all stainless steel. The boundary conditions are similar to the regulatory 30 minutes HAC fire analyses. Computer simulations of the HAC fire transients lasting 4 hours of burn time show that the interface between the primary containment vessel and the Pu metal in the 9975 package will not reach Pu-Fe eutectic temperature of 400 C.

Gupta, N; Allen Smith, A

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Am phases in the matrix of a U-Pu-Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

Dawn E Janney; J. Rory Kennedy; James W. Madden; Thomas P. O'Holleran

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection and quantification of the aquo ions of Pu in 1 MHClO4 was carried out using a 1-meter liquid core waveguide (LCW) coupledto a fiber optic UV-Vis spectrometer. Detection limits of 7 x 10-7 M forPu(VI), 1.6 x 10-5 M for Pu(V), 5 x 10-6 M for Pu(IV) and 8 x 10-6 M forPu(III) were achieved. The limits of detection represent increases of 18to 33 times those achievable using a conventional 1-cm path length.Because of the much lower detection limits of the LCW, routineidentification of the oxidation states in dilute Pu solutions can bemade.

Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

EIS-0299: Proposed Production of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) for Use in Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for Space Missions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS is for the proposed production of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) using one or more DOE research reactors and facilities.

85

Stabilization of Rocky Flats Pu-contaminated ash within chemically bonded phosphate ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility study was conducted on the use of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilization of combustion residue of high transuranic (TRU) wastes. Using a matrix of magnesium potassium phosphate formed by the room-temperature reaction of MgO and KH2PO4 solution, we made waste forms that contained 5 wt% Pu to satisfy the requirements of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The waste forms were ceramics whose compression strength was twice that of conventional cement grout and whose connected porosity was ?50% that of cement grout. Both surrogate and actual waste forms displayed high leaching resistance for both hazardous metals and Pu. Hydrogen generation resulting from the radiolytic decomposition of water and organic compounds present in the waste form did not appear to be a significant issue. Pu was present as PuO2 that was physically microencapsulated in the matrix. In the process, pyrophoricity was removed and leaching resistance was enhanced. The high leaching resistance was due to the very low solubility of PuO2 coupled with superior microencapsulation. As a result, the waste forms satisfied the current Safeguard Termination Limit requirement for storage of TRU combustion residues.

A.S. Wagh; R. Strain; S.Y. Jeong; D. Reed; T. Krause; D. Singh

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

6th US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

US-Russian Pu Science Workshop US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory University of California, Livermore, California July 14 and 15, 2006 Local Chairs: Michael Fluss, James Tobin, Adam Schwartz LLNL, Livermore, USA Alexander V. Petrovtsev, RFNC * VNIITF, Snezhinsk, Russia Boris A. Nadykto, RFNC * VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia Lidia F. Timofeeva, VNIINM, Moscow, Russia Siegfried S. Hecker, (Luis Morales POC) LANL, Los Alamos, USA Valentin E. Arkhipov, IMP, Ural Branch of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia This is a satellite meeting of the "Pu Futures-The Science 2006 International Conference", 9-13 July 2006, Asilomar Conference, Grounds, Pacific Grove Ca. The workshop is hosted by LLNL, under the aegis of the United States/Russian Federation Scientific and Technical Collaboration pursuant

87

Correlation-induced anomalies and extreme sensitivity in fcc-PU1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used GGA + U density functional theory to study the effects of correlation on the properties offcc-Pu. We found that the structural and elastic properties offcc-Pu are highly sensitive to the Hubbard U parameter. Within an interval of 0.1 eV ofthe U parameter, the equilibrium lattice constants offcc-Pu can change from 0.44 to 0.47 nm. While the bulk modulus can drop by a factor of5 to 10. The pressure derivative, dB/dp, ofthe bulk modulus can rise dramatically from 5 to 16 and then drop to a negative value before recovering to a more normal value. These observations are partially supported by existing experiments and the prediction of a negative dB/dp needs to be tested in future experiments.

Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and built a gamma-ray spectrometer system that measures the relative plutonium isotopic abundances of plutonium oxide enriched in {sup 238}Pu. The first system installed at Westinghouse Savannah River Company was tested and evaluated on plutonium oxide in stainless steel EP60/61 containers. {sup 238}Pu enrichments ranged from 20% to 85%. Results show that 200 grams of plutonium oxide in an EP60.61 container can be measured with {plus minus}0.3% precision and better than {plus minus}1.0% accuracy in the specific power using a counting time of 50 minutes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Density-functional electronic structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density-functional electronic-structure calculations for PuCoGa5 are performed to address the possibility of magnetic interactions in this high-temperature superconductor. Within an itinerant 5f-electron picture, cohesion and crystallographic parameters compares favorably with experiment, whereas only when spin and orbital interactions are accounted for the calculated electronic density of states agrees with photoemission spectra. This fact suggests that spin and orbital correlations are important for a correct description of the PuCoGa5 electronic structure and may play a role in an unconventional mechanism for superconductivity.

P. Sderlind

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

Comprehensive appraisal of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of {sup 239+240}Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site.

Litaor, M.I.; Allen, L. [EG& G Rocky Flats, Golden, CO (United States); Ellerbroek, D. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......were located in a fire-proof safe in...Laboratory, and the release of the 240Pu caused...were stored in a fire-proof, heavy-duty...regular intervals to release the build-up of...catch and retain a fraction of the airborne 240Pu resulting......

R. Hochmann; H. Eisenwagner; T. Benesch; J. Hunt; R. Cruz-Suarez; S. Bulyha; C. Schmitzer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......located in a fire-proof safe...Laboratory, and the release of the 240Pu...stored in a fire-proof, heavy-duty...intervals to release the build-up...placed in a glove box through a special...and retain a fraction of the airborne 240Pu resulting......

R. Hochmann; H. Eisenwagner; T. Benesch; J. Hunt; R. Cruz-Suarez; S. Bulyha; C. Schmitzer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH nd relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(VI)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in G-Seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Wygmans, D.G.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

IN FORMATION PU BLIC ATION SC H EME TITLE Agency plan for The Australian National University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 | IN FORMATION PU BLIC ATION SC H EME TITLE Agency plan for The Australian National University on its website. It will be directly accessible from the webpage foi.anu.edu.au and be identified possible, provide online content that can be searched by web browsers Provide a search function

95

Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

Wang, T F

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Recovery of UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a process for converting PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the U0{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} to metals while converting Li metal to Li{sub 2}O. Li{sub 2}O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting 0{sub 2} out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li{sub 2}O to disassociate to 0{sub 2} and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl{sub 2}.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Beyond Spin-Orbit: Probing Electron Correlation in the Pu 5f States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments planned to address the issue of electron correlation in the Pu 5f states are described herein. The key is the utilization of the Fano Effect, the observation of spin polarization in nonmagnetic systems, using chiral excitation such as circularly polarized X-rays.

Tobin, J G

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently rtxpeetlng pemlasion to !wu mpmaentatfoee of Uallinckrodt visit 03% to review rare earth smparatlon tmkniquas. Their lntsmst In purev binstrIal In that they hop to indsti- preilnotlon '- emparntlon of thssae elwnts., Dr. %odnUf oheckad ritli Paul -1. : '/I .._ ,,,. . . w!w was will- to ao"rrlon~vit~~'thoir,Pisiffirg.~e Laboratory sliax he did not feel that it lzpliad 8.pmferentia.l tmabmnt of KalllncJwodt. Subsquently, Dr. %odmfP check~wlth Dr. Davidmnof the Office of Industrial Developmemtuho aleodid Mt objsctbutpointed Out that the Vick Chezdcal Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced UNpPu fuel to achieve long-life core in heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to look at the possibility of approaching the long-life core comparable with reactor life-time. The main issues are centered on UNpPu fuel in a tight lattice design with heavy water as a coolant. It is found that in a hard neutron spectrum thus obtained, a large fraction of 238Pu produced by neutron capture in 237Np not only protects plutonium against uncontrolled proliferation, but substantially contributes in keeping criticality due to improved fissile properties (its capture-to-fission ratio drops below unit). Equilibrium fuel composition demonstrates excellent conversion properties that yield the burn-up value as high as 200 GWd/t at extremely small reactivity swings.

K. Nikitin; M. Saito; V. Artisyuk; A. Chmelev; V. Apse

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Density-functional study of water adsorption on the PuO2(110) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water adsorption on a PuO2(110) surface is studied using a periodic model with both the local-density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density-functional theory. The 60 core electrons of the Pu atom are represented by a relativistic effective core potential, and scalar relativistic effects have been incorporated into the valence orbitals. Both molecular and dissociative configurations of the adsorbate H2O are considered at one molecular layer coverage. For molecular water adsorption, LDA calculations indicate binding only at the top site, whereas the GGA indicates no binding for any site. Dissociative adsorption is found to be energetically more favorable than molecular adsorption, in agreement with experimental observations. The effects on the geometric and electronic structures influenced by water adsorption are investigated.

Xueyuan Wu and Asok K. Ray

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of NpO{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}O{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}P{sup 2+} in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Prompt ?-ray production in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The prompt gamma-ray spectrum from fission is important for understanding the physics of nuclear fission, and also in applications involving fission. Relatively few measurements of the prompt gamma spectrum from 239Pu(n,f) have been published.Purpose: This experiment measured the multiplicity, individual gamma energy spectrum, and total gamma energy spectrum of prompt fission gamma rays from 239Pu(n,f) in the neutron energy range from thermal to 30 keV, to test models of fission and to provide information for applications.Method: Gamma rays from neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE gamma-ray calorimeter. Fission events were tagged by detecting fission products in a parallel-plate avalanche counter in the center of DANCE. The measurements were corrected for detector response using a geant4 model of DANCE. A detailed analysis for the gamma rays from the 1+ resonance complex at 10.93 eV is presented.Results: A six-parameter analytical parametrization of the fission gamma-ray spectrum was obtained. A Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach calculation provided good general agreement with the data, but some differences remain to be resolved.Conclusions: An analytic parametrization can be made of the gamma-ray multiplicity, energy distribution, and total-energy distribution for the prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. This parametrization may be useful for applications. Modern Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach calculations can do a good job of calculating the fission gamma-ray emission spectrum, although some details remain to be understood.

J. L. Ullmann; E. M. Bond; T. A. Bredeweg; A. Couture; R. C. Haight; M. Jandel; T. Kawano; H. Y. Lee; J. M. ODonnell; A. C. Hayes; I. Stetcu; T. N. Taddeucci; P. Talou; D. J. Vieira; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. A. Becker; A. Chyzh; J. Gostic; R. Henderson; E. Kwan; C. Y. Wu

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Spent Nuclear Fuel Self-Induced XRF to Predict Pu to U Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area of interest, would improve input accountability and shipper/receiver differences. XRF measurements were made on individual PWR fuel rods with varying fuel ages and final burn-ups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July 2008 and January... Committee NRF Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence viii ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pu Plutonium PUREX Plutonium and Uranium Recovery by Extraction PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RPP Reprocessing Plant SNM Special Nuclear Material...

Stafford, Alissa Sarah

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Mass spectrometric characterization of sequence-specific complexes of DNA and transcription factor PU.1 DNA binding domain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to study the noncovalent interaction of the 13.5-kDa DNA binding domain of PU.1 (PU.1-DBD) with specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) target molecules. Mixtures of PU.1-DBD protein and wildtype target DNA sequence yielded ESI-MS spectra showing only protein-dsDNA complex ions of 1:1 stoichiometry and free dsDNA. When PU.1-DBD protein, wild type target DNA, and a mutant target DNA lacking the consensus sequence were mixed, only the 1:1 complex with the wild-type DNA was observed, consistent with gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay results, demonstrating the observation of sequence-specific protein-dsDNA complexes using ESI-MS. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cheng, Xueheng; Harms, A.C.; Bruce, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); and others

1996-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Shenzhen Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Shenzhen Prosunpro/ PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Place Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip 518055 Sector Solar Product Shenzhen Prosunpro makes and installs flat panel solar passive energy collectors and engineers central solar hot water systems. Coordinates 22.546789°, 114.112556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.546789,"lon":114.112556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Characterization of a mixed salt of 1-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one Pu(IV)complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most expert analyses of the projected world energy needs show utilization of nuclear energy will be essential for the next few decades, and hence the need to support this technology grows. But as one measure of the supporting science base of this field, as of December 2006, only 25 Pu containing structures were in the Cambridge Structural Database, as compared to 21,807 for Fe. A comparison of the rate of addition to this knowledge base reveals that approximately 500 Fe structures are registered with the Cambridge Structural Database every year, while in the same period only two or three Pu crystal structures are published. A continuing objective of this laboratory has been the development of new sequestering agents for actinide decorporation and selective extractions. This effort has been based on similarities in the properties of Pu(IV) and Fe(III), and the chelating groups in microbial Fe(III) sequestering agents, siderophores. The HOPO ligands (Figure 1) are one such class of chelating group which have been investigated as selective actinide extractants.

Gorden, Anne E.V.; Xu, Jide; Szigethy, Geza; Oliver, Allen; Shuh,David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technical Basis for Safe Operations with Pu-239 in NMS and S Facilities (F and H Areas)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-239 is now being processed in HB-Line and H-Canyon as well as FB-Line and F-Canyon. As part of the effort to upgrade the Authorization Basis for H Area facilities relative to nuclear criticality, a literature review of Pu polymer characteristics was conducted to establish a more quantitative vs. qualitative technical basis for safe operations. The results are also applicable to processing in F Area facilities.The chemistry of Pu polymer formation, precipitation, and depolymerization is complex. Establishing limits on acid concentrations of solutions or changing the valence to Pu(III) or Pu(VI) can prevent plutonium polymer formation in tanks in the B lines and canyons. For Pu(IV) solutions of 7 g/L or less, 0.22 M HNO3 prevents polymer formation at ambient temperature. This concentration should remain the minimum acid limit for the canyons and B lines when processing Pu-239 solutions. If the minimum acid concentration is compromised, the solution may need to be sampled and tested for the presence of polymer. If polymer is not detected, processing may proceed. If polymer is detected, adding HNO3 to a final concentration above 4 M is the safest method for handling the solution. The solution could also be heated to speed up the depolymerization process. Heating with > 4 M HNO3 will depolymerize the solution for further processing.Adsorption of Pu(IV) polymer onto the steel walls of canyon and B line tanks is likely to be 11 mg/cm2, a literature value for unpolished steel. This value will be confirmed by experimental work. Tank-to-tank transfers via steam jets are not expected to produce Pu(IV) polymer unless a larger than normal dilution occurs (e.g., >3 percent) at acidities below 0.4 M.

Bronikowski, M.G.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. [Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Callow, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Callow, R.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Status of solubility data for selected elements (U, Mp, Pu, Am, Te, Ni, and Zr)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an evaluation of solubility data for U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni and Zr compounds at ambient and elevated temperatures. We review the status of such data in light of the most recently reported experimental results. The focus is on the solid phases that may control solubilities under expected conditions in and near a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Solubility data or reliable predictions over the temperature range 20 to 150{degrees}C will be used in geochemical modeling studies of the Yucca Mountain Project [96PAL].

Moll, H.; Brachmann, A.; Wruck, D.; Palmer, C.

1997-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Attempt to produce element 120 in the 244Pu + 58Fe reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment aimed at the synthesis of isotopes of element 120 has been performed using the {sup 244}Pu({sup 58}Fe,xn){sup 302-x} 120 reaction. No decay chains consistent with fusion-evaporation reaction products were observed during an irradiation with a beam dose of 7.1 x 10{sup 18} 330-MeV {sup 58}Fe projectiles. The sensitivity of the experiment corresponds to a cross section of 0.4 pb for the detection of one decay.

Oganessian, Y T; Utyonkov, V K; Lobanov, Y V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Sagaidak, R N; Shorokovsky, I V; Tsyganov, Y S; Voinov, A A; Mezentsev, A N; Subbotin, V G; Sukhov, A M; Subotic, K; Zagrebaev, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Henderson, R A; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M; Landrum, J H; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, M A; Stoyer, N J; Wilk, P A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Electrodeposition of U and Pu on Thin C and Ti Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physics experiments aimed at deducing key parameters for use in a variety of programs critical to the mission of the National Laboratories require actinide targets placed onto various substrates. The target material quantity and the substrate desired depend upon the type of experiment being designed. The physicist(s) responsible for the experimental campaign will consult with the radiochemistry staff as to the feasibility of producing a desired target/substrate combination. In this report they discuss the production of U and Pu targets on very thin C and Ti substrates. The techniques used, plating cells designed for, tips, and limits is discussed.

Henderson, R A; Gostic, J M

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

New heavy-fermion system, NpBe13, with a comparison to UBe13 and PuBe13  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have prepared single crystals of NpBe13, Np0.68U0.32Be13, and PuBe13 and measured their resistivity, susceptibility, and specific heat down to low temperatures. NpBe13 has an itinerant-electron magnetic transition at 3.4 K, with a large temperature-dependent specific heat above this transition that is quite similar to that observed in the heavy-fermion superconductor UBe13 and a ?(T=0) of approximately 900 mJ/mole K2. PuBe13 may be described as a Kondo-type system, with certain inconsistencies. The data are compared to results for UBe13 and are consistent with a narrow f band at the Fermi energy in UBe13 moving lower in energy with the addition of f electrons in heavier actinide elements to create a Kondo resonance by PuBe13.

G. R. Stewart; Z. Fisk; J. L. Smith; J. O. Willis; M. S. Wire

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Levels in Pu237 populated by Am237 (electron capture) and Cm241(?) decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electron capture decay scheme of Am237 (73 min) has been investigated by measuring the ?-ray and conversion-electron spectra of mass-separated Am237 samples. The ?-ray spectra were measured with a Ge(Li) spectrometer and the conversion-electron spectra were measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and a magnetic ?-ray spectrometer. Thirty-five ? rays were identified and the multipolarities of most of the transitions were deduced. The half-life of Am237 was determined by following the decay of the 280.2 keV photopeak and was found to be 73.0 1.0 min. The ?-particle energy and ? branching were measured to be 6.042 0.005 MeV and [(2.5 0.3) 10-2]%, respectively. On the basis of the present investigation the following single-particle states have been identified in Pu237: 72-[743],0 +[631], 145.5; 52+[622],280.2; 32+[631],370.4; 52+[633],407.8; 72+[624],473.5; 52-[752],655.3; and 72+[613],908.8 keV. The ground state of Am237 has been deduced to be the 52-[523] Nilsson orbital. The logft values for electron capture transitions to the observed states were derived. The ?-particle spectrum of a mass-separated Cm241 sample was measured with the Argonne double focusing magnetic spectrometer. Eleven ? groups identified in this spectrum populate the members of the ground state, +[631], and 32+[631] bands. The ?-decay hindrance factors are consistent with the Nilsson-state assignments deduced from Am237 electron capture decay.RADIOACTIVITY Am237 [from Np237(?,4n) and Np237(He3,3n))]; measured T12, E?, E?, I?, Ece, Ice, ??- coin, ? branching, Cm241 [from Pu239(?,2n)]; measured E?, I?; deduced hindrance factors. Pu237 deduced levels logft, (EC) ? multipolarity, I, ?, eight single-particle states. Mass-separated Am237 and Cm241. Toroidal ? spectrometer at 0.15% FWHM.

I. Ahmad; F. T. Porter; M. S. Freedman; R. K. Sjoblom; J. Lerner; R. F. Barnes; J. Milsted; P. R. Fields

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources & trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly.

Hamilton, T.F., Millies-Lacrox, J.C. [Service Mixte de Securite Radologique, Mondhery (France); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup ?1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup ?1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup ?3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup ?3}.

Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia); Wisnubroto, Djarot S. [The Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Glenwood Springs technical conference proceedings. Volume II. Bibliography of publications, state coupled geothermal resource assessment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography of publications is divided by state as follows: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas and Washington. (MHR)

Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solubility of Pu, Np, and U from Spent UO2?Fuel Under Inert/Reducing Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to improve the scientific understanding of processes that control the release of radioactive species especially actinides from spent fuel inside a disposal canister. The Swedish concept has focused on deep burial in the rock with an iron?lined Cu?canister. Corrosion of the canister iron insert will consume any residual oxygen and provide actively reducing conditions in any fluid phase. Therefore an investigation of the solubility of different radionuclides under actively reducing conditions) (Fe2+/H2) has been performed. The solubility of U Np and Pu is measured as a function of time for three different conditions: Ar atmosphere H2 atmosphere and H2 atmosphere with Fe(II) in solution.

Yngve Albinsson; Virginia Oversby; Arvid degaard?Jensen; Lars Werme

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Neutron spectral reactivity comparison of /sup 235/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 239/Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of storing fuel from reactors capable of breeding fissile material, it is possible that the beginning-of-life fissile loadings are not the most reactive for the fuel. In this context, it is necessary to consider the bred fissile isotopes to ensure conservative safety margins on storage of these fuels. Of particular interest for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant were fuels consisting primarily of /sup 235/U as the fissile isotope, such as those for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-I and -II) and some light water breeder reactor (LWBR) test elements. This study examines the relative worth of additions of the isotopes /sup 239/Pu, /sup 233/U, and /sup 235/U to a /sup 235/U-fueled critical system. The equivalence relationship between fissile isotopes depends in a complex fashion on the neutron spectrum and the relative abundance of the isotopic species.

McBroom, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties ...

Vogt, R; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Calculation of 239Pu fission observables in an event-by-event simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased interest in more exclusive fission observables has demanded more detailed models. We describe a new computational model, FREYA, that aims to meet this need by producing large samples of complete fission events from which any observable of interest can then be extracted consistently, including any interesting correlations. The various model assumptions are described and the potential utility of the model is illustrated. As a concrete example, we use formal statistical methods, experimental data on neutron production in neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu, along with FREYA, to develop quantitative insights into the relation between reaction observables and detailed microscopic aspects of fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission taken together with less accurate current measurements for the prompt post-fission neutron energy spectrum, up to the threshold for multi-chance fission, place remarkably fine constraints on microscopic theories.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

An evaluation of alternate production methods for Pu-238 general purpose heat source pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past half century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to power deep space satellites. Fabricating heat sources for RTGs, specifically General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs), has remained essentially unchanged since their development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the applicable fields of chemistry, manufacturing and control systems. This paper evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu 238 fueled heat sources. Specifically, this paper discusses the production of the plutonium-oxide granules, which are the input stream to the ceramic pressing and sintering processes. Alternate chemical processes are compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product.

Mark Borland; Steve Frank

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Exploring simultaneous single and coincident gamma-ray measurements for U/Pu assay in safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a broad range of gamma-ray uranium standards and two plutonium samples of known isotopic content, list mode gamma ray information from two Compton suppressed and one planar HPGe detectors were analyzed according to the time information of the signals. Interferences from Cs-137 were introduced. In this study, we extended singles measurements by exploring the potential of simultaneously using both singles and coincidence data for U/Pu assay. The main goals of this exploratory study are: 1) whether one will be able to use coincidence information in addition to the complicated 100-keV unfolding to obtain extra information of uranium and plutonium isotopic ratios, and 2) with higher energy interference gamma-rays from isotopes such as Cs-137, can the coincidence information help to provide the isotopic information. (authors)

Wang, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Horne, S. M. [Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Henderson, R. A.; Roberts, K. E.; Vogt, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modeling and analysis of the latent period of osteosarcomas induced by incorporated 239Pu: The role of immune responses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the utility of a stochastic model of carcinogenesis, proposed earlier by Yakovlev and Polig, in quantitative analysis of the incidence of radiation-induced osteosarcomas in beagels injected with various amounts of ^2^3^9Pu. The original ... Keywords: Bone tumors, Carcinogenesis models, Immune response, Internal irradiation, Survival analysis

A. D. Tsodikov; F. Bruenger; R. D. Lloyd; S. Miller; E. Polig; A. Yu. Yakovlev

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Prompt Gamma Emission in Resonance Neutron Induced Fission of 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scientific interest in the resonance neutron induced capture and fission reactions on 239Pu is continuously rising during the last decade. From a practical point of view, this is because more precise data on capture and fission cross sections, fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions, variation of prompt fission neutron and gamma yields in the resonance neutron region, are needed for the modelling of new generation nuclear power plants and for nuclear spent fuel and waste transmutation. From a heuristic and fundamental point of view, such a research improves our knowledge and understanding of the fission phenomena itself. To achieve these goals more powerful neutron sources and more precise fission product detectors have to be used. At the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP), where already half a century the thermal and resonance neutron induced nuclear reactions are studied, a new electron accelerator driven white spectrum pulsed neutron source IREN has been built and successfully tested. The improved characteristics of this facility, in comparison with those of the former pulse neutron fast reactor IBR-30, will allow measuring some of the neutron-nuclear reaction data with better precision and accuracy. A new experimental setup for detecting gamma rays (and neutrons) has been designed and is under construction. It will consist of 2 rings (arrays) of 12 NaI(Tl) detectors each (or 1 array of 24 detectors) with variable ring diameter and distance between both rings. Such a setup will make possible not only to measure the multiplicity, energy and angular anisotropy of prompt fission gammas, but also to separate the contribution of prompt fission neutrons by their longer time-of-flight from the fissile target to the detectors. The signals from all the 24 detectors will be recorded simultaneously in digitized form and will be stored on the hard disk of the personal computer for further off-line analysis. The measurement of the prompt gamma-ray emission from 239Pu resonance neutron induced fission is one of the most probable candidates for the first experiments to be performed at IREN using the newly designed gamma-ray detector.

I. Ruskov; Yu.N. Kopatch; Ts. Panteleev; V.R. Skoy; V.N. Shvetsov; E. Dermendjiev; N. Janeva; L.B. Pikelner; Yu.V. Grigoriev; Zh.V. Mezentseva; I. Ivanov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Neutron induced fission of Pu240,242 from 1 eV to 200 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron induced fission cross sections of Pu240,242 have been measured as a function of incident neutron energy from 1 eV to 200 MeV. This is part of an effort to reduce experimental uncertainties of nuclear data in support of next generation nuclear reactors and transmutation technology. These two plutonium isotopes are nonfissile, and the available data are limited below reaction threshold. The present data demonstrate the presence of a 2.67 eV resonance in the Pu242 fission cross section, which is missing in the ENDF/B-VII evaluation, and resolve discrepancies in the keV region. The measured cross sections are also compared with statistical model calculations made with the nuclear reaction code GNASH.

F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill; M. Mocko; J. D. Baker; C. A. McGrath

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energys request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Phase Characteristics of a Number of U-Pu-Am-Np-Zr Metallic Alloys for Use as Fast Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic fuel alloys consisting of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium with minor additions of americium and neptunium are under evaluation for potential use to transmute long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in fast reactors. A series of test designs for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), designated as the AFC-1 and AFC-2 designs. Metal fuel compositions in these designs have included varying amounts of U, Pu, Zr, and minor actinides (Am, Np). Investigations into the phase behavior and relationships based on the alloy constituents have been conducted using x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. Results of these investigations, along with proposed relationships between observed behavior and alloy composition, are provided. In general, observed behaviors can be predicted by a ternary U-Pu-Zr phase diagram, with transition temperatures being most dependent on U content. Furthermore, the enthalpy associated with transitions is strongly dependent on the as-cast microstructural characteristics.

Douglas E. Burkes; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas Hartmann; Cynthia A. Papesch; Denis D. Keiser, Jr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Event-by-Event Study of Prompt Neutrons from 239Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of {sup 240}Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies of less than 2 MeV.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Employing a recently developed Monte-Carlo model, we study the fission of {sup 240}Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte-Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies of less than 2 MeV.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies up to 2 MeV.

R. Vogt; J. Randrup; J. Pruet; W. Younes

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-precision prompt-?-ray spectral data from the reaction Pu241(nth, f)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present results from the first high-precision prompt-?-ray spectral measurements from the reaction Pu241(nth, f). Apart from one recent experiment, no data are reported in the literature for this fissioning system, which motivated a new dedicated experiment. We have measured prompt-fission ? rays with three cerium-doped LaBr3 (two 5.08cm5.08cm and one 7.62cm7.62cm) and one CeBr3 (5.08cm5.08cm) scintillation detectors, which all exhibit excellent timing and good energy resolution. The average ?-ray multiplicity was determined to be ??=(8.210.09) per fission, the average energy to be ??=(0.780.01)MeV, and the total energy to be E?,tot=(6.410.06) MeV as the weighted average from all detectors. Since the results from all detectors are in excellent agreement, and the total released ? energy is modestly higher than the one in the present evaluated nuclear data files, we suspect that the underestimation of the prompt-? heating in nuclear reactors is due to fast-neutron-induced fission on U238 or rather from fission induced by ? rays from neutron capture in the construction material.

S. Oberstedt; R. Billnert; T. Belgya; T. Bry?; W. Geerts; C. Guerrero; F.-J. Hambsch; Z. Kis; A. Moens; A. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; L. Szentmiklosi; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Report on the effectiveness of flocculation for removal of {sup 239}Pu at concentrations of 1 pCi/L and 0.1 pCi/L. RFP Pond Water Characterization and Treatment (LATO-EG&G-91-022): Task C deliverables: 5.1.2 and 5.2.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to assess the effectiveness of flocculation for the removal of Pu from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pond waters spiked with {sup 239}Pu at the 1.0 and 0.1 pCi/L level. The flocculation treatment procedure is described in detail. Results are presented for treatment studies for the removal of Pu from C-2 pond water spiked with {sup 239}Pu and from distilled water spiked with {sup 239}Pu.

Triay, I.R.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Mitchell, A.J.; Cisneros, M.R.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Attrep, M.; Nuttall, H.E. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could actually help extend the life of a fuel pin in a long pin reactor design to a higher peak fuel burnup.

D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible ... On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake with a magnitude of M 9.0 occurred in the western North Pacific about 180 km off the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in the northeast coast of Japan and it was followed by gigantic tsunami. ... Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP), significant levels of anthropogenic radionuclides have been detected in seabed sediments off the east coast of Japan. ...

Wenting Bu; Miho Fukuda; Jian Zheng; Tatsuo Aono; Takashi Ishimaru; Jota Kanda; Guosheng Yang; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida; Qiuju Guo; Masatoshi Yamada

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

Directional correlation between. alpha. particles and L x rays in the decay of sup 238 Pu and sup 244 Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anisotropy in the directional correlation of nuclear radiations and {ital L} x rays has been clearly identified for the first time. {ital L}{sub 3} x-ray groups, {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha}, are observed to be directionally correlated with {alpha} particles in the decays of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm. The ratio of anisotropy for {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha} is consistent with the recent observation that {ital L}{sub {ital l}} has a much greater admixture of {ital M}2 than predicted by relativistic calculations.

Johnston, P.N. (Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effect of Fe2+ Oxidation on the Removal of 238Pu from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ferrous sulfamate (FS) oxidation and variation in nitric acid concentration on the removal of {sup 238}Pu contamination from Np by the HB-Line anion exchange flowsheet has been tested. Significant rejection of {sup 238}Pu was observed by washing with a reductive wash solution containing 6.0 to 6.8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) with as little as 30% of the Fe{sup 2+} from the FS remaining in its reduced form. To achieve the desired 30% removal of {sup 238}Pu from the process, conditions should be controlled to maintain the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in the reductive wash to be greater than 60%/40% (or 1.5). Since Fe{sup 2+} oxidation is strongly affected by temperature and nitric acid concentration, these parameters (as well as time after FS addition) need to be controlled to ensure predictable results. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 2000 g Np were observed with modest losses for ''up-flow'' washing. The following are recommended conditions for removing {sup 238}Pu from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), 0.05 M excess FS. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6 Bed volumes (BV) of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS (minimum 0.03M Fe{sup 2+} during wash cycle), 0.05 M hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 1-2 BV of 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (4) Elution conditions: ''Down-flow'' 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Reactor Decay Heat in 239Pu: Solving the Gamma Discrepancy in the 43000-s Cooling Period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {beta} feeding probability of {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei, which are important contributors to the decay heat in nuclear reactors, has been measured using the total absorption technique. We have coupled for the first time a total absorption spectrometer to a Penning trap in order to obtain sources of very high isobaric purity. Our results solve a significant part of a long-standing discrepancy in the {gamma} component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range.

Algora, A.; Sonzogni, A.; Algora,A.; Jordan,D.; Tain,J.L.; Rubio,B.; Agramunt,J.; Perez-Cerdan,A.B.; Molina,F; Caballero,L.; Nacher,E.; Krasznahorkay,A.; Hunyadi,M.D.; Gulyas,J; Vitez,A.; Csatlos,M.; Csige,L.; Aysto,J.; Penttila,H.; Moore,I.D.; Eronen,T.; Jokinen,A.; Nieminen,A.; Hakala,J.; Karvonen,P.; Kankainen,A.; Saastamoinen,A.; Rissanen,J.; Kessler,T.; Weber,C.; Ronkainen,J.; Rahaman,S.; Elomaa,V.; Rinta-Antila,S.; Hager,U.; Sonoda,T.; Burkard,K.; Huller,W.; Batist,L.; Gelletly,W.; Nichols,A.L.; Yoshida,T.; Sonzogni,A.A.; Perajarvi,K.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fission gas bubble nucleated cavitational swelling of the alpha-uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavitational swelling has been identified as a potential swelling mechanism for the alpha uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The trends of U-Pu-Zr swelling data prior to fuel cladding contact can be interpreted in terms of unrestrained cavitational driven swelling. It is theorized that the swelling mechanisms at work in the alpha uranium phase can be modeled by single vacancy and single interstitial kinetics with intergranular gas bubbles providing the void nuclei, avoiding the use of complicated defect interaction terms required for the calculation of void nucleation. The focus of the kinetics of fission gas evolution as it relates to cavitational swelling is prior to the formation of a significant amount of interconnected porosity and is on the development of small intergranular gas bubbles which can act as void nuclei. Calculations for the evolution of intergranular fission gas bubbles show that they provide critical cavity sizes (i.e., the size above which the cavity will grow by bias-driven vacancy flux) consistent with the observed incubation dose for the onset of rapid swelling and gas release.

Rest, J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Plutonium isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu in EP 60/61 containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This user's manual is addressed to the Savannah River Site personnel (routine operators and supervisors) who perform measurements with the Pu-238 isotopic analysis system. Each chapter begins with a table of contents that lists the section title, illustrations, and tabular data presented in that chapter. The first chapter in this manual is an introduction to the system. Chapter 2 lists required settings for the system's commercial nuclear instrument modules. System operating procedures are given in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains routine and supervisorial operator interactions. Chapter 5 describes the system's short- and long-printout output formats. Chapter 6 gives instructions for changing system parameters. Error messages are listed and described Chapter 7. Chapter 8 contains a reference article on measuring relative plutonium isotopics in plutonium samples enriched in Pu-238. All commercial items mentioned in this manual are assumed to be functioning correctly for the purposes of system operation. Users are referred to individual equipment manufacturers' manuals for details of operation, trouble-shooting, and maintenance of this commercial equipment.

Ruhter, W.D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Kinetics of the reaction between plutonium dioxide and water from 25?C to 350?C: Formation and properties of the phases PuO 2+ X  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the areas of plutonium waste disposition and storage and medium to long-term retrievable Pu materials storage the issue of water and other small molecule interactions with pure or impure Pu oxide materials and metal has become a major concern. The interaction of PuO 2 with water was investigated from 100?C to 350?C using a suite of experimental techniques which include microbalance and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) methods thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) mass spectrometry (MS) x-ray and neutron diffraction. Reaction rates and oxide compositions were determined from measured increases in sample mass or pressure over time (t). Gaseous and solid products were analyzed using MS and diffraction methods respectively.

L. Morales; T. Allen; J. Haschke

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ab initio full charge-density study of the atomic volume of ?-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation.

L. Vitos; J. Kollr; H. L. Skriver

1997-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

EXPERIMENTAL AND CALCULATED RESEARCHES OF NUCLEAR-PHYSICS CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSEMBLIES CONTAINING [237Np + 239Pu(98%)] IN TH  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics Of Assemblies Containing [ 237 Np + 239 Pu(98%)] in The Core and Reflector of Natural Uranium V.I.Gavrilov, I.Yu.Drozdov, N.V.Zavialov, V.I.Il'in, A.A.Kajgorodov, M.I.Kuvshinov, A.V.Panin Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics Neptunium 237 seems to be a promising material as a core component of such systems as pulsed reactors [2] and cascade blankets for electronuclear facilities [1]. To realize calculated simulation of such facilities it is required to know neutron-physics data for the materials included. In this respect 237 Np is a little-studied material. Thus, the rated values of critical mass for a "bare" sphere of

155

Radiochemical procedures for analysis of Pu, Am, Cs and Sr in water, soil, sediments and biota samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Radioactivity Analysis Laboratory (ERAL) was established as an analytical facility. The primary function of ERAL is to provide fast and accurate radiological data of environmental samples. Over the years, many radiochemical procedures have been developed by the staffs of ERAL. As result, we have found that our procedures exist in many different formats and in many different notebooks, documents and files. Therefore, in order to provide for more complete and orderly documentation of the radiochemical procedures that are being used by ERAL, we have decided to standardize the format and compile them into a series of reports. This first report covers procedures we have developed and are using for the radiochemical analysis of Pu, Am, Cs, and Sr in various matrices. Additional analytical procedures and/or revisions for other elements will be reported as they become available through continuation of these compilation efforts.

Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Noshkin, V.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Effects of self-irradiation on local crystal structure and 5flocalization in PuCoGa5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 18.5 K superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} has many unusual properties, including those due to damage induced by self-irradiation. The superconducting transition temperature decreases sharply with time, suggesting a radiation-induced Frenkel defect concentration much larger than predicted by current radiation damage theories. Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements demonstrate that while the local crystal structure in fresh material is well ordered, aged material is disordered much more strongly than expected from simple defects, consistent with strong disorder throughout the damage cascade region. These data highlight the potential impact of local lattice distortions relative to defects on the properties of irradiated materials and underscore the need for more atomic-resolution structural comparisons between radiation damage experiments and theory.

Booth, C.H.; Daniel, M.; Wilson, R.E.; Bauer, E.D.; Mitchell,J.N.; Moreno, N.O.; Morales, L.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Allen, P.G.

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Intrinsic Nanoscience of ? PuGa Alloys: Local Structure and Speciation, Collective Behavior, Nanoscale Heterogeneity, and Aging Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials Science and Technology Division, Theoretical Division, Health, Safety, Radiation Protection Division, and ?Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, United States ... The EXAFS were calculated as the difference between the full spectra and their smooth atomic backgrounds approximated by an arctangent and Gaussian for the edge and a polynomial spline at higher energies, divided by the atomic absorbance fall off with increasing energy. ... That the Ga environment is only minimally or negligibly affected by aging implies that the aging-induced defects, whether isolated or as novel ordered structures, almost exclusively involve Pu sites and are thus concentrated in Ga-depleted domains in the crystal that must therefore reform if they are lost at some point in the aging process. ...

Steven D. Conradson; Nicolas Bock; Julio M. Castro; Dylan R. Conradson; Lawrence E. Cox; Wojciech Dmowski; David E. Dooley; Takeshi Egami; Francisco J. Espinosa-Faller; Franz J. Freibert; Angel J. Garcia-Adeva; Nancy J. Hess; Erik Holmstrm; Rafael C. Howell; Barbara A. Katz; Jason C. Lashley; Raymond J. Martinez; David P. Moore; Luis A. Morales; J. David Olivas; Ramiro A. Pereyra; Michael Ramos; Jeffrey H. Terry; Phillip M. Villella

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling of irradiation-induced amorphization in a titanate ceramic. [(CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations have been carried out to model the alpha decay-induced conversion of a titanate ceramic (CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/) from the crystalline state to an amorphous condition. Experimental results have shown that the disordered state varies with irradiation temperature and extent of redamage, and so special consideration is given to those factors. Results of these calculations are applied to the analysis of dimensional changes during irradiation at various temperatures and release of stored energy on recovery to the crystalline state. Modeling results appear to show that it is possible to convert to the amorphous state under irradiation by two different processes. Modeling is also employed to extend experimental results on swelling from the present data base to a high damage rate characteristic of ion implantation and the low rates typical of nuclear waste storage and self-damage of natural mineral analogues. 15 refs., 5 figs.; 1 tab.

Coghlan, W.A.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ratio of the ternary-to-binary fission cross sections induced by thermal and resonance neutrons in 241Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ternary-to-binary fission cross-section ratio (T/B) was determined for 241Pu for neutron induced fission in the energy region from 0.01 eV to 50 eV. The ternary and binary fission time-of-flight spectra were recorded at a 8.1 m flightpath at the CBNM Linac with a bank of four large gold-silicon surface-barrier detectors viewing a 1 mg/cm2 241Pu target. The ternary alpha pulse-height spectrum in the neutron energy region of interest was checked continuously. From the time-of-flight spectra the ratios of the areas of the strongest resonances in ternary and in binary fission were calculated; in the neutron energy region from 0.01 to 0.5 eV ratios were calculated for 18 zones throughout the spectrum. In the energy region from 1 to 50 eV the T/B ratio varies significantly from resonance to resonance, allowing a classification into a high and a low group. Although the statistical accuracy is poorer in the region below 1 eV we deduce from these T/B data that the 0.260 eV resonance probably belongs to the high group and also that there is only a slight difference between the T/B value at 0.260 eV and at thermal energy. We correlate these T/B values with the resonance spin J in terms of the channel theory of fission.

C. Wagemans; A.J. Deruytter

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A comparative study of 239,240Pu in soil near the former Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility, Golden, CO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Golden, CO released plutonium into the environment during almost 40 years of operation. Continuing concern over possible health impacts of these releases has been heightened by lack of public disclosure of the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. A dose reconstruction study for the Rocky Flats facilities, begun in 1990, provided a unique opportunity for concerned citizens to design and implement field studies without participation of the DOE, its contractors, or other government agencies. The Citizens Environmental Sampling Committee was formed in late 1992 and conducted a field sampling program in 1994. Over 60 soil samples, including both surface and core samples, were collected from 28 locations where past human activities would have minimal influence on contaminant distributions in soil. Cesium-137 activity was used as a means to assess whether samples were collected in undisturbed locations. The distribution of plutonium (as 239,240Pu) in soil was consistent with past sampling conducted by DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and others. Elevated levels of 239,240Pu were found immediately east of the Rocky Flats Plant, with concentrations falling rapidly with distance from the plant to levels consistent with background from fallout. Samples collected in areas south, west, and north of the plant were generally consistent with background from fallout. No biases in past sampling due to choice of sampling locations or sampling methodology were evident. The study shows that local citizens, when provided sufficient resources, can design and implement technical studies that directly address community concerns where trust in the regulated community and/or regulators is low.

Todd D. Margulies; Niels D. Schonbeck; Normie C. Morin-Voillequ; Katherine A. James; James M. LaVelle

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Determination of the solubility of Np(IV), Pu(III) - (VI),Am(III) - (VI), and Te(IV), (V) hydroxo compounds in 0.5 - 14 M NaOH solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubilities of Am(III), Np(IV), Pu(IV), Tc(IV), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(V), and Tc(V) hydroxo compounds were studied in 0.5 to 14 M NaOH solutions at 25{+-}2 {degrees}C. The effects of fluoride, phosphate, carbonate, oxalate, and some other organic complexing agents on the solubilities of Np(IV), Pu(IV), and TC(IV) hydroxides were investigated at 1.0 and 4.0 M NAOH. Some predictions were made on the dissolved (I.V) and (V) species present in alkali solutions.

Delegard, C.H.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Simulating Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy in MCl62- (M= U, Np, Pu) complexes and UOCl5- using time-dependent density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report simulations of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Cl K-edge of actinide hexahalides MCl62- (M = U, Np, Pu) and the UOCl5- complex using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) extended for core excitations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first calculations of the Cl K-edge spectra of NpCl62- and PuCl62-. In addition, the spectra are simulated with and without the environmental effects of the host crystal as well as ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to capture the dynamical effects due to atomic motion. The calculated spectra are compared with experimental results, where available and the observed trends are discussed.

Govind, Niranjan; De Jong, Wibe A.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Coulomb effects in isobaric cold fission from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Coulomb effect hypothesis, formerly used to interpret fluctuations in the curve of maximal total kinetic energy as a function of light fragment mass in reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f), is confirmed in high kinetic energy as well as in low excitation energy windows, respectively. Data from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf) show that, between two isobaric fragmentations with similar Q-values, the more asymmetric charge split reaches the higher value of total kinetic energy. Moreover, in isobaric charge splits with different Q-values, similar preference for asymmetrical fragmentations is observed in low excitation energy windows.

Modesto Montoya

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

The CIELO Collaboration: Neutron Reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. The focus will initially be on a small number of the highest-priority isotopes, namely 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu. This paper identifies discrepancies between various evaluations of the highest priority isotopes, and was commissioned by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency WPEC (Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation) during a meeting held in May 2012. The evaluated data for these materials in the existing nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, CENDL-3.1, ROSFOND, IRDFF 1.0 are reviewed, discrepancies are identified, and some integral properties are given. The paper summarizes a program of nuclear science and computational work needed to create the new CIELO nuclear data evaluations.

M.B. Chadwick; E. Dupont; E. Bauge; A. Blokhin; O. Bouland; D.A. Brown; R. Capote; A. Carlson; Y. Danon; C. De Saint Jean; M. Dunn; U. Fischer; R.A. Forrest; S.C. Frankle; T. Fukahori; Z. Ge; S.M. Grimes; G.M. Hale; M. Herman; A. Ignatyuk; M. Ishikawa; N. Iwamoto; O. Iwamoto; M. Jandel; R. Jacqmin; T. Kawano; S. Kunieda; A. Kahler; B. Kiedrowski; I. Kodeli; A.J. Koning; L. Leal; Y.O. Lee; J.P. Lestone; C. Lubitz; M. MacInnes; D. McNabb; R. McKnight; M. Moxon; S. Mughabghab; G. Noguere; G. Palmiotti; A. Plompen; B. Pritychenko; V. Pronyaev; D. Rochman; P. Romain; D. Roubtsov; P. Schillebeeckx; M. Salvatores; S. Simakov; E.Sh. Soukhovitski??; J.C. Sublet; P. Talou; I. Thompson; A. Trkov; R. Vogt; S. van der Marck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Generalized gamma-ray isotopic analysis software and re-evaluation of the two important 242Pu branching ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the generalized gamma-ray analysis software is to provide precise and accurate isotopic analyses of samples that do not have a standard experimental geometry. This analysis tool will analyze gamma-ray data from all types of measurement scenarios with little or no interaction from the user. This tool also provides complete transparency regarding the gamma-ray peaks and branching intensities used in the analysis with the capability for the user to modify this information. They are currently at the data collected phase of building a validated spectral library. One of the by-products in this data collection phase is enabling them to reevaluate the two important branching ratios in {sup 242}Pu. These branching ratios are required for very high burn-up plutonium fuels. The preliminary analysis shows that the energy of the states are 103.5 keV and 158.82 keV, the branching ratio are 1.36E-5 (9%) and 3.37E-6(7%), respectively. More accurate measurements and analysis are currently being carried out.

Wang, T; Raschke, K; Roberts, K; Dougan, A

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

169

The CIELO Collaboration:Neutron Reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. The focus will initially be on a small number of the highest-priority isotopes, namely 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu. This paper identifies discrepancies between various evaluations of the highest priority isotopes, and was commissioned by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency WPEC (Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation) during a meeting held in May 2012. The evaluated data for these materials in the existing nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, CENDL-3.1, ROSFOND, IRDFF 1.0 are reviewed, discrepancies are identified, and some integral properties are given. The paper summarizes a program of nuclear science and computational work needed to create the new CIELO nuclear data evaluations.

Giuseppe Palmiotti; M. B. Chadwick

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electronic structure and anomalous properties of UAl2, NpAl2, and PuAl2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic ground states of UAl2, NpAl2, and PuAl2 in the C15 crystal structure were determined by performing self-consistent, semirelativistic, warped muffin-tin linear augmented-plane-wave electronic band-structure calculations. Then the densities of states and band states were determined by obtaining solutions including spin-orbit interactions with the self-consistent semirelativistic potential. The partial density of states functions obtained for these systems indicate strong d-f hybridization. A consistent procedure for determining the spin fluctuation parameters from the experimental data was obtained. This procedure was used to obtain the spin-fluctuation parameters from UAl2. It is found that this procedure yields parameters that are different from previous estimates and indicates that the calculated parameters such as the bare density of states at the Fermi energy N(0), and the occupied f-band width are consistent with the band-structure values. It is found that although the actinide-actinide separation is about the same, the electronic structure near EF is different. These calculations indicate that both d-f hybridization and spin-orbit coupling are important in the electronic structure of these systems.

A. Michael Boring; R. C. Albers; G. R. Stewart; D. D. Koelling

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

137Cs in Urine of Tourists Who Visited Kiev Late in April, 1986. Estimation of the Intake of 137Cs and 239Pu: Due to the Nuclear Reactor Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Urine of Tourists Who Visited Kiev Late in April, 1986. -Estimation of the Intake of 137Cs and 239Pu: Due to the Nuclear Reactor Accident- Teruhisa Watabe Kohki Sugawara * Division of Radioecology, Laboratory for Radioecology, Isozaki 3609......

Teruhisa Watabe; Kohki Sugawara

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glenwood, New Mexico, [WTI 02-1], 1995. Zeiner, D.C. , W.F.Manual, Glenwood, New Mexico, [WTI 02-1], 1995. Yee, Henry,

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Heavy element radionuclides (Pu, Np, U) and {sup 137}Cs in soils collected from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and other sites in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of Pu in soils on and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been determined in order to apportion the sources of the Pu into those derived from stratospheric fallout, regional fallout from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and facilities on the INEEL site. Soils collected offsite in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming were collected to further characterize NTS fallout in the region. In addition, measurements of {sup 237}Np and {sup 137}Cs were used to further identify the source of the Pu from airborne emissions at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) or fugitive releases from the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). There is convincing evidence from this study that {sup 241}Am, in excess of that expected from weapons-grade Pu, constituted a part of the buried waste at the SDA that has subsequently been released to the environment. Measurements of {sup 236}U in waters from the Snake River Plain aquifer and a soil core near the ICPP suggest that this radionuclide may be a unique interrogator of airborne releases from the ICPP. Neptunium-237 and {sup 238}Pu activities in INEEL soils suggest that airborne releases of Pu from the ICPP, over its operating history, may have recently been overestimated.

Beasley, T.M.; Rivera, W. Jr. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States). Environmental Measurements Lab.; Kelley, J.M.; Bond, L.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Liszewski, M.J. [Bureau of Reclamation (United States); Orlandini, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on Pu239  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of Pu239 are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P(?), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass ??(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum ?(Ein,Eout), as well as average neutron multiplicity ??. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is ??c=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value ??e=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P(?) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on ??(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

P. Talou; B. Becker; T. Kawano; M. B. Chadwick; Y. Danon

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Review of Vacuum Degradation Research and the Experimental Outgassing Research of the Core Material- Pu foam on Vacuum Insulation Panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum Insulation Panels(VIPs) have been regarded as a super thermal insulation material with a thermal resistance of about 5-8 times higher than that of equally thick conventional polyurethane boards. In this paper, the researches on factors influencing interior pressure in VIPs, including gas and water vapor permeation through the barrier and outgassing of the core materials, were reviewed respectively. Following this, aiming at the outgassing from open cell PU foam, the specific outgassing rate of the core material is tested not only at room temperature but also at low and high temperatures by an orifice known-conductance method.

C.G. Yang; Y.J. Li; X. Gao; L. Xu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

Lav Tandon

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Chloride anion exchange coprocessing for recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical residues and Cs sub 2 PuCl sub 6 filtrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing studies of plutonium recovery from direct oxide reduction (DOR) and electrorefining (ER) pyrochemical process residues show that chloride anion exchange coprocessing is useful and effective. Coprocessing utilizes DOR residue salt as a reagent to supply the bulk of chloride ion needed for the chloride anion exchange process and to improve ER residue salt solubility. ER residue salt and ER scrapeout can be successfully treated, either alone or together, using coprocessing. In addition, chloride anion exchange at 2.0M acidity results in improved process performance by greatly reducing disproportionation of plutonium(IV), eliminating restrictions on oxidation time compared to operation at 1.0M acidity. Laboratory-scale experiments show that below-discard effluent plutonium losses are obtained. Resin capacity was 30 g Pu/{ell} or greater. Furthermore, it is feasible to perform chloride anion exchange recovery of plutonium from filtrate resulting from precipitation of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs{sub 2}PuCl{sub 6}, an oxidant salt to be used in the molten salt extraction process) and integration of its preparation with recovery of DOR salts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Killion, M.E.

1990-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of both systematic and statistical uncertainties, including correlations, are critical to the assessment of both the experimental measurements (due to variations between experimental techniques, irradiation conditions, calibration procedures, etc.), and the evaluation of those experiments to extract fundamental nuclear data. A clear example of the importance of uncertainty analysis is in the justification for energy-dependent {sup 147}Nd fission product yield, where the magnitude of the effect is comparable to the uncertainties of the individual fission product yield measurements. Both LANL and LLNL are committed to the inclusion of full uncertainty analysis in their evaluations. (6) The Panel reviewed in detail two methods for determining/evaluating fission product yields from which fission assessments can be made: the K factor method and high-resolution gamma spectroscopy (both described more fully in Sections 3 and 4). The panel concluded that fission product yields, and thus fission assessments, derived using either approach are equally valid, provided that the data were obtained from well understood, direct fission measurements and that the key underlying calibrations and/or data are valid for each technique. (7) The Panel found the process of peer review of the two complementary but independent methods to be an extremely useful exercise. Although work is still ongoing and the numbers presented to the Panel may change slightly, both groups are now in much better agreement on not just one, but four key fission product yields. The groups also have a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of each other's methods.

Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Plutonium (Pu) and Depleted Uranium (DU) Site, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Cactus Spring Ranch on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, CAU 485 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-39-001-TAGR. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 485. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the preliminary assessment investigation (PAI) performed in January and February 1998 showed no evidence of contamination at the site. In the past, this CAU included holding pens which housed sheep and burros used to test inhalation uptake from atmospheric releases of Pu and DU, and the animals were sacrificed after the tests. Specifically, the investigation focused on data to determine: if surface activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were present; if potential contaminants of concern (COCs) such as Pu and DU were present; and if plutonium was present in the soil and dung at levels significantly above background levels. Investigation results concluded that surface radiological activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were within range of typical background levels. Evaluation of process knowledge determined plutonium to be the only potential COC, but soil and dung samples tested were not positive for plutonium-238 and only two samples had positive concentrations of plutonium 239/240 (subsequent plutonium alpha spectroscopy results demonstrated that there was no plutonium contamination in the Cactus Spring surface soil or dung). Therefore, the DOE/NV recommended that no corrective action was required at CAU 485; further, no Corrective Action Plan was required. No use restrictions were required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of contamination at the site.

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

/sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise measurements of subcriticality for a slab tank containing aqueous Pu-U nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to study nuclear criticality safety related to the development of fast breeder technology, /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis measurements were performed with a Pu-U nitrate solution in a slab tank of various heights and thickness varying 11.43 cm to 19.05 cm. The results and conclusions of these experiments are (1) a capability to measure the subcriticality of a multiplying system of slab geometry to a k/sub eff/ as low as 0.7 was demonstrated, (2) calculated neutron multiplication factors agreed with those from the experiments within approx.0.02, and (3) the applicability of the method for plutonium solution systems was demonstrated. This paper describes measurements in which the height of the slab was varied for a fixed thickness and the thickness varied for a fixed height, which are the first applications of this measurement method to slab geometry.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.; Robinson, R.C.; Seino, H.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Measurement of prompt neutron spectra from the 239Pu(n,f) fission reaction for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Mean energies deduced from the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) lead to the observation of the opening of the second chance fission at 7 MeV and to indications for the openings of fission channels of third and fourth chances. Moreover, the general trend of the measured PFNS is well reproduced by the different models. The comparison between data and models presents, however, two discrepancies. First, the prompt neutron mean energy seems constant for neutron energy, at least up to 7 MeV, whereas in the theoretical calculations it is continuously increasing. Second, data disagree with models on the shape of the high energy part of the PFNS, where our data suggest a softer spectrum than the predictions.

A. Chatillon; G. Blier; T. Granier; B. Laurent; B. Morillon; J. Taieb; R. C. Haight; M. Devlin; R. O. Nelson; S. Noda; J. M. O'Donnell

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Savannah River Site Public and regulatory involvement in the transuranic (TRU) program and their effect on decisions to dispose of Pu-238 heat source tru waste onsite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of heat source Pu-238 TRU waste. As can be imagined, a decision to dispose of TRU waste onsite versus shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal is of considerable interest to the stakeholders in South Carolina. The interaction between the stakeholders not only include the general public, but also the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and Region IV of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The discussions, educational sessions, and negotiations include resolution of equity issues as well and moved forward to an understanding of the difficulties including risk management faced by the Ship-to- WIPP program. Once the program was better understood, the real negotiations concerning equity, safety, and risk to workers from handling Pu-238 waste could begin. This paper will also discuss the technical, regulatory, and public involvement aspects of disposal onsite that must be properly communicated if the program is to be successful. The Risk Based End State Vision Report for the Savannah River Site includes a variance that proposes on-site near surface disposal of waste from the program to produce Pu-238 heat sources for deep space probes. On-site disposal would greatly reduce the risk to workers by eliminating the need to repackage the waste in order to characterize it and ship it to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Significant cost savings can also be realized. A performance assessment was completed to demonstrate that on-site disposal of this waste can be done while meeting the Department of Energy and EPA performance objectives for disposal of TRU waste in a non-WIPP location such as the SRS. This analysis provides a means of demonstrating the technical basis for this alternative to management, stakeholders and regulators. The technical analysis is required to demonstrate that the performance objectives contained in 40 CFR 191, Environmental Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes will be met over a 10,000 year period. This paper will describe the successful results of this technical, regulatory, and public involvement program, explore why and how the accomplishments occurred, and describe the future challenges along with the road map for the future. In doing this, the TRU Ship-to-WIPP program must be described to give the readers an understanding of the technical complexities that must be communicated successfully to achieve constructive stakeholder participation and regulatory approval. (authors)

Bert Crapse, H.M. [U. S. Department of Energy, Washington (United States); Sonny, W.T. [Goldston Washington Savannah River Company (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

Selby, H.D., E-mail: hds@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Co-operativity among defect sites in AnO2+ and An4O9 (An = U, Np or Pu)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Actinide dioxides derived from the AnO{sub 2} fluorite lattice are of high technological relevance due to their application in nuclear reactor fuels. Oxidation of AnO{sub 2} compounds emerges as a central theme in fuel fabrication, reactor operation, long-term storage forms for both spent fuels and surplus weapons materials, and environmental actinide migration. In this paper, we use density functional theory calculations to study the oxidation of uranium, neptunium and plutonium dioxides, AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np or Pu), in O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environments. We pay particular attention to the formation of oxygen clusters (co-operativity) in AnO{sub 2+x} and how this phenomenon govern oxidation thermodynamics and the development of ordered An{sub 4}O{sub 9} compounds. The so-called split di-interstitial, which is composed of two nearest neighbor octahedral oxygen interstitials that are distorted in such a way that they dislocate one regular fluorite lattice oxygen ion to form a cluster of triangular geometry, is predicted to be the fundamental building block of the most stable cluster configurations. We also identify how the formation of oxygen defect clusters and the degree of oxidation in AnO{sub 2+x} are both governed by the characer of the An-5f to excess O-2p charger transfer, i.e. the charge transfer to the O-2p orbitals of the interstitial-like (+x) ions, and the ability of the excess O-2p orbitals to hybridize with regular fluorite lattice ions.

Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lezama Pacheco, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al. (authors)

De Saint Jean, C.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Litaize, O.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Leray, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nuclear resonance fluorescence in 240Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Research Center (BNRC) through the 00F8F4 University of California Lab Fees Research Program. [

Quiter, Brian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07272012_Clean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disposition o f 7 .1 m etric t ons ( MT) o f a dditional w eapons---usable p lutonium f rom p its t hat w ere declared s urplus t o n ational d efense n eeds i n 2 007 but w ere n...

189

Measurements of cross sections and decay properties of the isotopes of elements 112, 114, and 116 produced in the fusion reactions {sup 233,238}U, {sup 242}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm+{sup 48}Ca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the dependence of the production cross sections of the isotopes {sup 282,283}112 and {sup 286,287}114 on the excitation energy of the compound nuclei {sup 286}112 and {sup 290}114. The maximum cross section values of the xn-evaporation channels for the reaction {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 286-x}112 were measured to be {sigma}{sub 3n}=2.5{sub -1.1}{sup +1.8} pb and {sigma}{sub 4n}=0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.6} pb; for the reaction {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 290-x}114: {sigma}{sub 2n}{approx}0.5 pb, {sigma}{sub 3n}=3.6{sub -1.7}{sup +3.4} pb, and {sigma}{sub 4n}=4.5{sub -1.9}{sup +3.6} pb. In the reaction {sup 233}U({sup 48}Ca,2-4n){sup 277-279}112 at E*=34.9=2.2 MeV we measured an upper cross section limit of {sigma}{sub xn}{<=}0.6 pb. The observed shift of the excitation energy associated with the maximum sum evaporation residue cross section {sigma}{sub ER}(E*) to values significantly higher than that associated with the calculated Coulomb barrier can be caused by the orientation of the deformed target nucleus in the entrance channel of the reaction. An increase of {sigma}{sub ER} in the reactions of actinide targets with {sup 48}Ca is consistent with the expected increase of the survivability of the excited compound nucleus upon closer approach to the closed neutron shell N=184. In the present work we detected 33 decay chains arising in the decay of the known nuclei {sup 282}112, {sup 283}112, {sup 286}114, {sup 287}114, and {sup 288}114. In the decay of {sup 287}114({alpha}){yields}{sup 283}112({alpha}){yields}{sup 279}110(SF), in two cases out of 22, we observed decay chains of four and five sequential {alpha} transitions that end in spontaneous fission of {sup 271}Sg (T{sub {alpha}}{sub /SF}=2.4{sub -1.0}{sup +4.3} min) and {sup 267}Rf (T{sub SF}{approx}2.3 h), longer decay chains than reported previously. We observed the new nuclide {sup 292}116 (T{sub {alpha}}=18{sub -6}{sup +16} ms,E{sub {alpha}}=10.66{+-}0.07 MeV) in the irradiation of the {sup 248}Cm target at a higher energy than in previous experiments. The observed nuclear decay properties of the nuclides with Z=104-118 are compared with theoretical nuclear mass calculations and the systematic trends of spontaneous fission properties. As a whole, they give a consistent pattern of decay of the 18 even-Z neutron-rich nuclides with Z=104-118 and N=163-177. The experiments were performed with the heavy-ion beam delivered by the U400 cyclotron of the FLNR (JINR, Dubna) employing the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator.

Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Utyonkov, V.K.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Polyakov, A.N.; Shirokovsky, I.V.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.; Gulbekian, G.G.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Gikal, B.N.; Mezentsev, A.N.; Iliev, S.; Subbotin, V.G.; Sukhov, A.M.; Voinov, A.A.; Buklanov, G.V.; Subotic, K.; Zagrebaev, V.I.; Itkis, M.G.; Patin, J.B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards Brian J. Quiter, ?resonances on nuclear safeguards measurements will be

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07152010 _final_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov CBO: Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 deg.gill@wipp.ws TVA: Terry Johnson, (423) 751-6875 twjohnson@tva.gov DOE Announces Modification of Supplemental Environmental Study on Plutonium Disposition WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration is announcing its intent to modify the scope of the ongoing Surplus Plutonium

192

Low power DIPS design for NASA missions. [Pu 238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of low power dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) for NASA's future deep space missions are being developed to characterize the power system's unique features in the 0.5--1.0 kilowatt-electric (kWe) range. The August 1990 Mariner Mark II spacecraft design was used for the spacecraft integration study. One basic design with slight mission specific variations was developed for the Cassini, Comet Nucleus Sample Return, and Outer Planet Orbiter Probe missions. A low power DIPS flight unit offers comparable specific power values to the MOD-RTG unit with a factor-of-three improvement in radioisotope fuel requirements. This was accomplished by fully exploiting the dynamic power conversion technology available in the DIPS program.

Johnson, R.A.; Determan, W. (Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Shirbacheh, M. (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA (USA))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Photochemical oxidation of oxalate in Pu-238 process streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over forty years, NASA has relied on plutonium-238 in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) units and Radioisotope Heater Units ( W s ) to provide power and heat for many space missions including Transit, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses and Cassini. RHUs provide heat to keep key components warm in extremely cold environments found on planets, moons, or in deep space. RTGs convert heat generated from the radioactive decay of plutonium-238 into electricity using a themocouple, Plutonium-238 has proven to be an excellent heat source far deep space missions because of its high thermal power density, useful lifetime, minimal shielding requirements, and oxide stability.

Long, K. M. (Kristy M.); Ford, D. K. (Doris K.); Trujillo, L. A. (Leonardo A.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ceramicrete stabilization of U-and Pu-bearing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of stabilizing nuclear material is disclosed. Oxides or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs) and/or hydrocarbons and/or acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs are treated by adjusting the pH of the nuclear material to not less than about 5 and adding sufficient MgO to convert fluorides present to MgF.sub.2; alumina is added in an amount sufficient to absorb substantially all hydrocarbon liquid present, after which a binder including MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 is added to the treated nuclear material to form a slurry. Additional MgO may be added. A crystalline radioactive material is also disclosed having a binder of the reaction product of calcined MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 and a radioactive material of the oxides and/or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs). Acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs, and/or actinides and/or TRUs with or without oils and/or greases may be encapsulated and stabilized by the binder.

Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Maloney, M. David (Evergreen, CO); Thompson, Gary H. (Thornton, CO)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dynamic Restructuring of Transactions Gail E. Kaiser and Calton Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or aborted independently of the others. Join­transaction merges two or more transactions transaction, and all their work is now committed or aborted together. Split­transaction is useful­ action atomicity properties. Uncertain duration results in long transactions 1 with two specific problems

197

7 . Guessing Logging video takes time. How much time depends on the nature of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of every object in the frame? If you are a continuity supervisor for feature film production, you do [Lasky'' button on the segment­editor window. In the original system design, clicking on the guess button added inherited values to the segment­editor window. This was charmingly mysterious ­­ a largely correct

Bruckman, Amy

198

Colloque C4, supplkment au no 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-24 Self-diffusion of U and Pu in (U, Pu)C and (U,Pu)N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and swell- ing during reactor operation of these advanced LMFBR fuel candidates. Since these diffusion pro

Boyer, Edmond

199

Type B Accident Investigation on the August 5, 2003, Pu-238 Multiple Uptake Event at the Pu Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 5, 2003, a release of plutonium-238 occurred in a storage room at the Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, resulting in radiation doses to two workers in the room. The Accident Investigation Board concluded that the direct cause of the accident was the release of airborne contamination from a degraded package that contained cellulose material and plutonium-238 residues.

200

Distribution of sup 137 Cs, sup 90 Sr, sup 238 Pu, sup 239 Pu, sup 241 Am and sup 244 Cm in Pond B, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gradual senescence of present-day operating nuclear facilities, and resultant contamination of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, emphasize the importance of understanding the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. Observations and deductions concerning mechanisms of radionuclide transport can contribute significantly to knowledge of fundamental ecological processes. This study emphasized the ecosystem-level distribution of several long-lived radionuclides in an abandoned reactor cooling impoundment after a twenty year period of chemical and biological equilibration. 90 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Whicker, F.W. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Pinder, J.E. III; Bowling, J.W. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Alberts, J.J. (Georgia Univ., Sapelo Island, GA (USA). Marine Inst.); Brisbin, I.L. Jr. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MEMORANDUM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 TO: Ex parte communications, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FROM: Andrew deLaski, ASAP and Robert Asdal, Hydraulic Institute DATE: May 10, 2012 RE: Energy Conservation Standards for Pumps The purpose of this memorandum is to memorialize a meeting on May 1, 2012 at the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to DOE's guidance on ex parte communications. The following individuals were present at the meeting: John Cymbalsky DOE Dan Cohen DOE, Office of General Counsel Elizabeth Kohl DOE, Office of General Counsel Robert Asdal Hydraulic Institute Dave McKinstry Colfax/IMO Mark Handzel Xylem, Inc. Al Huber Patterson Pump Dennis Wierzbicki Grundfos Pump Neal Elliott American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Andrew deLaski Appliance Standards Awareness Project

202

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

203

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revieir of the Plutonium Revieir of the Plutonium Preparation Project at Savannah River Site October 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. R. Bruce Mathews, Consultant Mr. David Nulton, National Nuclear Security Administration (ret.) Dr. Kenneth Okafor, South Carolina State University Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy I I External Technical Review of the Plutonium Preparation Project October 2008 - I Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Ms. Michelle Ewart, Savantiah River Site, and Mr. Ricky Bell, for their exceptional support during this review. Ms. Ewart was the lead DOE representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Theodore Venetz (Fluor Hanford Company) served as an observer to this review. The

204

Serial Replica Exchange Morten Hagen, Byungchan Kim, Pu Liu, Richard A. Friesner, and B. J. Berne*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home

Berne, Bruce J.

205

Coprocessed nuclear fuels containing (U, Pu) values as oxides, carbides or carbonitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for direct coprocessing of nuclear fuels derived from a product stream of fuels reprocessing facility containing uranium, plutonium, and fission product values comprising nitrate stabilization of said stream vacuum concentration to remove water and nitrates, neutralization to form an acid deficient feed solution for the internal gelation mode of sol-gel technology, green spherule formation, recovery and treatment for loading into a fuel element by vibra packed or pellet formation technologies.

Lloyd, M.H.

1981-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microsoft Word - Template_SLAC Proprietary Use Agreement_PU 11...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Officer approval for substantive changes cannot be obtained, Work for Others (WFOs) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) may be more appropriate due to...

207

Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

RELATIVE ATTENUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR PuB NEUTRONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1: Polyethylene Water Spodumene-gypsum Gypsum, wet and dryconstituents of the spodumene-gypsum, and gypsum shields.SPODUMENK,GYPSUM SHIELD 30% Spodumene by weight 40% Gypsum

Bringham, P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Versatile dynamic isotope power systems for the exploration of space. [Pu 238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic, isotope-heated power systems are needed to carry out the exploration of space and are major elements identified by NASA for the Space Exploration Inititative (SEI). The Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) Demonstration Program is aimed at establishing the advanced technology as well as the system designs and hardware for the SEI and other exploratory missions. Several conceptual designs of DIPS systems have been developed to provide compact, reliable, and long-lived power systems.

Johnson, R.A.; Stadnik, A.G. (Rockwell International Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Ave Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Cataldo, R. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (USA)); Williams, R. (US Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (USA))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effects of Self Irradiation from 238Pu on Candidate Ceramics for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document, we describe the results of radiation damage testing and characterization for specimens that were resintered to re-establish crystallinity. The phases in these specimens have become amorphous from radiation induced damage over the 8 months since sintering.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

Goddard, Braden

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparisons of 239Pu inhalation doses calculated with ICRP 67 and proposed systemic models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......depositions for workers and members of...system for Mayak workers(6), part...of the public after inhalation of...of many Mayak workers might have influenced...intravenously to man. (1950) Los Alamos...energies. (1993) Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge......

W. B. Li; U. Oeh; H. G. Paretzke

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Clearwater: Extensible, Flexible, Modular Code Generation Galen S. Swint, Calton Pu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in two non-trivial code generators: the In- fopipe Stub Generator (ISG) to support distributed flow for distributed systems soft- ware has been an established technique since the introduction of RPC stub generator life span of code generation tools developed for distributed system software. Two of our recent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Over Batch Analysis for the LLNL Plutonium Packaging System (PuPS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses the concern raised in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Acceptance Criteria (Reference 1, Section 6.a.3) about receiving an item that is over batched by 1.0 kg of fissile materials. This document shows that the occurrence of this is incredible. Some of the Department of Energy Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) requirements are described in Section 2.1. The SRS requirement is discussed in Section 2.2. Section 2.3 describes the way fissile materials are handled in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility (B332). Based on the material handling discussed in Section 2.3, there are only three errors that could result in a shipping container being over batched. These are: incorrect measurement of the item, selecting the wrong item to package, and packaging two items into a single shipping container. The analysis in Section 3 shows that the first two events are incredible because of the controls that exist at LLNL. The third event is physically impossible. Therefore, it is incredible for an item to be shipped to SRS that is more than 1.0 kg of fissile materials over batched.

Riley, D; Dodson, K

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Observation of the 2p?u-1s?g Electronic Spectrum of D2+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-range van der Waals state of D2+ has been characterized through observations of electronic transitions from the ground state.

Alan Carrington; Iain R. McNab; Christine A. Montgomerie

1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolic KOHbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF oruranyl complexes are difficult to separate from the mixture of potassium, tetramethylammonium and nitrate

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Metrology and quality assurance from surveillance of gas compositions over PuO[sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until the late 1980s, a primary mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) has been the production of nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Termination of the Cold War in 1989 and the subsequent nuclear weapons treaties dramatically decreased the inventory needs for nuclear weapons. These activities resulted in the consolidation of nuclear material inventories and activities, generating substantial amounts of surplus nuclear materials ranging from plutonium metal and pure oxides to impure plutonium residues. Packaging and storage of these materials in physically and environmentally safe configurations for significant time periods were required. In 1993 the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) and the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety examined the storage of metal and oxides at the Rocky Flats Plant that ultimately resulted in recommendation 94-1, calling for a standard to define the processing and storage of plutonium bearing materials. This recommendation generated a standard for storage of plutonium metals and oxides, DOE-STD-3013-2000, which is now in its fourth revision. The current DOE 3013 Standard is limited to metal and oxides, which contain greater than 30 weight percent plutonium and uranium. The 3013 Standard requires that the oxide be calcined to 950 C for two hours in an oxidizing environment. Before packaging, the oxide is required to have less than 0.5 weight percent moisture. Up to five kilograms of the stabilized oxide material is subsequently sealed in a set of two-nested welded stainless steel container, which must have a power less than 19 Watts.

Worl, L. A. (Laura A.); French, Catherine A.; Kreyer, L. S. (Lawrence S.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RELATIVE ATTENUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR PuB NEUTRONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Neutron Conversion Factors," Health Physics Flux-to~to dose-equivalent conversion factors are those taken fromsion factors " The conversion factors for neutrons

Bringham, P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

El TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FROM Kn= O-AND Kn=1- STATES OF 238Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratio 1:8x1o-6 Americium and curium were separated fromthen separated from the americium by elution from a cation-

Lederer, C. Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

QSAR OF DISTRIBUTION COEFFICIENTS FOR PU (NO3)062-COMPLEXES USING MOLECULAR MECHANICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer-aided modeling has been very successful in the design of chelating ligands for the formation of selective metal complexes. We report herein preliminary efforts to extend the principles developed for ion-specific chelating ligands to the weaker, more diffuse electrostatic interactions between complex anions and dicationic sites of anion-exchange resins. Calculated electrostatic affinity between plutonium (IV) hexanitrato dianions and analogue of dicationic anion-exchange sites correlate well with empirically-determined distribution coefficients. This Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) is useful in the determination of the overall trend within a select series of bifunctional resins and which structural modifications are most likely to be advantageous. Ultimately, we hope to refine this methodology to allow the a priori determination of ion-exchange behavior for abroad class of materials.

M. BARR; G. JARVINEN; E. MOODY

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Statistical Nonparametric Model for Natural Salt Estimation James R. Prairie1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Colorado River basin in the western United States are afflicted with salinity problems. In the Colorado ; Terrance J. Fulp3 ; and Edith A. Zagona, M.ASCE4 Abstract: Many rivers in the Western U.S. suffer from high the nonparametric model. We apply this model to data from a stream gauge at Glenwood Springs, Colo., on the Colorado

Balaji, Rajagopalan

223

HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

needles). Fuel moistures were extremely low throughout Colorado during spring/early summer of 1994 firefighters in a blowup near Glenwood Springs. Table 1 indicates dead fuel moistures in the Pingree Park). Spotting was occurring 1/2 mile in advance of the fire. By this time personnel/engines from Colorado State

224

Isotope correlations for determining the isotopic composition of plutonium produced in research and power reactors using the experimental data obtained by alpha and mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Correlations have been developed for obtaining the isotopic composition of Pu produced in Indian research (CIRUS, DHRUVA) and power (PHWR) reactors. The experimental data obtained on 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) alpha activity ratio using alpha spectrometry and on 240Pu/239Pu, 241Pu/239Pu, 242Pu/239Pu atom ratios by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry were used for developing isotope correlations.

S.K. Aggarwal; D. Alamelu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Preliminary molten salt extraction experiments with dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dicesium hexachloroplutonate was prepared on a 200-gram scale and used as an oxidant in the molten salt extraction process to remove americium from plutonium metal. Single-pass extraction efficiencies exceeding 90% were achieved in molten calcium chloride. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomas, R.L. (ed.); Long, J.L.; Humiston, T.J.; Murray, A.M.

1989-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Final Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 239Pu above 2.5 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence measurements were performed at the free electron laser facility at UC Santa Barbara using a bremsstrahlung beam. Three endpoint energies were chosen for the bremsstrahlung to cover as much area above 2.5 MeV as possible. We were able to set an upper limit of NRF state strengths between 2.5 and 3.8 MeV at roughly 38(5) eV barns at the 4-sigma level and 9(2) eV barns at the 1-sigma level. Published results on states near 2.4 MeV indicate strengths about 10(2) eV barns. Details of the results are presented in this report.

Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Dynamics of Life. I. Death from Internal Irradiation by 239Pu and 226Ra, Aging, Cancer, and Other Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...readily operable cancer such as cancer of the skin. The rightmost...5 10.9 2.28 0 Aging and cancer 18 0 4 .4 1 .87 2443 Epilepsy...in the case of radium. The depleted reserve, as indicated by 30...atomic bomb survivors, the uranium miners, and the Marshall Islanders...

Betsy J. Stover; Henry Eyring

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

229

Spi-1/PU.1 Oncogene Accelerates DNA Replication Fork Elongation and Promotes Genetic Instability in the Absence of DNA Breakage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sively a "plug" of solvent, an air bubble, and 1 to 3 //I of sample. For detection...was not fully airtight, we could not bubble the gases through Griess solution...pro portional to the amount of NSA. NSA stability was measured in the presence of various...

Pauline Rimmel; Jun Komatsu; Philippe Hup; Christophe Roulin; Emmanuel Barillot; Marie Dutreix; Emmanuel Conseiller; Aaron Bensimon; Franoise Moreau-Gachelin; and Christel Guillouf

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modelling of bioassay data from a Pu wound treated by repeated DTPA perfusions: biokinetics and dosimetric approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......E. Application of multi-compartment wound models to plutonium-contaminated wounds incurred by former workers at Rocky Flats. Health Phys (2006) 91:128-143. 16 Fritsch P. , Dudoignon N., Guillet K., Oghiso Y., Morlier J. P......

P. Fritsch; L. Grappin; A. M. Guillermin; R. Fottorino; M. Ruffin; A. Mile

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Activities of Pu and Am Isotopes and Isotopic Ratios in a Soil Contaminated by Weapons-Grade Plutonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Radiation Division of the Surveillance Directorate for the U.S. Air Force Institute for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health Risk Analysis collected soil samples at the BOMARC site in June, 2000. ... with a mean value of 0.19, which is close to the value reported from the BOMARC WGP contaminated soil (6) and the Rocky Flats WGP contaminated soil (27). ...

M. H. Lee; S. B. Clark

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fast, Optimized Sun RPC Using Automatic Program Specialization Gilles Muller, Renaud Marlet, Calton Pu and Ashvin Goel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast, Optimized Sun RPC Using Automatic Program Specialization Gilles Muller, Renaud Marlet, Calton automatic optimization of an existing, commercial RPC implementation, namely the Sun RPC. The optimized Sun the original Sun RPC. Close examination of the specialized code does not reveal further optimization

Goel, Ashvin

233

Cost-benefit analysis of unfired PuO/sub 2/ pellets as an alternative plutonium shipping form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A limited cost-benefit evaluation was performed concerning use of unfired plutonium dioxide pellets as a shipping form. Two specific processing operations are required for this use, one to form the pellet (pelletizing) and a second to reconstitute an acceptable powder upon receipt (reconstitution). The direct costs for the pelletizing operation are approximately $208,000 for equipment and its installation and $122 per kg of plutonium processed (based upon a 20-kg plutonium/day facility). The direct costs for reconstitution are approximately $90,000 for equipment and its installation and $81 per kg of plutonium processed. The indirect cost considered was personnel exposure from these operations. Whole body exposures ranged from 0.04 man-rem per 100 kg of low-exposure plutonium reconstituted to 0.9 man-rem per 100 kg of average-exposure plutonium pelletized. Hand exposures were much higher - 17 man-rem power 100 kg of low-exposure plutonium reconstituted to 67 man-rem per 100 kg of average plutonium pelletized. The principal benefit is a potential twentyfold reduction of airborne release in the event of an accident. An experimental plan is outlined to fill the data gaps uncovered during this study in the areas of pelletizing and reconstitution process parameters and pellet response behavior to accident-generated stresses. A study to enhance the containment potential of the inner packaging used during shipment is also outlined.

Mishima, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Libby, R.A.; Soldat, K.L.; White, G.D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CANDU core analysis with spent PWR fuel of fixed {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in a CANDU (DUPIC) fuel cycle requires that the spent PWR fuel be refabricated as a DUPIC fuel to be used in a CANDU reactor that was originally designed for the natural uranium fuel. Because there is no separation of isotopes from the spent PWR fuel, the DUPIC fuel contains all the actinides and fission products as fuel constituents and, therefore, the isotopic composition changes depending on the initial and discharge conditions of PWR fuels. Such heterogeneity in fuel composition is not desirable, especially for a CANDU reactor that adopts an on-power refueling scheme, because the operational flexibility is reduced appreciably if the fuel bundles of different composition are loaded throughout the core.

Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyu H.; Park, J.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Health Spa Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

236

Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pu-238) radioisotope and a thermoelectric generator. The Pu-to radioisotopes. In designing thermoelectric generators for

Chen, Alic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EPA Air DOCKET NO: A-98-49; II-B1-30; July 2014 Analysis of EPA and DOE WIPP Air Sampling Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

filters were analyzed for americium-241 (Am-241), plutonium-238 (Pu-238) and plutonium-239/240 (Pu-239

238

dases de la salive d'abeille. La structure de L1 et de L2 n'a pas pu tre dtermine si  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) The pollution of honeys from the uranium mining area in Thuringia with the natural radionuclides 235U, 238U, 226. The pollution of honey with natural radionuclides in the area of former ura- nium mines in Thuringia (Wismut the mining area is not dangerous for humans. Contamination du miel par des radionu- cléides naturels dans l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

239

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions. Phys. Rev. C,transfermium elements in cold fusion reactions. Phys. Rev.have been deemed cold fusion reactions because of the low

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Analysis of linear energy transfers and quality factors of charged particles produced by spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf and 244Pu in the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determining the energy of charged...emitted from neutron-induced nuclear reactions...of neutron spectra on D T and...spontaneous fission of 252Cf...Watt B. E. Energy spectrum of neutrons from thermal fission of 235U...irradiated by high energy hadrons......

Akira Endo; Tatsuhiko Sato

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nitric acid solutions are selectively extracted by organophosphorus extrac- tants such as tributyl phosphate (TBP) [

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Multicolored ZnO Nanowire Architectures on Trenched Silicon Substrates Pu-Xian Gao,, J. L. Lee, and Zhong L. Wang*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoimprinting lithography by a low-temperature hydrothermal approach. Au nanoparticles or ZnO nanofilms were, for these techniques, major drawbacks include the postprocessed poly- crystalline structure, high processing cost architectures using low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis. Optically, 3D NW architectures exhibited unique

Wang, Zhong L.

243

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Wilmarth, and Glenn T. Seaborg. Actinide production in XeJames W. Cobble, and Glenn T. Seaborg. Spallation-fissionA, 216(1):97 108, 1973. Glenn T. Seaborg. The transuranium

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program (SSAAP). This program funds academic research

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

PuO 2 surface catalyzed reactions: recombination of H 2 and O 2 and the effects of adsorbed water on surface reactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is responsible for the management and long-term disposition of a variety of materials located at Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Hanford Savannah River and other DOE sites. The purpose of this work is to measure the recombination rates of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures in contact with pure and impure plutonium oxides and to test the effects of adsorbed water on the surface reactivity. This was accomplished by using a calibrated pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) apparatus to measure the recombination rates in a fixed volume as the gas mixture was brought into contact with oxide powders whose temperatures ranged from 50?C to 300?C.

Luis Morales

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Cleanup levels for Am-241, Pu-239, U-234, U-235 & U-238 in soils at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation briefly outlines a cleanup program at a Rocky Flats site through viewgraphs and an executive summary. Exposure pathway analyses to be performed are identified, and decontamination levels are listed for open space and office worker exposure areas. The executive summary very briefly describes the technical approach, RESRAD computer code to be used for analyses, recommendations for exposure levels, and application of action levels to multiple radionuclide contamination. Determination of action levels for surface and subsurface soils, based on radiation doses, is discussed. 1 tab.

Roberts, R.; Colby, B.; Brooks, L.; Slaten, S.

1997-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the separation of americium(III) and curium(III) fromFission cross sections of americium isotopes. Atomic Energy,fission cross sections for americium. Nucl. Sci. Eng. , 154(

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the low excitation energy of the nuclear reaction results inof nuclear fusion reactions at low excitation energies withlow (1 eV 100 keV) neutron energies. It goes on to discuss the nuclear reactions

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analytical Capability of Plasma Spectrometry Team  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples analyzed were: (1) Pu and U metal; (2) Pu oxide for nuclear fuel; (3) {sup 238}Pu oxide for heat source; and (4) Nuclear forensic samples - filters, swipes. Sample preparations that we did were: metal dissolution, marple filter dissolution, Pu oxide closed vessel acid digestion, and column separation to remove Pu.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Dr  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM To: Sean Lev, Acting General Counsel, United States Department of Energy From: Katherine Kennedy, Andrew DeLaski, Benjamin Longstreth Re: Six-Year Review of Covered Products Date: April 11, 2011 I. Introduction This memorandum explains that the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires the Department of Energy to re-evaluate efficiency standards for all covered appliances and products every six years. Through EISA, Congress specifically mandated that the Department review any final rule setting standards every six years. 42 U.S.C. §§ 6295(m)(1); 6313(a)(6)(C). As discussed below, the terms Congress used in this amendment sweep broadly and include all products for which the Department has issued a final rule, including water efficiency standards for

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium 243 target Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Summary: . Mainly, it is plutonium (239 Pu, 240 Pu and 242 Pu), americium (243 Am) and curium (245 Cm). An example... of the accelerator. Basic structure of ADS ADS consists of...

252

Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

...233 Table 68. Activity to Mass Conversion Factors for Pu, Am, and U Isotopes ...234 Table 69. Offsite Pu and Am...

253

I.R.Yukhnovskii, M.V.Tokarchuk, I.P.Omelyan, R.I.Zhelem STATISTICAL THEORY FOR DIFFUSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are unique and hold isotopes of uranium 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, plutonium 239Pu, 240Pu, americium 241Am

254

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 214701 (2013) The liquid surface of chiral ionic liquids as seen from molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these applications include drug delivery as active phar- maceutical ingredients, solvents for green processing, pu

Lisal, Martin

255

Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Valencia Jingzhi Pu, Harvard University Wangshen Xie, Shuhua Ma, Sudeep Bhattacharyay, Marian

Truhlar, Donald G

256

Computational Model of Forward and Opposed Smoldering Combustion with Improved Chemical Kinetics (PhD. Thesis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for modeling urethane foam insulation performance, Journalinsulation, upholstery, shock absorbing, and soundproofing. PU foam

Rein, Guillermo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, Volume 17: Plutonium-239  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Volume 17 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of plutonium-239 (Pu-239). This report also discusses waste types and forms in which Pu-239 can be found, waste and disposal information on Pu-239, and Pu-239 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

J. P. Adams; M. L. Carboneau

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isolation Pilot Plant WUF waste unit factor Elements and Chemical Compounds Am americium Cs cesium Pu

259

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Elements and Chemical Compounds Am americium Pu plutonium Ra radium Rn

260

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC_2012_Rappleye  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method Method for Determining Deposition Rates in an Electrorefiner Using Electrode Potentials D. S. Rappleye, M. S. Yim, R. M. Cumberland 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference August 26 - 29, 2012 Fontana, WI Objective * Determine species deposition rates at the cathode - Product optimization - Safeguards * Selected measures: - Electrode potentials - Cell current 8/28/2012 2 Background * "Normal" operating condition - Only uranium U U U U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 3 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Zirconium co-deposition U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 4 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Plutonium co-deposition Pu Pu U Pu U U U U Pu U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 5 Theory * Notation and Symbols 8/28/2012 6 electrode area electrode potential Faraday's constant current i current density c mass transfer coefficient n electrons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

nature CHeMICaL BIOLOGY | vol 10 | JUNE 2014 | www.nature.com/naturechemicalbiology 437 puBLIsHed OnLIne: 13 aprIL 2014 | dOI: 10.1038/nCHeMBIO.1501  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modification is weakened owing to averaging over many products. Therefore, strategies to engineer the enzyme of the polysaccharide chain (acceptor substrate). Here we demonstrate that these enzymes can be readily engineered- tions and increase cellular motility6 . The functions of polySia in providing plasticity in the nervous

Gleeson, Joseph G.

262

Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CMPO-functionalized C{sub 3}-symmetric tripodal ligands in liquid/liquid extractions : efficient, selective recognition of Pu(IV) with low affinity for 3+ metal ions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural modifications of carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CPMO)-functionalized triphenoxymethane platforms are described, and the influence of these changes on the ability of the ligand to extract actinides from simulated acidic nuclear waste streams has been evaluated. The ligand system has been shown to have excellent binding efficiency and a selectivity for An(IV) in comparison to the a simple monomeric CMPO ligand under analogous conditions. Both the extraction efficiency and selectivity are strongly dependent on the flexibility and electronic properties of the ligating units in the triphenoxymethane construct. The Tb(III) and Bi(III) nitrate complexes of tris-CMPO derivatives have been isolated, and their structures were elucidated by NMR, ESI FT-ICR MS, and X-ray analysis, providing information on the interactions between metal ions and the tris-CMPO molecules.

Matloka, K.; Sah, A. K.; Peters, M. W.; Srinivasan, P.; Gelis, A. V.; Regalbuto, M.; Scott, M. J.; Univ. of Florida

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Magazine of The Johns hopkins BlooMBerg school of puBlic healTh www.jhsph.eduspecial death and data death and lifespan death and learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Tanzania #12;One day when he was 9 years old, Amartya Sen's worldview changed. First one, then thousands. The Bengal famine of 1943 was on its way to killing three million people, yet Sen was completely unaware of it. No one in his social circle had even been affected. (Sen later learned that an inflationary surge

Scharfstein, Daniel

265

The Magazine of The Johns hopkins BlooMBerg school of puBlic healTh www.jhsph.eduspecial death and data death and lifespan death and learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P for deatH" #12;One day when he was 9 years old, Amartya Sen's worldview changed. First one, then thousands. The Bengal famine of 1943 was on its way to killing three million people, yet Sen was completely unaware of it. No one in his social circle had even been affected. (Sen later learned that an inflationary surge

Scharfstein, Daniel

266

nature CHeMICaL BIOLOGY | vol 8 | december 2012 | www.nature.com/naturechemicalbiology 969 puBLIsHed OnLIne: 28 OCtOBer 2012 | dOI: 10.1038/nCHeMBIO.1108  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an SN2-type direct displacement catalytic mechanism (reviewed in ref. 6), which is believed to require or retaining) of the reactions they catalyze5 . OGT is a metal-independent enzyme that uses the nucleotide than 1,000 acceptor proteins in the human cell. The reaction proceeds with inversion of stereochemistry

van Aalten, Daan

267

NEUTRONINDUCED FISSION CROSS SECTIONS OF 232 Th, 233 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, nat Pb AND 209 Bi RELATIVE TO 235 U IN THE ENERGY RANGE 1--200 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A water­cooled lead target situated inside the vacuum chamber of the accelerator is used as a pulsed, Russia 2 Nuclear Data Center/JAERI, Tokai­mura, Naka­gun, Ibaraki­ken, 319-1195, Japan 3 Radiation for actinides above 20 MeV, the most important are accelerator­driven transmutation of waste reactor materials

Titov, Anatoly

268

UPWARD MOVEMENT OF PLUTONIUM TO SURFACE SEDIMENTS DURING AN 11-YEAR FIELD STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An 11-y lysimeter study was established to monitor the movement of Pu through vadose zone sediments. Sediment Pu concentrations as a function of depth indicated that some Pu moved upward from the buried source material. Subsequent numerical modeling suggested that the upward movement was largely the result of invading grasses taking up the Pu and translocating it upward. The objective of this study was to determine if the Pu of surface sediments originated from atmosphere fallout or from the buried lysimeter source material (weapons-grade Pu), providing additional evidence that plants were involved in the upward migration of Pu. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu and {sup 242}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic fraction ratios of the lysimeter surface sediments, as determined by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS), were 0.063 and 0.00045, respectively; consistent with the signatures of the weapons-grade Pu. Our numerical simulations indicate that because plants create a large water flux, small concentrations over multiple years may result in a measurable accumulation of Pu on the ground surface. These results may have implications on the conceptual model for calculating risk associated with long-term stewardship and monitored natural attenuation management of Pu contaminated subsurface and surface sediments.

Kaplan, D.; Beals, D.; Cadieux, J.; Halverson, J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Elemental composition in sealed plutoniumberyllium neutron sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Five sealed plutoniumberyllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed.

N. Xu; K. Kuhn; D. Gallimore; A. Martinez; M. Schappert; D. Montoya; E. Lujan; K. Garduno; L. Tandon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Neural network based design of cellular manufacturing systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems do". The simple elements are called processing units [PU) and are the parallel of the neurons of the nervous system. A simple PU is shown in Figure 3. Between two PU's there is a dzrected interconnection which is the parallel of the synapses... connecting the neurons in the nervous system. The direction of the interconnection between two PU's decide which unit receives input from the other. The inputs to the PU j is the output from other PU's along the interconnections directed towards j or input...

Ramachandran, Satheesh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hycon2 Benchmark: Power Network System Stefano Riverso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps and produce the required power. We consider thermal power stations with single-stage turbines nominal value (p.u.) Pvi Deviation of the steam valve position from nominal value (p.u.) Prefi Deviation

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium 239 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and 239,240 Pu concentration Summary: 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu concentration surface water time series in the Pacific and Indian... Project Worldwide Marine Radioactivity...

274

Polyurethane plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The polyurethanes (PU) offer the widest choice of properties of any group of plastics materials, and the opportunity to incorporate specific chemical structures into a PU chain allows the polymer chemist to ta...

A. W. Birley; R. J. Heath; M. J. Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_THOMAS_MORELLO_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium. Reporting of PU-238 is to be to the nearest tenth of one gram of the PU-238 isotope. - Why are reportable quantities or greater important to DOENRCIAEA? - There is a...

276

Microsoft PowerPoint - 11_THOMAS_MORELLO_NMMSS_2014_Update.ppt...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium. Reporting of PU-238 is to be to the nearest tenth of one gram of the PU-238 isotope. A review of the Statements of Consideration did not provide additional regulatory...

277

Mechanical behavior of shape memory fibers spun from nanoclay-tethered polyurethanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined the effect of nanoclays on the shape memory behavior of polyurethane (PU) in fibrous form. A cation was introduced into the PU molecules to disperse the organo-nanoclay (MMT) into poly(?- capr...

Seok Jin Hong; Woong-Ryeol Yu; Ji Ho Youk

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical Study of Affine Supply Function Equilibrium in AC ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed to characterize oligopolistic competition in electricity markets. The models ..... Each line's resistance is 0.005 p.u., the inductive reac- tance is 0.01 p.u.,...

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Characterization of Polyurethane at Multiple Scales for Erosion Mechanisms Under Sand Particle Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOMENCLATURE PU Polyurethane PS Polyester PT Polyether Tg Glass Transition Temperature Tm Melting Temperature viii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... Characterization of PU Films....................................................... 43 3 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS ............................................................................ 45 3.1 Characterization of Pristine Films...

Sigamani, Nirmal

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microsoft Word - S11432_2013Annual Rpt.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Department of Energy Doc. No. S11432 April 2014 Page 208 Table 76. Activity to Mass Conversion Factors for Pu, Am, and U Isotopes Analyte MassActivity (gramscurie) Pu-239, 240...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SREL Reprint #3280  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VA 23529, USA Abstract: To study the effects of natural organic matter (NOM) on Pu sorption, Pu(IV) and (V) were amended at environmentally relevant concentrations (10-14 M) to...

282

REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basedonreal?timePMUdata byobservingthedifferencesas analysisofWECCPMUdata. Therecommendedanalysisapproach. V (pu) P-V curve PMU data P (pu) P-V curve PMU

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Application of Genetic Algorithms and Thermogravimetry to Determine the Kinetics of Polyurethane Foam in Smoldering Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for modeling urethane foam insulation performance, Journalinsulation, upholstery, as well as sound and shock dampening materials. PU foam

Rein, Guillermo; Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Torero, Jose; Urban, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds Am americium Cs cesium Pu plutonium Sr strontium Y yttrium 137m Ba metastable barium-137 DOE

285

praseodymium roentgenium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] 99 californium Cf[251] 98 curium Cm[247] 96 americium Am[243] 95 plutonium Pu[244] 94 neptunium Np

Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

286

OPA EVMS Acceptance Review Out Briefing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jennifer O'Connor (GL 28-32) PU-PPPL 6Oct2011 #12;Thanks The PPPL Team is to be commended Team's requests. PU-PPPL 6Oct2011 #12;Noteworthy Practices · PPPL should be commended for the actions demonstrated detailed technical knowledge; · Effective relationship between PSO and PPPL is noted.p PU-PPPL 6

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

287

West Valley Plutonium and Americium-241 in Lake Ontario sediments off the mouth of Niagara River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently deposited fine-grained sediments in Lake Ontario off the mouth of Niagara River contain highly toxic238Pu,239,240pu, and241Pu (241Am) from global fallout as well as from low level releases of these radio...

S. R. Joshi

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

FY12 Final Report for PL10-Mod Separations-PD12: Electrochemically Modulated Separation of Plutonium from Dilute and Concentrated Dissolver Solutions for Analysis by Gamma Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned on and off depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 g Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

Pratt, Sandra H.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Cloutier, Janet M.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Schwantes, Jon M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electrochemically Modulated Separation for Plutonium Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned "on" and "off" depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 g Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

Pratt, Sandra H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reflection Coefficient of Sine-Gordon Systems: Application to Josephson Junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Klein-Gordon type equation, 520 }Jro~ress lSetters Vol. 87, No.2 ;Pu ;Pu (;Pu) at2 - ax2 +u= Q(x) C1 ax2- C2U . (2) The solutions of Eq.(2) have the harmonic form exp(i(kx-wkt , where the frequencies Wk obey the dispersion......

Hikaru Yamamoto

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Neutronic Analysis of TRU Recycling in PWRs Loaded with MOX-UE Fuel (MOX with U-235 Enriched U Support)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study dealing with the homogeneous recycling of either Pu or Pu+Np or Pu+Np+Am or Pu+Np+Am+Cm in PWRs using MOX-UE fuel, i.e. standard MOX fuel with a U235 enriched uranium support instead of the standard tail uranium (0.25%) for standard MOX fuel. This approach allows to multirecycle Pu or TRU (Pu+MA) as long as U235 is available, by keeping the Pu or TRU content in the fuel constant and at a value ensuring a negative moderator void coefficient (i.e. the loss of the coolant brings imperatively the reactor to a subcritical state). Once this value is determined, the U235 enrichment of the MOX-UE fuel is adjusted in order to reach the target burnup (51 GWd/t in this study).

G. Youinou; S. Bays

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Plutonium partitioning in uranium and plutonium co-recovery system for fast reactor fuel recycling with enhanced nuclear proliferation resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For enhancement of nuclear proliferation resistance, a 'co-processing' method for U and Pu co-recovery was studied. Two concepts, no U scrubbing and no Pu reduction partitioning, were employed to formulate two types of flow sheets by using a calculation code. Their process performance was demonstrated using radioactive solutions derived from an irradiated fast reactor fuel. These experimental results indicated that U and Pu were co-recovered in the U/Pu product, and the Pu content in the U/Pu product increased approximately 2.3 times regardless of using reductant. The proposed no U scrubbing and no Pu reductant flow sheet is applicable to fast reactor fuel reprocessing and enhances its resistance to nuclear proliferation. (authors)

Nakahara, Masaumi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4-33 Muramatsu, Naka-gun, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Role of Sea Ice in the Fate of Contaminants in the Arctic Ocean:? Plutonium Atom Ratios in the Fram Strait  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indeed, the largest Sellafield discharges of Pu occurred in the 1970s and were characterized by 240Pu/239Pu close to 0.18, although the ratio increased to 0.21?0.22 in the recent years as a result of an increase in burn up time of the fuel for civil nuclear power production (20, 21). ... In Geological History of the Polar Oceans:? Arctic Versus Antarctic; Bleil, U., Thiede, J., Eds; Kluwer Academic Publishers:? Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1990; pp 317?335. ... We report thermal ionization mass spectrometry measurements of 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, and 237Np isolated from oceanic, estuarine, and riverine sediments from the Arctic Ocean Basin. ...

Pere Masqu; J. Kirk Cochran; Dierk Hebbeln; David J. Hirschberg; Dirk Dethleff; Amelie Winkler

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of a Composite Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Model Describing Plutonium Sorption to Aluminosilicates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their ubiquity in nature and chemical reactivity, aluminosilicate minerals play an important role in retarding actinide subsurface migration. However, very few studies have examined Pu interaction with clay minerals in sufficient detail to produce a credible mechanistic model of its behavior. In this work, Pu(IV) and Pu(V) interactions with silica, gibbsite (Aloxide), and Na-montmorillonite (smectite clay) were examined as a function of time and pH. Sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to gibbsite and silica increased with pH (4 to 10). The Pu(V) sorption edge shifted to lower pH values over time and approached that of Pu(IV). This behavior is apparently due to surface mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Surface complexation constants describing Pu(IV)/Pu(V) sorption to aluminol and silanol groups were developed from the silica and gibbsite sorption experiments and applied to the montmorillonite dataset. The model provided an acceptable fit to the montmorillonite sorption data for Pu(V). In order to accurately predict Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite, the model required inclusion of ion exchange. The objective of this work is to measure the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to silica, gibbsite, and smectite (montmorillonite). Aluminosilicate minerals are ubiquitous at the Nevada National Security Site and improving our understanding of Pu sorption to aluminosilicates (smectite clays in particular) is essential to the accurate prediction of Pu transport rates. These data will improve the mechanistic approach for modeling the hydrologic source term (HST) and provide sorption Kd parameters for use in CAU models. In both alluvium and tuff, aluminosilicates have been found to play a dominant role in the radionuclide retardation because their abundance is typically more than an order of magnitude greater than other potential sorbing minerals such as iron and manganese oxides (e.g. Vaniman et al., 1996). The sorption database used in recent HST models (Carle et al., 2006) and upscaled for use in CAU models (Stoller-Navarro, 2008) includes surface complexation constants for U, Am, Eu, Np and Pu (Zavarin and Bruton, 2004). Generally, between 15 to 30 datasets were used to develop the constants for each radionuclide. However, the constants that describe Pu sorption to aluminosilicates were developed using only 10 datasets, most of which did not specify the oxidation state of Pu in the experiment. Without knowledge or control of the Pu oxidation state, a high degree of uncertainty is introduced into the model. The existing Pu surface complexation model (e.g. Zavarin and Bruton, 2004) drastically underestimates Pu sorption and, thus, will overestimate Pu migration rates (Turner, 1995). Recent HST simulations at Cambric (Carle et al., 2006) suggest that the existing surface complexation model may underpredict Pu K{sub d}s by as much as 3 orders of magnitude. In order to improve HST and CAU-scale transport models (and, as a result, reduce the conservative nature Pu migration estimates), sorption experiments were performed over a range of solution conditions that brackets the groundwater chemistry of the Nevada National Security Site. The aluminosilicates examined were gibbsite, silica, and montmorillonite.

Powell, B A; Kersting, A; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

UPC Events All on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events All on BG/P Systems Events All on BG/P Systems BG/P Hardware Events - Complete List Event Number Mode Counter Number Name Hardware Unit Description 0 0 0 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU J-pipe instructions 1 0 1 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in J-pipe 2 0 2 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in J-pipe 3 0 3 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU J-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 4 0 4 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU I-pipe instructions 5 0 5 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_MULT_DIV P0 CPU Mult/Div in I-pipe 6 0 6 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in I-pipe 7 0 7 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in I-pipe 8 0 8 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU I-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 9 0 9 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_BRANCHES P0 CPU Branches

298

Colloidal Cutin-like Siderophoric Molecules Mobilize Plutonium from Contaminated Soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relatively recently, inorganic colloids have been invoked to reconcile the apparent contradictions between expectations based on classical dissolved-phase Pu transport and field observations of 'enhanced' Pu mobility (Kersting et al. Nature 1999, 397, 56-59). A new paradigm for Pu transport is mobilization and transport via biologically produced ligands. This study for the first time reports a new finding of Pu being transported, at sub-pM concentrations, by a cutin-like natural substance containing siderophore-like moieties and virtually all mobile Pu. Most likely, Pu is complexed by chelating groups derived from siderophores that are covalently bound to a backbone of cutin-derived soil degradation products, thus revealing the history of initial exposure to Pu. Features such as amphiphilicity and small size make this macromolecule an ideal collector for actinides and other metals and a vector for their dispersal. Cross-linking to the hydrophobic domains (e.g., by polysaccharides) gives this macromolecule high mobility and a means of enhancing Pu transport. This finding provides a new mechanism for Pu transport through environmental systems that would not have been predicted by Pu transport models.

Xu, C.; Santschi, P; Roberts, K; Zhong, J; Hatcher, P; Hung, C; Francis, A; Dodge, C; Honeyman, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Wind resuspension of trace amounts of plutonium particles from soil in a semi-arid climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study of resuspension of soil containing minute amounts of plutonium (Pu-239) has been in progress at the Rocky Flats (RF) Plant since 1978. It is one of several studies initiated after wind relocated small amounts of soil-borne Pu-239 during cleanup of an outdoor storage area. The Pu-239-settled field is now sparsely covered with prairie grass typical of the area. Past studies were limited to comparisons of bulk soil activity with total activity in the airborne dust. This work covers the physics of the particle resuspension process. This report covers the following: (1) Pu-239 resuspension rate versus wind speed, (2) mechanisms of soil particle resuspension, (3) vertical concentration profile of Pu-239 particles, (4) Pu-239 and host particle size distribution and activity concentration. 5 references, 1 table.

Langer, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Plutonium(IV) and plutonium(VI) extraction by 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2-(1H)-pyridinone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) from nitric acid media by the promising new extractant 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2(1H)-pyridinone (octyl-1,2-HOPO) has been investigated. The effects of nitric acid, sodium, aluminum and iron(III) nitrates on extraction have been examined. Octyl-1,2-HOPO exhibits high specificity for Pu(IV) over a wide range of acidity and ionic strength. The affinity of octyl-1,2-HOPO for Pu(VI) is much less than for Pu(IV). However, the extraction of Pu(VI) is possible from acidic as well as from highly salted media. Two water soluble ligands, 1-hydroxyethane-1,1,-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and H(2,2)-1,2-HOPO, have been shown to be very effective for back extraction.

Romanovski, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science; Hoffman, D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; White, D.J.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Li, T.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Bluebird Territory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bluebird Territory Bluebird Territory Name: Jesse Lasky Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am posting this message in hope of finding more information on bluebirds because I am starting a trail of bluebird boxes near my home. I have already done a lot of research on bluebirds already but I still have some questions. One of these was what is the size of a bluebird pair's territory. Another question I have is what amount of this area has to be open grassy area. I would also like suggestions on how I can make this trail better. Thank you. Replies: According to Petersen's Field Guide, there are three species of bluebird-- the western, the eastern, and the mountain bluebirds. All three inhabit similar habitats and have the same nesting habits. (hmm... 3 words with the root "habit" in one sentence) No mention is made of territoriality. As a cross check, I looked up a species I know to be territorial, Anna's Hummer, and the guide does mention it; so the implication is that bluebirds are not strongly territorial (many species are not territorial). Be that as it may, territory size varies with food supply and population density. If you put too many birdboxes too close together, maybe other species will inhabit some of them. As for the area of open grassy land, the Guide just says "open terrain with scattered trees", so I would *guess* that any terrain with 20% - 80% open grassland is probably OK.

304

Influence of Sources on Plutonium Mobility and Oxidation State Transformations in Vadose Zone Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today, 34 metric tons of Pu is planned to be shipped back to SRS from the Pantex site and converted into commercial reactor fuel. ... Existing Pu waste stored in the site's 49 waste tanks is also presently being processed into glass logs for eventual disposal in a yet-unnamed federal repository. ... The transport of Pu potentially released from spent nuclear fuel disposal and storage sites will be dependent on its interaction with mineral surfaces and speciation in the subsurface. ...

Daniel I. Kaplan; Brian A. Powell; Martine C. Duff; Deniz I. Demirkanli; Miles Denham; Robert A. Fjeld; Fred J. Molz

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Procedure Sample Analysis 3 3 . 9 . 11 HI THEORY. . IH. 1 Backscattering Principles HI. 2 The RBS Spectrum IH. 3 The Surface Energy Approximation . . . HI. 4 Stainless Steel 316. . IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . . 13 . 13 15... for the disposition of weapons grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) in the United States: MOX fuel conversion and immobilization. The first option uses nuclear reactors to transmutate WG Pu and the second imbeds the WG Pu in glass logs for deep burial. Due to the large amount...

Ortensi, Javier

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both.

Crawford, Douglas C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hayes, Steven L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hill, Robert N. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Adaptive excitation control in power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control input pu? and output gE? , we have puBxAx ?+?=? ? (2.25) xig ? (2.26) where ?? ? ?? ? ?== 6667 2 rJA , ?? ? ?? ?= 67 0 iB , [ ]08213.1=C 32....38) or puBxAx ?+?=? ? (2.39) xip ? (2.40) where p is a measurable output and iii C are uncertain system parameters. In the Chapter IV, we apply our adaptive control approaches to the real DAE system. We...

Chiu, Pei-Chen

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Environmental application of stable xenon and radioxenon monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1969) Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, Richland WA. [8]Batches Processed through Hanford Separations Plants, 1944Locations Ref iso = Xe Ave. Hanford Fuel Xe) 216-Z-1A Pu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES STORED IN STAINLESS STEEL CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The destructive examination (DE) of 3013 containers after storage is part of the Surveillance and Monitoring Program based on the Department of Energy's standard for long-term storage of Pu (DOE-STD-3013). The stored, Pu-bearing materials may contain alkali halide contamination that varies from trace amounts of salt to about 50 weight percent, with smaller fractions of other compounds and oxides. These materials were characterized prior to packaging, and surveillance characterizations are conducted to determine the behavior of the materials during long term storage. The surveillance characterization results are generally in agreement with the pre-surveillance data. The predominant phases identified by X-ray diffraction are in agreement with the expected phase assemblages of the as-received materials. The measured densities are in reasonable agreement with the expected densities of materials containing the fraction of salts and actinide oxide specified by the pre-surveillance data. The radiochemical results are generally in good agreement with the pre-surveillance data for mixtures containing 'weapons grade' Pu (nominally 94% {sup 239}Pu and 6% {sup 240}Pu); however, the ICP-MS results from the present investigation generally produce lower concentrations of Pu than the pre-surveillance analyses. For mixtures containing 'fuel grade' Pu (nominally 81-93% {sup 239}Pu and 7-19% {sup 240}Pu), the ICP-MS results from the present investigation appear to be in better agreement with the pre-surveillance data than the radiochemistry results.

Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.; Bridges, N.; Bronikowski, M.; Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Mcelwee, M.; Missimer, D.; Scogin, J.; Summer, M.; Jurgensen, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Investigation of the behavior of plutonium(V) in alkaline media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of the plutonium(V) oxidation state in alkaline media was studied with respect to the neighboring Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) oxidation states. Tests were conducted in 1 M or higher NaOH solutions in the presence and absence of other components of Hanford Site high-level tank waste. Spectrophotometric techniques were found to be effective in studying the behavior of plutonium(V) in alkaline solution at plutonium concentrations above 10{sup -3} M. To this end, plutonium(V) and plutonium(VI) in NaOH were prepared and their spectra characterized. In alkaline solutions with NaOH concentration below 8 M, plutonium(V) was found to be unstable to disproportionation occurring according to the reaction 2 Pu(V)(aq) {yields} Pu(VI)(aq) + Pu(IV)(s). The disproportionation of Pu(V) is complicated by at least two simultaneous processes: (1) the sorption of a significant fraction of the Pu(V) onto the forming Pu(IV) hydrous oxide precipitate, and (2) partial reduction of Pu(VI) by water {alpha}-radiolysis products.

Budantseva, N.A.; Tananaev, I.G.; Fedoseev, A.M.; Bessonov, A.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Anticipated dose to workers for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP Project W-460  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report provides estimates of expected whole body and extremity radiological dose to workers conducting planned Pu stabilization and packaging operations at PFP.

LILLY, J.T.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

SciTech Connect: The Microscopic Theory of Fission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Theory of Fission Fission-fragment properties have been calculated for thermal neutron-induced fission on a sup 239Pu target, using constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov...

316

PHONETIC NAME MATCHING FOR CROSS-LINGUAL SPOKEN SENTENCE RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Talabani Iraq pu jing Putin Russia bu shi Bush US sha bi er Shabir Afghanistan bu le er Blair UK ying show

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - active volcanic features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

enormous Jurassic--Cretaceous volcanic activity, CretaceousJurassicPermian andesite Permian metasediment... of Mesozoic volcanic rocks in the Songliao basin, NE China PU-JUN...

318

No d'ordre : 3836 PRSENTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

qui j'ai pu travailler, qui ont porté Navidget sous Blender et SketchUp : Pierre Faure, Pierre Rouanet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Radiation Damage in Titanate Ceramics Used for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from radiation damage experiments are discussed with respect to the immobilization of Pu declared excess to the weapons programs. The ceramics are titanate-based.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Computer News, Volume 32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bauelos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Investigation of the November 8, 2011, Plutonium Contamination...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

one of the storage containers, the workers discovered a Pu fuel plate wrapped in plastic and tape. When the workers attempted to remove the wrapping material, an uncontrolled...

322

Enduring Stockpile CMM Shell Inspection Plan (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The slides are intended to serve as a high level summary of the CMM Shell Inspection Plan as presented to Pu Sustainment Legacy Pit Production IPT.

Montano, Joshua D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flores, Randy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Separation of plutonium and americium by low-temperature fluorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have demonstrated separation of Pu and in-grown Am using the gaseous reagent dioxygen difluoride. Aged PuF{sub 4} was fluorinated at room temperature to generate PuF{sub 6} gas, which was trapped separately and reduced to PuF{sub 4}. The reaction product contained very little Am. Unreacted solid had elevated concentrations of Am that were consistent with a material balance. Use of a gaseous reagent and product enabled remote handling during reaction and purification. This result demonstrated a simple and minimal waste alternative that may have application to a number of actinide purification problems.

Mills, T.R.; Reese, L.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Synthesis and thermal studies of flexible polyurethane nanocomposite foams obtained using nanoclay modified with flame retardant compound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents thermal studies of nanocomposites based on the flexible polyurethane (PU) matrix and filled using montmorillonite organically modified with organophosphorus flame retardant compound. Flexibl...

?ukasz Piszczyk; Magdalena Danowska

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Systems Under Outage Probablility Constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SU) link with multiple transmitting an- tennas and a single receiving antenna, coexisting with a primary user (PU) link with a single receiving antenna. At the SU transmitter (SU-Tx), the channel state infor- mation (CSI) of the SU link is assumed... to be perfectly known; while the interference channel from the SU-Tx to the PU receiver (PU-Rx) is not perfectly known due to less cooperation between the SU and the PU. As such, the SU-Tx is only assumed to know that the interference channel gain can take values...

Cai, Pei Li

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Caractrisation des sources radioactives du cycle du combustible. Applications au cycle du thorium : synthse de l232U en combustibles solides.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Si le cycle du thorium possde plusieurs avantages par rapport au cycle U/Pu, notamment une meilleure rgnration de la matire fissile en spectre thermique et (more)

Leniau, Baptiste

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Compilation of fission product yields Vallecitos Nuclear Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the ninth in a series of compilations of fission yield data made at Vallecitos Nuclear Center in which fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been utilized to produce a recommended set of yields for the known fission products. The original data with reference sources, as well as the recommended yields are presented in tabular form for the fissionable nuclides U-235, Pu-239, Pu-241, and U-233 at thermal neutron energies; for U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Th-232 at fission spectrum energies; and U-235 and U-238 at 14 MeV. In addition, U-233, U-236, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Np-237 at fission spectrum energies; U-233, Pu-239, Th-232 at 14 MeV and Cf-252 spontaneous fission are similarly treated. For 1979 U234F, U237F, Pu249H, U234He, U236He, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, and Cm242F yields were evaluated. In 1980, Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242Mt, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, and Es254T are also evaluated.

Rider, B.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Email Template  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emy Laija, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that EPA met with the remedy review board regarding leaving Plutonium (Pu) waste on the plateau, and the Hanford...

330

Section 55: Results of Compliance Assessments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of drinking water WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Elements and Chemical Compounds Am americium Pu plutonium Ra radium Rn radon Th thorium U uranium This page intentionally left...

331

Time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields: Study of multiphoton processes and dynamical response of individual valence electrons of N2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the exchange ~x!- only limit. In the latter approach @1#, theTime-dependent density-functional theor Study of multiphoton processes and dynam of N2 in inten Xi Chu and Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, and Kansas Ce ~Received 30 July 2001; pu We...-I CHU PHYSICAL REVIEW A 64 0634041sg 21su 22sg 22su 21pu 43sg 2 . According to the valence bond theory, this molecule has a triple bond formed with 3sg and 1pu electrons. The 3sg orbital is parallel to the internuclear axis and the two degen- erate 1pu...

Chu, Xi; Chu, Shih-I

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Acronyms ADR BWR CANDU DA ESARDA FAA FWHM Geant4 GGGCanada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors, to several weightenergy spectrum, such as CANDU systems, 239 Pu more readily

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

rifle.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JUNCTION JUNCTION RIFLE GRAND DISPOSAL SITE N NEW RIFLE 70 DENVER COLORADO MILLSITE 6 65 MILES 20 10 0 133 30 OLD RIFLE MILLSITE RIFLE C O L O R A D O RIVER 13 R I F L E C R E E K GLENWOOD SPRINGS NEW CASTLE M:\LTS\111\0017\01\S0016200.DWG The Grand Junction Office has provided cost-effective and efficient stewardship for more than 10 years F A C T S H E E T Overview Regulatory Setting Rifle Disposal Site Uranium and vanadium ores were processed at two millsites near Rifle, Colorado, between 1924 through 1981. Milling operations created process-related wastes and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radio- active materials and other contaminants. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings from the two millsites in an engineered disposal cell at Estes Gulch, north of Rifle. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the

334

CAPABILITY TO RECOVER PLUTONIUM-238 IN H-CANYON/HB-LINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np-237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-anyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase-3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ~ 2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase-1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material.

Fuller, K.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Capability to Recover Plutonium-238 in H-Canyon/HB-Line - 13248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np- 237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase- 3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ?2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase- 1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material. (authors)

Fuller, Kenneth S. Jr.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Plutonium gamma-ray measurements for mutual reciprocal inspections of dismantled nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The O`Leary-Mikhailov agreement of March 1994 stated that the U.S. and the Russian Federation would engage in mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) of fissile materials removed from dismantled nuclear weapons. It was decided to begin with the plutonium (Pu) removed from dismantled weapons and held in storage containers. Later discussions between U.S. and Russian technical experts led to the conclusion that, to achieve the O`Leary-Mikhailov objectives, Pu MRI would need to determine that the material in the containers has properties consistent with a nuclear-weapon component. Such a property is a {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio consistent with weapons-grade material. One of the candidate inspection techniques under consideration for Pu MRI is to use a narrow region (630-670 keV) of the plutonium gamma-ray spectrum, taken with a high-purity germanium detector, to determine that it is weapons-grade plutonium as well as to estimate the minimum mass necessary to produce the observed gamma-ray intensity. We developed software (the Pu600 code) for instrument control and analysis especially for this purpose. In November 1994, U.S. and Russian scientists met at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for joint experiments to evaluate candidate Pu MRI inspection techniques. In one of these experiments, gamma-ray intensities were measured from three unclassified weapons-grade plutonium source standards and one reactor-grade standard (21% {sup 240}pu). Using our software, we determined the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of these standards to accuracies within {+-}10%, which is adequate for Pu MRI. The minimum mass estimates varied, as expected, directly with the exposed surface area of the standards.

Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Clark, D.; Gosnell, T.B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Published February 2013 Published February 2013 Pu Pu Publ b blis s ishe he hed d d Fe Fe Febr br brua ua u ry ry 2 201 013 3 FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 2 STC STONETURN CONSULTANTS 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program * i Table of Contents Abbreviations ............................................................................................................................................iii Foreword .................................................................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................

339

LMS-AMC-S01980-0-0.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Amchitka Data for Inclusion in the Database Amchitka Data for Inclusion in the Database This page intentionally left blank Table D-1. Actinide Concentration Determined by Analysis 1 of Biota Samples Collected by CRESP 2 Composite ID Coded Sample ID Weight (grams) Tissue Coded Species Species Location Collector Serial No Am-241 (Bq/kg) Am-241 s.d. Am-241 MDA Am-241 Detects Pu-238 (Bq/kg) Pu-238 s.d. Pu-238 MDA Pu-238 Detects Pu-239+240 (Bq/kg) Pu-239+240 s.d. Pu-239+240 MDA Pu-239+240 Detects Sr-90 (Bq/kg) Sr-90 s.d. Sr-90 MDA Sr-90 Detects ATKA-Ki2-JW-C551 B-A-163-B 15 B A ATKA Ki2 JW C551 0.025 0.0256 0.0255 0 -0.001 0.0057 0.0287 0 0.0037 0.0112 0.0287 0 -0.227 0.477 1.95 0 BROCK-KI-AL-C503 B-B-154-B 15 B B BROCK KI AL C503 0.0289 0.0266 0.0281 1 0.0042 0.0119 0.031 0 0.0243 0.0346 0.031 0 -0.177 0.53 2.16 0

340

Dielectric Change of Copper Phthalocyanine and Polyurethane Foam with High Elasticity as a Function of Pressure Discussed in Terms of Conversion from Natural Mechanical Energy to Electric Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A composite with both high permittivity and high elasticity was prepared by using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and polyurethane (PU) foam. The formation and chemical, structural, and electrical characterizations of CuPc and the PU/CuPc composites were ...

Shaoyan Fan; Yuezhen Bin; Rong Zhang; Panpan Zhang; Dan Zhu; Masaru Matsuo

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

variability 1. Dry areas reasonable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., wind energy #12;Marine Core Service Organisation Wind KNMI lead DU at IFREMER L3 PU at KNMI L4 PU, .. ), QuikScat (NSCAT3, NWP Ocean Calibration) Documentation, verification #12;Plans Wind Constellation Description Platform NASA, Rapidscat, ISS · HY2A not NRT yet #12;Global constellation users OSI SAF Message

Haak, Hein

342

Measurement of a Complete Set of Nuclides, Cross Sections and Kinetic Energies in Spallation of 238  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear power than today, reactors of a 4th generation should be envisaged, ready to offer wide Pu could be burnt in a 3rd generation of reactors (EPR) using mixed U/Pu-fuel (MOX). Aiming and of molten-salt reactors are discussed. The innovative vision for the 4th generation are Accelerator Driven

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

343

Preserving Secondary Users' Privacy in Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in improv- ing spectrum utilization in wireless services. In the cognitive radio paradigm, secondary users (SUs) are allowed to utilize licensed spectrum opportunistically without interfering with primary users (PUs). To motivate PU to share licensed spectrum with SU, it is reasonable for SU to pay PU

Li, Qun

344

Effects of lump characteristics on plutonium self absorption correction methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation study has been undertaken to assess the robustness of several published Pu self-absorption correction methods against variation in size, shape, density etc. for use in the gamma assay of nuclear waste. The correction methods studied are a numerical plutonium self absorption correction (PuSAC) technique, the Fleissner 2-line, Fleissner 3-line and Infinite Energy Extrapolation methods with both linear and polynomial extrapolation to 1/E=0. The performance of these methods has been compared for a limited set of measured encapsulated PuO{sub 2} sources plus a range of modelled unencapsulated Pu lumps. An indication of the magnitude of the uncertainties of the numerical PuSAC method has been determined for cases of blind assays where the Pu material, shape and distribution are unknown with the aim of ultimately applying it to real waste. The importance of the range of Pu lumps used in the baseline modelled dataset has been examined. Data are presented to illustrate how the uncertainties in the method are affected by the shape, composition, density, number and mass distribution of Pu particles in a sample for a given modelled base dataset. (authors)

Curtis, D. C.; Wormald, M. R. [Canberra UK Ltd (United Kingdom); Croft, S. [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

THERMAREST BASECAMP REGULAR The BaseCamp mattress is the straightforward, workhorse of car  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. in Top fabric type 75d Polyester 75d Polyester Bottom fabric type 75d Polyester 75d Polyester 1 Expanded foam core expands when unpacked for easy self-inflation. Durable: Sturdy, classic design provides PU Foam Expanded PU Foam Country of Origin Made in Seattle, USA Made in Seattle, USA #12;

Walker, Lawrence R.

346

NASA's Planetary Science Program Support of Radioisotope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Mars 2020 · Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator ­ 2 Pu-238 General Purpose Heat Source Modules Inventory 4 #12;Radioisotope Power Systems · Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator ­ 8 Pu-238;Looking Ahead · Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) -- working well on Mars

Rathbun, Julie A.

347

INHIBITION COGNITIVE, TRAITEMENT EMOTIONNEL IMPLICITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Rapporteur, PU-PH, Université Paris VI, France Pr V. Camus, Rapporteur, PU-PH, Université R. Descartes, Tours jury, les Professeurs Danion, Sander, Fossati et Camus pour m'avoir fait l'honneur de participer à l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Non-destructive assay of EBR-II blanket elements using resonance transmission analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonance transmission analysis utilizing a faltered reactor beam was examined as a means of determining the {sup 239}Pu content in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II depleted uranium blanket elements. The technique uses cadmium and gadolinium falters along with a {sup 239}Pu fission chamber to isolate the 0.3 eV resonance in {sup 239}Pu. In the energy range of this resonance (0.1 eV to 0.5 ev), the total microscopic cross-section of {sup 239}Pu is significantly greater than the cross-sections of {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U. This large difference allows small changes in the {sup 239}Pu content of a sample to result in large changes in the mass signal response. Tests with small stacks of depleted uranium and {sup 239}Pu foils indicate a significant change in response based on the {sup 239}Pu content of the foil stack. In addition, the tests indicate good agreement between the measured and predicted values of {sup 239}Pu up to approximately two weight percent.

Klann, R.T.; Poenitz, W.P.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Multirecycling of Plutonium from LMFBR Blanket in Standard PWRs Loaded with MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is now well-known that, from a physics standpoint, Pu, or even TRU (i.e. Pu+M.A.), originating from LEU fuel irradiated in PWRs can be multirecycled also in PWRs using MOX fuel. However, the degradation of the isotopic composition during irradiation necessitates using enriched U in conjunction with the MOX fuel either homogeneously or heterogeneously to maintain the Pu (or TRU) content at a level allowing safe operation of the reactor, i.e. below about 10%. The study is related to another possible utilization of the excess Pu produced in the blanket of a LMFBR, namely in a PWR(MOX). In this case the more Pu is bred in the LMFBR, the more PWR(MOX) it can sustain. The important difference between the Pu coming from the blanket of a LMFBR and that coming from a PWR(LEU) is its isotopic composition. The first one contains about 95% of fissile isotopes whereas the second one contains only about 65% of fissile isotopes. As it will be shown later, this difference allows the PWR fed by Pu from the LMFBR blanket to operate with natural U instead of enriched U when it is fed by Pu from PWR(LEU)

Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Practical implications of neutron survey instrument performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......252Cf 241Am-Be GCR PWR Spent fuel flask PuO2 store Fuel processing R H (10) (90...incidence through the electronics and batteries, and the connections to the detector...252Cf 241Am-Be GCR PWR Spent fuel flask PuO2 store Fuel processing......

R. J. Tanner; D. T. Bartlett; L. G. Hager; L. N. Jones; C. Molinos; N. J. Roberts; G. C. Taylor; D. J. Thomas

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(-1) + Su,2(-1)2 + Su,3(-1)3 + Su,4(-1)4] x TP T = Tu / 298 K = 0 + (-1) 1 P = Pu / 1 bar = 0 + (-1) 1 bar; x r = 0 Temperature (K) BurningVelocity(cm/s) Figure 9 Iso-octane correlation for Pu = 1 bar

352

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Thursday 5-23 9 NMMSS_2013_Obligations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Communications DOEFAC1 ANSTO-999-11 AUSFAC1, KoalaTown, Australia DOEFAC1, Intheboonies, AL DOE LEU, PU 75,000g U (3,000g U235), 5,000g PU NONE 11101, 11102, 11103 Obligations Case...

353

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Thursday 5-23 830 NMMSS_2013_Presentation...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Communications DOEFAC1 ANSTO-999-11 AUSFAC1, KoalaTown, Australia DOEFAC1, Intheboonies, AL DOE LEU, PU 75,000g U (3,000g U235), 5,000g PU NONE 11101, 11102, 11103 Obligations Case...

354

Reactivity of high plutonium-containing glasses for the immobilization of surplus fissile materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been performed on glasses doped with 2 and 7 wt % plutonium to evaluate factors that may be important in the performance of these high-Pu-loaded glasses for repository storage. The high Pu loadings result from the need to dispose of excess Pu from weapons dismantling. The glasses were reacted in water vapor to simulate aging that may occur under unsaturated storage conditions prior to contact with liquid water. They were also reacted with liquid water under standard static leach test conditions. The results were compared with similar tests of a reference glass (202 glass) containing only 0.01 wt % Pu. In vapor hydration testing to date, at 2 wt % loading, the Pu was incorporated into the glass without phase separation, and reaction in water vapor proceeded at a rate comparable with that of the 202 glass. At wt % loading, a Pu phase separated and was not uniformly incorporated into the glass. The vapor reaction of this glass proceeded at a more rapid rate. This phase separation was manifested in the static leach tests, where colloidal phases of Pu-rich material remained suspended in solution, thereby increasing the absolute Pu release when compared to the 202 glass.

Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Wolf, S.F.; Johnson, T.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

J. Environ. Radioactivity, Vol. 36, No. I, pp. 69-83, 1997 0 1997 Elsevier Science LImited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there are two major sources of PM in this basin: close-in (troposphertc) fallout from nuclear weapons testing of fallout plutonium (Pu) from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing is the largest source of Pu particles that are generated under differing testing conditions. These findings will have major implications

Buesseler, Ken

357

5 SAMPLING TO ESTIMATE SPATIAL PATTERN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......distribution over a region An example objective might be mapping the distribution of 239Pu in a given area around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado, USA. The 239Pu source in this case was storage drums, and the primary......

5 SAMPLING TO ESTIMATE SPATIAL PATTERN

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Monte Carlo simulation of embedded 241Am activity in injured palm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Pu isotopes (17.5 keV) and neptunium L X-rays (17.8 keV) of 241Am...uranium L X-rays due to Pu and neptunium L X-rays due to 241Am. Ratio...wounds incurred by former workers at rocky flats. Health Phys. (2006) 91(2......

M. Y. Nadar; H. K. Patni; D. K. Akar; Lokpati Mishra; I. S. Singh; D. D. Rao; P. K. Sarkar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at Non-Hanford Sites and Relevance to Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven sites where Pu release to the environment has raised significant environmental concerns have been reviewed. A summary of the most significant hydrologic and geochemical features, contaminant release events and transport processes relevant to Pu migration at the seven sites is presented.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

tokamakreactors University ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Presented at PPPL PS&T seminar Jan 12, 2001, Princeton, NJ #12; 1, PU, Jan.18, 2001, Princeton NJ PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 2 #12; INTRODUCTION Plasma reactor. Leonid E. Zakharov, PPPL Theory seminar, PU, Jan.18, 2001, Princeton NJ PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS

Zakharov, Leonid E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A new technique to reject dc-link voltage ripple in PWM inverters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the rlc-link, is numerically calculated. Let us assume, Inverfer output frequency f, ? 60 Hz Vs, = 1 pu Dc ? link voltage rrpple = k Vs, ? 0. 2 x Vge = . 2 pu Dc ? link voltage ripple frequency f, = 120 Hz :tfodulation index ? 0. 5 Frequency spectrum...

Shireen, Wajiha

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry PuPreyssler The trans-uranium chemistry of the Preyssler heteropolyanion was extended to include the synthesis of the Pu(III) complex, [PuP5W30O110]12-, whose electroanalytical characterization reveals dual redox activity involving the 1-electron Pu(III)/Pu(IV) couple of the guest ion at +0.96 V vs. Ag/AgCl and the 5 × 2-electron reductive electrochemistry of the P-W-O host framework at potentials between -0.6 and 0 V, and electrostatic ion solvation behavior. Details are presented in the article by Antonio and Chiang, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 8285. Polyoxoanions of general composition [XaMbOc]d- (X º P, Si; M º W, Mo) have applications in various disciplines including medicine, catalysis, and separations science. In prospective applications relating to nuclear waste

363

Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu/sup 3 +/ in LaCl/sub 3/, and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states.

Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radiation Damange Effects in Candidate Titanates for Plutonium Disposition: Pyrochlore.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify certain assumptions as to the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur in a waste-form ceramic as 239Pu decays. To study to effects of 239Pu decay, 238Pu, a short-lived isotope, was incorporated into a pyrochlore-rich baseline titanate one that is formulated for pyrochlore as the dominant phase. The self-irradiation with 238Pu provided information on damage to the crystal structures of the phases in the ceramic as well as changes in dimensions, densities, and chemical durability. Overall, the pyrochlore baseline material appears to be a viable material for the immobilization of weapons-ready Pu. The physical and chemical properties of this material are not adversely affected by the material becoming amorphous from radiation-induced damage.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Preliminary safety evaluation for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) describes and analyzes the installation and operation of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The SPS is a combination of components required to expedite the safe and timely storage of Plutonium (Pu) oxide. The SPS program will receive site Pu packages, process the Pu for storage, package the Pu into metallic containers, and safely store the containers in a specially modified storage vault. The location of the SPS will be in the 2736- ZB building and the storage vaults will be in the 2736-Z building of the PFP, as shown in Figure 1-1. The SPS will produce storage canisters that are larger than those currently used for Pu storage at the PFP. Therefore, the existing storage areas within the PFP secure vaults will require modification. Other modifications will be performed on the 2736-ZB building complex to facilitate the installation and operation of the SPS.

Shapley, J.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

Two?photon dissociation of vibrationally excited HD+: The inhomogeneous differential equation approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dalgamo and Lewis,6 we write S2(kj /J,v j jj) = (,6kh(1su) I,uTlx~,i), (21) and S3(kj /J,v j j;) = (,6kh(2pu) I~D Ix~,i), where (22) (,6Vj (2pu) I~T l(,6v) (Isu X(T)(R) - '" ' , . A.. (2:pu) v,j, - ~ EVj (2pu) - Ev,j, (Isu) _ fIm '{'vj (23...( )(R) - '" ' , . A.. (1su) v,j, - ~ EVj (Isu) - Evd, (Isu) _ fIm '('vj , (25) so that SI(kj/J,v j j;) = (,6kh(1su)I,uDlx~~:(R and S4(kj/J,vj j;) = (,6kjf(2pu)I,uTlx~~:(R, where X~~: (R) satisfies the IDE: {~_ j(j+ I) dR 2 R2 + 2: [EVd, + f...

Chu, Shih-I; Laughlin, Cecil; Datta, Krishna K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Microsoft PowerPoint - CRIEPI_R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Pyro-processing Fuel Cycle Technology at CRIEPI Fontana, WI, USA August 28, 2012 Y. Sakamura, M. Iizuka, K. Uozumi, T. Murakami and T. Koyama Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Concept of Metal Fuel Fast Reactor Cycle Uranium Ore Fuel Fabrication U Enrichment U, Pu PUREX U U U, Pu, MA U, Pu, MA, FP Fresh MOX Metal Fuel Fast Reactor Spent Oxide Fuels LWR U, Pu Spent Metal Fuels Pyroprocessing & Fuel Fabrication CRIEPI has been studying pyroprocessing since 1986 Metal fuel FR cycle has high potential in Proliferation resistance Transmutation of minor actinides High breeding ratio Substantial reduction of fuel cycle cost CRIEPI's R&D Program on Pyroprocessing Process Development -Basic data assessment (electrochemistry, thermodynamics, etc.) -Process test with unirradiated U, Pu, MA or irradiated materials -Process flowsheet

369

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that the observed surface Pu residue was from the buried sources, not atmospheric fallout. (6) The

Fred J. Molz, III

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Preserving Plutonium-244 as a National Asset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-244 (244 Pu) is an extremely rare and long-lived isotope of plutonium with a half-life of 80 million years. Measureable amounts of 244 Pu are found in neither reactor-grade nor weapons-grade plutonium. Production of this isotope requires a very high thermal flux to permit the two successive neutron captures that convert 242 Pu to 243 Pu to 244 Pu, particularly given the short (about 5 hour) half-life of 243 Pu. Such conditions simply do not exist in plutonium production processes. Therefore, 244 Pu is ideal for precise radiochemical analyses measuring plutonium material properties and isotopic concentrations in items containing plutonium. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is about ten times more sensitive when using 244 Pu rather than 242 Pu for determining plutonium isotopic content. The isotope can also be irradiated in small quantities to produce superheavy elements. The majority of the existing global inventory of 244 Pu is contained in the outer housing of Mark-18A targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The total inventory is about 20 grams of 244 Pu in about 400 grams of plutonium distributed among the 65 targets. Currently, there are no specific plans to preserve these targets. Although the cost of separating and preserving this material would be considerable, it is trivial in comparison to new production costs. For all practical purposes, the material is irreplaceable, because new production would cost billions of dollars and require a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles spanning up to 50 years. This paper will discuss a set of options for overcoming the significant challenges to preserve the 244 Pu as a National Asset: (1) the need to relocate the material from SRS in a timely manner, (2) the need to reduce the volume of material to the extent possible for storage, and (3) the need to establish an operational capability to enrich the 244 Pu in significant quantities. This paper suggests that if all the Mark-18A plutonium is separated, it would occupy a small volume and would be inexpensive to store while an enrichment capability is developed. Very small quantities could be enriched in existing mass separators to support critical needs.

Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Romano, Catherine E [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Microsoft PowerPoint - Zr_behavior [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reduction Reduction Behaviors of Zirconium Oxide Compounds in LiCl-Li 2 O Melt International Pyroprocessing Research Conference August 29, 2012 Fontana, Wisconsin, USA Y. Sakamura, M. Iizuka and T. Koyama Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) S. Kitawaki, A. Nakayoshi and H. Kofuji Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Pyrochemical Reprocessing for Spent LWR Fuels LWR Reduction product (U-Pu-MA +FP) MO 2 + 4e - M + 2O 2- Electrolytic reduction U-Pu-MA, U metal Spent oxide fuel Electrorefining O 2- LiCl (650 o C) O 2 3 V FP(Cs,Sr,etc) U U,Pu MA 液体Cd 陰極 固体陰極 陽極 還元物 U LiCl-KCl (500 o C) U,Pu MA Liquid Cd cathode Solid cathode Anode RE 3+ Pu 3+ U 3+ MA 3+ Metal fuel Pyrochemical Reprocessing for Spent LWR Fuels LWR Reduction product (U-Pu-MA +FP) MO 2 + 4e - M + 2O 2- Electrolytic reduction U-Pu-MA, U metal Spent oxide fuel Electrorefining

373

The complexation behavior of neptunium and plutonium with nitrilotriacetic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first stability constant of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was determined at four ionic strengths (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 M) using spectrophotometry. Nonlinear least-squares data fitting identified the complex as NpO{sub 2}NTA{sup 2-}. The Specific Ion Interaction Theory (S.I.T) approximation method was used to determine the stability constants at infinite dilution. First results on Pu{sup 4+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA are reported. The stability constant for the Pu(NTA){sup +} complex at I = 0.1 M strength is given. From results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA (I = 1 M) at pH < 3, the stability constant was derived for PuO{sub 2} NTA{sup {minus}}. At pH > 3, NTA partially reduced PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to PuO{sub 2}{sup +}. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Nitsche, H.; Becraft, K.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dust transport: Wind blown and mechanical resuspension, July 1983 to December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study defines the processes that resuspend plutonium (Pu) particles from Pu-contaminated soil at Rocky Flats. Such knowledge can predict the transport of Pu particles from the site and the population dose. A vertical dust flux tower profiled the plume of Pu particles from the site. The data show a 70% reduction between 1 and 10 m in the concentration of coarse and inhalable Pu particles. The respirable particle concentration remained steady at both heights, slightly above background levels. High winds visually resuspend large amounts of dust for short periods, but we suspected that present sampling devices do not function properly above 50 km/h. During a windstorm reaching 80 km/h, the size-selective sampler used seriously underestimated the dust(Pu) concentration. Wind tunnel studies measured resuspension versus wind speed from our prairie grass covered, arid soil. We failed to find a good correlation between resuspension and wind speed. This led to a search for alternative mechanisms of resuspension besides wind erosion. Resuspension of dust(Pu) from grass proved to be important, as well as resuspension from rain splash.

Langer, G.

1986-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

The application of N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DOGA) in the PUREX process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new salt-free complexant, DOGA for separating trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric acid solution was studied. DOGA has stronger complexing abilities to Pu(IV) and Np(IV), but complexing ability of DOGA to U(VI) was weaker. The DOGA can be used in the PUREX process to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric solution. On one hand, U(IV) in the nitric acid solution containing trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) was extracted by 30%TBP - kerosene(v/v) in the presence of DOGA, but Pu(IV) and Np(IV) were kept in the aqueous phase. On the other hand, Pu(IV) and Np(IV) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene were effectively stripped by DOGA into the aqueous phase, but U(VI) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene was remained in 30% TBP - kerosene. DOGA is a promising complexant to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) solution in the U-cycle of the PUREX process. (authors)

Jianchen, Wang; Jing, Chen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology - INET, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 1021, Beijing 102201 (China)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of /sup 239 +240/Pu and lesser amounts of /sup 241/Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of /sup 239 +240/Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables.

Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Plutonium uptake by brucite and hydroxylated periclase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Batch adsorption experiments and spectroscopic investigations consistently show that aqueous Pu(IV) is quickly removed from solution and becomes incorporated in a brucite or hydroxylated MgO surface to a depth of at least 50nm, primarily as Pu(IV) within a pH range of 8.512.5, and is unaffected by the presence of the organic ligand, citrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used to estimate Pu penetration depth and provide information about its chemical state.

John Douglas Farr; Mary P. Neu; Roland K. Schulze; Bruce D. Honeyman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Plutonium (IV) Ions in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo-and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Pu(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have been obtained and trends established. The affinity of aceto-hydroxamic acid for Pu(IV) ions and its selectivity over U(VI) ions is demonstrated by the values of the stability constants in HCIO4. These data support the applications of simple hydroxamic acids in advanced Purex-type solvent extraction systems.

Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; Maher, C. J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mucrobial Stabilization of Plutonium in the Subsurface Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the results of work performed at the Colorado School of Mines, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Texas A and M University during the second reporting phase of this project. The sub-projects focused on this year include: (1) Biotransformation of Pu-contaminated soil; (2) Environmental colloids at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; (3) Production, isolation and characterization of EPS (exopolymeric substances, or exopolysaccharides); (4) Colloid trapping; (5) Determination of stability constants of complexes of Pu(IV) with organic ligands; and (6) The role of bacterial EPS in the transport of Pu through saturated porous media.

BJ Honeyman, AJ Francis, CJ Dodge, JB Gillow, PH Santschi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

PANS turbulence model: investigation of computational and physical closure issues in flow past a circular cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

p = P +pu (2.4) The cut-o can be arbitrary but the lter must commute with temporal and spatial di erentiation (Germano 1992). When the lter is applied, we get hVii = Ui and 7 hpi= P. However, this decomposition is unlike that of the statistical one... of the unresolved kinetic energy equation emerges. @ku @t +Uj @ku @xj = Pu u +Tku (2.19) This is the generalized form of the unresolved kinetic energy evolution equation with ku = 12 (Vi;Vj) where Pu = 12 (Vi;Vj) @Ui@xj . In PANS closure at the two-equation level...

Reyes, Dasia Ann

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Rigidity theory for matroids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the (squared) edge lengths Q(pu pv), for fu;vg2E, where Q(x) = Pdi=1x2i ? (II.) What is the dimension of the space of in nitesimal motions p that preserve all the edge directions pu pv regarded as slopes, that is, up to scaling? The answers... to these questions are known to be determined by certain linear dependence matroids repre- sented over transcendental extensions of R, as we now explain. First, the d-dimensional rigidity matroid Rd(G) is the matroid represented by the vectors (2) f(eu ev) (pu pv...

Develin, Mike; Martin, Jeremy L.; Reiner, Victor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SU?E?T?153: Proton Linearity and Energy Dependence Studies of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors for Remote Audits of Proton Beam Calibrations by the Radiological Physics Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: Implement Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors (OSLD) into Radiological Physics Center's (RPC) remote audit quality assurance (QA) program for protons. Methods: The OSLDs were aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) nanoDots from Landauer Inc. (Glenwood IL.). A standard RPC remote audit electron phantom with detector inserts at two different locations with three scatter rings and slabs of water equivalent plastic phantom added on top of the phantom to place both dosimeter locations within the SOBP were used. Two nanoDots were placed in each detector insert of the phantom. For the linearity study a 250 MeV proton beam with reference setup (FS = 10 10 cm2 10cm SOBP) was used with the beam isocenter located between the two detector depths. Doses of 25 50 100 200 300 350 cGy at isocenter were delivered. For the energy dependence study doses of 200 cGy each were delivered with the reference setup for 250 200 and 160 MeV proton beams. Co?60 measurement was performed as a standardization process. The OSLDs were read on a MicroStar reader from Landauer between 5 to 7 days after irradiation. Results: The OSLD irradiated had a linear dose response of y=?8.3513E?5x+1.0084 with an R2 = 1.000 over the dose range where y=Kl (dose linearity factor) and x=dose. The energy dependence of the OSLD for the three different energies was less than 3% for the irradiation conditions and fluctuation for different OSLDs less than 1% for the same energy used for the RPC remote audit program. Conclusions: The OSLD showed a linear dose response and consistent energy dependence for three proton energies at the MD Anderson Cancer Center Proton Center. OSLD can be used to replace the TLD for RPC's remote audit QA program for proton beam output.

J Cho; P Alvarez; D Followill; M Gillin; G Ibbott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

AT-TN: Mr. R. L. Rudolph  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MAR 1 ? 7982 MAR 1 ? 7982 3echW tiational, Inc. AT-TN: Mr. R. L. Rudolph PO Box 350 Oak Ridge, TFi 37830 Gentlemen: CRITERIA FOR REMEDIAL ACTION AT ACID/PUEBLO AND BAY0 CANYONS; REQUEST FOR COST/BENEFIT ANALYSES OF REMEDIAL ACTION OPTIONS AT THE CANYONS Enclosed are several pieces of cqrespondence related to AcldjPueblo * and Bayo Canyons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . First, EP has concurred with the remedial action DATE criteria for the New Mexico sftes that were proposed to them on August 20, 1987 (wfth the addition of a criterion for Pu-239 added RTG SYMBO, October 20, 7981). In summary, the cri terla will be: . . . . . . . IUITI*LSSIG. f ---- Radionuclfdt Sr-90 cs-137 Th-228 Th-230 Th-232 u-234 U-238 Pu-239 Pu-240 Pu-241 Am-241 Sofl Limft (pCi/g) 100 80

386

Accelerated Weathering of High-Level and Plutonium-bearing Lanthanide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This configuration consists of a high-level waste (HLW) canister fitted with a rack that holds mini-canisters containing a Pu-bearing lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) waste...

387

SOURCES: a code for calculating (,n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......available nuclides are isotopes of Po, Rn, Ra, Th...as well as six Pu isotopes and one Be isotope were present. Reasonable...including lithium, 9Be, boron, carbon, oxygen...23. Stewart, L. Determination of the neutron spectrum......

W. B. Wilson; R. T. Perry; W. S. Charlton; T. A. Parish; E. F. Shores

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

AVIATRAerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply of 238Pu (plutonium-238) is critical for our ability to explore the outer solar system, and also a potentially limiting resource. The radioactive decay of plutonium-238 provides the heat that powers RT...

Jason W. Barnes; Lawrence Lemke; Rick Foch; Christopher P. McKay

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mobile System for Air Pollution Evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper proposes a mobile measurement system for the real-time monitoring of environmental pollutions in urban areas. The proposed approach is based on the use of a set of vehicles, typically employed for pu...

A. Bernieri; G. Betta; L. Ferrigno; M. Laracca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996. 12 p. Toshinsky, G.I. , LMFBR Operation in the Nuclearand characterization of LMFBR carbide and nitride fuels andcores with oxide fuel, LMFBR recycle Pu/U, are used.

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Group Constants Generation of the Pseudo Fission Products for Fast Reactor Burnup Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pseudo fission products for the burnup calculations of the liquid metal fast reactor were generated. The cross-section data and fission product yield data of ENDF/B-VI were used for the pseudo fission product data of U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. The pseudo fission product data can be used with the KAFAX-F22 or -E66, which are the MATXS-format libraries for analyses of the liquid metal fast reactor at KAERI and were distributed through the OECD/NEA. The 80-group MATXS-format libraries of the 172 fission products were generated and the burnup chains for generation of the pseudo fission products were prepared.

Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Do Heon; Chang, Jonghwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Dukjin-dong, Yusung-gu, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Design of Nanosensors for Fissile Materials in Nuclear Waste Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium ions and their complexes play an important role in nuclear fuel reprocessing, and their trace characterization is important in nuclear forensics. In this work, we perform ab initio density functional theory calculations of U and Pu ...

Narendra Kumar; Jorge M. Seminario

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Neutron flux and energy characterization of a plutonium-beryllium isotopic neutron source by Monte Carlo simulation with verification by neutron activation analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research was to characterize the neutron energy distribution and flux emitted from the UNLV plutonium-beryllium source, serial number MRC-N-W PuBe 453. (more)

Harvey, Zachary R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pu...

E. A. Boiko; S. V. Pachkovskii

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Flight Path 14 - About DANCE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M. Jandel, E. Kwan, J. M. O'Donnell, J. Ullmann, and C. Y. Wu,"Improved neutron capture cross section of 239Pu",Phys. Rev. C89, 034610 (2014). J. L. Ullmann, T. Kawano, T....

396

The Role of Colloids in the Transport of Plutonium and Americium: Implications for  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colloids are small particulates (ranging in size from 1 to 0.001 micron) composed of inorganic and organic material and found in all natural water. Due to their small size, they have the ability to remain suspended in water and transported. Small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) can adsorb (attach) to colloids, and/or form colloidal-sized polymers and migrate in water. At Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) sedimentation and resuspension of particulates and colloids in surface waters represent the dominant process for Pu and Am migration. The amount of Pu and Am that can be transported at RFETS has been quantified in the Pathway Analysis Report. The Pathway Analysis Report shows that the two dominant pathways for Pu and Am transport at RFETS are air and surface water. Shallow groundwater and biological pathways are minor.

Kersting, A B

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analysis of resuspension source area impacts at Rocky Flats surveillance air samplers S-7 and S-8, July 25-August 25, 1983 and September 8-October 4, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An on-going study at the Rocky Flats Plant is being used to evaluate resuspension source area contributions to Pu-239 concentrations at 2 of the samplers in the Plants air sampling network. Early results from the study indicate that Pu-239 concentration levels are being affected primarily by resuspension from a zone 150 meters east and west of the study samplers. Initial results have also shown that net transport of Pu-239 during the sampling period has been from the east toward the west, onto the plant proper. These early findings show that sources immediately east of the 2 samplers are responsible for most of the Pu-239 exposure at the samplers. 2 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Hammer, R.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Anti-inflammatory Effects of v-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, further increased the renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (ie, the long-chain v-3 PU- FAs have the potential to protect against many CVDs,4,5 espe- cially coronary heart

Hammock, Bruce D.

399

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE BEHAVIOR OF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS UNDER EXPLOITATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U. S. Department of Energy, Geothermal direct h e a t a p pU S Department of Energy, Geothermal Energy Division, 87,homes are heated by geothermal energy, and there are plans t

Bodvarsson, G.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Molten salt fuels with high plutonium solubility  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes a composition of LiF--ThF.sub.4--UF.sub.4--PuF.sub.3 for use as a fuel in a nuclear engine.

Moir, Ralph W; Turchi, Patrice E.A.; Shaw, Henry F; Kaufman, Larry

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

[Cover page, Margins: Left 1 in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(typically 242 Pu) were located in the flux trap for californium production. Today, curium targets are transmuted for californium production. The 37 rods modeled in HFV4.0...

402

Culture and Social Media: Changing Service Expectations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moderating effects of culture. Srite and Karahannas (2006) study tested a model in which Hofstedes four main cultural dimensions moderated the relationships between PU and PEOU. The result of the s...

Sanjukta Pookulangara Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Study of the specific features of pulsed-plasma generation in air at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structural scheme and operational characteristics of a pulse-plasma device generating a pulsed plasma in air at atmospheric pressure are presented. The functional scheme and ... given. It is shown that the pu...

Ya. A. Chivel; O. O. Kuznechik

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Particle analysis for a strengthened safeguards system: Use of a scanning electron microscope equipped with EDXRF and WDXRF spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was twofold: the identification of some uranium compounds and a measurement of mixed U/Pu particles with different ratios of these elements. We used a Philips XL-30 scanning electron ...

A. Ciurapinski; J. Parus; D. Donohue

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Politecnico di Milano Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

id variable / pthread_t th [DATA_SIZE]; for (i = 0; i tutte esi- stenti) e LOCALI, negli istanti di tempo specificati. Lo stato di una variabile può essere

Silvano, Cristina

406

Effect of the Microstructure of a Hyperbranched Polymer and Nanoclay Loading on the Morphology and Properties of Novel Polyurethane Nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the addition of nanoclays, even the elongation at break of the PU nanocomposites increases. ... composite formation. ... High-strength and low-stiffness composites of nanoclay-filled thermoplastic polyurethanes ...

Pradip K. Maji; Prasanta K. Guchhait; Anil K. Bhowmick

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thickness Change in Molecularly Thin Lubricant Under Flying Head in Hard Disk Drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In hard disk drives (HDDs), lubricants on disks are very important material to reduce head and disk wear. Thus, it is necessary to ... thickness to keep lubricant thickness constant on rotating disks. For this pu...

K. Yanagisawa; T. Watanabe; Y. Kawakubo; M. Yoshino

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Information flow in entangled quantum systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Information flow in entangled quantum systems David...of Oxford, , Oxford OX1 3PU, UK All information in quantum systems is, notwithstanding...Heisenberg picture to analyse quantum information processing makes this locality explicit...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not extractable by TBP at high nitric acid concentrations.that TBP is also more stable against attack by nitric acid.TBP in kerosene to extract Pu(IV) and U(VI) from nitric acid

Leggett, Christina Joy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

RTDS-Based Design and Simulation of Distributed P-Q Power Resources in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2 MW grid-connected solar panel at bus 8. The power outputis as in Figure 5.11 [104]. Solar Panel Power Injection (pu)The daily output of the solar panel during a cloudy day.

Taylor, Zachariah David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

L'ge d'or du hajj ymnite Article paru dans Qantara (revue de l'Institut du monde arabe, Paris), 91, mai 2014, p. 43-46.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sainte n'aurait pu être assuré tout au long de l'année. Selon Ibn al-Mujâwir, un voyageur persan du début

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

The Application of an Alpha Autoradiographic Technique for Determination of Boron-10 Concentrations in a Study of Intratumoral Injection of BSH and CBU-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accurate measurement of 10B distributions in biological samples with a sensitivity in the ppm range is essential for evaluating the potential usefulness of various boron-containing compounds for BNCT1. The pu...

Yirun Jiang; Sherry Ng; Thomas E. Blue; Joan Rotaru

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Health risks of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processing and dangers of nuclear power plant wastes are discussed for both solid and gaseous wastes. The handing of Pu is considered. The possibility of a reactor accident is studied.(AIP)

Bernard L. Cohen

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CAHE Technology Help Desk  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dr. Russell Hardy, Director CEMRC Ambient Air Sampler Locations New Mexico State University New Mexico State University Sampling Site Sample Period Am241 BqSample Pu239+240 Bq...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids reduce myeloid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: acids reduce myeloid Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 PU.1 Is a Lineage-specific Regulator of Tyrosine Phosphatase CD45* Received for publication, October 5, 2000, and in...

416

Impact of early Polynesian occupation on the land snail fauna of Henderson Island, Pitcairn group (South Pacific)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...slightly compressed laterally. Colour is light reddish-brown with irregularly spaced...black-winged petrel (Pterodroma nigripennis), Christmas shearwater (Pu nus nativitatis) and...the range reductions on Henderson of Christmas shearwater, black-winged petrel and...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic-ensemble quantum memory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

numbers: 03.67.-a, 71.36.+c, 03... .65.Fd, 05.30.Ch, 42.50.Fx Key words: ... Source: Sun, Chang-Pu - Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Collection:...

418

Heat transfer in open cell polyurethane foam insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper study systematic investigates the combined conductive and non-gray radiative heat transfer of open cell polyurethane (PU) foam in the pressure range between 760 and 0.02?Torr. Direct transmission m...

J.-W. Wu; H.-S. Chu

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Plutonium dissolution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-step process for dissolving Pu metal is disclosed in which two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously. Pu metal is exposed to a first mixture of 1.0-1.67 M sulfamic acid and 0.0025-0.1 M fluoride, the mixture having been heated to 45-70 C. The mixture will dissolve a first portion of the Pu metal but leave a portion of the Pu in an oxide residue. Then, a mineral acid and additional fluoride are added to dissolve the residue. Alternatively, nitric acid between 0.05 and 0.067 M is added to the first mixture to dissolve the residue as it is produced. Hydrogen released during the dissolution is diluted with nitrogen.

Vest, M.A.; Fink, S.D.; Karraker, D.G.; Moore, E.N.; Holcomb, H.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plutonium oxide (PuO2) and 70 % depleted uranium oxide (UO2) are blended together...and typical field conditions. Health Phys. (1990) 58(6):691-704...Power Plants Quality Assurance, Health Care Radiation Dosage Radiation......

C. Passmore; M. Million; M. Kirr; J. Bartz; M. S. Akselrod; A. Devita; J. Berard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fish welfare assurance system: initial steps to set up an effective tool to safeguard and monitor farmed fish welfare at a company level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective was to take a first step in the development of a process-oriented quality assurance (QA) system for monitoring and safeguarding of fish welfare at a company level. ... , which was adapted for the pu...

J. W. van de Vis; M. Poelman; E. Lambooij; M.-L. Bgout

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Trench Bathtubbing and Surface Plutonium Contamination at a Legacy Radioactive Waste Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive waste containing a few grams of plutonium (Pu) was disposed between 1960 and 1968 in trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), near Sydney, Australia. A water sampling point installed in a former trench has enabled the radionuclide ...

Timothy E. Payne; Jennifer J. Harrison; Catherine E. Hughes; Mathew P. Johansen; Sangeeth Thiruvoth; Kerry L. Wilsher; Dioni I. Cendn; Stuart I. Hankin; Brett Rowling; Atun Zawadzki

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Design and fabrication of physiologic tissue scaffolds using projection-micro-stereolithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in material processing are presenting groundbreaking opportunities for biomedical engineers. Projection-micro-stereolithography, or PuSL, is an additive manufacturing technique in which complex parts are ...

Brickman Raredon, Micha Sam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Perspective on plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview is given of the man-made element Pu: Its production, physical and chemical properties, fallout levels in the environment, detection in body, dosimetry and bioassay data, concerns over safety and control. Conclusion: Pu has an incredible potential as an energy source that does not adversely affect air quality; however concerns over toxic effects (bone cancers) and proper handling of wastes have kept many countries from fully embracing nuclear energy. For Pu toxicity, the policy has always been one of overestimation. Safe, secure methods have been developed for controlling Pu; as a result, the question of whether or not a nation uses nuclear energy is more likely to be decided by politics.

Sun, Lin-Shen Casper

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies Science Subject Feed Estimation of gas leak rates through very small orifices and channels. From sealed PuO...

426

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OlL3109 RQ,RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TYPE B(U) PACKAGE, FISSLE 7, UN3328, PU-239 From B&W Pemex DOE Acceptance Stamp to be in this approximate location on the Primary Shipping Label....

427

Laser ignition in internal-combustion engines: Sparkless initiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser ignition has been implemented in a single-cylinder ... pressure versus crank angle) were obtained for laser ignition with nano- and microsecond pulses of an Nd:YAG laser. The maximum power of microsecond pu...

A. A. Andronov; V. A. Gurin; A. V. Marugin; A. P. Savikin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A NEW EXTRACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY RESIN CONTAINING KLUI LIGANDS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 1 wt% L on Amberlite XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am(III) and Pu(IV). The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is...

429

Time pattern of off-site plutonium deposition from rocky flats plant by lake sediment analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sediment core from a lake downwind of the Rocky Flats Plant, where nuclear weapons components are produced, was used to reconstruct a time pattern of off-site plutonium deposition. Core sections were dated by analyses of 137Cs, 239,240Pu, 238Pu, and 241Am fallout from nuclear testing and 238Pu fallout from a satellite failure. A peak in transuranic concentrations occurred in late 1969 which was attributable to the Plant. This was confirmed by mass isotopic analysis of plutonium isotopes in selected core segments where the global fallout and Plant contributions could be differentiated. The 18 nCi 239,240Pu per m2 from the Plant that had accumulated in the sediment is reasonable when compared to soil analyses.

Edward P. Hardy; Herbert L. Volchok; Hugh D. Livingston; John C. Burke

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

2 VARIABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Doctor (1985) 241Am Grassland, Rocky Flats, Colorado, USA 104 0.13-1...1992) 239,240Pu Grassland, Rocky Flats, Colorado 104 0.25-1.38...densities in soil samples near Rocky Flats, Colorado, USA, varied from......

2 VARIABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

5 SAMPLING TO ESTIMATE SPATIAL PATTERN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mapping the distribution of 239Pu in a given area around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado, USA. The...Pacific Ocean ( NASNRC (1994) Committee on Radiological Safety in the Marshall Islands, 1994; Diggle et al., 1998......

5 SAMPLING TO ESTIMATE SPATIAL PATTERN

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - af svaert personlighedsforstyrrede Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rofft er id'een som folger: La F : T op T op vaere en funkor fra pu... (X) for et rom X, da er F G. Det* *te er et svaert kraftfullt resultat idet det gir muligheten fora......

433

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM AND CURIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM AND CURIUM Gary Hoyt Higgins (of alpha particles of americium produced by bombarding puMU3507 Fig. 2. Decay of americium produced by bombardment of

Higgins, Gary Hoyt.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - activating delayed rectifier Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: itself. The concept of active damping for the current-source rectifier is not new. However, most research... of 3.65-6.09 pu. Active damping uses the rectifier to...

435

Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts Yanbing Guo, Zheng Ren, and Pu-Xian Gao Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular...

436

Re-Os Ages of Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IVB Iron Meteorites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...evolution of the initial isotopic compositions may indicate either forma-tion...concentration and isotopic composition data varied little...calculate the parental melt compositions, we assumed that the...applications, such as drug and agrochemical delivery, pu-rification...

Michael I. Smoliar; Richard J. Walker; John W. Morgan

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Swelling of Clays: Molecular Simulations of the Hydration of Montmorillonite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IVB groups, respectively. To calculate the parental melt compositions, we assumed that the Re and Os abundances in...Clays are important in many applications, such as drug and agrochemical delivery, pu-rification and recycling of water streams...

S. Karaborni; B. Smit; W. Heidug; J. Urai; E. van Oort

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

RussiaLLNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of material properties of selected actinides at or near ambient pressure (~1 atmosphere) and with temperatures in the range of T = 0 K to near room temperature (T = 300 K) to better understand the nature of highly correlated electron systems. This project included a study of Np, including equilibrium geometry, total and partial density of states, magnetic moments, and diff erential with respect to energy magnetic moments. In addition, it provided comparison of the magnetic and electronic properties in the row U-Np-Pu-Am-Cm. Calculations of the total and partial density of states, and of the magnetic structure for Pu 3 Al, Pu 3 Ga and Pu 3 In were performed. In addition, the formation energies for non-spin-polarized and spin-polarized cases were evaluated.

439

A YEAR IN REVIEW Adult and Lifelong Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion: Adult Learning in Post-Modern times "demographics, the global economy, and technology have come together, emphasis ours). central Indiana adults are turning to IuPuI, acquiring new skills, refining existing

Zhou, Yaoqi

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium 240 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TBq) of 239,240 Pu. Paper IV, describes hot particle separation... is that it seems like uranium is leaching from the particles faster than plutonium and americium. This thesis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation state. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate phases. Mssbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for each of six treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. Mssbauer spectroscopy showed that the sediment contained 25-30% hematite, 60-65% Al-goethite, and <10%Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate buffer, DCB), much of the hematite and goethite disappeared and the Fe in the phyllosilicate reduced to Fe(II). The rate of sorption was found to correlate with the 1 fraction of Fe(II) remaining within each treated sediment phase. Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu(IV). Similar to the sorption kinetics, the reduction rate was correlated with sediment Fe(II) concentration. The correlation between Fe(II) concentrations and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing iron mineralogy on plutonium subsurface transport through redox transition areas. These findings should influence the conceptual models of long-term stewardship of Pu contaminated sites that have fluctuating redox conditions, such as vadose zones or riparian zones.

Hixon, Amy E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nitsche, Heino; Qafoku, Odeta; Powell, Brian A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EVALUATION OF FLOWSHEET CHANGES FOR THE HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLENDDOWN PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H Canyon is considering a flowsheet change for Plutonium (Pu) Contaminated Scrap (PuCS) material. The proposed change is to route dissolved PuCS material directly to a uranium (U) storage tank. As a result, the PuCS solution will bypass Head End and First U Cycle, and will be purified by solvent extraction in Second U Cycle. The PuCS solution contains appreciable amounts of boron (B) and fluoride (F{sup -}), which are currently at trace levels in the U storage tank. Though unlikely, if the B concentration in the U storage tank were to reach 1.8 g B/g U, the entire contents of the U storage tank would likely require a second pass through Second U Cycle to provide sufficient decontamination to meet the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Blend Grade Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) specification for B, which is 30 {micro}g/g U. In addition, Second U Cycle is expected to provide sufficient decontamination of F{sup -} and Pu regardless of the amount of PuCS solution sent to the storage tank. Though aluminum (Al) is not present in the PuCS solution, B can be credited as a complexant of F{sup -}. Both stability constants from the literature and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) corrosion studies were documented to demonstrate that B complexation of F{sup -} in nitric acid solutions is sufficient to prevent excessive corrosion. Though B and Al complex F{sup -} to a similar degree, neither completely eliminates the presence of free F{sup -} in solution. Therefore, a limited amount of corrosion is expected even with complexed F{sup -} solutions. Tanks maintained at ambient temperature are not expected to experience significant corrosion. However, the Low Activity Waste (LAW) evaporators may be subjected to a corrosion rate of about 25 mils per year (mpy) as they reach their highest F{sup -} concentrations. The feed adjustment evaporator would only be subjected to the corrosion rate of about 25 mpy in the latter stages of the PuCS campaign. An issue that must be addressed as part of the proposed PuCS flowsheet change is that B has limited solubility in concentrated nitric acid solutions. As the proposed PuCS campaign progresses, the B concentration will increase in the U storage tank, in Second U Cycle feed, and in the 1DW stream sent to the LAW evaporators. Limitations on the B concentration in the LAW evaporators will be needed to prevent formation of boron-containing solids.

Crowder, M.; Rudisill, T.; Laurinat, J.; Mickalonis, J.

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Vitrification of excess plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of nuclear disarmament activities, many thousands of nuclear weapons are being retired in the US and Russia, producing a surplus of about 50 MT of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) in each country. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) has more than 20 MT of Pu scrap, residue, etc., and Russia is also believed to have at least as much of this type of material. The entire surplus Pu inventories in the US and Russia present a clear and immediate danger to national and international security. It is important that a solution be found to secure and manage this material effectively and that such an effort be implemented as quickly as possible. One option under consideration is vitrification of Pu into a relatively safe, durable, accountable, proliferation-resistant form. As a result of decades of experience within the DOE community involving vitrification of a variety of hazardous and radioactive wastes, this existing technology can now be expanded to include immobilization of large amounts of Pu. This technology can then be implemented rapidly using the many existing resources currently available. A strategy to vitrify many different types of Pu will be discussed. In this strategy, the arsenal of vitrification tools, procedures and techniques already developed throughout the waste management community can be used in a staged Pu vitrification effort. This approach uses the flexible vitrification technology already available and can even be made portable so that it may be brought to the source and ultimately, used to produce a common, borosilicate glass form for the vitrified Pu. The final composition of this product can be made similar to nationally and internationally accepted HLW glasses.

Wicks, G.G.; Mckibben, J.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

SRS vitrification studies in support of the U.S. program for disposition of excess plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many thousands of nuclear weapons are being retired in the U.S. and Russian as a result of nuclear disarmament activities. These efforts are expected to produce a surplus of about 50 MT of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) in each country. In addition to this inventory, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has more than 20 MT of Pu scrap, residue, etc., and Russian is also believed to have at least as much of this type of material. The entire surplus Pu inventories in the U.S. and Russian present a clear and immediate danger to national and international security. It is important that a solution be found to secure and manage this material effectively and that such an effort be implemented as quickly as possible. One option under consideration is vitrification of Pu into a safe, durable, accountable and proliferation-resistant form. As a result of decades to experience within the DOE community involving vitrification of a variety of hazardous and radioactive wastes, this existing technology can now be expanded to include mobilization of large amounts of Pu. This technology can then be implemented rapidly using the many existing resources currently available. An overall strategy to vitrify many different types of Pu will be already developed throughout the waste management community can be used in a staged Pu vitrification effort. This approach uses the flexible vitrification technology already available and can even be made portable so that it may be brought to the source and ultimately, used to produce a consistent and common borosilicate glass composition for the vitrified Pu. The final composition of this product can be made similar to nationally and internationally accepted HLW glasses.

Wicks, G.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Selected papers for global `95 concerning plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains selected papers from the Global `95 Conference ``Evaluation of Emerging Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems,`` held in Versailles, Sept. 11-14, 1995. The 11 papers in Part I are from ``Benefits and Risks of Reprocessing`` sessions. The 7 papers in Part II are some of the more interesting poster papers that relate to the use of Pu for power generation. Finally, the 3 papers are on the topic of management and disposition of Pu from retired nuclear weapons.

Sutcliffe, W.G. [ed.

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

LBL Assembled Laminates with Hierarchical Organization from Nano- to Microscale: High-Toughness Nanomaterials and Deformation Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LBL assembly of this PU was carried out by sequential dipping of a glass microscope slide for 30 s intervals into aqueous solutions of negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, 1 wt %) and ?3.5 wt % PU (Figure 1a,b) using an automated dipping robot (see Experimental Details). ... The black dots on the surface of the specimens are paint marks which were used to accurately track the strain response. ...

Paul Podsiadlo; Ellen M. Arruda; Eugene Kheng; Anthony M. Waas; Jungwoo Lee; Kevin Critchley; Ming Qin; Eric Chuang; Amit K. Kaushik; Hyoung-Sug Kim; Ying Qi; Si-Tae Noh; Nicholas A. Kotov

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

High Gain Transformerless DC-DC Converters for Renewable Energy Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

current, voltage of node x Ix-rms, Vx-rms Root-mean-square value of current, voltage of node x pu Per-unit value PV Photovoltaic PWM Pulse-width modulation RF Ripple factor rx Resistance (actual) of branch x rX Equivalent averaged resistance... module series boost converter ....................................... 27 10 Multiple module series BB and series hybrid converters ........................... 28 11 Simulation results for pu CCM multiple module converters: gain and efficiency...

Denniston, Nicholas Aaron

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Determination of actinide elements at femtogram per gram levels in environmental samples by on-line solid phase extraction and sector-field-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An on-line solid phase extraction method has been developed for the determination of 232Th, 237Np, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Am and 243Am in biological certified reference material using a column containing TRU-Spec resin coupled with sector-field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Absolute detection limits were 0.7, 0.85, 0.6, and 0.65fg for 237Np, 239Pu, 241Am and 243Am, respectively. The 239Pu was determined in NIST Human Liver (963297fgg?1 compared with a certified value of 848161fgg?1) using a dry and wet ashing sample preparation method, and in a spiked cabbage reference material (39454fgg?1 compared to an indicative value of 467fgg?1) using microwave digestion. Sequential separation of Pu and U was achieved by on-column reduction of Pu with titanium(III) chloride and elution in 4M \\{HCl\\} to facilitate the determination of 239Pu in samples containing high levels of 238U, thereby eliminating the interference of 238U1H+ at m/z 239. The sequential elution procedure was used to determine 239Pu in NIST human lung (81455fgg?1 compared with a certified range of 227951fgg?1) and NIST Rocky Flats Soil (2423137fgg?1 compared with a certified value of 3307248fgg?1).

Jason B Truscott; Phil Jones; Ben E Fairman; E.Hywel Evans

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Handbookfor International Students at ETH Zurich Please note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbookfor International Students at ETH Zurich #12;Please note: This booklet was designed for twoSTudyIng aT ETH ZurIcH 49lIFE on camPuS 58camPuS maPS 60mIScEllanEouS InFormaTIon 63IndEx Content #12;ETH Zurich Main Building Campus Hönggerberg (Science City) #12;Dear international student

450

Fluorescence Imaging for Nuclear Arms Control Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grade Pu typically contains more than 90% 239Pu.10 Additionally, the fissile material must be in metallic form. There are many different nuclear warhead designs, but there are three general warhead types: gun-type, implosion and thermonuclear. In a... into a supercritical configuration. A thermonuclear device combines an implosion device, known as the primary, with a secondary fusion device composed of uranium and lithium deuteride. Most modern weapons contain a thermonuclear warhead. Gun...

Feener, Jessica S

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be obtained. The two types of material used in nuclear weapons are Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium (Pu). Uranium is an element found in nature and is contained in the soil all over the world. However, certain geological formations contain a... (LEU) portion of the network ..................................... 22 Figure 11 Last seciton of the Pu (LEU) portion of the network...................................... 23 Figure 12 Plutonium Section of the Network produced via Natural Uranium...

Ford, David Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D. [Inspection Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH < 10 which have absorption bands at 842, 846 and 849 mn. Evidence for colloid formation was observed but is not conclusive. The possibility of colloids prevents accurate analysis of the solubility experiments. A concentration of 10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup [minus]6] M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH [le] 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH [le] 11.6, but at pH [ge] 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10[sup [minus]4] M.

Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH < 10 which have absorption bands at 842, 846 and 849 mn. Evidence for colloid formation was observed but is not conclusive. The possibility of colloids prevents accurate analysis of the solubility experiments. A concentration of 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}6} M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH {le} 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH {le} 11.6, but at pH {ge} 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10{sup {minus}4} M.

Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Neptunium(V) and neptunium(VI) solubilities in synthetic brines of interest to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of Np(V) and Np(VI) has been measured in three synthetic Na-K-Mg-Cl brines in the presence of CO{sub 2}(g). Experiments were prepared from oversaturation by adding an excess of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} or NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to the brines and allowing the neptunium solids to precipitate. Vessels were maintained in contact with fixed CO{sub 2}(g) partial pressures at constant pH and 24 {+-} 1 C. Dissolved Np(V) concentrations decreased several orders of magnitude within the first 100 days of the experiment, while dissolved Np(VI) concentrations decreased initially but then remained relatively constant for more than 400 days. The solid phases formed in all experiments were identified by X-ray powder diffraction as KNpO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O(s). Steady state concentrations for Np(V) are similar to those observed for Pu(V) in the same brines under the same conditions, where Pu occurs predominantly as Pu(V). Similarly, steady state concentrations for Np(VI), which was not reduced over a two year period, compare well with measured Pu(VI) concentrations in the same brines before the Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V).

Novak, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Silber, H.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution directly. The releases of Gd, Hf, and Pu from the glass were also measured. The release of Pu was significantly less than Si at all temperatures and pH values (on a normalized basis). More Gd than Pu or Hf was released from the glass in acidic solutions, but more Pu than Gd or Hf was released in alkaline solutions. Almost all of the released Gd remained in solution in tests conducted in Teflon vessels, whereas about half of the released Pu and Hf became fixed to the Teflon. In tests conducted in Type 304L stainless steel vessels, most of the released Gd, Hf, and Pu became fixed to the steel. The aqueous concentrations of Gd, Hf, and Pu decreased from about 2 x 10{sup -5}, 2 x 10{sup -8}, and 1 x 10{sup -7} M in tests solutions near pH 3.7 to about 1 x 10{sup -9}, 8 x 10{sup -10}, and 1 x 10{sup -8} M in test solutions near pH 10.8, respectively, in the 90 C tests in Teflon vessels (the solutions were not filtered prior to analysis). Vapor hydration tests (VHTs) were conducted at 120 and 200 C with Pu LaBS-B glass and SRL 418 glass, which was made to represent the HLW glass that will be used to macro-encapsulate LaBS glass within the waste form. Some VHTs were conducted with specimens of Pu LaBS-B and SRL 418 glasses that were in contact to study the effect of the solution generated as HLW glass dissolves on the corrosion behavior of Pu LaBS-B glass. Other VHTs were conducted in which the glasses were not in contact. The Pu LaBS-B glass is more durable than the HLW glass under these accelerating test conditions, even when the glasses are in contact. The presence of the SRL 418 glass did not promote the dissolution of the Pu LaBS-B glass significantly. However, Gd, Hf, and Pu were detected in alteration phases formed on the Pu LaBS-B glass surface and in (or on) phases formed by SRL 418 glass degradation, such as analcime. This indicates that Gd, Hf, and Pu were transported from the LaBS glass, through the water film formed on the specimens, and to the SRL 418 glass during the test. The disposition of the PuO{sub 2} inclusion phases as the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolved was not det

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

MA transmutation performance in the optimized MYRRHA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MYRRHA (multi-purpose hybrid research reactor for high-tech applications) is a multipurpose research facility currently being developed at SCK-CEN. It will be able to work in both critical and subcritical modes and, cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic. In this paper the minor actinides (MA) transmutation capabilities of MYRRHA are investigated. (Pu + Am, U) MOX fuel and (Np + Am + Cm, Pu) Inert Matrix Fuel test samples have been loaded in the central channel of the MYRRHA critical core and have been irradiated during five cycles, each one consisting of 90 days of operation at 100 MWth and 30 days of shutdown. The reactivity worth of the test fuel assembly was about 1.1 dollar. A wide range of burn-up level has been achieved, extending from 42 to 110 MWd/kg HM, the samples with lower MA-to-Pu ratios reaching the highest burn-up. This study has highlighted the importance of the initial MA content, expressed in terms of MA/Pu ratio, on the transmutation rate of MA elements. For (Pu + Am, U) MOX fuel samples, a net build-up of MA is observed when the initial content of MA is very low (here, 1.77 wt% MA/Pu) while a net decrease in MA is observed in the sample with an initial content of 5 wt%. This suggests the existence of some 'equilibrium' initial MA content value beyond which a net transmutation is achievable.

Malambu, E.; Van den Eynde, G.; Fernandez, R.; Baeten, P.; Ait Abderrahim, H. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectra from the at-line spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the odd shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it odd shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Implications of Plutonium isotopic separation on closed fuel cycles and repository design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laser enrichment may enable relatively low-cost plutonium isotopic separation. This would have large impacts on LWR closed fuel cycles and waste management. If Pu-240 is removed before recycling plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, it would dramatically reduce the buildup of higher plutonium isotopes, Americium, and Curium. Pu-240 is a fertile material and thus can be replaced by U-238. Eliminating the higher plutonium isotopes in MOX fuel increases the Doppler feedback, simplifies reactor control, and allows infinite recycle of MOX plutonium in LWRs. Eliminating fertile Pu-240 and Pu-242 reduces the plutonium content in MOX fuel and simplifies fabrication. Reducing production of Pu-241 reduces production of Am-241 - the primary heat generator in spent nuclear fuels after several decades. Reducing heat generating Am-241 would reduce repository cost and waste toxicity. Avoiding Am- 241 avoids its decay product Np-237, a nuclide that partly controls long-term oxidizing repository performance. Most of these benefits also apply to LWR plutonium recycled into fast reactors. There are benefits for plutonium isotopic separation in fast reactor fuel cycles (particularly removal of Pu-242) but the benefits are less. (author)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 20129 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glenwood pu laski" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Studies of Plutonium Aerosol Resuspension at the Time of the Maralinga Cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the former nuclear test site at Maralinga, South Australia, soil cleanup began in October 1996 with the objective to remove the potential for residual plutonium (Pu) exposures to the public. In this case the cleanup was to restore access to the closed test site. The proposed long-term land use was primarily to be a hunting area for Pitjantjatjara (Aboriginal) people, but also presumably to be available to the public who might have an interest in the history of the site. The long-term management objective for the site was to allow casual use, but to prohibit habitation. The goal of this study is to provide an evaluation of the Maralinga soil cleanup in terms of potential long-term public inhalation exposures to particulate Pu, and in terms of a contribution to planning and conducting any such soil Pu-cleanup. Such cleanups might be carried out for example, on the Nevada Test Site in the United States. For Pu that has been deposited on the soil by atmospheric sources of finely divided particles, the dominant exposure pathway to humans is by inhalation. Other exposure pathways are less important because the Pu particles become oxidized into a nearly insoluble form, do not easily enter into the food chain, nor are they significantly transferred through the intestine to the bloodstream should Pu become ingested. The purpose of this report is to provide results of the Pu resuspension measurements made before, during, and after the Pu cleanup at Maralinga, to compare these against similar measurements made elsewhere, and to interpret the results as they relate to potential long-term public exposures. (Exposures to Pu in dust plumes produced by mechanical disturbance during cleanup are considered short-term, unlikely to be significant for purposes of this report, and are not included). A considerable amount of research had been conducted at Maralinga by the Australian Radiation Laboratory, now the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), prior to the cleanup (Johnston et al, 1992, Williams 1993, Johnston et al 1993, Burns et al 1994, Burns et al 1995). ARPANSA staff made major contributions to delineate the areas with Pu in the soil, to determine the degree of secondary soil contamination by fission products from nuclear testing, to measure Pu resuspension by wind erosion of the undisturbed soil, and to prepare assessments of the human health risk from residual soil Pu. In addition, ARPANSA supported the Maralinga cleanup to assure compliance with criteria set by an independent technical advisory committee. During the cleanup ARPANSA monitored the residual Pu in the soil and certified that the cleanup was complete according to the criteria. It was not the reduction in potential inhalation exposure that usually was the main driver of the cleanup, but the requirement to also remove individual hot particles and fragments. It is the residual microscopic particles of Pu in the soil, however, that have the potential for long-term human exposure. The resuspension of respirable-size Pu particles has been studied with specialized equipment at the Nevada Test Site (Gilbert et al 1988a, Gilbert et al 1988b, Shinn et al 1989, and Shinn 1992), and at Bikini and Enewetak in the Marshall Islands (Shinn et al 1997). These efforts were in large part contributed by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division, University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study reported here is a collaboration between ARPANSA and LLNL, and was jointly supported by the United States Department of Energy, and the Commonwealth of Australia Department of Primary Industry and Energy.

Shinn, J

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the subsurface.

Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Olsen, C.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Radionuclide Concentrations in soils an Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G During 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 15 locations and unwashed overstory and understory vegetation samples were collected at nine locations within and around the perimeter of Area G, the primary disposal facility for low-level radioactive solid waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These samples were analyzed for {sup 3}H, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U. Soil samples collected at Area G contained detectable concentrations of 3H (27%), {sup 239,240}Pu (60%), {sup 238}Pu (40%), and {sup 241}Am (47%) above regional statistical reference levels (RSRLs). In contrast, the levels of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and U in all of the soil samples at Area G were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The highest levels of {sup 3}H in soils were detected in the southwestern portion of Area G near the {sup 3}H shafts, whereas the highest concentrations of the Pu isotopes were detected in the northern and northeastern portions. All concentrations of {sup 3}H and Pu in soils, however, were far below LANL screening action levels. As for vegetation, most radionuclides in/on plants were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The exceptions were {sup 3}H in overstory and some understory vegetation, particularly in the southwestern portion of Area G, which correlated very well with the soils data in that area. Also, there was some foliar contamination from {sup 241}Am and Pu isotopes in/on a few plant samples--the highest concentrations occurring in the northern section of Area G.

P.R. Fresquez; E.A. Lopez

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Multimedia contaminant environmental exposure assessment methodology as applied to Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MCEA (Multimedia Contaminant Environmental Exposure Assessment) methodology assesses exposures to air, water, soil, and plants from contaminants released into the environment by simulating dominant mechanisms of contaminant migration and fate. The methodology encompasses five different pathways (i.e., atmospheric, terrestrial, overland, subsurface, and surface water) and combines them into a highly flexible tool. The flexibility of the MCEA methodology is demonstrated by encompassing two of the pathways (i.e., overland and surface water) into an effective tool for simulating the migration and fate of radionuclides released into the Los Alamos, New Mexico region. The study revealed that: (a) the /sup 239/Pu inventory in lower Los Alamos Canyon increased by approximately 1.1 times for the 50-y flood event; (b) the average contaminant /sup 239/Pu concentrations (i.e., weighted according to the depth of the respective bed layer) in lower Los Alamos Canyon for the 50-y flood event decreased by 5.4%; (c) approx. 27% of the total /sup 239/Pu contamination resuspended from the entire bed (based on the assumed cross sections) for the 50-y flood event originated from lower Pueblo Canyon; (d) an increase in the /sup 239/Pu contamination of the bed followed the general deposition patterns experienced by the sediment in Pueblo-lower Los Alamos Canyon; likewise, a decrease in the /sup 239/Pu contamination of the bed followed general sediment resuspension patterns in the canyon; (e) 55% of the /sup 239/Pu reaching the San Ildefonso Pueblo in lower Los Alamos Canyon originated from lower Los Alamos Canyon; and (f) 56% of the /sup 239/Pu contamination reaching the San Ildefonso Pueblo in lower Los Alamos Canyon was carried through towards the Rio Grande. 47 references, 41 figures, 29 tables.

Whelan, G.; Thompson, F.L.; Yabusaki, S.B.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both {sup 242}Pu and {sup 151}Sm normalizations, although the errors for the {sup 151}Sm correction are currently larger due to the greater uncertainty of their measurements. Additional efforts to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections are underway with emphasis on soil cores.

Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE WALL [HTF-13-82] AND POT BOTTOM [HTF-13-77] SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2Hevaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxy-hydroxide mineral). On as received basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E- 05 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA.

Oji, L.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

468

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Differential die-away technique for determination of the fissile contents in spent fuel assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the differential die-away (DDA) technique to quantify its capability to measure the fissile contents in spent fuel assemblies of 64 different cases in terms of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. The DDA count rate varies according to the contents of fissile isotopes such as {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu contained in the spent fuel assembly. The effective {sup 239}Pu concept was introduced to quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel by weighting the relative signal contributions of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu compared to that of {sup 239}Pu. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that the count rate of the DDA instrument for a spent fuel assembly of 4% initial enrichment, 45 GWD/MTU burnup, and 5 year cooling time is {approx} 9.8 x 10{sup 4} counts per second (c/s) with the 100-Hz repeated interrogation pattern of 0 to 10 {micro}s interrogation, 0.2 ms to 1 ms counting time, and 1 x 10{sup 9} n/s neutron source. The {sup 244}Cm neutron background count rate for this counting time scheme is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 4} c/s, and thus the signal to background ratio is {approx}10.

Lee, Tachoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Nartyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The effects of individual differences on e-learning users behaviour in developing countries: A structural equation model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of our study is to (1) empirically investigate the factors that affect the acceptance and use of e-learning in Lebanon, and (2) inv