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Sample records for glen forest preserve

  1. Forest Glen, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Glen is a census-designated place in Montgomery County, Maryland.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA...

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Forest Glen Subdivision, Niagara Falls, NY. (First remedial action), December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-29

    The Forest Glen Subdivision site consists of 21 acres of developed residential properties and undeveloped land in Niagara Fall, Niagara County, New York. Land in the area surrounding the Forest Glen subdivision is used for residential and industrial purposes, including a mobile home park, small shopping mall, and the CECOS Landfill. Chemical companies reportedly disposed of wastes onsite from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Sampling by EPA's Field Investigation Team revealed the presence of high concentrations of unknown and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) in August 1987, and further soil sampling was conducted to identify the TICs. EPA has executed interim measures to stabilize site conditions including collecting, staging, and securing drums in areas north and east of the subdivision and temporarily covering visibily contaminated soil with concrete. The remedial activity is the first of two planned operable units and addresses resident relocation only. A subsequent operable unit will address the remediation of site contamination once the relocation is complete.

  3. Glen Wurden

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glen Wurden Glen Wurden-What you can see from your driveway The Physics Division's Glen Wurden marvels at celestial objects 300 trillion kilometers (180 million trillion-or 180 quintillion-miles) from his house. February 18, 2015 Glen Wurden Glen Wurden owns several powerful telescopes. Watching the heavens from the convenience and safety of one's driveway is not always as undisturbed and peaceful as one may wish. "Java gets excited when coyotes are nearby," Wurden notes, "and one

  4. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  5. Glen Sweetnam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Sweetnam is the Director for African and Middle Eastern Affairs in the Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy.  Mr. Sweetnam is responsible for managing DOE...

  6. Glen Wurden

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glen Wurden February 18, 2015 What you can see from your driveway On the dark, moonless evening of January 26, 2015, the Physics Division's Glen Wurden stands in his driveway admiring the distant stars above Los Alamos, his 11- year-old, jet-black dog Java as always beside him. Wurden owns several powerful telescopes that allow him to see 30 million light-years or deeper into space. Since one light-year (the distance that light travels in one year) translates to about 10 trillion kilometers (six

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plot M) - IL 04 Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A Plot M) - IL 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A/Plot M) (IL.04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A/Plot M) Surveillance of

  8. Environmental surveillance of the Palos Park Forest Preserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Hayes, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second report describing an ongoing environmental surveillance program conducted at the Palos Park Forest Preserve near Chicago, Illinois. The Preserve was a site of a nuclear research laboratory (Site A) from 1943 to 1956 and a radioactive waste burial site (Plot M) from 1944 to 1949. An extensive radiological characterization of the site was conducted from February 1976 to August 1977, and tritium in the form of water was found to be the only radionuclide that migrated from the nuclear facilities. The results were published in US Department of Energy Report DOE/EV-0005/7. The present report summarizes the earlier findings and gives the detailed results of the work from August 1977 through December 1981. The vertical and horizontal distribution of tritium within the glacial till was determined from measurements of tritium in soil moisture. Chemical and radiochemical analyses were performed on a number of wells in the area. Tritiated water continued to be the only species that was observed to have migrated from the Plot M area. Migration from the Site A area was not observed. The concentration of tritium at the Red Gate Woods well, 1200 ft downgradient from Plot M, continued to show the seasonal fluctuations of high concentrations in the winter and low concentrations in the summer. Monitoring of the Palos Park area is continuing.

  9. Glen Wattman | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glen Wattman About Us Glen Wattman - Director, Office of Aviation Management A native of New York, Glen Wattman has served as a civilian Airline Pilot for more than thirteen years flying Boeing 757, 767 and 727 transport category aircraft. He has extensive experience operating flights domestically and throughout Central and South America and Europe. Mr. Wattman is currently a Major in the United States Air Force Reserve and serves as a subject matter expert as a liaison to the Florida Wing of

  10. Maintenance Plan Site A and Plot M Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maintenance Plan Site A and Plot M Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois January 2015 LMS/SAM/S01063-1.0 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for Site A and Plot M January 2015 Doc. No. S01063-1.0 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii 1.0 Introduction

  11. Glen Edward Cook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edward Cook Jump to: navigation, search Name: Glen Edward Cook Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.gedwardcook.com This company is listed in the...

  12. Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Washington, Df: 20545 ,J.LlN 2 0 19% Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director Division of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission r " Washington, D.C. 20555 Dear Mr. Sjoblom: As a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is trying to identify all sites and facilities where radioactive materials were handled, processed or used in support of Manhattan

  13. Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J-UN 2 0 1590 Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director Di.vision of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory C&iitii'&&; Washington, D.C. 20555 Dear Mr. Sjoblom: As a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is trying to identify all sites and facilities where radioactive materials were handled, processed or used in support of Manhattan Engineer. District

  14. Environmental review for Site A/Plot M, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biang, R.P.; Yuen, C.R.; Avci, H.I.; Haffenden, R.

    1993-06-01

    This report is an environmental review of two sites known as Site A and Plot M, which are located in the Palos Forest Preserve of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County, approximately 20 mi southwest of downtown Chicago and about 3 mi east of the current site of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). An enlarged map of the area around the sites is shown in a figure. Site A covers about 19 acres, and Plot M covers about 1 acre. This document consists of the following sections: a review of the site history and environment, a description of the conceptual pathway models for both Site A and Plot M and a brief discussion of previous sampling events, a discussion of possible transport pathways, an evaluation of the Phase 2 Work Plan for Site A, a review of the applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations (ARARs), and recommendations for future study. The recommendations are based on an evaluation of previously collected data. Where data were sufficient, a geologic conceptual model was developed. If data were not sufficient to develop a model, recommendations for data collection are made. A new base map was developed for the site by using the base survey conducted in the 1940s, aerial photographs dating back to 1948, and site visits.

  15. NREL: Biomass Research - Glen Ferguson, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glen Ferguson, Ph.D. Photo of Glen Ferguson Glen Ferguson is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in the National Bioenergy Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He is studying the computational design of solid catalysts to improve the production of renewable liquid fuels. Previously Glen was a postdoctoral fellow in the Material Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. At Argonne he studied energy storage and nanocatalysis. This work resulted in several publications, as

  16. Opal Creek Forest Preserve Act of 1994. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The legislative text proposes to provide for the establishment and management of the Opal Creek Forest Reserve in Oregon. The purpose of the Act is to protect and preserve the forests and watersheds in the Reserve. And to promote and conduct research regarding old-growth forests and for educators to provide scientifically credible information to the public.

  17. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook COunty, Illinois

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number S00218 DOE/Grand Junction Office Site A/Plot M LTSP September 1999 Page iii Contents 1.0

  18. Gloria Glens Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glens Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0583883, -81.8979171 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  19. Glen Rock, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Glen Rock, New Jersey BGA Engineering LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  20. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Lake Powell, Utah | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Lake Powell, Utah Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Lake Powell, Utah Photo of the Photovoltaic System at Lake Powell, Utah Lake Powell is part of Utah's Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. The Dangling Rope Marina operates by using diesel generators to supply power. They use 65,000 gallons of diesel fuel per year that has to be barged in over Lake Powell. The potential for environmental damage to the marina in the event of a fuel spill is

  1. Maple Glen, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Maple Glen is a census-designated place in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA...

  2. Glen Echo, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Glen Echo is a town in Montgomery County, Maryland. It falls under Maryland's 8th congressional district.12...

  3. Village of Watkins Glen, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Village of Watkins Glen Place: New York Phone Number: 607 535-6873 or 607 535-6870 or 607-535-2736 Website: www.watkinsglen.us Outage Hotline:...

  4. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Hare, K.

    1995-12-31

    The final environmental impact statement (EIS) on the operation of Glen Canyon Dam was filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the Bureau of Reclamation on March 21, 1995. The poster display depicts this highly complex EIS process and its results.

  5. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  6. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam. Final environmental impact statement, summary, comments and responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Federal action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is the operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP), Arizona. The purpose of the reevaluation is to determine specific options that could be implemented to minimize--consistent with law-adverse impacts on the downstream environmental and cultural resources, as well as Native American interests in Glen and Grand Canyons.

  7. Recreation and jobs in the Glen Canyon Dam region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, A.J.; Harpman, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Natural resource economists have estimated the nonmarket benefits provided by streamflows in several recent research papers. The current paper also examines the economic implications of water based recreational activities. The analysis uses a software package and database called IMPLAN to estimate the jobs impacts of expenditures for recreation trips to the Lee`s Ferry reach on the Colorado River. The discussion describes the basic input-output model and water based recreation activities at the Lee`s Ferry reach. Non-resident river recreation trip expenditures to the Glen Canyon Dam region generate 585 jobs. The estimates presented here add further credence and policy weight to the premise that the outdoor recreation sector of the economy is relatively labor intensive.

  8. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region National Park Service, Intermountain Region December 2015 Cover photo credits: Title bar: Grand Canyon National Park Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam: T.R. Reeve High-flow experimental release: T.R. Reeve Fisherman: T. Gunn Humpback chub: Arizona Game and Fish Department Rafters: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015

  9. Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

  10. Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona: Nonuse values study final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsh, M.P.; Bishop, R.C.; Phillips, M.L.; Baumgartner, R.M.

    1997-10-01

    Nonuse or passive use economic value is the value of a natural resource held by individuals who may not physically use the resource. The goal of the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) Nonuse Study was to estimate the total economic value for changes in the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. This four year effort included extensive qualitative research, a number of focus groups, a survey design phase, two reviews by the Office of Management and Budget, a pilot-test phase, and a final survey of 8,000 households in the United States. This document details the approach, methodology, analysis, and the results of that study.

  11. Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona. Final nonuse values study summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Nonuse or passive use economic value is the value of a natural resource held by individuals who may not physically use the resource. The goal of the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) Nonuse Study was to estimate the total economic value for changes in the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. This four year effort included extensive qualitative research, a number of focus groups, a survey design phase, two reviews by the Office of Management and Budget, a pilot-test phase, and a final survey of 8,000 households in the United States. This document summarizes the approach, methodology, analysis, and results of that study.

  12. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A-1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 APPENDIX A: 13 14 ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT WORKING GROUP 15 DESIRED FUTURE CONDITIONS 16 17 Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015 Draft Environmental Impact Statement A-2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 This page intentionally left blank 13 14 15 Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015 Draft Environmental Impact Statement A-3 APPENDIX A: 1 2 ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT WORKING GROUP 3 DESIRED FUTURE CONDITIONS 4 5 6

  13. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    K-1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 APPENDIX K: 13 14 HYDROPOWER SYSTEMS TECHNICAL INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS 15 16 Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015 Draft Environmental Impact Statement K-2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 This page intentionally left blank 13 14 15 Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015 Draft Environmental Impact Statement K-3 APPENDIX K: 1 2 HYDROPOWER SYSTEMS TECHNICAL INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS 3 4 5 This appendix

  14. Cultural Preservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental protection program, LANL specialists oversee and manage the Laboratory's cultural resources programs. Several laws, including the National Historic Preservation...

  15. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement PUBLIC DRAFT Volume 1-Chapters 1-8 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region National Park Service, Intermountain Region December 2015 Cover photo credits: Title bar: Grand Canyon National Park Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam: T.R. Reeve High-flow experimental release: T.R. Reeve Fisherman: T. Gunn Humpback chub: Arizona Game and Fish Department Rafters: Grand

  16. Comments on the Glen Canyon Dam EIS treatment of demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J.D.

    1992-10-08

    The Glen Canyon Dam EIS has developed a substantial body of research on the economic consequences of altering the dam and plant operation. The following comments deals only with the electric power planning aspects of the study in general and the demand-side management estimates in particular. Most of the material in the report Power System Impacts of Potential Changes in Glen Canyon Power Plant Operations'' is outside the area of DSM/C RE, but appears reasonable. In particular, the input assumptions relating to the potential costs of power plants for capacity expansion planning are not unlike the costs Argonne is using in its studies and those which are used by others when comparison are made to DSM program choices. Statement of Major Concerns. The central concerns of the DSM/C RE results shown in the Glen Canyon study are as follows: (1) The assumption that DSM will penetrate the systems of Western's customers to a level which would reduce peak demand by 10 percent in the baseline alternative is overly optimistic given (a) the current reductions from the C RE programs, (b) the economic incentives faced by Western's customers, and (c) the current manner in which Western's power is used by its customers. (2) The result that DSM will reduce load by the same amount in each alternative is suspicious and unlikely.

  17. Comments on the Glen Canyon Dam EIS treatment of demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J.D.

    1992-10-08

    The Glen Canyon Dam EIS has developed a substantial body of research on the economic consequences of altering the dam and plant operation. The following comments deals only with the electric power planning aspects of the study in general and the demand-side management estimates in particular. Most of the material in the report ``Power System Impacts of Potential Changes in Glen Canyon Power Plant Operations`` is outside the area of DSM/C&RE, but appears reasonable. In particular, the input assumptions relating to the potential costs of power plants for capacity expansion planning are not unlike the costs Argonne is using in its studies and those which are used by others when comparison are made to DSM program choices. Statement of Major Concerns. The central concerns of the DSM/C&RE results shown in the Glen Canyon study are as follows: (1) The assumption that DSM will penetrate the systems of Western`s customers to a level which would reduce peak demand by 10 percent in the baseline alternative is overly optimistic given (a) the current reductions from the C&RE programs, (b) the economic incentives faced by Western`s customers, and (c) the current manner in which Western`s power is used by its customers. (2) The result that DSM will reduce load by the same amount in each alternative is suspicious and unlikely.

  18. Cultural Preservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Protection » Cultural Preservation Cultural Preservation The Laboratory strives to balance its continued growth with proactive and effective management of cultural resources. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos is rich with native antiquities Ceramic pottery sherds found at Tsirege Pueblo at TA-54. The pueblo, which dates to the Classic period of the Ancestral Pueblo cultural period, AD 1325-1600, consisted of hundreds of rooms. The Tsirege site also contains

  19. Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona: Nonuse value study pilot-test final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsh, M.P.; Bishop, R.C.; Baumgartner, R.M.; Phillips, M.L.

    1997-10-01

    Nonuse or passive use economic value is the value of a natural resource held by individuals who may not physically use the resource. The goal of the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) Nonuse Study was to estimate the total economic value for changes in the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. This four year effort included extensive qualitative research, a number of focus groups, a survey design phase, two reviews by the Office of Management and Budget, a pilot-test phase, and a final survey of 8,000 households in the United States. This document details the Pilot-Test phase of the study.

  20. Health assessment for Stringfellow, Glen Avon, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT08001286. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-25

    The Stringfellow Hazardous Waste site lies at the head of the Pyrite Canyon in Riverside County less than a mile north of the community of Glen Avon. The principal contaminants of concern in the ground water include trichloroethene (TCE), chloroform, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, para-chlorobenzene sulfonic acid (p-CBSA), chromium, and cadmium. The principal environmental pathways for contaminant transport include ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air. The Pyrite Canyon portion of the site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from probable past and present exposure to hazardous substances that may result in adverse human health effects.

  1. Simulating operations at Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona gcflow version 1.4 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This product is a modeling tool for examining the amount and pattern of daily water releases from Glen Canyon Dam under various operational constraints. This program is an extension of the geometric model used by Western Area Power Administration and is primarily an educational tool. It is designed to help the user understand hydropower operations at Glen Canyon Dam and to illustrate how the alternatives examined in the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement affect power production. This program demonstrates, in a simplified way, the relationship between monthly release volume, flow constraints, lake elevation, and power production.

  2. Power system impacts of potential changes in Glen Canyon power plant operations. Phase 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Phase III report reflects several changes in assumptions and methodologies which augment the Phase II approach. The most significant changes from the Phase II, October 1993 report include the following: Inclusion of SO2 costs; Modeling of the Salt River Project transmission curtailment deterministically rather than probabilistically; Changes were made to the Combined Cycle and Combustion Turbine characteristics and costs; Inclusion of emissions for all interconnected systems. Inclusion of emissions for purchased power contracts; Only the winter/summer marketable capacity for the No Action and Modified Low Fluctuating Flow Dam Alternatives were modeled; Common fuel escalation rates were used in the extension periods; Corrections were made to the modeling of DSM programs and the market penetration of these programs was reevaluated; Two new sensitivity cases are included; 1995 as the Base Year and full replacement cost of capacity lost at Glen Canyon Dam.

  3. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  4. Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-07-31

    On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Forest Glen subdivision, Operable Unit 2, Niagara Falls, NY, March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    This operable unit represents the second of three operable units planned for the site. It addresses the principal threats posed by the site through controlling the source of contamination. The major components of the selected remedy include: excavation of contaminated soils from the southern portion of the site, and contaminated sediment from East Gill Creek, and consolidation of these materials in the northern portion of the site followed by grading in preparation for placement of the cap; construction of an 8.5-acre cap over the consolidated soils in the northern portion of the site in conformance with the major elements described in 6 New York Code of Rules and Regulations Part 360 for solid waste landfill caps; removal and off-site disposal of the vacant trailers and two permanent homes to facilitate the excavation of soils; and capping the Wooded Wetland with six inches of clean sediment.

  6. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2012-07-16

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

  7. Fernald Preserve Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fernald Preserve Renewable Energy Brochure – Providing energy that is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable

  8. Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.

  9. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a ''without experiments'' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  10. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2011-08-22

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

  11. Order 13287, Preserve America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 In response to requirements of Executive Order 13287, Preserve America Office of History and Heritage Resources Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Part I. Background and Overview

  12. EO 13287: Preserve America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Federal Government to provide leadership in preserving America’s heritage by actively advancing the protection, enhancement, and contemporary use of the historic properties owned by the Federal Government, and by promoting intergovernmental cooperation and partnerships for the preservation and use of historic properties.

  13. Calendar -- Fernald Preserve Calendar

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    > Visitors Center > Fernald Preserve Calendar Fernald Preserve, Ohio Calendar The Fernald Preserve offers scheduled events and programs in addition to the trails and wildlife viewing areas that are open seven days a week from 7:00 a.m. to dusk. Special hikes are routinely held at the site, as well as educational programs and unique events such as stargazing. Unless otherwise noted on the calendar, all events begin and end at the Visitors Center and don't require any special equipment or

  14. The effects of interim flow operations from Glen Canyon Dam on Colorado River sand bars in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Hazel, J.E.; Beus, S.S. . Geology Dept.); Stevens, L.E. . NPS Cooperative Parks Studies Unit); Mayes, H.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Discharges from Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) affect the geomorphology and stability of downstream alluvial sediment deposits. To protect downstream resources, the US DOI mandated interim flow criteria (IFC) on 1 August, 1991. The IFC consist of reduced daily fluctuations (226--566 m[sup 3]/s) and reduced ramping rates (42.5--57 m[sup 3]/s/hr), the primary objective of which is to maintain sediment storage in the river system by minimizing sediment transport. This study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the IFC in achieving this objective. The authors examined whether reduced daily fluctuations lead to subaerial sand bar erosion and increased subaqueous sediment storage. They collected and analyzed topographic and bathymetric survey data from sand bars throughout the Colorado River corridor in Sept/Oct, 1991 and in Oct/Nov, 1992 to compare changes in sand bar morphology. They examined changing topography due to GCD operation in what they termed the hydrologically active zone (HAZ), that portion of the sand bar exposed to daily dam operations (142--900 m[sup 3]/s stage elevations). Volumes within the HAZ and profiles across this zone were generated from these sediment deposits. Their preliminary results show that, in general, erosion of sediment at higher bar elevations was coincident with deposition along lower parts of the bar platform. The observed response to IFC elevation in order to maintain sediment deposits for Colorado River corridor bio-diversity (e.g., fisheries habitats). 88% of sand bars that showed significant volume gain were preceded by significant volume loss, implying that antecedent conditions are an important factor in sand bar response to GCD operations. Sediment transport capacity was reduced as evidenced by increased sediment storage in recirculation zones and sediment infilling of eddy return channels. The authors conclude that IFC are achieving their primary objective of maintaining sediment storage within the river corridor.

  15. EO 13287: Preserve America

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10635 Title 3- The President Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 43 / Wednesday, March 5, 2003 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13287 of March 3, 2003 Preserve America By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Historic Preser- vation Act (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.) (NHPA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), it is hereby ordered: Section 1. Statement of Policy. It is the

  16. California State Historic Preservation Officer | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Officer Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California State Historic Preservation Officer Name: California State Historic Preservation Officer Address: Dept....

  17. Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

    2011-01-11

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

  18. Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_mn

  19. Tennessee State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Tennessee State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Tennessee State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_tn

  20. Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE,...

  1. Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE,...

  2. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between...

  3. South Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement North Carolina...

  4. Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ct.pdf More Documents & Publications Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic

  5. South Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement South Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_sc.pdf More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement North

  6. South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_sd.pdf More Documents & Publications Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement New Hampshire

  7. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_nc.pdf More Documents & Publications Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

  8. Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_wa.pdf More Documents & Publications Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Utah State Historic

  9. Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_la.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Massachusetts

  10. Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ma.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana

  11. Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_pa.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State

  12. Historic Preservation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of State Historic Preservation Officers to complete a prototype Programmatic Agreement (PA). By way of background, the PA will allow flexibility between the States while...

  13. EO 13287: Preserve America (2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Federal Government to provide leadership in preserving America’s heritage by actively advancing the protection, enhancement, and contemporary use of the historic properties owned by the Federal Government, and by promoting intergovernmental cooperation and partnerships for the preservation and use of historic properties.

  14. Executive Order 13287: Preserve America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Federal Government to provide leadership in preserving America’s heritage by actively advancing the protection, enhancement, and contemporary use of the historic properties owned by the Federal Government, and by promoting intergovernmental cooperation and partnerships for the preservation and use of historic properties.

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  16. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  17. New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_nh.pdf More Documents & Publications Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and

  18. Wisconsin State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Wisconsin State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Wisconsin State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_wi.pdf More Documents & Publications Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic Preservation Offices PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE

  19. Historic Preservation DOE Program Guidance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 10-012 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 10-006 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT NOTICE 10-006 EFFECTIVE DATE: FEBRUARY 11, 2010 SUBJECT: HISTORIC PRESERVATION IMPLEMENTATION PURPOSE: To provide guidance regarding the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA or "the Act"), 16 U.S.C. 470 et seq., as it relates to DOE Grantees of the Weatherization Assistance Program for Low-Income Persons (WAP), the State Energy Program (SEP), and the Energy

  20. National Historic Preservation Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    goal of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which established the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in 1966, is to have federal agencies act as...

  1. Historic Preservation - Executed Programmatic Agreements | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Historic Preservation - Executed Programmatic Agreements Historic Preservation - Executed Programmatic Agreements Programmatic Agreements offer a more streamlined process for grantees to satisfy their historic preservation requirements with minimum or no consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer based on the type of activity that is being undertaken. Below please find state-specific executed Programmatic Agreements. Executed agreements will apply to counties,

  2. Appendix 7 - Historic Preservation Reporting Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number 1910 - 5155 U.S. Department of Energy HISTORIC PRESERVATION REPORT Historic Preservation Reporting Period: ______________________________ Grant Number: ______________________________ 1a. State where recipient is located: ______________________________ 1b. Name of Recipient: ______________________________________________________________ 1c. Have you utilized a U.S. DOE-executed Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement (PA) in order to comply with National Historic Preservation Act

  3. Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  4. Georgia State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  5. Arizona State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  6. Nebraska State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  7. Texas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  8. Nevada State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  9. Missouri State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  10. California State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  11. Energy balance studies over varying ground cover of the Colorado River riparian zone below Glen Canyon Dam, Part II. Modeling of solar and net radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brazel, A.J.; Brazel, S.W.; Marcus, M.G.

    1995-06-01

    A numerical radiation model was utilized to investigate the diurnal and seasonal variability of solar input at four sites along the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam: river miles -14.5, 43, 55, and 194. These simulations were compared to observations made during the spring growing season (April, 1994), the pre-monsoon dry season (June-July, 1994), the monsoon season (August, 1994), and winter (January 1995). At each river mile above, a main station was established for a 24-36 hour period observing radiation components. This station serves as a reference point to compare with simulations. The model requires specifications of sky horizon effects, albedo, atmospheric attentuation, and nearby terrain emissivity and reflectivity. A combination of field data, surveying information, and radiation theory provides an adequate methodology to yield close agreement between observations and simulations in the canyon environment. Solar shading by canyon topography can be responsible for as much 40% loss of potential photosynthetic radiation in summer months, even more at the equinoxes, and a near total reduction at some sites in winter.

  12. Glen Ganyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona. The short-run economic cost of environmental constraints on hydropower operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpman, D.A.

    1997-06-01

    In October of 1995, the Secretary of the Interior announced that Glen Canyon Dam would be operated under the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) criteria to protect downstream archeological, cultural, aquatic and riparian resources. Although the annual and monthly amounts of water released downstream remain the same, MLFF imposes a unique and complex set of constraints on hourly and daily hydropower operations. These constraints include restrictions on ramp rates (hourly rate of change in release), minimum flows, maximum flows, and the daily change in flow. In addition, a key component of MLFF operations is adaptive management which establishes a framework of research and monitoring on which future changes in operation will be based. Consequently, MLFF operations are not static and variants of these hourly constraints may be contemplated in the future. This paper summarizes the environmental concerns which led to MLFF, reviews some pertinent electric power concepts, and describes current institutional and market conditions. A generalized method for simulating and valuing hourly hydroelectric generation under various operational constraints is then introduced.

  13. Ecosystem management: Controlling biological invasion in an Illinois nature preserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thelen, C.S.; Schulz, K.E.

    1995-12-01

    Understanding the nature and effects of human interaction with the landscape is an important aspect of environmental decisionmaking. Often, human action alters the composition and distribution of organisms. In the North American central Midwest, human occupation has decimated native woodlands, which endure as habitat islands in a highly fragmented natural landscape dominated by intensive agriculture and permeated by invasive exotic species. The alterations in the landscape have affected the structure and function of the few remaining intact forests by altering the environment experienced by tree and herb species. A frequent invader of forest understories throughout the central Midwest is Vinca minor, a horticultural groundcover, yet this species has not previously been studied as a woodland invader. We tested the hypothesis that native understory species were excluded from colonized areas, and that tree seedling growth was suppressed. Using study plots in Knobeloch Woods Nature Preserve, St. Clair County, Illinois, we measured the effect of Vinca colonization on understory composition and diversity, by comparing colonized and uncolonized plots. We also related understory characteristics to soil and canopy properties. Finally, to evaluate an ongoing program to control the invasion in the field, we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous cutting and herbicide treatment had increased the diversity of native understory species. We hope with this study to provide fact-based recommendations for management of midwestern nature preserves experiencing exotic plant invasions.

  14. Notices 7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    577 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 14 / Wednesday, January 22, 2014 / Notices 7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing and 252.211-7005, Substitutions for Military or Federal Specifications and Standards; OMB Control Number 0704-0398. Type of Request: Extension. Number of Respondents: 385. Responses Per Respondent: 1.4. Annual Responses: 573. Average Burden Per Response: Approximately 2 hours. Annual Burden Hours: 1,136. Needs and Uses: This information collection permits offers to-

  15. EA-1863: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vegetation Management Plan for Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission line, Coconino National Forest, Arizona

  16. EA-1863: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vegetation Management Plan for Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission line, Coconino National Forest, Arizona

  17. Appendix 7 - Historic Preservation Reporting Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1c. Have you utilized a U.S. DOE-executed Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement (PA) in order to comply with National Historic Preservation Act requirements for all or some...

  18. New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Documents & Publications Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic...

  19. Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon statehistoricpreservationprogrammaticagreementpa...

  20. Conservation is good, preservation is better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conservation is good, preservation is better Conservation is good, preservation is better Laboratory employees share what they do to save energy, reduce pollution, cut costs, and preserve our natural resources. May 1, 2013 Preserving and protecting the earth is important to Laboratory employees Protecting the environment, conserving energy, and supporting a sustainable future are very important to the Laboratory and to its employees. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206

  1. Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) covers all seven thematic elements of sustainable forest management: Extent of forest resources Forest biological diversity Forest health and...

  2. Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ut.pdf More Documents & Publications Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Virginia State Historic Preservation

  3. Montana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Montana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Montana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_mt.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic Preservation

  4. Wyoming State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wyoming State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Wyoming State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_wy.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic Preservation

  5. Hawaii State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Hawaii State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Hawaii State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_hi.pdf More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Alabama State Historic Preservation

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  7. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  9. Title 22 Chapter 14 Historic Preservation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preservation, Vermont State Historic Preservation Officer, and the Vermont Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Cultural considerations are analyzed in a cooperative...

  10. Oregon State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office Name: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office Address: 725 Summer St NE,...

  11. New Mexico Historic Preservation Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Division Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New Mexico Historic Preservation Division Name: New Mexico Historic Preservation Division Abbreviation: NMHPD...

  12. ARM - Black Forest News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Campaign Images Black Forest News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany January 15, 2008 Microwave Radiometers Put to the Test in Germany September 15, 2007...

  13. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses Abstract...

  14. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Schedule of Proposed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Actions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Schedule of Proposed Actions Abstract The...

  15. AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009...

  16. Alaska State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alaska State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Alaska State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ak.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana

  17. Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_de.pdf More Documents & Publications Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Massachusetts State Historic

  18. New Mexico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy New Mexico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement New Mexico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_nm.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic

  19. Ohio State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Ohio State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Ohio State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_oh.pdf More Documents & Publications Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic Preservation Offices Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic

  20. Iowa State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Iowa State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Iowa State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ia.pdf More Documents & Publications Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement North Carolina

  1. Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ks.pdf More Documents & Publications Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Alabama

  2. Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Indiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_in.pdf More Documents & Publications Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic Preservation Offices North Carolina State Historic Preservation

  3. Maine State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Maine State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Maine State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_me.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana

  4. Maryland State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Maryland State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Maryland State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_md.pdf More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Kansas

  5. Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_fl.pdf More Documents & Publications Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Massachusetts State Historic

  6. Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_pr.pdf More Documents & Publications Arizona State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Florida State Historic

  7. National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation Officers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation Officers website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: National Association of Tribal...

  8. Hawaii Administrative Rules Pertaining to Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Administrative Rules Pertaining to Historic Preservation Citation...

  9. New Mexico Preservation Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Mexico Preservation Division Abbreviation: HPD Address: Bataan Memorial Building, 407 Galisteo Street, Suite 236 Place: Santa Fe,...

  10. Forest products technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-07-18

    Report highlights DOE Industrial Technology Program co-funded R&D resulting in commercial energy-efficient technologies and emerging technologies helping the forest products industry save energy.

  11. Integrated Forest Management Charter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Leslie A.

    2015-08-24

    The purpose of this charter is to establish, maintain, and implement programs for the protection, preservation, and enhancement of the land and water resources of Los Alamos National Laboratory in a changing climate.

  12. USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place: Madison, WI Website: www.fpl.fs.fed.us References: USDA Forest Products...

  13. Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Safeguards U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 Dear Mr. Sjoblom: As a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Progr; (FUSRAP), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is trying to identify all sites and facilities where radioactive materials v handled, processed or used in support of Mahhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) activities fl 1942 through the mid-1960's. The authority to conduct remedia' action under FUSRAP, derived from the

  14. Mr. Glen Sjoblom Deputy Director

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Safeguards. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Comrii~~ibn .' Washington, D.C. 20555 Dear Mr. Sjoblom: Y As a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is trying to identify all sites and facilities where radioactive materials were handled, processed or used in support of Manhattan Engineer. District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) activities from 1942 through the mid-1960's. ,The authority to conduct remed~ial action under FUSRAP,

  15. Fernald Preserve 2014 Site Environmental Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    F E R N A L D P R E S E R V E 2014 Site Environmental Report Fernald Preserve U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Issued May 2015 LMS/FER/S12455 This page intentionally left blank LMS/FER/S12455 Fernald Preserve 2014 Site Environmental Report May 2015 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Fernald Preserve 2014 Site Environmental Report May 2015 Doc. No. S12455 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  16. Virginia State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Virginia State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Virginia State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_va.pdf More Documents & Publications North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic

  17. Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Illinois State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_il.pdf More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic

  18. Michigan State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Michigan State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Michigan State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_mi.pdf More Documents & Publications Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic

  19. 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation PDF icon 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation More Documents & Publications WPN 10-12: Historic Preservation Implementation NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

  20. United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures and Guidance Abstract This...

  1. Symposium on Data Preservation in HEP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    1. A view point on data preservation in High Energy Physics by Rolf Heuer 2. Results from the PARSE.Insight project by Salvatore Mele 3. The ICFA-DPHEP study group by Cristinel Diaconu 4. Discussion

  2. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Forest Products Purchased energy remains the third largest manufacturing cost for the forest products industry-despite its extensive use of highly efficient co-generation technology. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for further improving energy efficiency. Some current R&D projects and Energy Management resources will benefit the forest products industry. Analytical Studies & Other Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

  3. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Address: Kakuhihewa Building601...

  4. Arizona State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona State Historic Preservation Office Abbreviation: SHPO Address: 1300 West Washington Street Place: Phoenix,...

  5. Nevada State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Name: Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Address: 901 S. Stewart St. Place: Carson City,...

  6. Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office Abbreviation: SHPO Address: 2301 Central Avenue Place: Cheyenne, Wyoming...

  7. Hawaii State Historic Preservation Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preservation Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii State Historic Preservation Website Author State of Hawaii State Historic...

  8. New Orleans Preservation Research Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Orleans Preservation Research Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Orleans Preservation Research Center Place: New Orleans, LA Website: www.neworleanspreservationrese...

  9. Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes You are accessing a document from the Department...

  10. Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geometry-Preserving Topological Landscapes Authors: Beketayev, Kenes ; Weber, Gunther ;...

  11. Title 16 USC 470a Historic Preservation Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historic Preservation Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 USC 470a Historic Preservation...

  12. Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Name: Office of Archaeology and Historic...

  13. Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Case study details the General Services Administration's (GSA) decision to align historic preservation...

  14. National Trust for Historic Preservation: America Saves! Energizing Main

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Street Small Businesses | Department of Energy Trust for Historic Preservation: America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses National Trust for Historic Preservation: America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses National Trust for Historic Preservation: America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses Lead Performer: National Trust for Historic Preservation - Washington, DC Partners: - National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Golden, CO - Lend Lease - New York, NY -

  15. The Disctrict of Columbia State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  16. Alabama State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alabama State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Alabama State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy, the Alabama Energy and Weatherization Offices and the Alabama State Historic Preservation Office regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_al.pdf More Documents & Publications New Hampshire State Historic Preservation

  17. August 10, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of K-25 | Department of Energy 0, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions of K-25 August 10, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions of K-25 August 10, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions of K-25 The Department in a ceremony at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, attended by representatives of federal, state, and local historic preservation groups, announces the formal completion of a memorandum of agreement that will preserve

  18. National Historic Preservation Act (1966, amended 2014) | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy National Historic Preservation Act (1966, amended 2014) National Historic Preservation Act (1966, amended 2014) The National Historic Preservation Act established a program to recognize and preserve historic properties in cooperation with other nations and in partnership with states, local governments, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and private organizations and individuals. Download Document PDF icon National Historic Preservation Act (1966, amended 2014) More

  19. Montage Builders - Northern Forest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montage Builders - Northern Forest SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse University, Onondaga Community College A 1,925 Square Foot Single Family Home: * 2 Stories, 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths * Est. Construction Cost: $243,082 * HERS Index Score: -5 * Estimated Monthly Energy Cost: $2 Location: Syracuse, NY - IECC Climate Zone 5 Design Strategy: Inspired by American Craftsman style architec- ture to fit the pattern language of the neighborhood. Optimized solar exposure for PV,

  20. Forest Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Carbon Cycle Terrestrial carbon stocks above- and belowground (in humus and litter layers, woody debris, and mineral soil) are not only sensitive to physical environmental controls (e.g., temperature, precipitation, soil moisture) but also to land use history/management, disturbance, "quality" of carbon input (a reflection of plant carbon allocation and species controls), and the microbial community. The relative importance of these controls on soil carbon storage and flux can

  1. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  2. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest County Potawatomi Project Greenfire

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The traditional values of the Forest County Potawatomi Community teach us to respect all living things, to take only what we need from mother earth, and to preserve the air, water, and soil for our children. Reflecting these values, we take leadership in creating a sustainable and healthy world. We resolve to reduce our own environmental impacts and to take steps to remedy the impacts of others. We encourage others to do the same. We also seek legislative and policy changes that protect the

  4. Forest Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Products (2010 MECS) Forest Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321, 322) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Forest Products More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Forest Products Cement (2010 MECS) Transportation

  5. MECS 2006 - Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forest Products MECS 2006 - Forest Products Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Forest Products More Documents & Publications Forest Products (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment

  6. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  7. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  9. Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index AgencyCompany Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations...

  10. Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Black Forest Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Forest Partners Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111 Product: San Francisco-based project developer focused on...

  11. Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com Forest Carbon Portal...

  12. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe AgencyCompany Organization US Department of...

  13. Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Agency...

  14. Montana Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act Webpage ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Streambed and Land Preservation Act Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act Webpage...

  15. An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy, 2014 An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S....

  16. Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Historic Preservation Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Archaeological and Historic Preservation ActLegal...

  17. Recommendation 167: Historic Preservation of the K-25 Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The OSSAB Recommendation to DOE on Historic Preservation of the K-25 Building at East Tennessee Technology Park.

  18. The Disctrict of Columbia State Historic Preservation Programmatic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preservation Office. PDF icon statehistoricpreservationprogrammaticagreementdc.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities...

  19. Vermont State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Vermont State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Vermont State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy, the Vermont Department of Public Service, the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_vt.pdf More Documents & Publications NEW JERSEY

  20. NEW JERSEY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy NEW JERSEY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT NEW JERSEY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT Fully executed programmatic agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, and the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_nj.pdf More Documents & Publications

  1. New York State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy York State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement New York State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, the NY State Homes and Community Renewal, the NY State Energy Research and Development Authority, the NY Power Authority, and the NY State Office and State Historic Preservation Office regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_ny.pdf More Documents &

  2. Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Case study details the General Services Administration's (GSA) decision to align historic preservation renovations with zero energy goals in the Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Grand Junction, Colorado. PDF icon

  3. Idaho State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Idaho State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Idaho State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) historic preservation programmatic agreement for Idaho. PDF icon state_historic_preservation_programmatic_agreement_id.pdf More Documents & Publications Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and

  4. Preservation of Department of Energy Federal Records | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preservation of Department of Energy Federal Records Preservation of Department of Energy Federal Records The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requires each agency to remind senior officials annually of their responsibility to preserve information assets, such as the Department's records PDF icon Preservation of Department of Energy Federal Records More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Brochure_Senior Officials.doc Procedures for Departing Employees Procedures for

  5. K-25: Historic Preservation Agreement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K-25: Historic Preservation Agreement K-25: Historic Preservation Agreement Addthis Description In a ceremony attended by representatives of federal, state, and local historic preservation groups, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the formal completion of an agreement that will preserve the historic contributions of Oak Ridge's K-25 site to the World War II Manhattan Project. In this video, Oak Ridge Historian Bill Wilcox explores the contributions the K-25 project gave to our country and

  6. Community celebrates K-25 historic preservation agreement | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Community celebrates K-25 historic preservation agreement Community celebrates K-25 historic preservation agreement August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge, TN - In a ceremony attended by representatives of federal, state, and local historic preservation groups, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the formal completion of an agreement that will preserve the historic contributions of Oak Ridge's K-25 site to the World War II Manhattan Project. Mark Whitney, the DOE's new

  7. WPN 10-12: Historic Preservation Implementation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Feb. 11, 2010 To provide guidance regarding the National Historic Preservation, 16 U.S.C. 470 et seq., as it relates to the DOE Grantees of the WAP, SEP, and EECBG. PDF icon WPN 10-12: Historic Preservation Implementation PDF icon Historic Preservation Memorandum Delegating Authority PDF icon 36 CFR 800 PDF icon DOE Prototype of Programmatic Agreement PDF icon Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Letter to Secretary Chu More Documents & Publications 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of

  8. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future.

  9. EA-1863: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project within the Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, Arizona

  10. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  11. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state ? for the ancillary mode; ? determines the properties of the added noise.

  12. Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area...

  13. Microsoft Word - Preservation of Department of Energy Federal Records

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preservation of Department of Energy Records A Reminder for Senior Officials Office of IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer July 2010 2 Purpose & Scope The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requires each agency to remind senior officials annually of their responsibility to preserve information assets, such as the Department's records. The Federal Records Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to preserve records that

  14. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Thursday, 21 August 2014 10:43 Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were

  15. Fernald Preserve: A Learning Destination | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fernald Preserve: A Learning Destination Fernald Preserve: A Learning Destination January 14, 2016 - 5:24pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect Human Health and the Environment f1.jpg Group visit to see monitoring wells and discuss the wetland and prairie ecology. College-level environmental science class students are frequent visitors to the Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Site. Their visits are usually preceded by program-specific requests and Fernald site staff collaborates with

  16. Idaho State Historic Preservation Office Website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho State Historic Preservation Office Website Abstract This webpage provides...

  17. Microsoft Word - Preservation of Department of Energy Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preservation of Department of Energy Records A Reminder for Senior Officials Office of IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer July 2010 ...

  18. National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers website...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers website Abstract This is the...

  19. Montana State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    recognize and protect the heritage sites of Montana, preserving our rich cultural landscape for generations to come. References "Montana SHPO Website" State Historic...

  20. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation - Section 106 Regulations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation - Section 106 RegulationsLegal Abstract Section 106 requires...

  1. Hawaii Historic Preservation Permit Packet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Historic Preservation Permit Packet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Checklist: Hawaii Historic...

  2. Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    historic preservation renovations with net-zero energy goals in the Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Grand Junction, Colorado. aspinallcourthouse.pdf...

  3. DOI - Archeology and Historic Preservation Standards and Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archeology and Historic Preservation Standards and Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: DOI - Archeology and Historic...

  4. Oregon Federal and State Historic Preservation Laws Webpage ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laws Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Federal and State Historic Preservation Laws Webpage Abstract Provides...

  5. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come...

  6. Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Webpage Abstract Provides information about...

  7. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sought a mechanism to explain preservation of these materials. They reasoned that such a mechanism should be naturally occurring in the immediate environment (i.e. bone) and...

  8. Bobcats at the Fernald Preserve | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bobcats at the Fernald Preserve Bobcats at the Fernald Preserve April 9, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 4. Optimize the use of land and assets AVI_snapshot.jpg Bobcat photo taken November 28, 2013, by a Fernald Preserve trail camera. The Fernald Preserve boasts over 10,000 visitors each year. Lately, many of the visitors to the site have been on the lookout for the elusive bobcat (Lynx rufus). Bobcats were found throughout the state of Ohio in early settlement times,

  9. Fernald Preserve Attracts 50,000 Visitors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fernald Preserve Attracts 50,000 Visitors Fernald Preserve Attracts 50,000 Visitors July 10, 2014 - 3:48pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 4. Optimize the use of land and assets. 8205D-1997.jpg The Fernald Preserve Visitors Center opened in August 2008. Gary Studer, a longtime resident of the greater Cincinnati area, is a regular visitor to the Fernald Preserve in Ohio, enjoying activities like trail walks and bird watching. On Saturday, March 1, 2014, Gary became the 50,000th recipient

  10. A Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Discovery, Mechanistic Studies, and Potential Applications Previous Next List Liu, Dahuan; Liu,...

  11. FGD betterment: Asset preservation and revenue generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, G.A.; Boward, W.L. Jr.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    Phase I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 is complete. A mix of technologies and compliance strategies were used by the subject utilities to meet their obligations at the lowest evaluated cost. Phase II of the CAAA, which begins in the year 2000, will require utilities to bring their systems into compliance while reducing their overall SO{sub 2} emissions by 4.4 million tons nationwide. However, considering some of the utilities` overcompliance in Phase I, the overall reduction that needs to be achieved in Phase II could be as low as 2 million tons. The economic and business factors that influenced the compliance technology decisions in Phase I are similar to the economic and business factors that will influence both Phase II decisions and asset preservation on existing systems. While there was a mixture of technologies used in Phase I compliance, the uncertainty over allowance pricing and the overall economic climate favored low capital intensive solutions. Most Utilities chose to fuel switch. Many fewer utilities chose to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems than was previously projected. Phase II of the CAAA is likely to continue to favor low capital invenstive solutions since allowance uncertainty continues to be a factor and electric utility restructuring promises continued business uncertainty.

  12. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  13. US Forest Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleUSForestService&oldid442004...

  14. Forest Products Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Industry Profile Forest Products Industry Profile Wood and paper products meet the everyday needs of consumers and businesses. They provide materials essential for communication, education, packaging, construction, shelter, sanitation, and protection. The U.S. forest products industry is based on a renewable and sustainable raw material: wood. It practices recovery and recycling in its operations. Its forests help the global carbon balance by taking up carbon dioxide from the

  15. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective PDF icon Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products - Douglas Gardner, University of Maine More Documents & Publications Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

  16. State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Fernald Preserve |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Fernald Preserve State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Fernald Preserve July 12, 2013 - 11:28am Addthis On June 4 and 5, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) hosted the State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio. This group-which receives support from the National Conference of State Legislatures-helps ensure that DOE facilities and

  17. Utah State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: Utah State Historic Preservation Offic Address: 300 S. Rio Grande Street Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84101 Website: history.utah.gov...

  18. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation website Abstract This is the website for the Advisory...

  19. Utah State Historic Preservation Office Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah State Historic Preservation Office Webpage Abstract Provides overview of the role...

  20. DOE Files Report Confirming Intent to Preserve and Archive Yucca...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy filed today a report with the NRC detailing the extensive steps it is taking to preserve and protect its document collection created in connection with the Yucca Mountain...

  1. Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment shear zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preservation of an...

  2. Title 41 Alaska Statutes Chapter 35 Historic Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Title 41 Alaska Statutes Chapter 35 Historic Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Certification | Department of Energy Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification October 16, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Acting Deputy Secretary Kupfer Thank you, Mike, for that introduction and to both you and Jane for hosting this event. You both have been instrumental in the dramatic transformation of this site. We made a commitment more than a decade ago to

  4. Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy April 17, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as

  5. National Historic Preservation Act Documents - Portsmouth | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Historic Preservation Act Documents - Portsmouth National Historic Preservation Act Documents - Portsmouth Portsmouth Site Architectural & Archaeological Surveys/Reports PDF icon PREHISTORIC ERA - Phase I Archaeological Investigations for 361 Acres at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant PDF icon PREHISTORIC ERA - Phase I Archaeological Investigations for 384 Acres (Areas 4A and 4B) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant PDF icon PREHISTORIC ERA - Phase I Archaeological

  6. Northern New Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory Pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours Northern New Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory San Ildefonso Pueblo's Summer Education Enhancement Program brought together academic and cultural learning in the form of a recent tour of Cave Kiva Trail in Mortandad Canyon. August 24, 2015 Students from the San Ildefonso Pueblo Summer Education

  7. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  8. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  9. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  10. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  11. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  12. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  13. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  14. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  15. Lowell, Massachusetts, Preserves Historic Home Through Energy Upgrades |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Preserves Historic Home Through Energy Upgrades Lowell, Massachusetts, Preserves Historic Home Through Energy Upgrades Photo of a two-story historic home. Artist James MacNeil Whistler's birthplace home in Lowell, Massachusetts, was built in 1823 and now houses the Lowell Art Association. The house was in need of a series of upgrades that improved energy efficiency while catering to the specific needs of a historic home and museum. Through the BetterBuildings Lowell

  16. Federal Register Notice: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Register Notice: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Federal Register Notice: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Extension of the Duration of Programmatic Agreements Based on the Department of Energy Prototype Programmatic Agreement for Its Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy Program, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant; Notice of Program Comment. PDF icon federal_register_notice-program_comment.pdf More Documents &

  17. An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy, 2014 | Department of Energy An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy, 2014 An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy, 2014 PDF icon Executive Order Report 2014 (20140929).pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - April06.doc Welcome to the Cultural Resources Newsletter Microsoft Word - August06.doc

  18. Energy Efficiency: Saving Money and Preserving Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Efficiency: Saving Money and Preserving Jobs Energy Efficiency: Saving Money and Preserving Jobs November 15, 2011 - 12:06pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory research scientist Robert Tenent is helping incorporate thin-film design and manufacturing processes to improve the performance and drive down the sticker price of electrochromatic windows and make the product more accessible. | Photo courtesy of NREL. National Renewable Energy Laboratory research scientist Robert Tenent is

  19. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rooftop PV installation on the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi Community Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity

  20. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Douglas Gardner, PhD. Advanced Structures & Composite Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ....... Bronze Age .......... Iron Age ................ Nano Age? "From the Sawmill to the Nanomill?" Overarching Research Focus "Establish world-class R&D capacity in the field of ligno-cellulose derived nanomaterials

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  2. International Forest Policy Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Forest Policy Database AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry...

  3. Tropical Forest Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Virginia. About "The Tropical Forest Foundation (TFF) is an international, non-profit, educational institution committed to advancing environmental stewardship, economic...

  4. Forest City Enterprises | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enterprises Jump to: navigation, search Name: Forest City Enterprises Place: Denver, CO Zip: 80238 Website: www.forestcity.net Coordinates: 39.7564482, -104.8863279 Show Map...

  5. CRiSTAL Forests | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Use: Simple Website: www.iisd.orgcristaltooldownload.aspxcristal-forests Cost: Free Related Tools CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Applied Dynamic Analysis of...

  6. Tradewinds Forest Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tradewinds Forest Products Place: Hawaii Product: Firm developing a cogeneration plant for a sugar mill in Hawaii. References: Tradewinds...

  7. National Forest Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The National Forest Management Act of 1976 is a federal law that governs the administration of national forests. This act requires the United States Forest Service to use a...

  8. Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a U.s. DeParTmenT of energy faciliTy One of the most fundamental tenets of astrophysical plasma physics is that magnetic fields can be stretched and amplified by flowing plasmas. In the right geometry, this can even lead to the self-generation of magnetic fields from flow through the dynamo process, a positive feedback

  9. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  10. Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii Place: Honolulu, HI Website: www.fcnavyhawaii.com References: Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest...

  11. Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon management, carbon credit trading, national reporting of greenhouse gas inventories to the United Nations Framework...

  12. Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse...

  13. Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for GHG reductions, Build and institutionalize technical capacity for economic valuation of forest ecosystem services and monitoring changes in forest carbon stocks, and...

  14. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  15. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests...

  16. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  17. Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  18. Malaysia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  19. Papua New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  20. Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  1. Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  2. USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Jump to: navigation, search Name: USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Abbreviation: Humbolt-Toiyabe NF Address: 1200 Franklin Way Place:...

  3. Forest City High School Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High School Energy Purchaser Forest City Community School District Location Forest City IA Coordinates 43.266011, -93.653378 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  4. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  5. Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature climate change features forest research Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  6. Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  7. Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forests and Climate Change Toolbox AgencyCompany Organization: Center for...

  8. Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany...

  9. Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  10. Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  11. Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  12. Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  13. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  14. Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.leafasia.orglibraryusaid-leaf-accuracy-assessment-forest-and-lan Cost: Free Language: English Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version)...

  15. Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Jump to: navigation, search Name Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement AgencyCompany Organization Government of Norway,...

  16. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (Section 110 Guidelines) (NPS, 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (63 FR 20496; April 24, 1998) are the formal guidance to each Federal agency on meeting the requirements of Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

  18. Energy Performance Techniques and Technologies: Preserving Historic Homes Volume 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2011-02-01

    Following Building America-sponsored research, this guide focuses on planning energy-efficient improvements for historic houses while preserving the homes historic features, being aware of and adhering to regulations related to historic designations, and addressing health and safety issues.

  19. FY2015 Budget Request: Preserving President Obama's Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Vision | National Nuclear Security Administration 5 Budget Request: Preserving President Obama's Nuclear Security Vision | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional

  20. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  1. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  2. U.S. Forest Service - Biomass Activities and Tribal Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities for Partnership with the USDA Forest Service Faline Haven Office of Tribal Relations USDA Forest Service fhaven@fs.fed.us 202-205-1520 Forest Service/Tribal Relationship * "We envision a future where the Forest Service and Indian Tribes work collaboratively through government-to-government relationships to manage the resources entrusted to their care, a future where the Forest Service has the organizational structure, skills and policies to redeem our responsibilities in this

  3. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the

  4. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. We used 10 Hz eddy flux signals and

  5. Forest Carbon … Sustaining an Important Climate Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Resilient Forests... Sustainable Communities Biomass 2014 Conference Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Session Washington D.C. 7/30/14 Dave Cleaves US Forest Service Climate Advisor Changing Forests...Enduring Values Changing Forests...Enduring Values Percent emissions offset by LULUCF Changing Forests...Enduring Values Based on U.S. EPA Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2011 Report

  6. Publications - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment. Phys. Plasmas 15, 055910 (2008). E. J. Spence, M. D. Nornberg, C. M. Jacobson, C. A. Parada, N.Z. Taylor, R. D. Kendrick, C. B. Forest. Turbulent Diamagnetism in...

  7. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  8. Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Tyler B.; Roe, Phil; Morgan, Nathaniel R.

    2012-08-15

    Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

  9. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  10. Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12 miles southwest of the boundary of LANL has not entered Lab property at this time. June 26, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Community Wundar Hall Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wundar Hall Project Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review October 27, 2010 Mercedes E. Vega Legal Office Administrator Forest County Potawatomi Community 2 Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community  FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and the City of Milwaukee.  Facilities include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a former college campus, a hotel, two casinos and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. 3

  12. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  13. Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2011-12-30

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to client's requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

  14. H.R.S. 6E - Historic Preservation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: H.R.S. 6E - Historic PreservationLegal Abstract This statute provides for the preservation...

  15. GIZ-Preserving and Expanding the Role of Non-Motorized Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preserving and Expanding the Role of Non-Motorized Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ-Preserving and Expanding the Role of Non-Motorized...

  16. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  17. Town of Forest City, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest City, North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Town of Forest City Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 828-245-0149 Website: www.townofforestcity.c...

  18. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New...

  19. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use and Markets | Department of Energy Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Breakout Session 2D-Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S.

  20. State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: moderncms.ecosystemmarketplace.comrepositorymoderncmsdocumentsSFCM State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Screenshot...

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's

  2. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Potawatomi Community | Department of Energy Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community July 21, 2014 - 12:03pm Addthis Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. | Image from Forest County Potawatomi Community Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. | Image from Forest County Potawatomi

  3. Directory of Tennessee's forest industries 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A directory of primary and secondary forest industries is presented. Firm names and addresses are listed by county in alphabetical order. The following information is listed for each industry: type of plant, production and employee size class, products manufactured, and equipment. For the primary industries, the major species of trees used are listed. (MHR)

  4. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes) in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.

  5. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more » in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  6. C-14/I-29 Preservation and Hold Time Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitchen, S.

    2015-04-08

    Preservation and hold time of radionuclides must account for both nuclear half-lives and nonnuclear loss mechanisms, but variations in the latter are often neglected. Metals-based defaults are inappropriate for long-lived non-metals C-14 and I-129, which are vulnerable to chemical and biological volatilization. Non-acidification is already widely practiced for them. Recommended addition measures from radiological and chemical literature include glass containers where possible, water filtration where possible, headspace minimization, light shielding, cold (4C) storage and unfiltered water hold time of 28 days. Soil hold time may need to be shortened when water-logged, excessively sandy, or still adjusting to significant new contamination.

  7. Procedure for the permeabilization and cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, K.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biology Div.; Schreuders, P.D. [Univ. of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Science, TN (United States); Mahowald, A.P. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology; Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biology Div.]|[Univ. of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Science, TN (United States)

    1993-05-06

    The authors describe the detailed protocol developed in their laboratory at Oak Ridge for the permeabilization and cryobiological preservation of embryos of Drosophila melanogaster, Oregon R strain. The protocol is supplemented by notes containing two sorts of information. One category includes references to the appropriate portions of their published papers giving the scientific rationale and experimental basis for important steps. The other category is concerned with the criticality of certain steps and the precision with which they need to be performed. As an aid to investigators, the authors list even ordinary pieces of equipment. Brand names and model numbers are given where it is either important or convenient for readers to know precisely what is used.

  8. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-10-01

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980s. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: 1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, 2) to extend passive safety experience to a large-size LMR and obtain data for validating design analysis computer codes, and 3) to develop and test passive safety enhancements that might be used for future LMRs. These tests were designed to provide data sufficient to allow separation of fuel temperature effects from structural temperature effects. The data developed through this testing program were used to verify the predictive capability of passive safety analysis methods as well as provide a data base for calibrating design tools such as the SASSYS/SAS4A codes. These tests were instrumental in improving understanding of reactivity feedback mechanisms in LMRs and demonstrating passive safety margins available in an LMR. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, startup, and operation of the reactor. This information may be of potential use for international exchanges with other LMR programs around the world. This information provides the basis for creating benchmarks for validating and testing large scale computer programs. All information preserved to date is now being stored and categorized consistent with the IAEA international standardized taxonomy. The test results information exists in several different formats depending upon the final stage of the test evaluation. Over 100 documents relevant to passive safety testing have been identified and are being recovered, scanned, and catalogued. Attempts to recover plant data tapes are also in progress. Documents related to passive safety testing are now being categorized consistent with internationally agreed upon IAEA standards. Documents are being converted to electronic format compatible with a general search engine being developed by INL. The data from the FFTF passive safety tests provides experimental verification of structural reactivity effects that should be very useful to innovative designers seeking to optimize passive safety in the design of new LMRs.

  9. Evaluation of spray-drying methods for cellulase preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmel, M.; Oh, K.; Tucker, M.; Rivard, C.; Grohmann, K.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    Spray drying processes are widely used for the large-scale preservation of biology goods. The application of this technology to the enhancement of the storability of cellulase and related enzymes would improve fermentation processes requiring input of specific quantities of enzyme catalyst of known activity. Very high percentages (90% of original) of filter paper and carboxymethyicellulose hydrolyzing activities can be recovered from conventional spray dryers when operated at inlet air temperatures ranging from 90 to 180 degrees. The beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity recoveries were somewhat lower and were optimal at temperatures ranging from 120 to 150 degrees. However, the individual performance of the 12 enzyme preparations examined was quite preparation specific. An ultrasonic nozzle adaptation to the Yamato dryer demonstrated the overall feasibility of high energy atomization inasmuch as the filter paper activity was retained after drying. The more labile beta-xylosidase activity was, however, entirely lost.

  10. Cryogenics for superconductors: Refrigeration, delivery, and preservation of the cold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatarao Ganni, James Fesmire

    2012-06-01

    Applications in superconductivity have become widespread, enabled by advancements in cryogenic engineering. In this paper, the history of cryogenic refrigeration, its delivery, its preservation and the important scientific and engineering advancements in these areas in the last 100 years will be reviewed, beginning with small laboratory dewars to very large scale systems. The key technological advancements in these areas that enabled the development of superconducting applications at temperatures from 4 to 77 K are identified. Included are advancements in the components used up to the present state-of-the-art in refrigeration systems design. Viewpoints as both an equipment supplier and the end-user with regard to the equipment design and operations will be presented. Some of the present and future challenges in these areas will be outlined. Most of the materials in this paper are a collection of the historical materials applicable to these areas of interest.

  11. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh for single material problems. The results demonstrate that the MPDATA gauge option is suitable for providing accurate ALE remapping and preserves the multidimensionality and sign of both scalar and vector fields.

  12. CX-008718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revolution Energy Services (RES) Agriculture (Ag) Forest Glen Oaks LLC Biomass Project CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 05/16/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. NMAC 4.10.15 Cultural Properties and Historic Preservation Standards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preservation Standards for Survey and InventoryLegal Abstract These rules outline procedures to conduct surveys to identify, record and evaluate archaeological sites, isolates,...

  14. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  15. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drought-induced forest mortality Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. April 23, 2015 Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications

  16. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relation to climatic provenance (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have

  17. Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have found that drought and heat-induced tree mortality is accelerating in many forest biomes as a consequence of a warming climate in their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change. May 19, 2015 Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree, which could be impacted by future droughts. Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree,

  18. Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Responses to a Warming Climate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate The increasing air temperatures central to climate change predictions have the potential to alter forest ecosystem function and structure by exceeding temperatures

  19. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. PDF icon November 2011 status report PDF icon November 2012 status report PDF icon March 2014 status report PDF icon

  20. Forest County Potawatomi Community: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Community: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Projects Mercedes Vega Forest County Potawatomi Community Milwaukee, Wisconsin 2 Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community Ø FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and the City of Milwaukee. Ø Facilities include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a former college campus, a hotel, two casinos and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. 3 Forest County Potawatomi Community

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A 2-megawatt anaerobic digester and biogas generation facility converts food waste into electricity to power 1,500 homes. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi Community. A 2-megawatt anaerobic digester and biogas generation facility converts food waste into electricity to power 1,500 homes. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi

  2. Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or for non wood forest products may also have a considerable role in the global carbon balance, but these are beyond the scope of this publication." References "Forestry...

  3. Forest Grove Light & Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest Grove Light & Power offers a variety of rebates through Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

  4. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will implement energy efficiency improvements in revitalizing its historic Milwaukee inner-city trust property.

  5. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environment, Forests and Wildlife1 Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers...

  6. River Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8978091, -87.8139483 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  7. Forest County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5341012, -79.2451149 Show Map Loading map......

  8. Forest View, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest View, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8086431, -87.7933895 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  9. Forest Hills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Hills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4197911, -79.8500487 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Forest Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5198364, -123.1106631 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  11. Forest City, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest City, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.6612, -81.445063 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  12. Lake Forest, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake Forest, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6469661, -117.689218 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  13. Black Forest, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Black Forest, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.0130484, -104.7008083 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Lake Forest, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake Forest, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.3980165, -81.6737085 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  15. Forest Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9594739, -85.4897456 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  16. Oak Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oak Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6028116, -87.7439384 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  17. Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics:...

  18. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as...

  19. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This abstract outlinse a project that is designing and demonstrating a...

  20. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Historic Building Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will implement energy efficiency improvements in revitalizing its historic Milwaukee inner-city trust property.

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fulfill its mission, Forest County Potowatomi Community Chief Financial Officer Kevin Hanson presented at the Tribal Leader Forum on "Financing and Investing in Tribal Renewable...

  2. Forest Service Handbook 2709.15 - Hydroelectric Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest Service Handbook 2709.15 - Hydroelectric HandbookPermitting...

  3. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describes the U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program, which strongly encouraged employees to shut off their computers when leaving the office.

  4. Wake Forest, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9798734, -78.5097228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  5. WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Publications Website: pdf.wri.orgworkingpapersgfitenureindicatorssep09.pdf Cost: Free WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit Screenshot References: WRI-The Governance of...

  6. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: ... Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ...

  7. Factors affecting the remotely sensed response of coniferous forest plantations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danson, F.M. ); Curran, P.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of forest biophysical properties has concentrated upon forest sites with a wide range of green vegetation amount and thereby leaf area index and canopy cover. However, coniferous forest plantations, an important forest type in Europe, are managed to maintain a large amount of green vegetation with little spatial variation. Therefore, the strength of the remotely sensed signal will, it is hypothesized, be determined more by the structure of this forest than by its cover. Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and SPOT-1 HRV data were used to determine the effects of this structural variation on the remotely sensed response of a coniferous forest plantation in the United Kingdom. Red and near infrared radiance were strongly and negatively correlated with a range of structural properties and with the age of the stands but weakly correlated with canopy cover. A composite variable, related to the volume of the canopy, accounted for over 75% of the variation in near infrared radiance. A simple model that related forest structural variables to the remotely sensed response was used to understand and explain this response from a coniferous forest plantation.

  8. The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

  9. Title 14 CFR 77 Safe, Efficient Use, and Preservation of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    77 - Safe, Efficient Use, and Preservation of the Navigable Airspace under Title 14: Aeronautics and Space of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, current as of April 14, 2014....

  10. H.A.R. 13-284 - Rules Governing Procedures for Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    H.A.R. 13-284 - Rules Governing Procedures for Historic Preservation Review Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation:...

  11. H.A.R. 13-275 - Rules Governing Procedures for Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 13-275 - Rules Governing Procedures for Historic Preservation Review for Governmental...

  12. MCA 75-7-101 et seq - The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7-101 et seq - The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA...

  13. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal...

  14. UC 9-8-404 - Historic Preservation State Compliance | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 9-8-404 - Historic Preservation State ComplianceLegal Abstract Delegates responsibility to...

  15. Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomotives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War.

  16. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife...

  17. Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, R.; Hayter, S.; Hotchkiss, E.; Pless, S.; Sielcken, J.; Smith-Larney, C.

    2014-10-01

    The federal government is mandated with improving efficiency of buildings, incorporating renewable energy, and achieving net-zero energy operations where possible. These challenges led GSA to consider aligning historic preservation renovations with net-zero energy goals. The Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (Aspinall Courthouse), in Grand Junction, Colorado, is an example of a renovation project that aimed to accomplish both historic preservation and net-zero energy goals.

  18. Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy | Department of Energy Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy Virtual Museum Captures Ohio Plant History: Web-based Project Preserves Plant's Uranium Enrichment Legacy May 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. An online museum on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant went live earlier this year. PIKETON, Ohio - Do

  19. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act | Federal Historic Preservation Laws (2006)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Please note: This text is from the fourth edition of Federal Historic Preservation Laws, published in 2006 by the National Center for Cultural Resources, National Park Service, Department of the Interior. This edition contains 24 Federal laws and portions of laws that pertain to the preservation of the Nation's cultural heritage. The citations in this book are no longer up-to-date. We have retained this edition online for its historic value, and for the plain-language context that it provides

  20. Glen Gardner, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gardner, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.6967671, -74.9407248 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  1. FIA-13-0023- In the Matter of Glen Bowers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 29, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy’s...

  2. Glen F. Wattman Director, Office of Aviation Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    His military experience includes extensive war-fighting and joint and combined operational-level planning in theaters throughout the world. He has over 200 combat hours in the A...

  3. PetroAlgae formerly Dover Glen Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University, and bred selectively over many generations, to produce rapid growth and high oil yield for biodiesel production. Coordinates: -37.817532, 144.967148 Show Map...

  4. Glen Avon, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avon, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0116799, -117.4847714 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  5. Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... And, you know, certainly from their point of view, it's an energy security parameter. They'd like to have something that balances their major importing, collaborating sometimes, ...

  6. Effects of Projected Transient Changes in Climate on Tennessee Forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines transient effects of projected climate change on the structure and species composition of forests in Tennessee. The climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 were provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) that simulate the range of potential climate conditions for the state. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in the ecoregions by using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the five ecological provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation patterns are more complex with one model projecting wetter summers and two models projecting drier summers. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions in forest stands for the five ecological provinces of Tennessee from 1989 to 2300. These model runs suggest there will be a change in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces with the greatest changes occurring in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Most projections show a decline in total tree biomass followed by recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The changes in forest biomass and composition, as simulated in this study, are likely to have implications on forest economy, tourism, understory conditions, wildlife habitat, mast provisioning, and other services provided by forest systems.

  7. MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD GUIDE BY STEVEN M. JONES, DAVID H. VAN LEAR, AND S. KNIGHT COX~/ JULY 1981 l1Research Forester, Professor, and Forestry Aide I, Department of Forestry, Clemson University, Clemson, S. C. 29631 This research was conducted under U. S. Depart- ment of Energy Contract No. DE-AS09-77SROI026 -i- Table of Contents INTRODUCTI ON. . . ~1ETHODS . CLASSIFICATION CONCEPTS SUCCESSIONAL PATTERNS USE OF THE GUIDE . . KEY TO THE MAJOR FOREST

  8. Effects of harvest management practices on forest biomass and soil carbon in eucalypt forests in New South Wales, Australia: Simulations with the forest succession model LINKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranatunga, Kemachandra; Keenan, Rodney J.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Post, Wilfred M; Tharp, M Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Understanding long-term changes in forest ecosystem carbon stocks under forest management practices such as timber harvesting is important for assessing the contribution of forests to the global carbon cycle. Harvesting effects are complicated by the amount, type, and condition of residue left on-site, the decomposition rate of this residue, the incorporation of residue into soil organic matter and the rate of new detritus input to the forest floor from regrowing vegetation. In an attempt to address these complexities, the forest succession model LINKAGES was used to assess the production of aboveground biomass, detritus, and soil carbon stocks in native Eucalyptus forests as influenced by five harvest management practices in New South Wales, Australia. The original decomposition sub-routines of LINKAGES were modified by adding components of the Rothamsted (RothC) soil organic matter turnover model. Simulation results using the new model were compared to data from long-term forest inventory plots. Good agreement was observed between simulated and measured above-ground biomass, but mixed results were obtained for basal area. Harvesting operations examined included removing trees for quota sawlogs (QSL, DBH >80 cm), integrated sawlogs (ISL, DBH >20 cm) and whole-tree harvesting in integrated sawlogs (WTH). We also examined the impact of different cutting cycles (20, 50 or 80 years) and intensities (removing 20, 50 or 80 m{sup 3}). Generally medium and high intensities of shorter cutting cycles in sawlog harvesting systems produced considerably higher soil carbon values compared to no harvesting. On average, soil carbon was 2-9% lower in whole-tree harvest simulations whereas in sawlog harvest simulations soil carbon was 5-17% higher than in no harvesting.

  9. Preserving Lagrangian Structure in Nonlinear Model Reduction with Application to Structural Dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlberg, Kevin; Tuminaro, Ray; Boggs, Paul

    2015-03-11

    Our work proposes a model-reduction methodology that preserves Lagrangian structure and achieves computational efficiency in the presence of high-order nonlinearities and arbitrary parameter dependence. As such, the resulting reduced-order model retains key properties such as energy conservation and symplectic time-evolution maps. We focus on parameterized simple mechanical systems subjected to Rayleigh damping and external forces, and consider an application to nonlinear structural dynamics. To preserve structure, the method first approximates the system's “Lagrangian ingredients''---the Riemannian metric, the potential-energy function, the dissipation function, and the external force---and subsequently derives reduced-order equations of motion by applying the (forced) Euler--Lagrange equation with thesemore » quantities. Moreover, from the algebraic perspective, key contributions include two efficient techniques for approximating parameterized reduced matrices while preserving symmetry and positive definiteness: matrix gappy proper orthogonal decomposition and reduced-basis sparsification. Our results for a parameterized truss-structure problem demonstrate the practical importance of preserving Lagrangian structure and illustrate the proposed method's merits: it reduces computation time while maintaining high accuracy and stability, in contrast to existing nonlinear model-reduction techniques that do not preserve structure.« less

  10. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  11. Lake Forest Park, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lake Forest Park is a city in King County, Washington. It falls under Washington's 1st congressional district and...

  12. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - ... In pursuit of its long-term energy goal of reducing its carbon footprint to zero, the ...

  13. City of Forest City, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .cityofforestcity.comdepar Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Forest-City-IA142928346092 Outage Hotline: (641) 585-3574 or (641) 585-4343 References: EIA Form...

  14. Roman Forest, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Roman Forest is a town in Montgomery County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 8th congressional district.12 References...

  15. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C...

  16. Park Forest Village, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park Forest Village is a census-designated place in Centre County, Pennsylvania.1...

  17. Forest Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a city in Hamilton County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 1st congressional...

  18. Park Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park Forest is a village in Cook County and Will County, Illinois. It falls under Illinois'...

  19. Forest Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a village in Cook County, Illinois. It falls under Illinois' 3rd congressional...

  20. Forest Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a town in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. It falls under Oklahoma's 5th congressional...

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Lighting Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  2. Forest Service Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter 20 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest Service Handbook...

  3. Forest Service Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter 10 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest...

  4. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges Reid Miner, Vice President, NCASI

  5. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of LANL scientist A. Park Williams and partners from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona and several other organizations. February 27, 2013 Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after

  6. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potawatomi Community - A Case Study | Department of Energy A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar. PDF icon mironconstruction_rieth.pdf More Documents & Publications

  7. Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures LANL researcher Nate McDowell will discuss climate change and its effects on forest systems. March 31, 2014 Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "The data

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy National Parks and Forest Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Through the AVTA, Idaho National Laboratory

  9. Nanotechnology for the Forest Products Industry Vision and Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalla, Rajai; Beecher, James; Caron, Robert; Catchmark, Jeffrey; Deng, Yulin; Glasser, Wolfgang; Gray, Derek; Haigler, Candace; Jones, Philip; Joyce, Margaret; Kohlman, Jane; Koukoulas, Alexander; Lancaster, Peter; Perine, Lori; Rodriguez, Augusto; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wegner, Theodore; Zhu, Junyong

    2005-03-01

    A roadmap for Nanotechnology in the Forest Products Industries has been developed under the umbrella of the Agenda 2020 program overseen by the CTO committee. It is expected that the use of new analytical techniques and methodologies will allow us to understand the complex nature of wood based materials and allow the dramatically enhanced use of the major strategic asset the US has in renewable, recyclable resources based on its well managed Forests.

  10. Forest County Potawatomi Community Parking Ramp and Wundar Hall Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Energy Program Review Forest County Potawatomi Community Parking Ramp and Wundar Hall Projects Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community  FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and City of Milwaukee  Facilities in northern Wisconsin include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a casino and hotel and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. Trust Land in Milwaukee Project Greenfire  In late 2007, FCPC established

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Community: Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Systems Presented by: Nathan Karman Legal Department Forest County Potawatomi Community March 27, 2014 "Let us share our natural resources for the good of our People. Let us work for clean air and water and pray for the courage to stand up to those who would abuse our Mother Earth. So be it." - Bemwetek (Elder James Thunder) Excerpt from 2007 Class I Air Redesignation Public Hearing Prayer Community's Commitment to

  12. Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes | Department of Energy Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes April 29, 2014 - 2:15pm Addthis To help cut energy waste and improve U.S. energy productivity, the Energy

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel: What it takes to have a successful wood pellet manufacturing business Presented at The Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies Forum July 9, 2014 Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel: What it takes to have a successful wood pellet manufacturing business Presented at The Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies Forum July 9, 2014 Presented by Dr. William Strauss President, FutureMetrics Director, Maine Energy

  14. Baseline scheme for polarization preservation and control in the MEIC ion complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    The scheme for preservation and control of the ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been under active development in recent years. The figure-8 configuration of the ion rings provides a unique capability to control the polarization of any ion species including deuterons by means of "weak" solenoids rotating the particle spins by small angles. Insertion of "weak" solenoids into the magnetic lattices of the booster and collider rings solves the problem of polarization preservation during acceleration of the ion beam. Universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids allow one to obtain any polarization orientation at an interaction point of MEIC. This paper presents the baseline scheme for polarization preservation and control in the MEIC ion complex.

  15. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00 Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in

  16. Modeling Transient Response of Forests to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that a high diversity of dominant life forms in Tennessee forests conveys resilience to disturbance such as climate change. Because of uncertainty in climate change and their effects, three climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) were used to simulate a range of potential climate conditions for the state. These climate changes derive from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B storyline that assumes rapid global economic growth. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in five ecological provinces using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation differences from the long-term average are more complex but less striking. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions for five ecological provinces from 1989 to 2300. Average output projects changes in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces in Tennessee with the greatest changes in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Projected declines in total tree biomass are followed by biomass recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The Southern Mixed Forest province results in less diversity in dominant trees as well as lower overall biomass than projections for the other four provinces. The biomass and composition changes projected in this study differ from forest dynamics expected without climate change. These results suggest that biomass recovery following climate change is linked to dominant tree diversity in the southeastern forest of the US. The generality of this observation warrants further investigation, for it relates to ways that forest management may influence climate change effects.

  17. Preservation and Dissemination of the Hardcopy Documentation Portion of the NCSP Nuclear Criticality Bibliographic Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B L; Heinrichs, D

    2009-05-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy supports a nuclear criticality safety bibliographic internet database that contains approximately 15,000 records. We are working to ensure that a substantial portion of the corresponding hardcopy documents are preserved, digitized, and made available to criticality safety practitioners via the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program web site.

  18. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  19. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  20. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  1. Durable Media for Long-Term Preservation of Geological Repository Records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, K.; Fujii, N.; Kageyama, H.; Yoshimura, K.; Ohuchi, J.; Tsuboya, T.

    2008-07-01

    Durability of selected hard materials as information preserving media has been studied, leading to some promising results. Several engraving experiments on the selected materials confirmed that characters and patterns can be expressed along with shading and gradation. Engraving experiments on durable artificial materials were carried out by applying laser technologies. By selecting appropriate materials and engraving methods, characters and patterns can be expressed along with shading and gradation. These technologies can be applied to not only documentary records but also to markers and monuments. Among the materials, silicon carbide, which has strong resistance against heat wear and chemical impacts, corrosion resistance and wear resistance, showed satisfactory results in terms of accuracy. Thus, it is expected to be a promising material for the long-term record preservation. With respect to the density of characters in written records in the case of dot printing, it was estimated that, with 2-point characters, information totaling 6 to 8 pages of A-4 size can be engraved on a 10 cm x 10 cm plate. When a document that has 500 pages of A4 size paper is engraved on sintered silicon carbide plates, the total volume of recording media is evaluated as follows: - Size of plate: 10 cm x 10 cm; - Size of character to be engraved: 2-points ({approx} 0.7 mm; of readable size by naked eye or using a magnifying glass); - Number of pages of original document to be engraved on a plate: 8; - Number of pages of original document to be engraved on both sides of a plate: 16; - Number of plates needed for a series of document package: 500 / 16 = 32; - The thickness of a plate: 1 mm; - The total thickness of recording media: 32 mm; - Bulk of recording media preserving 500 pages of document: 10 cm x 10 cm x 32 cm. The examination has shown the possibility of long-term preservation of documentation records as a permanent system. A further examination is suggested concerning the assessment of the durability of the sintered silicon carbide plate against wear and chemical impacts. Preserving color pictures and photographs for a long-term duration is also proposed. In conclusion: We have proposed that the concept of a record preservation system is the combination of several different methods in order to impart redundancy to the communication function. The system should be robust that its overall function would not be influenced by partial damage, and also be flexible enough to adapt to the changes of background conditions in the future. Records and information should be preserved by way of both Relay System and Permanent System. The former would maintain record preservation and communication functions in the framework of social systems whereas the latter would consist of durable storehouse facilities, recording media and markers/monuments and be independent of any social systems and human control. Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for the Permanent System of Records Preservation. It is expected to be the potential candidate for long-term recording media with its superior characteristics of resistance against heat, wear and chemical impacts, and of engraving accuracy. (authors)

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest-tundra_LANL-28 Jan-2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circumpolar pattern Why Why focus focus on on the the subarctic subarctic forest? forest? Models predict: * Rapid advance of trees and shrubs i p t l b l i in response to global...

  3. File:03-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf...

  4. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the...

  5. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ... Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ...

  6. US forests and global change - precolonization to the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1997-12-31

    The forests of the United States and manufacture of products from raw materials produced in the forests are significant for the international global economy and for amelioration of threatening global climate change. This paper explores the conditions of the forests as a result of changing anthropogenic influences, and how these conditions might impact on global change.

  7. Three methods for large-scale preservation of a microbial inoculum for bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romich, M.S.; Cameron, D.C.; Etzel, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    Spray-drying, freeze-drying, and freezing were evaluated as methods of preserving Alcaligenes eutrophus H850 cultures for use as a microbial inoculum in bioremediation. A. eutrophus was cultivated on succinate or biphenyl prior to spray-drying, freeze-drying, or freezing. Dehydration inactivation was the primary reason for the loss of viability and degradation activity after spray-drying and freeze-drying. Thermal inactivation played a substantially lesser role. The ability of surviving bacteria to grow on biphenyl was more sensitive to drying than was overall survival of the microorganisms. Of the three preservation methods evaluated, freezing produced cultures with substantially higher survival and ability to grow on biphenyl than did freeze-drying or spray-drying.

  8. Geometry, lateral variability, and preservation of downlapped regressive shelf deposits, eastern Tyrrhenian Margin, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, M.E. ); Trincardi, F. )

    1990-05-01

    The shelf of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin changes substantially in width, shelf-break depth, and sea-floor steepness over relatively short distances, largely due to marked lateral changes in geologic structure. Remnants of late Pleistocene prograded coastal deposits are locally preserved on the middle and outer parts of this complex shelf. Through the authors studies of these prograded deposits they recognize two major controls on the distribution, lateral extent, thickness, and preservation potential. First, prograded (downlapped) deposits formed only where the physiographic shelf break was deeper than the lowstand shoreline, thus providing accommodation space for the lowstand deposits. Second, the proximity and relative size of sediment sources and the local coastal dispersal system influenced the geometry of the deposit. Mid-shelf and shelf-margin bodies composed of seaward-steepening downlapping reflectors were deposited as thin-to-thick continuous prograding sheets over an irregular eroded shelf surface and onto the shelf edge during the last fall and lowstand of sea level. A dearth of sediment at the end of lowstand conditions led to a switch from deposition to erosion. During sea level rise, shoreface erosion produced a major marine erosional (ravinement) surface landward of the 120-m isobath, and much, and in many places all, of the downlapping deposit was removed. Preservation of downlapping deposits is largely a function of their thickness. Thick continuous deposits are common on the shelf edge, whereas on the mid-shelf only thin remnants are preserved locally where depressions or morphologic steps were present in the shelf surface.

  9. An Energy Preserving Time Integration Method for Gyric Systems: Development of the Offshore Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Preserving Time Integration Method for Gyric Systems: Development of the Offshore Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit Brian C. Owens Texas A&M University brian_owens@tamu.edu John E. Hurtado Texas A&M University jehurtado@tamu.edu Matthew Barone Sandia National Laboratories* mbarone@sandia.gov Joshua A. Paquette Sandia National Laboratories* japaque@sandia.gov *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  10. Microsoft Word - Construction of Accuracy-Preserving Surrogate for the Eigenvalue Radiation Diffusion and Transport Problem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Advances in Reactor Physics - Linking Research, Industry, and Education Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, April 15-20, 2012, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2012) CONSTRUCTION OF ACCURACY-PRESERVING SURROGATE FOR THE EIGENVALUE RADIATION DIFFUSION AND/OR TRANSPORT PROBLEM Congjian Wang and Hany S. Abdel-Khalik  Department of Nuclear Engineering North Caroline State University Raleigh, NC 27695 cwang21@ncsu.edu ; abdelkhalik@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT The construction of surrogate

  11. Aspinall Courthouse: GSAs Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Case Study Prepared by The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with the General Services Administration on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program R. Chang, S. Hayter, E. Hotchkiss, S. Pless, J. Sielcken, and C. Smith-Larney October 2014 ii Contacts Jason Sielcken General Services Administration 1 Denver Federal Center, Bldg. 41, Rm. 240 Denver, CO 80225 Phone: (303) 236-2972 E-mail:

  12. Simulation of fluid and particles flows: Asymptotic preserving schemes for bubbling and flowing regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrillo, Jose-Antonio Goudon, Thierry Lafitte, Pauline

    2008-08-10

    In this work, we propose asymptotic preserving numerical schemes for the bubbling and flowing regimes of particles immersed in a fluid treated by two-phase flow models. The description comprises compressible Euler equations for the dense phase (fluid) and a kinetic Fokker-Planck equation for the disperse phase (particles) coupled through friction terms. We show numerical simulations in the relevant case of gravity in the one-dimensional case demonstrating the overall behavior of the schemes.

  13. € Prototype Programmatic Agreement Between DOE, State Energy Offices, and State Historic Preservation Offices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, THE [INSERT STATE NAME] ENERGY OFFICE AND THE [INSERT STATE NAME] STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE REGARDING EECBG, SEP AND WAP UNDERTAKINGS February 5, 2010 WHEREAS, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) administers the following financial assistance programs: the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program under the Energy Independence and Securities Act of 2007 (EECBG); the State Energy Plan

  14. Native Workplace: Preserving our Sacred Sources while Building a Green Economy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workplace we make a path by walking Preserving our Sacred Sources while Building a Green Economy Native Workplace: what do we do? Community education on Green Jobs Green Trades Training Program: Recruiting a Native Workforce Website is a hub for education, training, recruitment and Green Tribal news Connecting Green Jobs to our Traditional Values A Native Operated Non-Profit NWP Green Job Community Education *Green Career Community Events *Green Career Class Project *Green Trades Training

  15. Dr. David Snyder, Ph.D. Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Snyder, Ph.D. Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office 1017 Majestic Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 (859) 219-4000 OCT 1 1 2011 PPPO-03-1265954-11 SUBMITTAL OF A REPORT REGARDING PREHISTORIC NATIVE AMERICAN EARTHWORKS AND MOUND SITES IN THE AREA OF THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT IN SCIOTO AND SEAL TOWNSHIPS, PIKETON, OHIO Enclosed please find a

  16. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  17. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  18. Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service March 11, 2011 - 12:50pm Addthis USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs John O'Connor has worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest

  19. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  20. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akopov, Zaven; Amerio, Silvia; Asner, David; Avetisyan, Eduard; Barring, Olof; Beacham, James; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bethke, Siegfried; Boehnlein, Amber; Brooks, Travis; Browder, Thomas; Brun, Rene; Cartaro, Concetta; Cattaneo, Marco; Chen, Gang; Corney, David; Cranmer, Kyle; Culbertson, Ray; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje; Denisov, Dmitri

    2013-03-27

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  1. A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI

    2013-01-22

    EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  2. An Invariant-Preserving ALE Method for Solids under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Christon, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    We are proposing a fundamentally new approach to ALE methods for solids undergoing large deformation due to extreme loading conditions. Our approach is based on a physically-motivated and mathematically rigorous construction of the underlying Lagrangian method, vector/tensor reconstruction, remapping, and interface reconstruction. It is transformational because it deviates dramatically from traditionally accepted ALE methods and provides the following set of unique attributes: (1) a three-dimensional, finite volume, cell-centered ALE framework with advanced hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories for solids; (2) a new physically and mathematically consistent reconstruction method for vector/tensor fields; (3) advanced invariant-preserving remapping algorithm for vector/tensor quantities; (4) moment-of-fluid (MoF) interface reconstruction technique for multi-material problems with solids undergoing large deformations. This work brings together many new concepts, that in combination with emergent cell-centered Lagrangian hydrodynamics methods will produce a cutting-edge ALE capability and define a new state-of-the-art. Many ideas in this work are new, completely unexplored, and hence high risk. The proposed research and the resulting algorithms will be of immediate use in Eulerian, Lagrangian and ALE codes under the ASC program at the lab. In addition, the research on invariant preserving reconstruction/remap of tensor quantities is of direct interest to ongoing CASL and climate modeling efforts at LANL. The application space impacted by this work includes Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), Z-pinch, munition-target interactions, geological impact dynamics, shock processing of powders and shaped charges. The ALE framework will also provide a suitable test-bed for rapid development and assessment of hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories. Today, there are no invariant-preserving ALE algorithms for treating solids with large deformations. Therefore, this is a high-impact effort that will significantly advance the state of ALE methods and position LANL as world leaders in advanced ALE methods.

  3. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  4. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  5. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  6. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  7. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  8. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, The Preserve, New Paltz, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Preserve New Paltz, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  9. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  10. Presentations - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Presentations UW Madison Madison Dynamo Experiment Presentations MDE HomeLinksNewsBackgroundPublicationsPresentationsContactsMDE People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Workshops Dynamo Theory Program, Kavli Institute for Theoretical physics, UC-Santa Barbara, May 5-July 18, 2008. Cary Forest, Sodium Dynamo Experiments on Two Continents: History and Current Successes Modeling

  11. Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts' Crumbles. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

    2012-04-02

    The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

  12. Contacts - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Contacts UW Madison Madison Dynamo Experiment Contacts MDE HomeLinksNewsBackgroundPublicationsPresentationsContactsMDE People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Group Members Prof. Cary Forest - Principal Investigator Nicholas Zane Taylor - Research Assistant Elliot Kaplan - Research Assistant Mark Nornberg - Staff Scientist Kian Rahbarnia - Post doc Collaborators Erik Spence - Associate

  13. Contacts - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Contacts UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Contacts PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Contacts Principal Investigator Cary B. Forest Graduate Student Cami Collins Engineers John Wallace Mike Clark Undergraduate Researchers Jonathan Jara-Almonte Kristine Garot

  14. NREL Helps Industry Partner Commercialize Promising Technology For Forest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Products Industry Industry Partner Commercialize Promising Technology For Forest Products Industry For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., April 3, 1997 -- The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently signed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with Minerals Technologies, Inc. of Bethlehem, Penn. to conduct research to improve the quality of paper derived from thermomechanical pulp (TMP). The 17-month

  15. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  16. Compensation for Distributed Solar. A Survey of Options to Preserve Stakeholder Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Espino, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Compensation mechanisms for electricity generation systems installed behind the meter are under scrutiny in several jurisdictions in the United States. Legislators in 29 states introduced bills to amend net metering provisions in 2014, and in 33 states in the 2015 legislative session as of August 20, 2015. Some utilities have also sought to increase the revenue they receive from net-metered customers through rate redesign. The circumstances that have triggered the recent push for change include a growing percentage of net-metered customers, potential effects of distributed generation on cost allocation, decreasing photovoltaic (PV) system costs, the challenges of integrating high levels of solar generation in the distribution network, and increasing pressure on utility business models. This report presents a survey of options to charge and compensate PV customers, as well as options that may preserve utility revenues in scenarios with increased DG. These options could be used as building blocks to create a distributed generation (DG) compensation policy that may preserve the value of the different stakeholders and balance their interests.

  17. Occurrence of Schoenoplectus mucronatus at the U.S. Department of Energy Fernald Preserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homer, John; Decker, Ashlee; Bien, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Bog bulrush (Schoenoplectus mucronatus) is a perennial wetland species native to Africa, Asia, and Europe. Its documented occurrence in the United States includes California, Hawaii, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Tennessee. This species spreads through seed, rhizomes, and stolons, and has shown resistance to certain herbicides. Online plant databases do not show the distribution of the species reaching into Ohio or Indiana; however, local experts have indicated that specimens are in both states. Various reports indicate that S. mucronatus is locally abundant but not yet widespread regionally. In recent years, S. mucronatus has become increasingly abundant at the Fernald Preserve, a U.S. Department of Energy site in northwest Hamilton County, Ohio. The 425- hectare (1,050-acre) site has undergone extensive remediation and subsequent ecological restoration, and various wetlands have been constructed across the site. S. mucronatus was first observed at the Fernald Preserve in 2008, in one constructed basin. During monitoring in 2009, S. mucronatus was seen in 8 of 23 basins surveyed. This increase has raised concern that the species may become a regional problem. This poster aims to alert botanists and ecological restoration personnel of the species regional occurrence, and prompt discussion of its potential impacts and how it can be controlled.

  18. Nucleic Acid Encoding A Lectin-Derived Progenitor Cell Preservation Factor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colucci, M. Gabriella (Dugenta, IT); Chrispeels, Maarten J. (La Jolla, CA); Moore, Jeffrey G. (New York, NY)

    2001-10-30

    The invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a protein that is effective to preserve progenitor cells, such as hematopoietic progenitor cells. The nucleic acid comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:1, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof. The encoded protein has an amino acid sequence that comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:2, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof that contains an amino acid sequence TNNVLQVT. Methods of using the encoded protein for preserving progenitor cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo are also described. The invention, therefore, include methods such as myeloablation therapies for cancer treatment wherein myeloid reconstitution is facilitated by means of the specified protein. Other therapeutic utilities are also enabled through the invention, for example, expanding progenitor cell populations ex vivo to increase chances of engraftation, improving conditions for transporting and storing progenitor cells, and facilitating gene therapy to treat and cure a broad range of life-threatening hematologic diseases.

  19. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage appropriate geothermal energy development on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service have prepared a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for geothermal leasing in the West, including Alaska. The draft PEIS considers all public lands and national

  20. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee on Natural Resources | Department of Energy National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources By: Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of Management Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park PDF icon Microsoft Word - 6.28.12 MA Final

  1. Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321 and 322) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis 2.3 FOREST PRODUCTS SECTOR (NAICS 321 AND 322) 2.3.1. Overview of the Forest Products Manufacturing Sector The forest products sector produces thousands of products from renewable raw materials (wood) that are essential for communication, packaging, consumer goods, and construction. The sector is divided into two major categories: Wood Product Manufacturing (NAICS 321) and Paper Manufacturing (NAICS 322). These industries are

  2. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paper Industry | Department of Energy Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry PDF icon pulppaper_profile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries

  3. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI Pallardy, Stephen G 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

  4. Using Atmosphere-Forest Measurements To Examine The Potential For Reduced Downwind Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, B.

    2015-10-13

    A 2-D dispersion model was developed to address how airborne plumes interact with the forest at Savannah River Site. Parameters describing turbulence and mixing of the atmosphere within and just above the forest were estimated using measurements of water vapor or carbon dioxide concentration made at the Aiken AmeriFlux tower for a range of stability and seasonal conditions. Stability periods when the greatest amount of mixing of an airborne plume into the forest were found for 1) very unstable environments, when atmospheric turbulence is usually at a maximum, and 2) very stable environments, when the plume concentration at the forest top is at a maximum and small amounts of turbulent mixing can move a substantial portion of the plume into the forest. Plume interactions with the forest during stable periods are of particular importance because these conditions are usually considered the worst-case scenario for downwind effects from a plume. The pattern of plume mixing into the forest was similar during the year except during summer when the amount of plume mixed into the forest was nearly negligible for all but stable periods. If the model results indicating increased deposition into the forest during stable conditions can be confirmed, it would allow for a reduction in the limitations that restrict facility operations while maintaining conservative estimates for downwind effects. Continuing work is planned to confirm these results as well as estimate specific deposition velocity values for use in toolbox models used in regulatory roles.

  5. Nonenzymatic Role for WRN in Preserving Nascent DNA Strands after Replication Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yang, Yanyong; Mori, Eiichiro; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Kobayashi, Junya; Yannone, Steven  M.; Chen, David  J.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2014-11-20

    WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome (WS), is a multifunctional nuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, and genome stability maintenance. It was assumed that the nuclease activities of WRN were critical for these functions. Here, we report a nonenzymatic role for WRN in preserving nascent DNA strands following replication stress. We found that lack of WRN led to shortening of nascent DNA strands after replication stress. Furthermore, we discovered that the exonuclease activity of MRE11 was responsible for the shortening of newly replicated DNA in the absence of WRN. Mechanistically, the N-terminal FHA domain of NBS1 recruits WRN to replication-associated DNA double-stranded breaks to stabilize Rad51 and to limit the nuclease activity of its C-terminal binding partner MRE11. Thus, this previously unrecognized nonenzymatic function of WRN in the stabilization of nascent DNA strands sheds light on the molecular reason for the origin of genome instability in WS individuals.

  6. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  7. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PID was an agency-wide program launched through piloting and mul- tiple phases with strong leadership support and a cross-functional team. Outreach material spoke to multiple motivations. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program The Power-IT-Down (PID) program, in effect from 2013-2015, strongly encour- aged employees to shut off their computers when leaving the offce. The U.S. For- est Service did not initially launch the program agency-wide, but frst piloted it on a voluntary basis in one

  8. Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1994-11-01

    In November 1994, the forest products industry published Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry, which articulated the industry's vision. This document set the foundation for collaborative efforts between the industry and the federal government.

  9. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  10. Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  11. Nitrogen Deposition to and Cycling in a Deciduous Forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pryor, Sara C.; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Carreiro, Margaret; Davis, Melissa L.; Hartley, Anne; Jensen, Bjame; Oliphant, Andrew; Randolph, Melissa J. C.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2001-01-01

    The project described here seeks to answer questions regarding the role increased nitrogen (N) deposition is playing in enhanced carbon (C) sequestration in temperate mid-latitude forests, using detailed measurements from an AmeriFlux tower in southern Indiana (Morgan-Monroe State Forest, or MMSF). The measurements indicate an average atmosphere-surface N flux of approximately 6 mg-N m -2 day -1 during the 2000 growing season, with approximately 40% coming from dry deposition of ammonia (NH 3 ), nitric acid (HNO 3 ), and particle-bound N. Wet deposition and throughfall measurements indicate significant canopy uptake of N (particularly NH 4 +) at themore »site, leading to a net canopy exchange (NCE) of –6 kg-N ha -1 for the growing season. These data are used in combination with data on the aboveground C:N ratio, litterfall flux, and soil net N mineralization rates to indicate the level of potential perturbation of C sequestration at this site. « less

  12. Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

  13. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  14. The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection At the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.; Johnston, F.; Homer, J.; Deyo, Y.

    2008-07-01

    At both the Fernald Preserve and the Weldon Spring Site, the development of ecological restoration goals and objectives was used to complement and even enhance achievement of selected remedies. Warm-season native grasses and forbs were used for revegetation of remediated areas. The hardiness and ability to establish in low-nutrient conditions make native grasses ideal candidates for reestablishment of vegetation in excavated areas. At the Fernald Preserve, native grasses were used for vegetative cover on an on-site disposal facility as well. Also at the Fernald Preserve, excavation footprints were optimized to increase the quantity and quality of created wetlands. Drainage features in a couple instances provide passive groundwater recharge, potentially accelerating groundwater remediation efforts. In addition, a number of clean materials and structures were beneficially reused as part of ecological restoration designs, including wood-chip mulch and woody debris, clean concrete, and a rail trestle. At the Weldon Spring Site, several methods were used to control erosion for three years after the initial seeding of native species. A field evaluation of soil conditions and general species diversity was performed in 2007 and it was determined that erosion at the site was typical and repairing naturally. These approaches resulted in 'win-win' strategies needed to successfully remediate and restore complex projects such as the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring. (authors)

  15. Preservation of coherence for a two-level atom tunneling through a squeezed vacuum with finite bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Samyadeb Roy, Sisir

    2014-09-15

    Tunneling of a two-state particle through a squeezed vacuum is considered. It has been shown that repetitive measurement or interaction with the external field can preserve the coherence. Moreover, the coherence time in terms of the squeezing parameters has been calculated. A specific condition is derived, under which the coherence is sustainable.

  16. Nonenzymatic Role for WRN in Preserving Nascent DNA Strands after Replication Stress

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yang, Yanyong; Mori, Eiichiro; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Kobayashi, Junya; Yannone, Steven  M.; Chen, David  J.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2014-11-20

    WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome (WS), is a multifunctional nuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, and genome stability maintenance. It was assumed that the nuclease activities of WRN were critical for these functions. Here, we report a nonenzymatic role for WRN in preserving nascent DNA strands following replication stress. We found that lack of WRN led to shortening of nascent DNA strands after replication stress. Furthermore, we discovered that the exonuclease activity of MRE11 was responsible for the shortening of newly replicated DNA in the absence of WRN. Mechanistically, the N-terminal FHA domain of NBS1 recruits WRNmore » to replication-associated DNA double-stranded breaks to stabilize Rad51 and to limit the nuclease activity of its C-terminal binding partner MRE11. Thus, this previously unrecognized nonenzymatic function of WRN in the stabilization of nascent DNA strands sheds light on the molecular reason for the origin of genome instability in WS individuals.« less

  17. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  18. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  19. Limitations on the Delegation of Authority by Federal Agencies to Initiate Tribal Consultation under Section 106 of National Historic Preservation Act (2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation explains in this memo why federal agencies cannot delegate to applicants the responsibility for consultation with Indian tribes under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, unless expressly authorized by the Indian tribe to do so.

  20. Long-term successional forest dynamics: species and community responses to climatic variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul; Todd Jr, Donald E; Hanson, Paul J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Question: Are tree dynamics sensitive to climatic variability, and do tree species differ in their responses to climatic variability? Hence, is vulnerability of forest communities to climatic variability depending on stand composition? Location: Mixed young forest at Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, East-Tennessee, USA. Methods: Using a long-term data set (1967-2006), we analyzed temporal forest dynamics at the tree and species level, and we analyzed community dynamics for forest stands that different in their initial species composition (i.e., Chestnut Oak, Oak-Hickory, Pine, and Yellow poplar stands). Using summer drought and growing season temperature as defined climate drivers, we evaluated relationships between forest dynamics and climate across levels of organization. Results: Over the 4-decade studied period, forest communities underwent successional change and substantially increased their biomass. Variation in summer drought and growing season temperature contributed to temporal biomass dynamics for some tree species, but not for others. Stand-level responses to climatic variability were shown to be related to responses of specific component species; however, not for Pine stands. Pinus echinata, the dominant species in stands initially identified as Pine stands, decreased over time due to periodical outbreaks of the pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis). The outbreaks on Walker Branch could not be directly related to climatic conditions. Conclusions: Our results imply that vulnerability of developing forests to predicted climate conditions is stand-type dependent, and hence, is a function of species composition. Autogenic successional processes (or insect outbreaks) were found to prevail over climatic variability in determining long-term forest dynamics for stands dominated by sensitive species, emphasizing the importance of studying interactions between forest succession and climate change.

  1. New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest: From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest: From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower: NOx, Oxidant, Isoprene Research (PINOT-NOIR) were conducted in a Missouri forest dominated by isoprene emissions,

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM A long-term experiment to measure carbon and water fluxes was initiated in 2004 as part of the Ameriflux network in a second-growth oak-hickory forest in central Missouri. Ecosystem-scale (~ 1 km2) canopy gas exchange (measured by eddy-covariance methods),

  3. Tectonic controls on deposition and preservation of Pennsylvanian Tensleep Formation, Bighorn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Anne, O.; Horne, J.C.; Wheeler, D.M.; Musgrave, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    During deposition of the Tensleep Formation, a shallow, semirestricted portion of a major seaway that occupied the geosynclinal area to the west extended into the area of the present-day Bighorn basin. Limiting the transgression of this sea was the Beartooth high on the north and the Bighorn high on the east and southeast. On the western side of the area, a southerly extension of the Yellowstone high restricted circulation. The lower Tensleep Formation (Desmoinesian), characterized by extensive marine influence, was deposited as coastal sand dunes and interdunes over subaerially exposed structural highs. These deposits grade basinward into shoreface sandstones, which in turn grade into sandstones and carbonates of the shelf environment. During deposition of upper Tensleep strata (Missourian through Virgilian), marine waters were less widespread. The Greybull arch, a northeast-trending feature in the northern part of the area, was uplifted, dividing the shallow sea into two parts. The upper Tensleep Formation was deposited as a terrestrial sand sea over the Bighorn high. Coastal dunes and interdunes were deposited seaward of the sand seas and over the Beartooth high, the Greybull arch, and the southerly extension of the Yellowstone high. These deposits grade basinward into clastic shoreface deposits. Following Tensleep deposition, the region underwent southward tilting, which caused exposure and erosion of the Tensleep Formation. The resulting unconformity surface was deeply incised by a dendritic drainage system that controlled the thickness of the formation. The Greybull arch and the Bighorn high acted as significant drainage divides, over which very little of the formation was preserved.

  4. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ? The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ? The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ? The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ? PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ? The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  5. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  6. 16 U.S.C. 1600 et seq.: Chapter 36: Forest and Rangeland Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1600 et seq.: Chapter 36: Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 16...

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  8. The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab March 26, 2015 The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide By the end of the century, the...

  9. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Robert C. Abt, Professor of Natural Resource Economics and Management, North Carolina State University

  10. MCA 77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management Zones Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA...

  11. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  12. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI Citation Details In-Document Search Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI by June 14, 2004, the MOFLUX site was fully

  13. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest Service), F. Corley (Corley Land Services), G. Somerville (Tigercat), O. Fasina (Auburn University), J. Fulton (Auburn University), T. McDonald (Auburn University), M. Smidt (Auburn University), T. Gallagher (Auburn University) This project is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process,

  14. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  15. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  16. Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

    1993-04-06

    Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

  17. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  18. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  19. Carbon flows and economic evaluation of mitigation options in Tanzani's forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.R.; Okinting'Ati, Aku

    1995-02-02

    This paper presents estimates of the rate of forest use, deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the corresponding carbon flows, in the Tanzanian forest sector. It is estimated that the country lost 525,000 ha of forests in 1990, with associated committed emissions of 31.5 Mt. Carbon (MtC), and 7.05 MtC of committed carbon sequestration. The paper then describes the possible response options in the forest sector to mitigate GHG emissions, and evaluates the most stable subset of these-i.e. forest conservation, woodfuel plantations and agroforestry. The conservation options were found to cost an average of U.S. $1.27 per tonne of carbon (tC) conserved. Five options for fuelwood plantations and agroforestry, with two different ownership regimes were evaluated. Each one of the options gives a positive net present value at low rates of discount, ranging from U.S. $1.06 to 3.4/1C of avoided emissions at 0 percent discount rate. At 10 percent discount, the eucalyptus and maize option has a highest PNV of U.S. $1.73 tC, and the government plantation gives a negative PNV (loss) of U.S. $0.13 tC sequestered. The options with a private/community type of ownership scheme fared better than government run options. This conclusion also held true when ranking the options by the BRAC indicator, with the government fuelwood plantation ranked the lowest, and the private agroforestry option of eucalyptus and corn performing best. The mitigation options evaluated here show that the forest sector in Tanzania has one of the most cost-effective GHG mitigation opportunities in the world, and they are within the developmental aspirations of the country.

  20. Project risk and appeals in U.S. Forest Service planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.; Seesholtz, David N.

    2013-09-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires U.S. Forest Service planning processes to be conducted by interdisciplinary teams of resource specialists to analyze and disclose the likely environmental impacts of proposed natural resource management actions on Forest Service lands. Multiple challenges associated with these processes have been a source of frustration for the agency. One of these challenges involves administrative appeals through which public entities can challenge a Forest Service decision following a NEPA process. These appeals instigate an internal review process and can result in an affirmation of the Forest Service decision, a reversal of that decision, or additional work that re-initiates all or part of the NEPA process. We examine the best predictors of appeals and their outcomes on a representative sample of 489 Forest Service NEPA processes that were decided between 2007 and 2009. While certain factors associated with pre-existing social contexts (such as a history of controversy) or pre-determined elements of a proposed action (such as the extraction of forest products) predispose certain processes to a higher risk of appeals, other practices and process-related strategies within the control of the agency also appear to bear meaningful influence on the occurrence of appeals and their outcomes. Appeals and their outcomes were most strongly related to programmatic, structural (turnover of personnel in particular), and relationship risks (both internal and external) within the processes, suggesting the need for greater focus within the agency on cultivating positive internal and external relationships to manage the risk of appeals. -- Highlights: ? We examined appeals and their outcomes on 489 U.S. Forest Service NEPA processes. ? Project type, context, team turnover, and personal relationships predicted appeals. ? External relationship management and staff turnover best predicted appeal outcomes. ? Positive internal and external relationships appear to reduce appeal risks.

  1. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jantine; Pescatore, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

  2. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  3. Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries. The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At present little land and labour resources are expended on energy production, but the woodlands in Dodoma are disappearing, causing villagers to save time by switching from fuelwood collected on foot to charcoal shipped in by truck. Results of a linear program show that if the costs of growing the wood for charcoal are counted the switch to charcoal saves time only in areas where population is relatively dense and natural woodland remote. Woodland preservation in Dodoma will require more plantations, increased plantation productivity, improved efficiency of charcoal kilns or stoves and ultimately a switch to some other fuel than wood.

  4. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  5. Archiving data from new survey technologies: Enabling research with high-precision data while preserving participant privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Burton, Evan; Murakami, Elaine

    2015-12-29

    Despite the significant effort and expense to collect high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) data in travel surveys, privacy concerns often lead to its underutilization. This paper describes development of the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) to address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy. Furthermore, the TSDC operating structure was developed in consultation with an advisory committee and includes: a secure enclave with no external access for backing up and processing raw data, a publicly accessible website for downloading cleansed data, and a secure portal environment through which approved users can work with detailed spatial data using a variety of tools and reference information.

  6. DOE-STD-1064-94; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Seasonal Facility Preservation at DOE Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    64-94 June 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR SEASONAL FACILITY PRESERVATION AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA MNTY DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public

  7. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  8. The plant cell wall decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastwood, Daniel C.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Schneider, Patrick; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Baker, Scott E.; Barry, Kerrie; Bendiksby, Mika; Blumentritt, Melanie; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Vries, Ronald P. de; Gathman, Allen; Goodell, Barry; Henrissat, Bernard; Ihrmark, Katarina; Kauserud, H; vard; Kohler, Annegret; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lavin, Jos; L.; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lindquist, Erika; Lilly, Walt; Lucas, Susan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Oguiza, Jos; A.; Park, Jongsun; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Riley, Robert; Rosling, Anna; Salamov, Asaf; Schmidt, Olaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Skrede, Inger; Stenlid, Jan; Wiebenga, Ad; Xie, Xinfeng; K; es, Ursula; Hibbett, David S.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; H; gberg, Nils; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Watkinson, Sarah C.

    2011-05-01

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood?residual lignin contributing up to 30percent of forest soil carbon?and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the ?dry rot? fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota

  9. The biological diversity conservation district: A rain forest conservation tool for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simons, M.

    1995-12-01

    Over the next twenty years, the Earth`s rain forests may decrease by forty percent! This paper presents a revolutionary corporate entity for the protection of those forests, the biological diversity conservation district (biodistricts). The underlying cause of rain forest destruction is unfettered competition for limited resources. The competitors are many: farmers, business, local and national governments, the biotechnology and ecotourism industries, multinational companies, public utilities, and indigenous groups. To varying degrees, all compete within the marketplace. biodistricts will bring together two forces once thought to be antithetical: conservation an development. They will be set up in corporate form, owned and controlled by groups claiming access to the forest resources. Because the various groups will fight for the same resources habitats, ecosystems, and genetic diversity-each will prevent the others from destroying them. The district members will ensure that all businesses maintain sustainable development practices because the economic success of the district depends upon the area`s natural beauty and biological diversity. This paper analyzes the effects on the culture, politics, economy and conservation there. It will conclude that the comprehensive approach taken by biodistricts is the only method for solving the problem of rain forest destruction; that it is economically feasible, culturally viable, and ethically defensible. By March 1, 1995, the paper will represent not only the culmination of eighteen months of research, writing and interviews regarding biological diversity conservation, but also the impetus to push the thinking of environmentalists and business persons in a new direction, perhaps the only direction that will allow the nations of the world to protect their forests for the next twenty years and beyond.

  10. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  11. Effects of Warming on Tree Species’ Recruitment in Deciduous Forests of the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Clark, James S.; Mohan, Jacqueline

    2015-03-25

    Climate change is restructuring forests of the United States, although the details of this restructuring are currently uncertain. Rising temperatures of 2 to 8oC and associated changes in soil moisture will shift the competitive balance between species that compete for light and water, and so change their abilities to produce seed, germinate, grow, and survive. We have used large-scale experiments to determine the effects of warming on the most sensitive stage of species distributions, i.e., recruitment, in mixed deciduous forests in southern New England and in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Two questions organized our research: (1) Might temperate tree species near the “warm” end of their range in the eastern United States decline in abundance during the coming century due to projected warming? and (2) Might trees near the “cool” end of their range in the eastern United States increase in abundance, or extend their range, during the coming 100 years because of projected warming? To explore these questions, we exposed seedlings to air and soil warming experiments in two eastern deciduous forest sites; one at the Harvard Forest (HF) in central Massachusetts, and the other at the Duke Forest (DF) in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. We focused on tree species common to both Harvard and Duke Forests (such as red, black, and white oaks), those near northern range limits (black oak, flowing dogwood, tulip poplar), and those near southern range limits (yellow birch, sugar maple, Virginia pine). At each site, we planted seeds and seedlings in common gardens established in temperature-controlled, open-top chambers. The experimental design was replicated and fully factorial and involved three temperature regimes (ambient, +3oC and +5oC) and two light regimes (closed forest canopy (low light) and gap conditions (high light)). Measured variables included Winter/Spring responses to temperature and mid-Summer responses to low soil moisture. This research will advance our understanding of how the abundances and geographic distributions of several important eastern tree species near the cool and warm ends of their ranges will change during the century because of projected warming. Warming-induced changes in eastern tree abundances and distributions have the potential to affect both the quality and quantity of goods and services provided by eastern forests, and will therefore be of importance to society.

  12. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  13. Archiving data from new survey technologies: Enabling research with high-precision data while preserving participant privacy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Burton, Evan; Murakami, Elaine

    2015-12-29

    Despite the significant effort and expense to collect high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) data in travel surveys, privacy concerns often lead to its underutilization. This paper describes development of the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) to address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy. Furthermore, the TSDC operating structure was developed in consultation with an advisory committee and includes: a secure enclave with no external access for backing up and processing raw data, a publicly accessible website for downloading cleansed data, and a secure portal environment through which approved users can work with detailed spatial data using amore » variety of tools and reference information.« less

  14. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  15. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Jalali, Rakesh; Goswami, Savita; Nair, Vimoj; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  16. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Manning, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States); Moody, John S., E-mail: john.moody@mosescone.com [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued research into bladder preservation strategies and suggest that definitive radiotherapy represents a viable initial treatment strategy for those who wish to attempt to preserve their native bladder.

  17. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  18. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, David Bryan

    2012-08-02

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  19. Consequences of stand age and species functional trait changes on ecosystem water use of forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewers, Brent; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mackay, D. Scott

    2011-07-22

    We tested whether using stomatal conductance could capture the dynamic in transpiration with forest age. To do this we by answered the question If we chose a reference stomatal conductance from one stand age of the entire chronosequence to put into a model, would modeled transpiration be biased from the other ages? with a resounding yes. We found that obtaining the right stomatal conductance was crucial for accurate models in two different chronosequences. This strongly suggests that stomatal conductance is the appropriate integrator of inter- and intra-species change in tree transpiration with forest age. If we had tried to use a single reference canopy stomatal conductance, it would not have been able to capture the variability in transpiration with stand age despite the suggestion that hydraulic limitation was consistently acting on the trees; the situation is even more complex in many boreal systems, where a transition to nonstomatal bryophytes may occur over the course of succession. Because we used a biophysical approach, even if our and other researchers chronosequences do not fit the assumptions, the results are still useful. Further, our synthesis of sap flux based estimates of tree transpiration showing a large dynamic suggest that our approach to modeling is crucial in the face of anthropogenic changes to forest age structure. We have now provided the framework for a mechanistically rigorous yet simple approach based on simple tree hydraulics to measuring and modeling stand transpiration with changing forest age and/or species composition.

  20. TCP Final Report: Measuring the Effects of Stand Age and Soil Drainage on Boreal Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Goulden

    2007-05-02

    This was a 6-year research project in the Canadian boreal forest that focused on using field observations to understand how boreal forest carbon balance changes during recovery from catastrophic forest fire. The project began with two overarching goals: (1) to develop techniques that would all the year round operation of 7 eddy covariance sites in a harsh environment at a much lower cost than had previously been possible, and (2) to use these measurements to determine how carbon balance changes during secondary succession. The project ended in 2006, having accomplished its primary objectives. Key contributions to DOE during the study were: (1) Design, test, and demonstrate a lightweight, fully portable eddy flux system that exploits several economies of scale to allow AmeriFlux-quality measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange at many sites for a large reduction in cost (Goulden et al. 2006). (2) Added seven year-round sites to AmeriFlux, at a relatively low per site cost using the Eddy Covariance Mesonet approach (Goulden et al. 2006). These data are freely available on the AmeriFlux web site. (3) Tested and rejected the conventional wisdom that forests lose large amounts of carbon during the first decade after disturbance, then accumulate large amounts of carbon for {approx}several decades, and then return to steady state in old age. Rather, we found that boreal forests recovers quickly from fire and begins to accumulate carbon within {approx}5 years after disturbance. Additionally, we found no evidence that carbon accumulation declines in old stands (Goulden et al. 2006, Goulden et al. in prep). (4) Tested and rejected claims based on remote sensing observations (for example, Myneni et al 1996 using AVHRR) that regions of boreal forest have changed markedly in the last 20 years. Rather, we assembled a much richer data set than had been used in the past (eddy covariance observations, tree rings, biomass, NPP, AVHRR, and LandSat), which we used to establish that the forests in our study region have remained largely constant over the last 20 years after accounting for the effects of stand age and succession (McMillen et al. in review).