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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 October 1970 research-article Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products A. J. Majumdar Glass fibre reinforced cements and gypsum plaster...discontinuous and irregular. The dispersion of glass fibre in the matrix is not easy. When chopped...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 January 1980 research-article Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion...Ubbelohde G. Manfre The development of glass fibre compositions having sufficient alkali...resistance were used in an initial evaluation of glass compositions, which were then further...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

MECS 2006 - Cement | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Cement More Documents & Publications Cement (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Glass Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)...

4

Glass Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late Bronze Age glasses. Journal of Archaeological Science781 - 789. Turner, W.E.S. 1954 Studies in ancient glassesand glass making processes. Part I: Crucibles and melting

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

China's Cement Production:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

6

Exergy analysis of cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, cement production in Greece has been examined using the exergy analysis methodology. The major goal of the modern cement and concrete production industry is the minimisation of energy costs and environmental effects. The rational management of raw materials and energy requires analytical decision making tools that will provide the necessary information for the identification of possible improvements in the life cycle of a product. The second law of Thermodynamics allows for the evaluation of the irreversibility and the exergetic performance of a process. The analysis involves assessment of energy and exergy input at each stage of the cement production process. The chemical exergy of the reaction is also calculated and taken into consideration. It is found that 50% of the exergy is being lost even though a big amount of waste heat is being recovered.

C. Koroneos; G. Roumbas; N. Moussiopoulos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 1800 years ago a Roman Corbita sunk off the coast of Italy carrying a barrel of glass cullet to the floor of the Adriatic Sea. Samples of glass cullet and the cemented surrounding sediment have been characterized and the reaction between the glass and the sea water saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite has been modeled. Results from characterization and modeling show that the cement phase surrounding the sediment grains is a high-Mg calcite. The origin of the cement phase is likely the reaction between the glass and the sea water to from a Mg-silicate, here modeled as sepiolite.

Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Silvestri, Alberta

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Portland cement mortar modified with latex and fiber glass for thin shell construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with latex and fiber glass as a covering material for thin shell structures. Tests were conducted on various formulations to determine certain physical properties of the modified portland cement. Application techniques were investigated to determine...

Raymond, Jewell Duane

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass Sector (NAICS 3272, 327993) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

14

Influence of poly(acrylic acid) molar mass on the fracture properties of glass polyalkenoate cements based on waste gasifier slags  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The failure behaviour of glass polyalkenoate cements was investigated using a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach. Cements were based on Drayton gasifier slag and four poly(acrylic acid)s...3 to 6.4...

A. Sullivan; R. Hill

15

Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

Columbia University

16

India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Special Cements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the production of expansive cements ettringite formation is used and the most popular ... ’s complex is added to Portland cement. Ettringite structure is discussed.

Wieslaw Kurdowski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

10 - Assessing the environmental impact of conventional and ‘green’ cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: With the current focus on sustainability, it is necessary to evaluate cement’s environmental impact properly, especially when developing new ‘green’ concrete types. Therefore, this chapter investigates the available literature on every process involved during the production of cement and its alternatives. A detailed study of ordinary Portland cement’s environmental impacts is followed by an assessment of improvement potentials which can be achieved with the use of supplementary cementitious materials. Finally, the environmental impacts of alternative binders such as sulfoaluminate or magnesia cements as well as alkali activated binders are studied.

G. Habert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Investigation of benefit of using coal wastes in cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste disposal in coal preparation plants leads to serious environmental problems. These wastes usually contain about 20% carbon, and the composition of the remaining ash is similar to clay. Addition of these wastes to cement clinker raw material utilises carbon as a source of energy. In this investigation, the effect of addition of these waste materials to the raw materials used in cement manufacture is studied. Ordinary type II cement and sulphoaluminate cement may be produced from the wastes. Mechanical strength, chemical and phase analysis, setting time and particle size distribution of the cement were studied. The results of the experiments show that an addition of about 3% of the coal wastes to the raw materials used in cement manufacture produces cements with good quality. Further, energy consumption may be reduced by up to 15%.

A. Sarrafi; M.R. Izadpanah; A. Ebrahimi; A.I. Mansouri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pu Glass Fabrication and Product Consistency Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers testing to support a near term data need regarding glass dissolution performance. Separate task plans will be developed for testing to address the degree of macroscopic cracking and the development of alternative frit formulations. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was identified as a means to provide some of the near term performance data. The PCT is a static test method in which known masses of crushed glass and demineralized water are reacted for a desired duration [1]. There are two reasons to perform the PCT. The first is that the results are used as a measure of acceptance in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications Document (WAPS) [2]. The second is the need for long-term static test results that can be used to verify the applicability of the degradation model. Thus, the primary focus will be on the use of the PCT Method B (PCT-B) to study the formation and stability of colloids and to study alteration phases formed on the glass surface. The standard 7-day PCT in demineralized water (PCT-A) will be included to demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criterion and determine the value of the k{sub E} rate parameter for comparison with the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model [3].

Marra, James

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Technology roadmapping for mature industries: 2010â??2050 global cement product roadmap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of a technology roadmap to create a holistic picture of the movement in a mature industry. Not only does it also help the cement manufacturers in mature and emerging markets, but also balances between market pull and technology push at a commercialised scale. The roadmap concept can assist any organisation to address three key strategic questions: where the company aims to go, where the status quo of the company and how the company will achieve its strategic intent goals. Thus, in this research, we illustrate the evolution of cement product from present to 2050 through the existing industrial literature, analysing forces, trends, impacts and developing a global cement product roadmap. The roadmap covers a wide range of cement products.

Tugrul U. Daim; Nuttavut Intarode

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Abstract: About 1800...

25

Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Evaluation of cement production using a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several primary conclusions which can be reached and used to define research required in establishing the feasibility of using PFBC-derived materials as cement feedstock. 1. With appropriate blending almost any material containing the required cement-making materials can be utilized to manufacture cement. However, extensive blending with multiple materials or the use of ash in relatively small quantities would compromise the worth of this concept. 2. The composition of a potential feedstock must be considered not only with respect to the presence of required materials, but just as significantly, with respect to the presence and concentration of known deleterious materials. 3. The processing costs for rendering the feedstock into an acceptable composition and the energy costs associated with both processing and burning must be considered. It should be noted that the cost of energy to produce cement, expressed as a percentage of the price of the product is higher than for any other major industrial product. Energy consumption is, therefore, a major issue. 4. The need for conformance to environmental regulations has a profound effect on the cement industry since waste materials can neither be discharged to the atmosphere or be shipped to a landfill. 5. Fifth, the need for achieving uniformity in the composition of the cement is critical to controlling its quality. Unfortunately, certain materials in very small concentrations have the capability to affect the rate and extent to which the cementitious compound in portland cement are able to form. Particularly critical are variations in the ash, the sulfur content of the coal or the amount and composition of the stack dust returned to the kiln.

DeLallo, M.; Eshbach, R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

production under ionizing radiation in aluminoborosilicate glasses by EPR spectroscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ti3+ production under ionizing radiation in aluminoborosilicate glasses by EPR spectroscopy. P irradiation of Ti4+ ions in aluminoborosilicate glasses have been studied by EPR spectroscopy at 20 K of the Ti3+ ion EPR spectra has shown three different Ti3+ environment attributed to one [VI] Ti3+ and two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of formation of the zeolitic phase. Therefore, the kinetics of secondary phase formation is an important parameter that should be taken into account in future glass dissolution modeling efforts. Secondly, the results indicate that, in the absence of a gel layer, the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

Denis M. Strachan; James J. Neeway

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B glass and perform testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the proposed Federal Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support glass durability testing via the ASTM Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. This characterization revealed some crystalline PuO{sub 2} inclusions with disk-like morphology present in the as fabricated, quench-cooled glass. A series of PCTs was conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. Filtered leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. The leachate solutions were also ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. Leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to investigate formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. A series of PCTs was conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT (7-day static test with powdered glass) results on the Pu-containing LaBS Frit B glass at SA/V of {approx} 2000 m{sup -1} showed that the glass was very durable with an average normalized elemental release value for boron of 0.013 g/m{sup 2}. This boron release value is {approx} 640X lower than normalized boron release from current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The PCT-B (7, 14, 28 and 56-day, static test with powdered glass) normalized elemental releases were similar to the normalized elemental release values from PCT-A testing, indicating that the LaBS Frit B glass is very durable as measured by the PCT. Normalized plutonium releases were essentially the same within the analytical uncertainty of the ICP-MS methods used to quantify plutonium in the 0.45 {micro}m-filtered leachates and ultra-filtered leachates, indicating that colloidal plutonium species do not form under the PCT conditions used in this study.

Crawford, C; James Marra, J; Ned Bibler, N

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

PRODUCTION OF LOW-ENERGY, 100% BY-PRODUCT CEMENT UTILIZING COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ever-increasing quantity of by-products generated from burning coal in the production of electricity has brought about the need for new areas of utilization. This… (more)

Rust, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH)

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Specialty Cellular Glass Products and Their Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and boroaluminosilicate fields which exhibit a high degree of resistance to corrosion by aggressive chemicals as well. One product, sold as PENNGUARDTM block by Pennwalt Corporation, is used as a liner for chimneys where acid corrosion had previously caused substantial...

Rostoker, D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effectiveness of the top-down nanotechnology in the production of ultrafine cement (~220?nm)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present investigation is dealing with the communition of the cement particle to the ultrafine level (?220 nm) utilizing the bead milling process, which is considered as a top-down nanotechnology. During the grinding of the cement particle, ...

Byung-Wan Jo, Sumit Chakraborty, Ki Heon Kim, Yun Sung Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the coal-dominated energy mix. We note that China’sof final energy consumption and fuel mix of China’s cement

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 abatement using the calcium looping cycle. Energy Environ.the CO 2 captured by the calcium looping system, use of the16. Flow diagram of calcium-looping CO 2 capture and cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of high-heat or pyroprocessing kiln used today is theis decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing (e.g. , ,in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

44

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Resource Saving Technologies in Cement Industry.1:87–94. Blue World Crete. 2012. Technology. Available atOakey. 2009. CO 2 Capture Technologies for Cement Industry.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Production and Decay of Mediæval Stained Glass1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE earliest direct evidence as to the methods of mediaeval glass-painting is contained in the treatise of Theophilusv (“Diversarum Artium Schedula”), which ... half of the twelfth century; here one finds detailed instructions for the making of the glass as well as for its formation into the flat sheets or “tables” in which ...

1907-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT B COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Therefore, the objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit B glass and perform additional testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and for additional performance testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The glass was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. The leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. The leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to identify the formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. Characterization of the glass prior to testing revealed that some undissolved plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The undissolved particles had a disk-like morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar disk-like PuO{sub 2} phases were observed in previous LaBS glass testing at PNNL. In that work, researchers concluded that plutonium formed with this morphology as a result of the leaching process. It was more likely that the presence of the plutonium oxide crystals in the PNNL testing was a result of glass fabrication. A series of PCTs were conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water. The PCT-Method A (PCT-A) was conducted to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT-A test has a strict protocol and is designed to specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of a nuclear waste glass have been consistently controlled during production and, thus, meet the repository acceptance requirements. The PCT-A results on the Pu containing LaBS Frit B glass showed that the glass was very durable with a normalized elemental release value for boron of approximately 0.02 g/L. This boron release value was better than two orders of magnitude better from a boron release standpoint than the current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The boron release value for EA glass is 16.7 g/L.

Marra, J

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

Fred Sabins

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

STABILIZING GLASS BONDED WASTE FORMS CONTAINING FISSION PRODUCTS SEPARATED FROM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model has been developed to represent the stresses developed when a molten, glass-bonded brittle cylinder (used to store nuclear material) is cooled from high temperature to working temperature. Large diameter solid cylinders are formed by heating glass or glass-bonded mixtures (mixed with nuclear waste) to high temperature (915°C). These cylinders must be cooled as the final step in preparing them for storage. Fast cooling time is desirable for production; however, if cooling is too fast, the cylinder can crack into many pieces. To demonstrate the capability of the model, cooling rate cracking data were obtained on small diameter (7.8 cm diameter) glass-only cylinders. The model and experimental data were combined to determine the critical cooling rate which separates the non-cracking stable glass region from the cracked, non-stable glass regime. Although the data have been obtained so far only on small glass-only cylinders, the data and model were used to extrapolate the critical-cooling rates for large diameter ceramic waste form (CWF) cylinders. The extrapolation estimates long term cooling requirements. While a 52-cm diameter cylinder (EBR-II-waste size) can be cooled to 100°C in 70 hours without cracking, a 181.5-cm diameter cylinder (LWR waste size) requires 35 days to cool to 100°C. These cooling times are long enough that verification of these estimates are required so additional experiments are planned on both glass only and CWF material.

Kenneth J. Bateman; Charles W. Solbrig

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

54

Cementation Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contributions vary in quality, but any...solid bed-rock by cementation...sedimentary rocks covered include...strata ofthe rock record...petroleum reservoir in which...microenvironmental permeability alone. Large...cements in sandstones, kinds ofsilicifica-tion...fabrics, porosity development...

GERALD M. FRIEDMAN

1988-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance characteristics of the waste form more predictable/flexible. However, in the future, the glass phase still needs to be accurately characterized to determine the effects of waste loading and additives on the glass structure. Initial investigations show a borosilicate glass phase rich in silica. Second, the normalized concentrations of elements leached from the waste form during static leach testing were all below 0.6 g/L after 28d at 90 C, by the Product Consistency Test (PCT), method B. These normalized concentrations are on par with durable waste glasses such as the Low-Activity Reference Material (LRM) glass. The release rates for the crystalline phases (oxyapatite and powellite) appear to be lower (more durable) than the glass phase based on the relatively low release rates of Mo, Ca, and Ln found in the crystalline phases compared to Na and B that are mainly observed in the glass phase. However, further static leach testing on individual crystalline phases is needed to confirm this statement. Third, Ion irradiation and In situ TEM observations suggest that these crystalline phases (such as oxyapatite, ln-borosilicate, and powellite) in silicate based glass ceramic waste forms exhibit stability to 1000 years at anticipated doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy). This is adequate for the short lived isotopes in the waste, which lead to a maximum cumulative dose of {approx}7 x 10{sup 9} Gy, reached after {approx}100 yrs, beyond which the dose contributions are negligible. The cumulate dose calculations are based on a glass-ceramic at WL = 50 mass%, where the fuel has a burn-up of 51GWd/MTIHM, immobilized after 5 yr decay from reactor discharge.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:and water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing ( e.g. , in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases.

Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V. [Idaho National Laboratory: P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-2110 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improvement of cephalosporin C production by Acremonium chrysogenum M35 in submerged culture with glass beads or silicone rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physical stimulation using a baffle or an impeller has been previously reported to improve cephalosporin C (CPC) production and cell growth. In this study, the effect of glass beads on CPC production in Acremoniu...

Hwan Hyo Lee; Yoon Seok Song; Seung Wook Kim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The proposed fixation of sludge in cement at the Feed Materials Production Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), located near Cincinnati, Ohio, is a government-owned facility. Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio (WMCO) is the prime contractor to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the FMPC. DOE has entered into a Consent Agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to remediate the FMPC site. A project known as the Environmental Remedial Action (ERA) Project was created to accomplish the task of remediating the site. The majority of the estimated $2-billion ERA Project was broken into five smaller manageable subtasks called operable units.'' Each operable unit is handled as a project with its own project manager/engineer. Due to the project's complexity and stringent completion dates, DOE and WMCO have devised a project management philosophy to ensure the successful completion of the ERA Project. This paper will discuss the ERA project and the development needs to accomplish this project. In particular, development of processes for the treatment of waste sludges for Operable Units 1 and 4 will be discussed. Operable Units 2 sludges will be treated in a similar fashion to Operable Unit 1 if it is determined these sludges need treatment. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Gimpel, R.F.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 per system per year. Algae biomass fuels are predicted toalgae oils suitable for manufacture of high-grade plastics, transport fuel,algae are grown at a facility next to the cement plant to be harvested, dried, and then used as fuel

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cardinal Glass Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cardinal Glass Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cardinal Glass Industries Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344 Product: Minnesota-based glass products maker. The...

64

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) are known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the gray rock of Portland, Eng...

O. V. Roussak; H. D. Gesser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) is known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the grey rock of Portland, Engl...

H. D. Gesser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wang, L.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Color Glass Condensate and hadron production in the forward region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider one loop corrections to single inclusive particle production in parton-nucleus scattering at high energies, treating the target nucleus as a Color Glass Condensate. We prove by explicit computation that in the leading log Q^2 approximation, these corrections lead to collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution of the projectile parton distribution and hadron fragmentation functions. At leading logarithmic level, and in single-inclusive cross sections, only two-point functions of Wilson lines in the adjoint and fundamental representations (Mueller's dipoles) arise, which can be obtained from the solution of the JIMWLK equations. The application of our results to forward-rapidity production at RHIC energy shows that, in general, recoil effects are large and that the forward rapidity region at RHIC is rather different from the central region at LHC, despite comparable gluon densities in the target. We show that both the quantum x-evolution of the high-density target as well as the DGLAP Q^2-evolution of the parton distribution and fragmentation functions are clearly seen in the BRAHMS data. This provides additional strong evidence for the Color Glass Condensate at RHIC.

Adrian Dumitru; Arata Hayashigaki; Jamal Jalilian-Marian

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tempered Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... year (NATURE, vol. xxxi. p. 7). It consists in the production of glass which appears to be of a very homogeneous character and of considerable strength and hardness ... which we propose to refer shortly, is that of keeping the whole body of the glass at a uniform temperature during the operations of heating and cooling—that is to say ...

1885-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

71

ITP Glass: Glass Industry Technology Roadmap; April 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Glass is a unique material that has been produced for thousands of years. The glass industry's products are an integral part of the American economy and everyday life. Glass products are used in food and beverage packaging, lighting, communications, etc.

72

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Environmental Advantages. Available at http://www.ceratechinc.com/environmental- advantages.asp Cross, D., J. Stephens, J. Vollmer. 2005. Structural Applications of 100 Percent Fly Ash Concrete. 2005 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), Lexington, Kentucky, USAApril...://recocement.com/ Roskos, C., D. Cross, M. Berry, J. Stephens. 2011. Identification and Verification of Self-Cementing Fly Ash Binders for ?Green? Concrete. 2011 World of Coal Ash (WOCA) Conference ? May 9-12, 2011 in Denver CO, USA. Available at www.flyash.info/2011...

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Borosilicate Microporous Glasses for Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of microporous borosilicate glasses are described. Glasses with an optimum pore distribution are recommended for production and application.

S. L. Zakharov

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

75

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production instantly reaches the current world best practice energyworld best practice and implement aggressive energy efficiency and carbon reduction measures in all cement productionenergy intensity of China’s cement production would reach current world

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Long-term monitoring of microleakage of dental cements by radiochemical diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive /sup 14/C sucrose was found to be an ideal marker for microleakage because it did not penetrate tooth tissue, dental cement, or mounting resin. The main finding is that the adhesive cements--the glass-ionomer and polycarboxylate--are significantly more effective at preventing microleakage than are the traditional phosphate cements--silicate and zinc phosphate. The differences can be as high as two orders of magnitude. The adhesive cements provide almost perfect and reliable seals. By contrast, the nonadhesive cements are erratic sealants with most of the restorations leaking.

Powis, D.R.; Prosser, H.J.; Wilson, A.D.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Problems in squeeze cementing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past half century, work has been carried out to improve squeeze cementing. During the course of time, new techniques, equipment, cement and cement additives were introduced. Work is still underway to improve squeeze cementing. Basic concept of squeeze cementing, understanding the problems, planning for a squeeze job and then later testing of the job help in achieving the goal. Solutions were offered to some common problems, whereas many regional problems need time to time study and effort. Squeezing long perforations in highly permeable sand has always been a problem, for which some techniques were presented.

Toor, I.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. (TNO Inst. of Applied Geoscience (NL)); Breunese, J.N. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands (NL)); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. (Ministry of Oil and Mineral Resources (YE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Two-dimensional computational simulation of eccentric annular cementing displacements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1 etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...in the far field. The narrow...Etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...can expect a cumulative error of size...design in a field setting. Thus...certain heavy oils in porous media......

S. Pelipenko; I. A. Frigaard

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Corrosion behavior of environmental assessment glass in product consistency tests of extended duration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted static dissolution tests to study the corrosion behavior of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, which is the benchmark glass for high-level waste glasses being produced at US Department of Energy facilities. These tests were conducted to evaluate the behavior of the EA glass under the same long-term and accelerated test conditions that are being used to evaluate the corrosion of waste glasses. Tests were conducted at 90 C in a tuff groundwater solution at glass surface area/solution volume (WV) ratios of about 2000 and 20,000 m{sup {minus}1}. The glass dissolved at three distinct dissolution rates in tests conducted at 2000 m{sup {minus}1}. Based on the release of boron, dissolution within the first seven days occurred at a rate of about 0.65 g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). The rate between seven and 70 days decreased to 0.009 g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). An increase in the dissolution rate occurred at longer times after the precipitation of zeolite phases analcime, gmelinite, and an aluminum silicate base. The dissolution rate after phase formation was about 0.18 g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). The formation of the same zeolite alteration phases occurred after about 20 days in tests at 20,000 m{sup {minus}}. The average dissolution rate over the first 20 days was 0.5 g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d) and the rate after phase formation was about 0.20 g/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} d). An intermediate stage with a lower rate was not observed in tests at 20,000 m{sup {minus}1}. The corrosion behavior of EA glass is similar to that observed for other high-level waste glasses reacted under the same test conditions. The dissolution rate of EA glass is higher than that of other high-level waste glasses both in 7-day tests and after alteration phases form.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Tam, S.W.

1998-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Projected radionuclide inventories of DWPF glass from current waste at time of production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the DWPF estimate the inventory of long-lived radionuclides present in the waste glass, and report the values in the Waste Form Qualification Report. In this report, conservative (biased high) estimates of the radionuclide inventory of glass produced from waste currently in the Tank Farm are provided. In most cases, these calculated values compare favorably with actual data. In those cases where the agreement is not good, the values reported here are conservative.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Projected radionuclide inventories of DWPF glass from current waste at time of production. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the DWPF estimate the inventory of long-lived radionuclides present in the waste glass, and report the values in the Waste Form Qualification Report. In this report, conservative (biased high) estimates of the radionuclide inventory of glass produced from waste currently in the Tank Farm are provided. In most cases, these calculated values compare favorably with actual data. In those cases where the agreement is not good, the values reported here are conservative.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Cement (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement Sector (NAICS 327310) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

86

Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

glass jewelry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

various personal adornments decorated with glass or made of glass, beads, finger rings, pendants, necklaces,...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chapter 14 - Glass Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Glass has established itself as an essential material in our lives. The composition of glass depends on what it is used for, but the majority of glass in circulation is of the soda-lime–silicate type. It is a material that is eminently recyclable, in the sense that it merely needs to be remelted and reformed to produce another glass article. However, glass must be color-sorted and processed to remove contaminants to ensure it is compatible with the product being manufactured. The key benefit of recycling via remelting is the reduced energy demand. However, because differences in color composition can arise between recovered glass and manufacturing output, alternative outlets are also often necessary. This chapter examines both the recycling of glass back into glass manufacture and these alternatives.

Thomas D. Dyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor IST Press, 2000 #12;Collaborative Design of... The GLASS the glass chair, but also for the numerous discussions on glass production processes. And last · Carmo Valente Chapter 4. GLASS: BEAUTY WITH STRENGTH Sushil Kumar Mendiratta Chapter 5. The IDEA

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect cement penetration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of carbonation of cement-based products. The process of carbonation and the rate of carbonation penetration... were very important factors that affect rate of...

96

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

99

Photon Interaction Studies with Some Glasses and Building Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass attenuation coefficients of some shielding materials, namely, Bakelite, black cement, white cement, plaster of paris, and concrete were determined at 356-, 511-, 662-, 1173-, and 1332-keV energies, and those of glasses containing oxides of B, Cd, Pb, and Bi were determined only at 662 keV using a narrow beam transmission method. These coefficients of glasses were then used to determine their interaction cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical values. It has been proven that glasses have a potential application as a transparent radiation shielding.

Singh, Harvinder [Guru Nanak Dev University (India); Singh, Kulwant [Guru Nanak Dev University (India); Sharma, Gopi [Guru Nanak Dev University (India); Nathuram, R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India); Sahota, H.S. [Punjabi University (India)

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

silica glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...any amorphous, pale yellow to pale green natural silica glass such as moldavite, Libyan Desert glass, contains nearly 98% silica. RI:...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012) [53] Bystronic Glass, Sashlite, http://www.bystronic-products_architectural_ glass/window_manufacturing/sashline/Production and Quality, Glass Processing Days (2005) 228-

Bergh, Sofie Van Den

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Diffractive vector meson production in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions from the Color Glass Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute cross sections for incoherent and coherent diffractive J/$\\Psi$ and $\\Psi(2S)$ production in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions. The dipole models used in these calculations are obtained by fitting the HERA deep inelastic scattering data and compared with available electron-proton diffraction measurements. We obtain a reasonably good description of the available ALICE data. We find that the normalization of the ultraperipheral cross section has large model dependence, but the rapidity dependence is more tightly constrained.

T. Lappi; H. Mäntysaari

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

106

History and some potentials of oil shale cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

108

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

110

Asahi Glass Co Ltd AGC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd AGC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Asahi Glass Co Ltd (AGC) Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 100-8405 Sector: Efficiency Product: Japanese glass manufacturer; produces cover...

111

Glass balls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a building with 100 floors in it, and glass balls, and an integer k with the following property. If one drops a glass ball from the floor number k or higher, ...

112

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Venetian glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a term used for imitation pearl made of hollow, iridescent glass, which is filled with wax to increase...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

Kinoshita, Hajime, E-mail: h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Carro-Mateo, Beatriz [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain)] [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain); Marchand, Geraldine [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)] [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Collier, Nick [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Milestone, Neil [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)] [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Design of High Viscosity Cement Gun for Vertebroplasty:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure for treating spine. Cement leakage is problem occurring from usage of low viscosity bone cements. High viscosity bone cements… (more)

Gupta, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide an assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 400 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 ..mu..m in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling. Particulate transport mechanisms which appear to be of greatest importance include laminar and turbulent mass transfer, thermophoresis, electrophoresis, and inertial impaction. Chemical reaction mechanisms of particular importance include the deposition of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, spurrite, calcium carbonate, and calcium sulfate. At sufficiently low temperatures, sulfuric acid and water can condense on heat exchanger surfaces which can cause corrosion and also attract particulates in the flow. The deleterious effects of gas-side fouling in cement plants are due to: (1) increased capital costs; (2) increased maintenance costs; (3) loss of production; and (4) energy losses. A conservative order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the cost of gas-side fouling in US cement plants is $0.24 billion annually.

Marner, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in mortars of white cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study white cement CEM I-52.5 and white limestone cement CEM II-LL, A and B, with 15% and 25% limestone substitution, were studied. The way delayed ettringite forms, due to exposure to high temperatures (50 °C) and external sulphate attacks, was examined in the mortar samples. The mortars were immersed at 50 °C for 180 days in: (a) a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and (b) a 5% Na2SO4 solution. During the experiment’s duration, the mortar samples were being observed visually on a regular basis while their expansion was estimated on a weekly basis by measuring the change of length with a micrometer. At the end of the experiment, the mortar samples’ compressive strength was determined and the deterioration products were identified through means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDAX), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Concluding it is evident that the amount of ettringite is proportional to the C3A content of cement. Sulphates amount in cement is the controlling factor for heat induced ettringite formation since when they are consumed the reaction stops. On the other hand in the case of external sulphate attack another important controlling factor is the compressive strength of the cement; the higher compressive strength the lower the risk of expansion. Finally, in the case of external sulphate attack, limestone, when added to cement, was proved to enhance the durability against sulphates attack when compared to a cement of the same class.

M. Katsioti; N. Patsikas; P. Pipilikaki; N. Katsiotis; K. Mikedi; M. Chaniotakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

122

Glass Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Structure and Crystallization of Glasses. By WernerVogel. Pp. 246. (Pergamon: Oxford and New York, October 1971. ... account of the experimental work on liquid-liquid separation and nucleation and crystal growth in glasses carried out by the author and his colleagues in the laboratories of VEB Jena ...

R. W. DOUGLAS

1972-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Optical Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... space of time. In the forefront of such vital industries is the manufacture of optical glass. However great the other resources in men and material may be, it would be ... be, it would be quite impossible to wage successful warfare without adequate supplies of optical glass ior binocular field- ...

1919-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

124

Glass Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... WE have received from the Department of Glass Technology, University of Sheffield, a copy of vol. ii. of “Experimental Researches ... that department. The papers included have already appeared in the Journal of the Society of Glass Technology. They range over a somewhat wide field of the ...

1920-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......these radionuclides in large amounts of waste products used in the cement manufacturing, like phosphogypsum, coal fly ash, shale ash, some rare minerals and so on. Fly ash is obtained from coal-fired power plants and certainly contains......

S. A. Mujahid; A. Rahim; S. Hussain; M. Farooq

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous portland cements Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainability of Concrete Construction Tarun R. Naik, F.ASCE1 Summary: , a greenhouse gas GHG ; production of one ton of portland cement produces about one ton of CO2 and other...

127

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specimens (58-60). The crystalline cement mineral tobermorite...has developed a cement waste form in which a slurry ofcement...additives is mixed with a waste solution. The "grout...Scintific Basr for Nuclear Waste Mangement VIII, vol...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analytical electron microscopy examination of solid reaction products in long-term test of SRL 200 waste glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alteration phases, found on the leached surfaces and present as colloids in the leachates of 200-based frit (fully active and simulated) nuclear waste glass, reacted under static test conditions, at a surface area to leachate volume ratio of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} for 15 days to 728 days, have been examined by analytical electron microscopy. The compositions of the secondary phases were determined using x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and structural analysis was accomplished by electron diffraction. Long-term samples of simulated glass, which had undergone an acceleration of reaction after 182 days, possessed a number of silicate secondary phases, including; smectite (iron silicate and potassium iron alumina-silicate, weeksite (uranium silicate), zeolite (calcium potassium alumino-silicate), tobermorite (calcium silicate), and a pure silica phase. However, uranium silicates and smectite have also been observed in tests, which have not undergone the acceleration of reaction, in both the leachate and leached layer, suggesting that these phases are not responsible for the acceleration of reaction.

Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.; Dietz, N.L.; Bradley, C.R.; Tani, B.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

132

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

133

Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

Chen, Ying-Liang [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Ko, Ming-Sheng [Institute of Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chunghsiao E. Rd., Taipei City 10608, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yi-Chieh [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Chung-Pei Rd., Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Chang, Juu-En, E-mail: juuen@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Glass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

industry sectors. Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis (2007) Documents for historical reference Energy and Environmental Profile of the Glass Industry (2002) Glass Industry...

135

Through a glass darkly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closeup Through a glass darklyThrough a glass darkly James E. Hall Keywords: AKAP2; AQP0;Medicine Closeup Through a glass darkly GLUT1 Glucose

Hall, James E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1 and Vasilis Fthenakis1,2* 1, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass

137

Colored optical glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory manufactures various types of colored optical glasses: yellow, orange, and red glasses and glasses that are transparent in the IR region, as well as...

Mogil’naya, L G; Zinov’eva, O B; Firsova, Yu A; Gulyukin, M N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970's. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Honeck, H.C. (Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970`s. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Honeck, H.C. [Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Forward Hadron Productions in high energy pp collisions from a Monte-Carlo generator for Color Glass Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a Monte-Carlo event generator based on combination of a parton production formula including the effects of parton saturation (called the DHJ formula) and hadronization process due to the Lund string fragmentation model. This event generator is designed for the description of hadron productions at forward rapidities and in a wide transverse momentum range in high-energy proton-proton collisions. We analyze transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons as well as identified particles; pion, kaon, (anti-)proton at RHIC energy, and ultra-forward neutral pion spectra from LHCf experiment. We compare our results to those obtained in other models based on parton-hadron duality and fragmentation functions.

Deng, Wei-Tian; Itakura, Kazunori; Nara, Yasushi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Particle production from the Color Glass Condensate: proton-nucleus collisions in light of the HERA data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions consistently within the CGC framework. The parameters in the calculations are obtained from electron-proton DIS and standard nuclear geometry. We obtain a good description of the DIS data without an anomalous dimension in the initial condition of the BK evolution and get a good agreement with the available single inclusive proton-proton and proton-nucleus data.

T. Lappi; H. Mäntysaari

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANA 99-06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden -- R, The Netherlands e-mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12;Abstract In the production of glass, temperature plays Conclusion 25 2 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

145

A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANA 99­06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden --- R, The Netherlands e­mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12; Abstract In the production of glass, temperature Conclusion 25 2 #12; Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

146

Relationship Between Engineering Properties, Mineralogy, and Microstructure in Cement-Based Hydroceramic Materials Cured at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. I. Introduction CEMENT is universally used in the construction of oil and geothermal wells. Cement

Bentz, Dale P.

147

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Biochemical response of Cupressus sempervirens to cement dust: Yields and chemical composition of its essential oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of cement dust on the yield and chemical composition of the essential oil were investigated in Cupressus sempervirens. Exposure to cement dust resulted in significant increase in the essential oil yields. Significant factory distance-related changes in qualitative and quantitative composition of the essential oil were observed. Increasing pollution with dust increased the content of monoterpene hydrocarbons concomitant to increase of ?-pinene, suggesting a redirection of the secondary metabolism of C. sempervirens towards biosynthesis of monoterpenes. By contrast, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were strongly reduced. These results provide an overall picture of the different response of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to air pollution caused by cement dust. They also reveal the suitability of using C. sempervirens in the creation of green areas around cement factories and encourage the use of dusted plants as potential source of valuable natural products.

Karim Hosni; Imed Hassen; Yacine M’Rabet; Hervé Casabianca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effect of halloysite nanoclay on mechanical properties, thermal behavior and microstructure of cement mortars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have targeted the application of clay in cement composites and declared some enhancement on the properties of concrete. However there is little knowledge on nanoclays and their effect on the mechanical properties and durability of cement composites. Halloysite nanoclay is one of the subcategories of nanoclay that has been undeservedly ignored in the production of cement composites. Chemically, the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes has properties similar to SiO2 while the inner cylinder core is related to Al2O3 which together may improve the cement matrix. In this study the mechanical properties, flowability, thermal behavior and durability of mortars containing 1, 2, 3% halloysite nanoclay were studied. Compressive strength and gas permeability of samples with 3% and 2% nanoclay were improved up to 24% and 56%, respectively. SEM, XRD, DSC tests were carried out to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition change in samples with halloysite nanoclay.

Nima Farzadnia; Abang Abdullah Abang Ali; Ramazan Demirboga; Mohammed Parvez Anwar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Combustion Technology Development for an Advanced Glass Melting System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concept feasibility of an innovative technology for glass production has recently been demonstrated. It is based on suspension heating of the glass-forming batch minerals while entrained in a combustion flow of preheated air and natural gas...

Stickler, D. B.; Westra, L.; Woodroffe, J.; Jeong, K. M.; Donaldson, L. W.

151

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstrationAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement PlantsCement Ltd. also installed waste heat recovery equipment on

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fracture model for cemented aggregates  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A World of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This clear molten liquid began to transform agriculture and horticulture. The use of glass houses to promote the precocious growth...enclosed coaches, watch-glasses, lighthouses, and street lighting. The sextant required glass, and the precision chronometer...

Alan Macfarlane; Gerry Martin

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

A World of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transform agriculture and horticulture. The use of glass houses...appeared. Glass cloches and greenhouses improved the cultivation...lighthouses, and street lighting. The sextant required glass...lanterns, lighthouses, and greenhouses, and finally through cameras...

Alan Macfarlane; Gerry Martin

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

Plastic Flow in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1964 research-article Plastic Flow in Glass D. M. Marsh The classical brittle fracture...account for the mechanical properties of glasses, but the widespread evidence of plastic flow in all glass fracture phenomena even at room temperature...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

157

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plantsquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinkerthere is significant effect of waste heat recovery on dioxin

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics Diverging views on glass transition Gregory B. mc.mckenna@ttu.edu T he glass transition is one of the most intriguing phenomena in the world of soft condensed matter. Despite decades of study, many aspects of the behaviour of glass-forming liquids remain elusive

Weeks, Eric R.

159

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Glass Cookware Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations.

Bourcier, W.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 industrialbandwidth.pdf More Documents &...

165

Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Sulfate impurities from deicing salt and durability of Portland cement mortar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports research on the effects of calcium sulfate in halite on Portland cement durability. Much has been published about sulfate ions causing expansion reactions in Portland cement concrete, on scaling caused by sodium chloride, and the participation of magnesium sulfate in seawater attack. However, little work has been done on the influence of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate solutions as they are found combined in natural halite. Durability studies were conducted using brines containing different amounts of gypsum as an impurity. Damage mechanisms, reaction products and pore structure changes were evaluated. 16 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

Schluter, M.C.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to provide models and parameter values that can be used to calculate the dissolution rates for the different modes of water contact. The analyses were conducted to identify key aspects of the mechanistic model for glass dissolution to be included in the abstracted models used for PA calculations, evaluate how the models can be used to calculate bounding values of the glass dissolution rates under anticipated water contact modes in the disposal. system, and determine model parameter values for the range of potential waste glass compositions and anticipated environmental conditions. The analysis of a bounding rate also considered the effects of the buildup of glass corrosion products in the solution contacting the glass and potential effects of alteration phase formation. Note that application of the models and model parameter values is constrained to the anticipated range of HLW glass compositions and environmental conditions. The effects of processes inherent to exposure to humid air and dripping water were not modeled explicitly. Instead, the impacts of these processes on the degradation rate were taken into account by using empirically measured parameter values. These include the rates at which water sorbs onto the glass, drips onto the glass, and drips off of the glass. The dissolution rates of glasses that were exposed to humid air and dripping water measured in laboratory tests are used to estimate model parameter values for contact by humid air and dripping water in the disposal system.

W. Ebert

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Glass Box offers a unique environment to support research, development and evaluation of software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Glass Box offers a unique environment to support research, development and evaluation of software products used by workers performing real computer- based tasks. The Glass Box instrumentation and to retrieve, store, and share Glass Box data. · Test Bed environment­Glass Box serves as a test bed

169

Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

Adam Buttress; Aled Jones; Sam Kingman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

17 - Immobilisation of Radioactive Waste in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclide immobilisation mechanisms are examined for vitreous wasteforms. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are described in detail, including the ability of cations to enter into the glass network structure. The role of various cations is considered, including boron, intermediates, and modifiers and elements difficult to immobilise. Selection rules for designing nuclear wasteform silicate glasses are outlined. Glass composite materials to immobilise glass-immiscible waste components are discussed. Both one- and two-stage vitrification technologies are described. An overview is given of the development of vitrification technology, including current operational data on radioactive waste vitrification facilities. Calcination processes are considered in detail, including typical properties of waste calcination products. Recent developments in vitrification are given, including descriptions of cold crucible induction-heated melters and in situ vitrification. Limitations caused by radionuclide volatility are examined. Acceptance criteria are given for vitreous wasteforms.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beck, Horace C. 1934 Glass before 1500 BC. Ancient Egypt7 - 21. Cooney, John 1960 Glass sculpture in ancient Egypt.Journal of Glass Studies 2, pp. 10 - 43. 1976 Glass.

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities...

Jang, Se Hoon

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissionsand energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop a novel, zeolite-containing lightweight, high temperature, high pressure geothermal cement, which will provide operators with an easy to use, flexible cementing system that saves time and simplifies logistics.

177

Kevin Glass | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass kglass Primary tabs View(active tab) Track Kevin Glass Staff Member Title: Scientist Address: P.O. Box 999 K8-83 City: Richland State: WA Zip Code: 99352 Phone: (509)...

178

DRAFT Glass.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

179

MECS 2006- Glass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

180

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production Intensity Material kg/m Section Steel Steel Bar Aluminum Cement Glass Gypsum board* Acrylic Rubber -

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

183

Sisal fiber-reinforced cement composite with Portland cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the partial replacement of Portland cement (PC) by combination of metakaolin (MK) and nanoclay (NC) in sisal fiber-reinforced cement composites by studying the microstructure, mechanical behavi...

Jianqiang Wei; Christian Meyer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts Background Sandvik in cemented carbide, high-speed steel and other hard materials such as diamond, cubic boron nitride in cemented carbide inserts will be performed using the FEM software Ansys and AdvantEdge. The work

Haviland, David

185

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5 wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad, Zainal Arifin [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zainal@eng.usm.my; Sakai, Etsuo [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, 2-12-1 Meguro-ku, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fabrication of microfluidics structures on different glasses by simplified imprinting technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imprinting technique is an efficient method for fabricating microstructures for microfluidics and lab-on-chip applications. However such technique is not commonly used for glass based microstructures fabrication. In this study, microstructures were transferred completely and successfully from a nickel alloy stamp to different glasses such as sodalime glass, Pyrex glass, SGBN glass and magneto optical glasses, using imprinting technique. Furthermore, the traditional vacuum hot press for imprinting was replaced with the conventional electric furnace which increases the cost efficiency and simplicity greatly. Using specific mold in the conventional furnace, the mass production of microstructured glass chips can be realized.

Qiuping Chen; Qiuling Chen; Gabriele Maccioni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also probe the texture and extent of anisotropic structures within cement paste at micrometer length...nanocomposites: Concrete, bone, and shale . J Am Ceram Soc 90 : 2677 – 2692 . 19...elasticity of an isotropic aggregate of anisotropic cubic crystals . J Appl Mech 21 : 135...

Roland J.-M. Pellenq; Akihiro Kushima; Rouzbeh Shahsavari; Krystyn J. Van Vliet; Markus J. Buehler; Sidney Yip; Franz-Josef Ulm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

GlassPoint Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GlassPoint Solar Inc GlassPoint Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GlassPoint Solar Inc. Place San Francisco, California Zip 94105 Sector Solar Product San Francisco-based developer and marketer of solar industrial process heat generating equipment for a wide range of industries including enhanced oil recovery, municipal waste water treatment and electrical power generation. References GlassPoint Solar Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. GlassPoint Solar Inc. is a company located in San Francisco, California . References ↑ "GlassPoint Solar Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GlassPoint_Solar_Inc&oldid=345889

195

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Machinery (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Machinery More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Machinery Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS...

197

Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Electronics and Electrical Equipment More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Computer, Electronics and Appliances Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)...

198

GlassMelt&Sealing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

199

Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or “isostructural”), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10?12 to 1012?K/s. Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG™ glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016?Pa?s. Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG™ viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

John C. Mauro; Douglas C. Allan; Marcel Potuzak

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Viscosity Measurements with Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 May 1925 research-article Viscosity Measurements with Glass Vaughan H. Stott Edith Irvine D. Turner The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Richard Serra - Philip Glass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In dieser Arbeit soll den Gemeinsamkeiten im Werk von Richard Serra und Philip Glass nachgegangen werden. Ausgehend von der Analyse von Serras Arbeiten werden die… (more)

Vogl, Christiane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

206

Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immunology Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass R. H. Purcell J. R. Valdesuso W. L...human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific...

R. H. Purcell; J. R. Valdesuso; W. L. Cline; W. D. James; R. M. Chanock

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 23 (1988) 1976-1980 Drying shrinkage of expansive cements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of strength-contributing substances, and formation of potentially deleterious products such as ettringite-type expansive cement is ettringite (C6AS3H32)t. C4A3Sin Type K, CA and C12A7in Type M, and C3A in Type S, are the sources of reactive alumina required for the formation of ettringite. Type K is the most widely used

Mobasher, Barzin

209

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Silica fume 0.2 2.89 3.3 Slag 8 14.2 Sand 150-1180 28.5 55.7 Steel 710-2000...28); 83-01 is made with basaltic sand. tSee (27). tSee (40). (pH 12...cement and 30% 28 days 38 15 11,000 30 21 sand Natura weathering (U.K.) for 36 13...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

211

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

213

Glass-Making  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... director of Messrs. Pilkington Brothers, Ltd., on “The Making of a Sheet of Glass”. Major Weeks first gave a brief outline of some fundamental scientific considerations, with ... the raw materials are introduced at one end of a continuous furnace and the molten glass withdrawn at the other. The various processes necessary for the manufacture of sheet and ...

1933-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Glass Research Association  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... widely known that among the industries which have been profoundly influenced by the war the glass and glassware industry of the United Kingdom occupies a foremost place. Not only have ... certain special sections of this industry, previously non-existent in the country, to supply glass and glassware, ...

EDWARD MEIGH

1919-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Glass for Optical Purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE importance of an adequate supply of optical glass of all the principal types cannot be overestimated. The improvement of the microscope has ... improvement of the microscope has been and is still retarded for the want of suitable glasses, the construction of large telescopes is limited by the capacity of the glassmaker to ...

S. D. CHALMERS

1914-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Glass for Reflectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... "for the 4-foot disc of glass for the Paris reflector, in place of that which has so recently resulted in ... in place of that which has so recently resulted in failure, the St. Gobain Glass Company require twelve months' time to perfect (although, be it remembered, the quality ...

HENRY BESSEMER

1878-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Decorative Glass Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of a number of processes employed for the purpose of producing architectural decorative work in glass. Beginning with an account of the various kinds of ... . Beginning with an account of the various kinds of glass available for such work, and indulging in a retrospect of ...

W. R.

1909-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

Structure of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Introduction of certain cations in soda or potash glass contracts or expands the network proportionally to the concentration, each oxide having its own ... constant over a wide range of compositions. The factors are different for soda and potash glasses, but they remain constant when

I. NÁRAY-SZABÓ

1959-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Notes on Glass1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A CERTAIN amount of experimental work on glass-ware of various kinds has been carried out recently at the National Physical Laboratory, ... known some of the results. Chemical investigations have for some years been dependent on German glass; the publication of the analyses and of test results may, it is hoped, ...

1915-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

The development of a system to optimise production costs around complex electricity tariffs / R. Maneschijn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising South African electricity prices and reduced sales following the 2008 economic recession have led cement manufacturers to seek ways to reduce production costs. Prior… (more)

Maneschijn, Raynard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

Donna Post Guillen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Durability and microstructure characteristics of alkali activated coal bottom ash geopolymer cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have focused on the production of mortar and concrete without cement. This is referred to as geopolymer mortar or concrete. This paper discusses the effect of alkali oxides (Na2O = 8, 12, 16 wt.% and SiO2 = 0, 4, 8, 12 wt.%) on compressive strength, microstructure and durability of circulating fluidized bed combustion coal bottom ash (CBA) geopolymer cements (GC). Durability and morphology tests were carried out through heating and freezing tests. The highest compressive strength (25.83 MPa) was achieved at Na2O wt.% = 12, SiO2 wt.% = 8. The optimum atomic ratios for a compact microstructure were obtained for Si/Al between 3.5 and 4 and Si/Na close to 0.5. Following the sintering, the main reaction products (N-A-S-H gel) became more amorphous at 800 °C, attaining Si/Al and Si/Na atomic ratios of 4.54 and 0.98. Sodium carbonate formation was observed at 800 °C. Also, the strength loss of GC was only 6.77% after 30 freeze-thaw cycles. The results show that durable geopolymer concrete without cement can be produced by using waste bottom coal ash. Therefore, the production of geopolymer concrete has a high environmental impact, decreasing waste material in addition to global warming.

?lker Bekir Topçu; Mehmet U?ur Toprak; Tayfun Uyguno?lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sol-GelGlasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

224

An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage characteristics of solid cement mortar cylinders. Two var1a- tions 1nvolving mechanically induced porosity were also investigated. Rocks, a commonly used sensible heat storage material, were tested to prov1de a reference for the cement... mortar. A numer1cal model, analogous to program available for rock bed storage systems, simulating the cement mortar cylinder storage section was developed. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for use in the model...

Davis, Glenn Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Glass: Recent Research and Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE systematic study of glass and the subject of ... and the subject of glass technology is a field with which the University of Sheffield is particularly associated, Sheffield ...

1956-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

227

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effect of alkalis and sulfates on Portland cement systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effect of the sulfates and alkalis on the durability of Portland cement systems was investigated through a series of cube and prism mixes. Durability… (more)

Halaweh, Mahmoud

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Power Generation by Waste Heat of the Kiln in NingguoPure Low Temperature & Waste Heat in Beijing Cement Ltd. ;flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstration

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Light-Driven Hydrogen Production by Hydrogenases and a Ru-Complex inside a Nanoporous Glass Plate under Aerobic External Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, the scientific community has shown an enormous interest in finding a method to efficiently produce sustainable and renewable hydrogen via light-driven water-splitting reactions, similar to those of natural photosynthesis. ... Experimental methods, table of hydrogen production activity, and figures displaying the characterization of RMH-PGP50s and time evolution of H2 production by RMH-PGP50 with/without irradiation. ... This work further establishes strategies for constructing functional, inexpensive, earth-abundant solar fuel-producing PSI hybrids that use light to rapidly produce hydrogen directly from water. ...

Tomoyasu Noji; Masaharu Kondo; Tetsuro Jin; Tetsuo Yazawa; Hisao Osuka; Yoshiki Higuchi; Mamoru Nango; Shigeru Itoh; Takehisa Dewa

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modelling Glass Parisons R.M.M. Mattheij, K. Wang & H.G. ter Morsche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling Glass Parisons R.M.M. Mattheij, K. Wang & H.G. ter Morsche EMail: mattheij@win.tue.nl Abstract In order to design better glass products, numerical modelling is essential. In this paper we focus, more specifically, on pressing forms, so called parison, appearing in the produc­ tion of packing glass

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

234

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Categorization and Decision Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Programming, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D

Maddox, W. Todd

235

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Designing and constructing, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D., Chotibut, T

Maddox, W. Todd

236

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 (512) 232-2883 e-mail: glass@mail.utexas.edu EDUCATION 2006 ­ Cognitive include: Designing and constructing experiments, statistical #12;Glass, Brian 2 analysis, manuscript

Maddox, W. Todd

237

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry incement and using alternative fuels in the cement kiln. There

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Expanded High-Level Waste Glass Property Data Development: Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two separate test matrices were developed as part if the EM-21 Glass Matrix Crucible Testing. The first matrix, developed using a single component-at-a-time design method and covering glasses of interest primarily to Hanford, is addressed in this data package. This data package includes methods and results from glass fabrication, chemical analysis of glass compositions, viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, canister centerline cooling, product consistency testing, and the toxicity characteristic leach procedure.

Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Lang, Jesse B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Raszewski, F. C.; Peeler, David K.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Best, D. R.; Reamer, Irene A.; Riley, W. T.; Simmons, P. T.; Workman, R. J.

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Solid-state NMR characterisation of transition-metal bearing nuclear waste glasses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Alkali borosilicate glass is used to immobilise high-level radioactive waste generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. However, poorly soluble waste products such as… (more)

Greer, Brandon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Super ionic conductive glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung Abstract Electric polarization induced an increase of the measured electrical resistivity of carbon fiber of the cement paste through the use of carbon fibers that were more crystalline, the increase of the fiber

Chung, Deborah D.L.

242

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production is obtained from proved reserves but the determinants of the scale of production in the industry and country components of the world total are many and complex with some unique to the individual com...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Glass blowing on a wafer level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. Shelby, Introduction to Glass Science and Technology. :Properties of Corning Glasses [Online]. Available: http://1981. [15] R. H. Doremus, Glass Science. New York: Wiley,

Eklund, E. Jesper; Shkel, Andrei M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Solid-phase synthesis of high-alumina cements by high-temperature treatment on the surface of molten cast iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of block and monolithic concreting technology in the construction of thermal power plants together with the technical and economic advantages arising from the use of high-alumina cements in the production of refractory concretes have made the development of new methods for the production of high-alumina cement clinkers mandatory. To this end the authors of this paper study the kinetics of synthesis of such clinkers obtained by their firing on the surface of molten cast iron as the heat transfer agent. Among the results presented are a structural and quantitative analysis of the clinker along with phase and activation energy studies.

Fedorov, N.F.; Gavrilov, A.P.; Ivanov, N.I.; Khalina, O.M.

1986-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257­271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum of the cement formed, the maturation of petroleum in the interbedded shales likely postdates cementation. q 1998 of partially cemented petroleum reservoirs may help in constraining the physical character of a reservoir

251

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements J, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK Abstract The heat of hydration of a number of composite cement systems has of composite cements based on the partial replacement of Portland cement by waste materials has become

Sheffield, University of

252

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

253

Identifying Improvement Potentials in Cement Production with Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Average heat contribution from waste, excluding petcoke, is 18% (4) (see Supporting Information S3 for waste types). ...

Michael Elias Boesch; Stefanie Hellweg

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Unsaturated drip tests on sludge based SRL glass : the effects of prior vapor hydration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a sludge-based Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) waste glasses exposed to as much as 7 years of unsaturated test conditions is reported. This test series included both as-cast glass and glass that had been pre-altered by exposure to 200 C water vapor. Actinides (except neptunium) are retained in alteration products and released primarily as solution-borne colloids and particulate when fresh glass is reacted. Pre-altered glass, however, rapidly releases most elements (including actinides) in a nearly congruent manner when first exposed to dripping water. Normalized boron release from the aged glass is more rapid than that of any other element by an order of magnitude. The response of pre-altered glass, as determined by cumulative boron release, follows a power-law behavior with time, corresponding roughly to t{sup 1/4}. This is consistent with a diffusion transport through clay alteration phases on the glass surface.

Fortner, J. A.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

IRON-PHOSPHATE GLASS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 (Tc-99) can bring a serious environmental threat because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The present work investigated the immobilization of Tc-99 (surrogated by Re) by heat-treating mixtures of an iron-phosphate glass with 1.5 to 6 wt.% KReO{sub 4} at {approx}1000 C. The Re retention in the glass was as high as {approx}1.2 wt. % while the loss of Re by evaporation during melting was {approx}50%. Re was uniformly distributed within the glass. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was {approx}0.39 g/m{sup 2}, comparable with that in phosphate-bonded ceramics and borosilicate glasses. These results suggest that iron-phosphate glass can provide a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; XU K; CHOI J; UM W; HEO J

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

258

Crystalline fragments in glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nature of tetrahedral molecular fragments is investigated in SiSe2 glasses using the molecular-dynamics method. The glass consists of both edge-sharing (ES) and corner-sharing tetrahedra. The ES tetrahedra are the building blocks of chain-like-molecular fragments. The two-edge-sharing tetrahedra are the nucleus, and corner-sharing configurations provide connecting hinges between fragments. Statistics of rings and fragments reveals that threefold and eightfold rings are most abundant, chainlike fragments that are typically 10–15 Å long occur mostly in eightfold rings, and the longest fragments occur in elevenfold rings.

Giomal A. Antonio; Rajiv K. Kalia; Aiichiro Nakano; Priya Vashishta

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

260

Leaching of Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resistance to aqueous corrosion is the most important requirement of glasses designed to immobilize high level radioactive wastes. Obtaining a highly durable nuclear waste glass is complicated by the requirement ...

L. L. Hench

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Americium/curium extraction from a lanthanide borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution containing kilogram quantities of highly radioactive isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) and lanthanide fission products is currently stored in a process tank at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). This tank and its vital support systems are old, subject to deterioration, and prone to possible leakage. For this reason, a program has been initiated to stabilize this material as a lanthanide borosilicate (LBS) glass. The Am/Cm has commercial value and is desired for use by the heavy isotope programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A recovery flowsheet was demonstrated using a curium containing glass to extract the Am/Cm from the glass matrix. The procedure involved grinding the glass to less than 200 mesh and dissolving in concentrated nitric acid at 110 {degrees}C. Under these conditions, the dissolution was essentially 100% after 2 hours except for the insoluble silicon. Using a nonradioactive surrogate, the expected glass dissolution rate during Am/Cm recovery was bracketed by using both static and agitated conditions. The measured rates, 0.0082 and 0.040 g/hr.sq cm, were used to develop a predictive model for the time required to dissolve a spherical glass particle in terms of the glass density, particle size, and measured rate. The calculated dissolution time was in agreement with the experimental observation that the curium glass dissolution was complete in less than 2 hrs.

Rudisill, T.S.; Pareizs, J.M.; Ramsey, W.G.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

263

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the microstructure of C3S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C3S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C3S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C3S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small ‘hollowed-out’ hydration shells were observed in the C3S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

K.O. Kjellsen; B. Lagerblad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the microstructure of C{sub 3}S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C{sub 3}S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C{sub 3}S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C{sub 3}S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small 'hollowed-out' hydration shells were observed in the C{sub 3}S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

Kjellsen, K.O. [Norcem A.S, Heidelberg Cement Group, N-3950 Brevik (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.kjellsen@norcem.no; Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Enabling Tool for Innovative Glass Applications - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting systems in the industrial sector has been limited to applications that are difficult to machine using conventional methods. A major factor for this limited use is the high cost of the garnet abrasive currently used. Initial studies indicated that glass can be processed to produce particles with the desired characteristics at a fraction of the existing price of garnet. Inexpensive abrasive waterjet cutting systems would allow a wider array of glass products to be produced while eliminating many existing design limitations. Availability of low-cost abrasive waterjet cutting media would open new markets for glass applications by making glass a more versatile material. A fundamental goal of this project was to scale up and refine the circuit that was established in the initial phase of this project, which using waste glass as a feed stream, could economically produce glass particles displaying high angularity, sharp edges and a low aspect ratio which would prove suitable for use in abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting systems. Using commercial scale equipment, demonstration runs were conducted at various manufacturers facilities to further establish that waste glass is a viable source for the production of an inexpensive AWJ media for use in cutting glass and a variety of other materials. The glass abrasive produced was used to demonstrate that processed waste glass could serve as a less costly alternative to garnet in many AWJ cutting applications. Studies indicated that glass can be processed to produce particles with the desired characteristics at less than 1% of the existing price of garnet. The waste stream resulting from the use of the glass abrasive in an AWJ system was in turn used as a source for inexpensive fillers in various polymers. The reduced energy requirements needed to produce glass abrasives and lower cost associated with the use of waste glass over garnet, as well as the environmental benefits associated with the recycling of glass waste streams were the primary objectives of this project. The use of the glass abrasive produced in this study did not result in feed rates as high as was expected when used as the media in the cutting of plate glass products. Furthermore, the process and equipment refinements that have been implemented at the PPG and Donnelly facilities since this project was initiated have also served to reduce their energy requirements and in turn the cost associated with the production of sidelites and foiled prisms using conventional means. In addition, further improvements would have to be realized in the cutting of these harder materials before the use of an AWJ system could be viewed as an economically viable means of establishing the perimeter of either product. The possibility of tempering to increase the hardness of the glass media may be one means of achieving this goal.

James M. Gillis

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sources of Weakness in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1964 research-article Sources of Weakness in Glass C. Gurney The theoretical strength of glass is of the order of 2 to 5 MLb./in.$^2$ At room temperature, common glasses with undamaged surfaces give breaking stresses of about...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

268

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

269

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

271

The Color Glass Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

274

Investigation of the formation of a Portland Cement plant detached plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gaseous and particulate-source emissions sampling program was conducted at a Portland Cement production plant in Rapid City, South Dakota. The study was conducted to determine the cause of the formation of an opaque detached plume from the plants' dry process kiln. The instack opacity of the emissions was less than 10% while the opacity of the plume five to ten stack diameters from the mouth of the stack was in excess of 40%, thus giving an appearance of a detached plume. The sampling and analysis program included particulate emissions measurements, particle sizing and composition, and measurements of gaseous and particle ammonia, chloride, fluoride, and sulfur dioxide. Extensive process materials sampling and analysis were also conducted. Based on the resulting data, one conclusion is that the opaque detached plume is the result of ammonium chloride particles formed by the reaction of gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid. It was also found that the ammonia in the cement plant was generated from the shale portion of the raw products when the raw product was passed through the heat exchanger.

Cheney, J.L.; Knapp, K.T.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

Energetic valorization of SRF in dedicated plants and cement kilns and guidelines for application in Greece and Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A debate is still open on issues of waste to energy methodologies aiming to answer to questions of particular relevance, such as whether the concept of SRF/RDF production can be applied directly to MSW through the Mechanical–Biological Treatment (MBT) process, when selective collection acts as a virtual pre-treatment of the same, or if the use of SRF/RDF as alternative fuel in cement kilns is the most sustainable solution. In this study, two scenarios were analyzed and compared: (a) the use of SRF in a new dedicated thermal plant for electricity production and (b) the use of SRF as an alternative fuel in an existing cement plant. The comparative assessment was based on principles of Sustainable Waste Management embracing technical and cost issues, environmental protection, industrial ecology and symbiosis. The application of SWOT analysis showed that the use of SRF in cement kilns is more sustainable compared to its use in a new dedicated plant for electricity production.

M.C. Samolada; A.A. Zabaniotou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Expansion-contraction cycles for cement optimized as a function of additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was carried out to investigate the addition of specific additives to cement in order to eliminate the micro-fractures and micro-annuli that cause gas migration. The experiments performed monitored the change in the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction were observed. This is due to the individual contributions of each part of the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized for the best final cement results. By utilizing the correct amount of Anchorage Clay, XC-Polymer, Ironite Scavenger, Ultrafine cement and Synthetic Rubber powder in a class G mixture at a given temperature and confining pressure, an impermeable cement mixture can be obtained. The correct amount of Synthetic Rubber used for cyclic pressure reduction is a function of cement setting temperature and pressure as well as the elastic properties of the rubber. By using laboratory testing at different pressure and temperature with different rubber concentrations and elastic properties, it is estimated that the entire annulus can have an impermeable cement from surface to total depth. The difference in temperature and pressure with depth dictates the concentration and elastic properties of the rubber as the required expansion and contraction changes with depth.

Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A guide to determining places in the glass-making process where energy can be saved and means by which energy can be saved.

282

Carrying Out and Developing the Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of its obligations under the above-mentioned project, the GMIC performed the following tasks: (1) Provided two-way communications liaison services between the U.S. glass industry and the D.O.E. to ensure the needs and concerns of each party are effectively communicated to the other. (2) Updated and modified on a continuing basis and in response to evolving conditions within the glass industry, the goals and priorities outlined in the Glass Industry Vision and the Glass Technology Roadmap. (3) Established relationships with a wide variety of government and non-governmental organizations with interests in further improving the levels of technology, productivity and environmental responsibility of the glass industry. (4) Canvassed the glass industry on an ongoing basis to determine overall and specific sector needs for technological development. (5) Fostered direct contacts between member companies and national laboratories to facilitate the development of individual company technology development. (6) Advised the DOE on the key elements of the solicitation process in support of the Glass Industry Vision and Technology Roadmap. In the course of this contract, the membership of the GMIC has grown to include over 70% of the glass industry. This gives it the ability to communicate persuasively with the vast majority of this energy intensive industry. One of the principal benefits of the existence of the GMIC is that, for the first time in this country, representative companies of all major sectors of the glass industry are now in regular communication with each other. Prior to the existence and activity of the GMIC, companies and individuals in the flat glass, container glass, fiber glass and specialty glass sectors rarely had contact with each other, in spite of the fact that they all face similar challenges and can benefit from pre-competitive research conducted to the benefit of the broad industry. The development of innovations in the industry under cost-shared DOE/industry research projects such as new melting technologies, sensors and controls, modeling programs, energy efficiency tools, etc. has led to substantial increases in energy efficiency in the industry. Increased energy efficiency results in increased job opportunities in the industry that has been negatively impacted by increases in energy costs, globalization and increased environmental controls.

Michael Greenman

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

284

Characteristics of hemp fabric reinforced nanoclay–cement nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement eco-nanocomposites reinforced with hemp fabric (HF) and nanoclay platelets (Cloisite 30B) are fabricated and investigated in terms of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, physical and mechanical properties. Results indicated that the mechanical properties generally increased as a result of the addition of nanoclay into the cement matrix with HF. An optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement with 1 wt% nanoclay decreased the porosity and also significantly increased the density, flexural strength and fracture toughness of HF-reinforced nanocomposite. The microstructural results indicate that the nanoclay behaves not only as a filler to improve the microstructure, but also as an activator to promote the pozzolanic reaction and thus improved the adhesion with hemp fabric. The failure micromechanisms and energy dissipative processes in HF-reinforced cement composite and HF-reinforced nanocomposite are discussed in terms of microstructural observations. These cement eco-nanocomposites can provide new insights for the development of new ‘environmental-friendly nanomaterials’ for building applications such as the construction of sandwich panels, ceilings and roofs.

A. Hakamy; F.U.A. Shaikh; I.M. Low

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sydney opera house glass walls: Colour measurement and control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the architectural requirements of the tinted laminated glass used in the construction of the Sydney Opera House glass walls was that it should be uniform in colour relative to an initially accepted colour standard. As the glass was manufactured in small batches over a two year period, stringent controls were needed to maintain the necessary colour quality of the laminate. The procedures adopted to check uniformity of colour are described and results are given of colorimetric analyses carried out on the colour standards and the production control specimens. The chromaticity data are interpreted in terms of subjective colour discrimination and are shown to be compatible with visual observations of the glass in situ.

J.A. Hooper; M.P. Wassall

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

Fox, K.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of Phase 2 are to determine the feasibility of using cements with controlled particle size distributions (CPSD cements) in practical concrete applications, and to refine our estimates of the potential energy savings that may ensue from such use. The work in Phase 2 is divided into two main tasks, some parts of which will be carried out simultaneously: Task 1 will continue cement paste studies to optimize cement performance similar to those of Phase 1, but with particular emphasis on gypsum requirements, blended cements, and water-reducing admixtures. This task will also include preparation of sufficient CPSD cements for use in all Phase 2 work. Task 2 will be a comprehensive examination of the properties of concretes made with CPSD cements. This will include optimization of concrete mix designs to obtain the best possible performance for practical applications of both portland and blended cements. The effects of chemical admixtures and curing temperature variations will also be determined.

Helmuth, R.A; Whiting, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 2008 is used as the fuel price in the fuel conservationprices and average fuel prices for Shandong’s cementCurve (FCSC) with average fuel price for the studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Monitoring the ettringite formation in cement paste using low field T2-NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work we study the transverse relaxation time evolution of water molecules confined inside cement paste during the hydration process. The cement paste under study was manufactured with different water-to-cement ratios and using two types of cement: gray cement (CEM I 52.5 R) having a high content of magnetic impurities and white cement (CEM I 52.5 N) with lower amount of magnetic impurities. The two cement types were chosen in order to better distinguish the surface contribution to the relaxation process. On this basis a relationship between porosity evolution ettringite formation and the transverse relaxation time evolution was established. It was also observed that the increase in the water-to-cement ratio better reveals the ettringite formation.

Alexandra Pop; Codruta Badea; Ioan Ardelean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Color Glass Condensate and Glasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I review the Color Glass Condensate theory of gluon saturation, and its application to the early stages of heavy ion collisions.

Francois Gelis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Glass as a structural material.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Glass can be beautiful and strong, so why is it not used more often as a structural material? Most often the reasoning is because people… (more)

White, Rachel Lynn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate cements hydration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements... Transportation & Development and Louisiana State University incorporating...

296

Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Beer-dispensing and direct draw units Glass frosters Deep well and bunker freezers. Open-air units, deli cases, prep tables, drawer cabinets, laboratory-grade products,...

300

Sulfur dioxide oxidation and plume formation at cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of source sampling at the Glens Falls cement kiln in Glens Falls, N.Y., are reported for sulfur oxides, ammonia, hydrochloric acid, oxygen, and moisture content. The origin of a detached, high-opacity, persistent plume originating from the cement kiln stack is investigated. It is proposed that this plume is due to ammonium salts of SOx and sulfuric acid that have been formed in condensed water droplets in the plume by the pseudocatalytic action of ammonia. (1 diagram, 1 graph, 22 references, 7 tables)

Dellinger, B.; Grotecloss, G.; Fortune, C.R.; Cheney, J.L.; Homolya, J.B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Efficient Breach Theory Through the Looking Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Signet 1960).Theory Through the Looking Glass such an award a put by theTheory Through the Looking Glass Consider also the hoary

Adler, Barry E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Immobilization of Chloroperoxidase on Aminopropyl-Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immobilization of Chloroperoxidase on Aminopropyl-Glass Tenshuk A. Kadima Michael A. Pickard...89362 was covalently bound to aminopropyl-glass by using a modification of an established method. Acid-washed glass was derivatized by using aminopropyltriethoxysilane...

Tenshuk A. Kadima; Michael A. Pickard

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retention in Hanford LAW Glass - Phase 1 Final Report. VSL-rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-rayfor NIST SRM 610–617 Glasses Following ISO Guidelines," 35[

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs.

Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of Research Needs Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

306

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Art and Form in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... book. The new edition has been brought up to date, the historical section on glass manufacture now concludes with a brief reference to the float process first announced a year ... a year or so ago and the beautiful collection of photographs illustrating the use of glass in buildings has been changed considerably. Many of the photographs are of things which ...

R. W. DOUGLAS

1962-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

308

New Types of Optical Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN view of the interest shown in new optical glasses recently produced in Great Britain and in the United States, we wish to summarize ... probable lines of development. Advances in lens design have led to a demand for new glasses with optical properties different from those available hitherto as outlined in a recent paper by ...

W. M. HAMPTON; R. E. BASTICK; W. N. WHEAT

1944-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Structure and Density of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SiO2-B2O3 mixed glasses show a linear relation between v and R, which is the number of oxygen ... where the chemical symbols stand for the gram atoms present in a given quantity of glass (for example, 100 gm.) of the respective elements. For SiO2-B2O 3- ...

I. NÁRAY-SZABÓ

1958-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Glass-making in England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... trouble to look through a catalogue of works in English dealing with the subject of glass will be struck with its poverty. For the most part, books on ... will be struck with its poverty. For the most part, books on glass have been written by collectors and admirers of ...

W. E. S. TURNER

1923-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Formation of zirconium metallic glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Bulk metallic glasses are commonly produced by the rapid cooling of liquid alloys. They have emerged over ... a novel class of materials, with attractive properties and technological promise. The bulk metallic glasses so far produced contain three or more component elements. These complex compositions are necessary ...

Jianzhong Zhang; Yusheng Zhao

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Third International Congress on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Third International Congress on Glass was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission ... was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission on Glass, the annual meeting of which was held on July 3. 179 delegates attended from ...

1953-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nanophase Glass Ceramics for Capacitive Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Glass ceramics are candidate dielectric materials for high energy storage capacitors. Since energy density depends primarily on dielectric permittivity and breakdown strength, glass ceramics with… (more)

Rangarajan, Badri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions at 40°C: Implications for a Chemical Affinity-Based Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under...

317

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their...

318

Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

MARIANO VELEZ

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Suspension process for cement synthesis. Final report, November 1986-March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute has initiated a program to develop an advanced gas-fired cement synthesis process which will markedly reduce product processing time, lower maintenance and initial capital costs, minimize alkali sulfate formation, and mitigate greenhouse gaseous emissions compared to conventional cement pyroprocessing technology. In the advanced process, pellets of agglomerated batch enter at the top of a vertical shaft and fall in counterflow with the combustion gases. During this time, which is of order a few seconds and an order of magnitude less than the state-of-the-art kiln process, the pellets heat-up, dry, calcine and are partially clinkered. They land on a fixed bed where clinkering is completed and heat is recovered from the pellets to the counter-flowing combustion air. Energy input to the process is through the direct combustion of natural gas in the clinkering and calcining zones of the shaft. This report describes the work performed in the first phase of the development program. Flow stability, batch agglomeration, and clinkering tests were performed to validate the process concept. An interim economic analysis comparing likely commercial installation options to the state-of-the-art process was made.

Zappa, O.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, Carol M. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Americium/curium extraction from a lanthanide borosilciate glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution containing kilogram quantities of highly radioactive isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) and lanthanide fission products is currently stored in a process tank at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). This tank and its vital support systems are old, subject to deterioration, and prone to possible leakage. For this reason, a program has been initiated to immobilize this material as a lanthanide borosilicate glass for safe long-term storage. The Am/Cm has commercial value and is desired for use by the heavy isotope programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Therefore, a flowsheet was demonstrated using a curium-containing glass to extract these elements from the glass matrix. The method involved grinding the glass to less than 200 mesh and dissolving in concentrated nitric acid at 110{degrees}C. Under these conditions, the dissolution was essentially 100% after 2 hours except for silicon which remained mostly insoluble. Since the actual process conditions at ORNL could not be exactly simulated, the dissolution rate of a surrogate glass was measured using static and agitated conditions to bracket the expected rate. The measured rates, 0.040 to 0.0082 grams/hour-centimeter, were constant which allowed development of a predictive model for the time required to dissolve a glass particle of spherical geometry in terms of the glass density, particle size, and experimentally measured rate. The calculated time required to dissolve an idealized curium glass particle was in agreement with the experimental observation that dissolution was complete in less than 2 hours.

Rudisill, T.S.; Pareizs, J.M.; Ramsey, W.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012 Revised: May 8 for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described on the Drawings and in this Special as required; 5. Constructing the composite pavement on a prepared subgrade, or subbase, without forms. 6

326

Leaching induced concentration profiles in the solid phase of cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the solid phase of portland cement specimens by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry before and after leaching provided elemental profiles within the cement. Releases of potassium were calculated from the solid phase profiles and were compared to releases determined from leachate analyses of potassium and cesium-137. The fraction of potassium released in the leachate was found to correlate closely to that of cesium-137 under varying time and temperature conditions, despite the different manner in which each was originally contained in the cement. Agreement was obtained among potassium releases as determined from the solid, potassium in the leachate and cesium-137 in the leachate. These correlations allowed the use of potassium as an analog for cesium-137 in cement. Profiles of potassium in the solid showed varying degrees of depletion. A specimen, sectioned immediately after leaching for 471 days, showed complete removal of potassium to 9 mm depth from the specimens surface. From 9 mm to the center of the specimen, an apparently linear increase in concentration was observed. Specimens that had been air dried prior to sectioning had profiles that were produced by evaporative transport of dissolved species toward the surface. Carbonation of the surface appears to have retarded migration of the dissolved material. This prevented it from reaching the outer edge and resulted in increased potassium concentrations several mm inside the surface. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

328

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Extension and replacement of aspalt cement with sulphur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deformation were performed on selected combinations of aggregate, asphalt and sulphur. Three different methods of incorpora- ting the mixture ingredients were studied. Based upon results of the screening and characterization tests, relationships between... Selection of Analysis Methods . Selection of Materials Characterization Tests CHAPTER IV. TASK B: DEVELOPMENT OF SULPHUR EXTENDED ASPHALT SYSTEMS Selection of Mixture Composition and Experimental Design Variables . Sulphur Selection Asphalt Cement...

Pickett, Daniel Ernest

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Topological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose and study a model with glassy behavior. The state space of the model is given by all triangulations of a sphere with $n$ nodes, half of which are red and half are blue. Red nodes want to have 5 neighbors while blue ones want 7. Energies of nodes with different numbers of neighbors are supposed to be positive. The dynamics is that of flipping the diagonal of two adjacent triangles, with a temperature dependent probability. We show that this system has an approach to a steady state which is exponentially slow, and show that the stationary state is unordered. We also study the local energy landscape and show that it has the hierarchical structure known from spin glasses. Finally, we show that the evolution can be described as that of a rarefied gas with spontaneous generation of particles and annihilating collisions.

Jean-Pierre Eckmann

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

BUTLER,L.G.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy – Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft® Excel® spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel® spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Numerical investigation of electric heating impacts on solid/liquid glass flow patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A typical glass furnace consists of a combustion space and a melter. Intense heat is generated from the combustion of fuel and air/oxygen in the combustion space. This heat is transferred mainly by radiation to the melter in order to melt sand and cullet (scrap glass) eventually creating glass products. Many furnaces use electric boosters to enhance glass melting and increase productivity. The coupled electric/combustion heat transfer patterns are key to the glass making processes. The understanding of the processes can lead to the improvement of glass quality and furnace efficiency. The effects of electrical boosting on the flow patterns and heat transfer in a glass melter are investigated using a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with addition of an electrical boosting model. The results indicate that the locations and spacing of the electrodes have large impacts on the velocity and temperature distributions in the glass melter. With the same total heat input, the batch shape (which is determined by the overall heat transfer and the batch melting rate) is kept almost the same. This indicates that electric boosting can be used to replace part of heat by combustion. Therefore, temperature is lower in the combustion space and the life of the furnace can be prolonged. The electric booster can also be used to increase productivity without increasing the furnace size.

Chang, S. L.; Zhou, C. Q.; Golchert, B.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of Impurity Extremes in a Plutonium-loaded Borosilicate Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for the disposition of excess weapons-usable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990's. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt % Pu and to be tolerant of a range of impurities. To confirm the results of previous testing with surrogate Pu feeds containing impurities, four glass compositions were selected for fabrication with actual plutonium oxide and impurities. The four compositions represented extremes in impurity type and concentration. The homogeneity and durability of these four compositions were measured. The homogeneity of the glasses was evaluated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The XRD results indicated that the glasses were amorphous with no evidence of crystalline species in the glass. The SEM/EDS analyses did show the presence of some undissolved PuO{sub 2} material. The EDS spectra indicated that some of the PuO{sub 2} crystals also contained hafnium oxide. The SEM/EDS analyses showed that there were no heterogeneities in the glass due to the feed impurities. The durability of the glasses was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT results indicated that the durability of Pu impurity glasses was comparable with Pu glasses without impurities and significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used as the benchmark for repository disposition of high-level waste (HLW) glasses. (authors)

Fox, K.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Marra, J.C.; Bibler, N.E.; Hoffman, E.N.; Edwards, T.B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuel oil is used in the glass industry (less than 2 percent of total energy). Natural gas is usually the fuel of choice as it is cleaner and in some cases, more cost-effective,...

339

Elaboration And Characterization Of Foam Glass Based On Cullet With Addition Of Soluble Silicates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The politics of the energy saving and of the acoustic comfort buildings is at the heart of the research of new compounds permitting to improve the materials performance actually commercialised. With this aim in view, we'll purpose to elaborate a porous material (foam glass) with addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) of which the principal material is the waste glass in order to recycle it and improving the present laws about the waste products in closed circuit: (Finished products (leftarrow) waste products (leftarrow) finished products). The investigations have shown that grinding waste glass to particle size less than 0.1 mm and adding 1% of Ca CO{sub 3} content provide production of material with the following properties: particle density 0,5 g/cm{sup 3}, strength 17,50 MPa and water adsorption 95%, the temperature for foaming ranges were determined at 850 deg. C. The microstructures are homogenous, with pore sizes up to 2 mm. The addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) has resulted in the foam glass of very high porosity. The foam glass is counted among the new glass products meeting certain requirements sought comfort in the building industry in particular (thermal and acoustic insulation). The product obtained present of excellent properties thermal ({lambda} = 0,031 W/m deg. C) and acoustic (R = 15 dB).

Ayadi, A.; Stiti, N.; Benhaoua, F.; Boumchedda, K.; Lerari, Y. [Laboratory of mineral materials and composite, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, University of Boumerdes (Algeria)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination identifying castable molds for

Allan, Shawn M.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 ���°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination id

Allan, Shawn M.; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) where the glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Experimental glass melters used to develop the vitrification process for immobilization of the waste have experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. Off-gas deposits from the DWPF 1/2 Scale Glass Melter (SGM) and the 1/10th scale Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, spinel, and frit particles. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cement the entrained particulates causing off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggage indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. Scale glass melter operating experience indicates that a velocity of >50 fps is necessary in order to transport the volatile species to the quencher to prevent having condensation occur in the off-gas line. Hotter off-gas line temperatures would retain the alkali compounds as vapors so that they would remain volatile until they reach the quencher. However, hotter off-gas temperatures can only be achieved by using less air/steam flow at the off-gas entrance, e.g. at the off-gas film cooler (OGFC). This would result in lower off-gas velocities. Maintaining a high velocity is, therefore, considered to be a more important criterion for controlling off-gas pluggage than temperature control. 40 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg EDCE Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1 ENAC/EDCE 2011In contemporary architecture glass is increasinglyIn contemporary architecture glass is increasingly applied for structural components such as beamsapplied for structural components such as beams. However glass

344

Microporous glasses for reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The preparation, heat-treatment and leaching of phase separable borosilicate glasses which are of interest as possible semipermeable membranes for reverse osmosis applications are described. It is shown that ... ...

P. W. McMillan; C. E. Matthews

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Viscosity Measurements in Molten Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relations existing between viscosity determinations and the various stages of glass manufacture are pointed out and explained with reference to a typical viscosity?temperature curve. The rotation viscometer employed in making such determinations is described. Curves are shown for four representative types of glasses: a lead a lime a lead borosilicate and a hard borosilicate and the use to which such comparison curves may be put is indicated.

Howard R. Lillie

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

Elsholz, William E. (Acampo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Coupled Nanoindentation/SEM-EDS Study on Low Water/Cement Ratio Portland Cement Paste: Evidence for C-S-H/Ca(OH)[subscript 2] Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low water/cement ratio (w/c=0.20) hydrated Portland cement paste was analyzed by grid-indentation coupled with ex situ scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (SEM-EDS) analysis at each indentation ...

Chen, Jeffrey J.

348

INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

67006 67006 INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS FINAL REPORT FY 1999 M.L. Allan and A.J. Philippacopoulos November 1999 Prepared for: Office of Geothermal Technologies United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Materials and Chemical Sciences Division DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agenc:y of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makers any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

349

Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of components from drip tests with ATM-10 glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste package assemblies consisting of actinide-doped West Valley ATM-10 reference glass and sensitized 304L stainless steel have been reacted with simulated repository groundwater using the Unsaturated Test Method. Analyses of surface corrosion and reaction products resulting from tests that were terminated at scheduled intervals between 13 and 52 weeks are reported. Analyses reveal complex interactions between the groundwater, the sensitized stainless steel waste form holder, and the glass. Alteration phases form that consist mainly of smectite clay, brockite, and an amorphous thorium iron titanium silicate, the latter two incorporating thorium, uranium, and possibly transuranics. The results from the terminated tests, combined with data from tests that are still ongoing, will help determine the suitability of glass waste forms in the proposed high-level repository at the Yucca Mountain Site.

Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we make use of a micro-continuum modeling approach (the Kinetic-Microscopic-Continuum Model or K{micro}C model) to capture the spatial distribution and identity of reaction products developing over time as a result of the archaeological glass corrosion, while also matching the time scales of alteration where possible. Since the glass blocks sat on the Mediterranean seafloor for 1800 years, the physical and chemical boundary conditions are largely constant. We focus on a fracture within the glass block identified by Verney-Carron et al. (2008) and simulate it as a 1D system, with a fixed concentration (Dirichlet) boundary corresponding to the interior of the fracture.

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

The effect of regimes and methods of glass forming on the tin content in float glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the tin content in glass is derived as a function of the iron oxidecontent in the glass composition, regimes and methods of forming, ... The ways of reducing the tin content in glass in the cour...

V. I. Kondrashov; V. S. Bezlyudnaya; Yu. V. Zverev

354

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

355

The impact of cement parameters on Delayed Ettringite Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) in concrete is likely to lead to swelling and cracking in structures which have undergone early age heating to a temperature of over 65 °C. Application of a method that accelerates this process has made it possible to study the impact of cement properties on DEF. For two temperatures reached by the concrete (75 °C or 85 °C), the study considers a domain defined by the sulphate content [2.6–3.6%], the alkali content [0.5–1%] and the Blaine specific area [3330–4635 cm2/g] of the cement. The impact of these parameters and the interactions between them on swelling are discussed. Monitoring of the dynamic elastic modulus of the concretes shows that this property may be reduced by DEF, but that it may increase again once the swelling process has ceased, probably due to the gradual filling of voids by ettringite formed under conditions of limited supersaturation.

A. Pavoine; X. Brunetaud; L. Divet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

357

Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hard x-ray nanotomography of amorphous aluminosilicate cements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotomographic reconstruction of a sample of low-CO{sub 2} 'geopolymer' cement provides the first three-dimensional view of the pore structure of the aluminosilicate geopolymer gel, as well as evidence for direct binding of geopolymer gel onto unreacted fly ash precursor particles. This is central to understanding and optimizing the durability of concretes made using this new class of binder, and demonstrates the value of nanotomography in providing a three-dimensional view of nanoporous inorganic materials.

Provis, J. L.; Rose, V.; Winarski, R. P.; van Deventer, J. S. J. (Advanced Photon Source); ( CNM)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Exponential coefficient plots for identifying cement channels from temperature logs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One technique for identifying a cement channel in such a well is to inject cold water or diesel fuel for a period of time, followed by recording shut-in temperature profiles after the injection ceases. Qualitative judgements are made from the appearance of these profiles in order to confirm the existence of a channel. Alternatively, by processing the temperature logs mathematically, an exponential coefficient may be calculated and plotted against depth. This exponential coefficient plot is very responsive to the presence of cold fluid in a cement channel, and confirms a channel's existence quantitatively and conclusively. This paper discusses use of such a mathematical relationship in a predictive fashion for identifying injection zones. Methods are given for deriving and plotting the exponential coefficients from temperature logs of a well placed on cold fluid injection. Three examples are presented on the application of exponential coefficient plots to actual field logs for confirmation of suspected channels and for assessment of the uniformity of cement bonding.

Barnette, J.C.; Lanuke, E.W.; Carlson, N.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental...

363

A radiochemical study of the mechanism of polishing glass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In an effort to determine whether glass flows when polished uranium glasses were fused to non uranium glasses and polishings carried out in a direction… (more)

Smith, John Graham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Optically transparent glass with vertically alignedcomposition of biosoluble glass fiber” Korean ApplicationS. Jin, “Optically Transparent Glass with Vertically Aligned

Kim, Jin Yeol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a fractured Roman glass. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta,Santarini (2008). SON68 nuclear glass dissolution kinetics:B. (2006). Nuclear waste glasses – How durable? Elements, 2,

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Small Glass-Melting Furnaces for Clear, Tinted, and Specialized Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the design and application areas of small-sized glass-melting furnaces for melting various-purpose glasses are supplied.

A. A. Dymov; V. A. Fedorova

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The rate of mucus production by corals and its assimilation by the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overall mucus production results in about 51 mg of particulate ... production in relation .to environmcn tal .... from a rubber bulb attached to a glass tube.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

Multiple reentrant glass transitions in confined hard-sphere glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass forming liquids exhibit a rich phenomenology upon confinement. This is often related to the effects arising from wall-fluid interactions. Here we focus on the interesting limit where the separation of the confining walls becomes of the order of a few particle diameters. For a moderately polydisperse, densely packed hard-sphere fluid confined between two smooth hard walls, we show via event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the emergence of a multiple reentrant glass transition scenario upon a variation of the wall separation. Using thermodynamic relations, this reentrant phenomenon is shown to persist also under constant chemical potential. This allows straightforward experimental investigation and opens the way to a variety of applications in micro- and nanotechnology, where channel dimensions are comparable to the size of the contained particles. The results are in-line with theoretical predictions obtained by a combination of density functional theory and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition.

S. Mandal; S. Lang; M. Gross; M. Oettel; D. Raabe; T. Franosch; F. Varnik

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study of cementing practices applied to the shallow casing in offshore wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Survey information shows annular gas flow associated with cementing defects to be a major problem in shallow casing strings offshore as well as in other cemented strings in oil and gas wells. The gas flow hazard to safety, environment, and economics could be reduced by an aggressive program keyed to prevent gas migration. The program components are: (1) historical data base; (2) training; (3) research of cement hydration in a long, thin column; and (4) development of logging-surveillance devices.

Martinez, J.; McDonald, W.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

'The Overriding Demand for Energy Conservation in the Cement Industry' An Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and argillaceous materials such as limestone and clay or shale into an intermediate fused material called clinker, which is subse quently ground together with a small amount of gypsum. Portland cement is the principal material produced by the U. S. cement..., energy con sumption pe r ton of cement produced dropped overall by 10 percent, despite considerably higher electric power requirements for pollution control and coal-handling facilities. It is significant that the industry has rapidly con verted its...

Spellman, L. U.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Formation of ettringite in Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates at lower temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To explore the formation of ettringite at lower temperatures in the Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates, the effect of calcium sulfate variety on the setting time of the ternary system and the strength development of its mortars at 0, 5, 10 and 20 °C were investigated. The formation of ettringite was further analyzed using XRD and ESEM. The results show that, as temperature increases, both initial and final setting time are shortened and that compressive and flexural strength are enhanced. In particular, mortars with anhydrite develop higher strength between 0 and 10 °C but lower strength at 20 °C than those with hemihydrate. Further, pastes with anhydrite set faster than those with hemihydrate. It is also found that both the formation rate and amount of ettringite are sensitive to temperature and calcium sulfate variety.

Linglin Xu; Peiming Wang; Guofang Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyᚠet al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - african portland cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ex... materials produced in rotary kilns are portland cement, quicklime and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate... is discussed later in this report as a concern when using...

375

Identifying demand market participation opportunities available in cement plants / Izak Daniël Krüger.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??South African cement manufacturers are under financial pressure. Sales have declined due to the 2008 recession and electricity costs have tripled from 2005 to 2012.… (more)

Krüger, Izak Daniël

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash blended cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CLSM mixture utilized... . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... investigation. Two additional ash ......

377

Characterization of cement from a well at Teapot Dome Oil Field: Implications for geological sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wellbores represent the weakest link in terms of CO2 storage permanence. As a result, special attention to the numerous existing wells that perforate storage formations is needed. The pre-injection condition of the cement can influence the rate (and type) of alteration by the injected CO2 plume. The condition of the existing well cement depends on a variety of factors including wellbore/formation and wellbore/brine interactions as well as the composition and type of cement placed in the well (i.e. type of admixtures used, water/solids ratio, sulfate resistant mixes, etc.). In this paper, the details of recovering wellbore cement from an older well to determine pre-injection seal integrity are described. Petrographical and chemical analyses are presented for samples of cement that were retrieved from a 19-year-old well at Teapot Dome in Wyoming. Examination revealed that the retrieved cement had altered as a result of original slurry composition and with respect to the local downhole wellbore environment. Although samples were obtained from a single well, significant differences were observed in their alteration and condition. Sulfate attack resulted in abundant ettringite formation in a cement sample taken adjacent to the Wall Creek sandstone (3060 ft), while cement taken adjacent to the Tensleep formation (5478 ft) was decalcified and enriched in magnesium, owing to reaction of calcium hydroxide in the cement with the dolomitic formation.

George W. Scherer; Barbara Kutchko; Niels Thaulow; Andrew Duguid; Bryant Mook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azure. Alternative Fuel Use in the Cement Sector in ShandongAlternative fuels ..6 Resource potential for alternative fuel use in Shandong

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development waste heat recovery World Wide FundTaishan Cement Works Waste Heat Recovery and Utilisation forPlant’s Low Temperature Waste Heat Power Generation Project.

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report of cement industry waste heat power generation. ChinaWorrell et al. , 2001). Waste heat recovery (WHR) poweradoption and utilization of waste heat recovery (WHR) power

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of {sup 1}H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The 'Solid-liquid' separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C-S-H gel. {sup 1}H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C-S-H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

Bortolotti, Villiam, E-mail: villiam.bortolotti@unibo.it [Department DICAM, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, 40131, Bologna (Italy); Fantazzini, Paola [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Mongiorgi, Romano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Sauro, Salvatore [Department of Dental Biomaterials Science Kings College, London Dental Institute at Guy's, King's College and St Thomas' Hospitals, Floor 17 Guy's Tower, Guys Hospital, London Bridge, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, University of Granada, Colegio Maximo, Campus de Cartuja, Granada (Spain); Zanna, Silvano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers 7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers June 17, 2011 - 5:41pm Addthis Check out a short animation of a 3D plasmon ruler as it delivers optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein and read more below. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The discovery of a new property of glass offers new insight into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which are in products such as anti-theft tags and power transformers. A new ruler could help provide scientists with unprecedented details into a variety of biological events, including the interaction between DNA and enzymes, protein folding and cell membrane vibrations.

385

Crystallization of niobium germanosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Niobium germanosilicate glasses are potential candidates for the fabrication of transparent glass ceramics with interesting non-linear optical properties. A series of glasses in the (Ge,Si)O{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-K{sub 2}O system were prepared by melting and casting and their characteristic temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis. Progressive replacement of GeO{sub 2} by SiO{sub 2} improved the thermal stability of the glasses. Depending on the composition and the crystallization heat-treatment, different nanocrystalline phases-KNbSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, K{sub 3}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 13} and K{sub 3.8}Nb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 20.4} could be obtained. The identification and characterization of these phases were performed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The 40 GeO{sub 2}-10 SiO{sub 2}-25 Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-25 K{sub 2}O (mol%) composition presented the higher ability for volume crystallization and its nucleation temperature was determined by the Marotta's method. An activation energy for crystal growth of {approx}529 kJ/mol and a nucleation rate of 9.7x10{sup 18} m{sup -3} s{sup -1} was obtained, for this composition. Transparent glass ceramics with a crystalline volume fraction of {approx}57% were obtained after a 2 h heat-treatment at the nucleation temperature, with crystallite sizes of {approx}20 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy. - Abstract: TEM image and XRD pattern of the glass ceramic produced (circles indicate nanocrystals).

Santos, Rodrigo [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, Luis F., E-mail: luis.santos@ist.utl.p [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, Rui M. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Deubener, Joachim [Institute of Non-Metallic Materials, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wondraczek, Lothar [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic timescales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models be validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year-long PUF experiment was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year-long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 day) based on B release for low-activity waste glass LAWA44. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by four orders of magnitude) and suggests that the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic conditions.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Glass Transition in Confined Geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending mode-coupling theory, we elaborate a microscopic theory for the glass transition of liquids confined between two parallel flat hard walls. The theory contains the standard MCT equations in bulk and in two dimensions as limiting cases and requires as input solely the equilibrium density profile and the structure factors of the fluid in confinement. We evaluate the phase diagram as a function of the distance of the plates for the case of a hard sphere fluid and obtain an oscillatory behavior of the glass transtion line as a result of the structural changes related to layering.

Simon Lang; Vitalie Botan; Martin Oettel; David Hajnal; Thomas Franosch; Rolf Schilling

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. Buchenau...transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of...Supplement No. 126, 1997 Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. BUCHENAU......

U. Buchenau

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological...

Arcak, Cory

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

Behavior of cement mortars containing an industrial waste from aluminium refining: Stability in Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and chemical interaction between a solid industrial waste from aluminium refining and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution, as well as the effects of substituting siliceous sand for the waste on the physical and mechanical properties of mortars were studied. The waste is a solid that contains reactive alumina capable of combining with the calcium hydroxide. These reactions result in stable and insoluble compounds. This alumina, together with the halite (also present in the waste composition), chemically react with a saturated solution of Ca(OH){sub 2}, giving as a main reaction product the so-called Friedel's salt (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}O{sub 6} {center{underscore}dot} 10 H{sub 2}O). Straetlingite and Si-hydrogarnets were among other products detected. The waste has a high specific surface area. The cement/waste mixtures therefore require a higher quantity of mixing water than cement/sand mixtures. The result is a decrease of the mechanical strengths and an increase of the total porosity. However, a decrease of the average size of the pores occurs, which can have a positive effect on the durability of the final material.

Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Vazquez, T.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Muller and L. B. Ioffe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Mu¨ller and L. B. Ioffe Department December 2004) We establish the connection between the presence of a glass phase and the appearance correlations in a systematic way, we show that in the case of strong disorder a continuous glass transition

Müller, Markus

393

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. , 1990. “Utilisation of Waste Heat from the Cement RotaryAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”a roller mill. Utilizing waste heat from the kiln exhaust,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Classification of oxide glasses: A polarizability approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classification of binary oxide glasses has been proposed taking into account the values obtained on their refractive index-based oxide ion polarizability {alpha}{sub O2-}(n{sub 0}), optical basicity {lambda}(n{sub 0}), metallization criterion M(n{sub 0}), interaction parameter A(n{sub 0}), and ion's effective charges as well as O1s and metal binding energies determined by XPS. Four groups of oxide glasses have been established: glasses formed by two glass-forming acidic oxides; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic oxide and modifier's basic oxide; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic and conditional glass-forming basic oxide; glasses formed by two basic oxides. The role of electronic ion polarizability in chemical bonding of oxide glasses has been also estimated. Good agreement has been found with the previous results concerning classification of simple oxides. The results obtained probably provide good basis for prediction of type of bonding in oxide glasses on the basis of refractive index as well as for prediction of new nonlinear optical materials.

Dimitrov, Vesselin [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, The Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata-ken 940-2188 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@chem.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

On the Strength and Structure of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article On the Strength and Structure of Glass J. E. Gordon D. M. Marsh Margaret E. M. L. Parratt The strength of glass is known to be very variable and also...been revealed on the surface of drawn glasses. These crack systems are correlated...

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Monte Carlo Simulation of Isopentane Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Monte Carlo Simulation of Isopentane Glass S. Yashonath C. N. R. Rao Monte Carlo...quenching the liquid, we have obtained the glass-transition temperature from the temperature...distribution functions suggest a structure of the glass primarily influenced by geometrical factors...

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Service/Product Provider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I I I n n s s t t r r u u c c t t i i o o n n s s f f o o r r A A p p p p l l y y i i n n g g f f o o r r t t h h e e E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S T T A A R R ® ® P P l l a a n n t t C C e e r r t t i i f f i i c c a a t t i i o o n n Background Select manufacturing plants located within the U.S. and its territories are eligible to receive ENERGY STAR certification from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when they score within the top quartile of energy performance. Industrial plants that are eligible include: Auto Assembly Plants Cement Manufacturing Plants Cookie and Cracker Baking Plants Container Glass Manufacturing Plants Flat Glass Manufacturing Plants Frozen Fried Potato Processing Plants Integrated Paper Mills Juice Processing Plants Petroleum Refineries (Solomon-EII(tm) scoring system)

400

Identifying the Bose glass phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introducing disorder into the Bose-Hubbard model at integer fillings leads to a Bose glass phase, along with the Mott insulator and superfluid phases. We suggest a new order parameter: the determinant of the one body density matrix, which is nonzero only within the Mott-insulator phase. Alongside the superfluid fraction, it is then possible to distinguish the three phases. The Bose glass phase is the only phase which has vanishing determinant and superfluid fraction. The vanishing of the determinant in the Bose glass phase occurs due to the partial fragmentation of the condensate into localized fragments, each with zero superfluid response, which implies the presence of unoccupied sites and hence the presence of lines of zeros in the one body density matrix. In the superfluid phase, the determinant vanish for another reason - due to the macroscopic occupation of a single particle state. Finally, we suggest the enhancement of the three body decay rate in the Bose glass phase, as an experimental indicator for the presence of localized fragments.

R. Pugatch; N. Bar-gill; N. Katz; E. Rowen; N. Davidson

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Glass-ceramic material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Control technology assessment of hazardous-waste-disposal operations in chemicals manufacturing: in-depth survey report of San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico, November 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A visit was made to the San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico to evaluate control methods for a storage and delivery system for hazardous wastes used in a demonstration project as a supplemental fuel for cofiring a cement kiln. Analysis of the material during the visit revealed the presence of methylene chloride, carbon-tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, hexane, ethanol, and ethyl acetate. Steel storage tanks were placed on an impermeable concrete slab surrounded by a sealed retaining wall. Steel piping with all welded joints carried the waste fuels from storage tanks to the kiln, where fuels were injected through a specially fabricated burner. Vapor emissions were suppressed by venting the displaced vapor through a recycle line. Exhaust gases from the kiln passed through a bag house type dust collector, and were vented to the atmosphere through a single stack. Half-mask air-purifying respirators were used when in the hazardous-waste storage/delivery area. Neoprene gloves were used when performing tasks with potential skin contact. Hard hats, safety glasses, and safety boots were all worn. The author concludes that the control methods used seemed effective in suppressing vapor emissions.

Crandall, M.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227­256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum-feldspars recovered at various depths from a deep well drilled through a carbonate-cemented sandstone petroleum of a sandstone petroleum xreservoir, Elk Hills, California. Part 2: In situ oxygen and carbon isotopic results

404

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone, UK North Sea A. M (Received 15 June 1998; revised 11 February 1999) ABSTRACT: In the Miller Field, diagenetic quartz abundance: quartz cementation, Miller deep water sandstone, North Sea, diagenetic quartz. The Miller Field

Haszeldine, Stuart

405

Carbon 39 (2001) 19952001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon 39 (2001) 1995­2001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement *Yunsheng Xu, D-treated carbon fibers and silane-treated silica fume, relative to the values for cement paste with as-received carbon fibers and as-received silica fume. Silane treatment of fibers and silica fume contributed about

Chung, Deborah D.L.

406

Corrosion of Metals in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi*, J. Hill and N. B. Milestone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastes (ILW) in the UK. Cements are used because they are economic, durable and have long-term stability and assess whether the corrosion has any effects on cement durability over extended storage. Background Steel by carbonation. However, in waste encapsulation processes this is not the case as the grouts are enclosed

Sheffield, University of

407

Sr radionuclide in cement: An atomistic modeling study Mostafa Youssef a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Available online xxxx Keywords: Molecular simulation Cement Nuclear waste storage Mechanical properties a b the interaction of each radionuclide with the cement matrix. Understanding on a fundamental level the long-term s t r a c t Cementitious materials are considered to be a waste form for the ultimate disposal

Yildiz, Bilge

408

Improved cement quality and grinding efficiency by means of closed mill circuit modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grinding of clinker is the last and most energy-consuming stage of the cement manufacturing process, drawing on average 40% of the total energy required to produce one ton of cement. During this stage, the clinker particles are substantially reduced...

Mejeoumov, Gleb Gennadievich

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transient Model for Behavior of Mercury in Portland Cement Kilns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Bituminous coals (median value of 0.1 ?g/g) typically contain more mercury than petcoke (0.05 ?g/g median) or tires (0.04 ?g/g median), although the range of fuel mercury content is broad. ... Figure 2. Cumulative distribution of mercury in bituminous coal, petcoke, and tires fired at coal-fired power plants(2) and limestone input to cement kilns. ... The kiln used coal and petcoke as primary fuels, while tires were burned in the precalciner. ...

Constance Senior; Christopher J. Montgomery; Adel Sarofim

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

Kruger, A.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were not successful in preventing the formation of iron titanate crystals in the KT09-series glasses. Increased K{sub 2}O concentrations were successful in hindering the formation of iron titanates in some of the glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. However, this result did not apply to all of the CCC versions of the glasses, indicating a compositional dependence of this effect. In addition, high concentrations of K{sub 2}O have been shown to hinder the ability of the DWPF durability and viscosity models to predict the performance of these glasses. The usefulness of increased K{sub 2}O concentrations in preventing the formation of iron titanates may therefore be limited. Further characterization was not performed for the KT09-series glasses since the type of crystallization formed was the characteristic of interest for these compositions. All of the KT10-series glasses were XRD amorphous, regardless of heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements showed that the glasses met the targeted concentrations for each oxide. In general, the measured PCT responses of the KT10-series glasses were well predicted by the DWPF models. The measured, normalized release values for silicon for some of the glasses fell above the 95% confidence interval for the predicted values; however, the PCT responses for these glasses remain considerably lower than that of the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The viscosities of the KT10-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. The next step in this study will be to compile all of the data developed and further compare the measured properties and performance with those predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. Recommendations will then be made as to which models, if any, may need to be modified in order to accommodate the material from SCIX into DWPF

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment and risk analysis of casing and cement impairment in oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, 2000–2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and/or casing impairment. Remedial action is often attempted once...contamination/gas migration investigations, but these types of inspections...annular vent" 20 Cement Squeeze Remedial cementing operation performed...patch", "perf" 34 Top Job Remedial cementing operation used to...

Anthony R. Ingraffea; Martin T. Wells; Renee L. Santoro; Seth B. C. Shonkoff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Extraction of Proteins Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead method is preferred. Some researchers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of Proteins ­ Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead. glass beads (106 micron glass bead, Sigma cat. No. G4649) 7. Tabletop centrifuge 8. Vortex 9 µl glass beads (106 micron glass beads, Sigma, cat. G4649). 8. Vortex at top speed for 5 minutes. 9

416

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

417

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

418

Iron phosphate glass for immobilization of 99Tc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 (99Tc) can bring serious environmental threats because of its long half-life (t1/2 = ~2.1 x 105 years), high fission yield (~6%), and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The high volatility makes it difficult to immobilize 99Tc in continuous melters vitrifying 99Tc-containing nuclear wastes in borosilicate glasses. This work explores a possibility of incorporating a high concentration of 99Tc, surrogated by the non-radioactive Re, in an iron phosphate glass by melting mixtures of iron phosphate glass frits with 1.5-6 mass% KReO4 at ~1000 C. The retention of Re achieved was ~1.1 mass%. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was <10*2 g/m2. Surprisingly, the Re escaped from the melt within a short time of heating, especially when the temperature was increased. Therefore, 99Tc volatilization would still be a challenging task for its immobilization in iron phosphate glasses.

Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Um, Wooyong; Heo, Jong

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, D.P.

1984-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass products cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Glasses for solar energy conversion systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar technologies are projected to increase tremendously over the next 10 years. Glasses are playing an important role as transparent materials of photovoltaic (PV) cells and concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Glasses are materials of short energy payback time and environmental compatibility suitable for sustainable energy concepts. The paper reviews recent solar applications. Surface structuring and coating of glasses are shown to improve energy efficiency for solar conversion systems substantially. Encapsulated glass-to-glass PV modules and solar photocatalytic glass surfaces are identified as elements of a green architecture combining renewable power generating and destruction of air pollutants of urban environments. Emerging solar technologies for power generation, including transparent PV modules, solar chimney and thermoelectric systems may become significant areas of future solar glass applications.

J. Deubener; G. Helsch; A. Moiseev; H. Bornhöft

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND PCT DATA FOR THE INITIAL SET OF HANFORD ENHANCED WASTE LOADING GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test results for 20 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation ranges of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. Two components of the study glasses, fluorine and silver, were not measured since each of these species would have required the use of an additional preparation method and their measured values were likely to be near or below analytical detection limits. Some of the glasses were difficult to prepare for chemical analysis. A sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was successful in completely dissolving the glasses. Components present in the glasses in minor concentrations can be difficult to measure using this dissolution method due to dilution requirements. The use of a lithium metaborate preparation method for the minor components (planned for use since it is typically successful in digesting Defense Waste Processing Facility HLW glasses) resulted in an unacceptable amount of undissolved solids remaining in the sample solutions. An acid dissolution method was used instead, which provided more thorough dissolution of the glasses, although a small amount of undissolved material remained for some of the study glasses. The undissolved material was analyzed to determine those components of the glasses that did not fully dissolve. These components (e.g., calcium and chromium) were present in sufficient quantities to be reported from the measurements resulting from the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method, which did not leave undissolved material. Overall, the analyses resulted in sums of oxides that ranged from about 98 to 101.5 wt % for the study glasses, indicating excellent recovery of all the components in the chemical composition analyses. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions indicated that, in general, the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations. Exceptions were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The measured values for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were somewhat low when compared to the targeted values for all of the study glasses targeting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations above 0.5 wt %. Many of the measured MgO and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} values were below the targeted values for those glasses that contained these components. Two of the study glasses exhibited differences from the targeted compositions that may indicate a batching error. Glasses EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 and EWG-OL-1672 had measured values for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} that were lower than the targeted values, and measured values for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} that were higher than the targeted values. Glass EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 also had a measured value for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} that was lower than the targeted value. A review of the PCT data, including standards and blanks, revealed no issues with the performance of the tests. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Comparisons of the normalized PCT results for both the quenched and Canister Centerline Cooled versions of the study glasses are made with the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass for reference.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

Kacimi, Larbi [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: kacimi20002000@yahoo.fr; Simon-Masseron, Angelique [Laboratoire des Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, CNRS UMR 7016, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 3, rue Alfred-Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)], E-mail: A.Simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Salem, Souria [Departement d'Architecture, Faculte de Genie Civile, USTO-Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: zinaisalem@yahoo.fr; Ghomari, Abdelhamid [Departement de Chimie, U.A.I.B., Route de Belahcel, Mostaganem (Algeria)], E-mail: belkey@hotmail.com; Derriche, Zoubir [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Acceptable approaches for beneficial use of cement kiln dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One beneficial use of cement kiln dust (CKD) is application of CKD to cropland as agricultural lime or fertilizer. However, the EPA has expressed a concern over land application of CKD when the metals constituents in the CKD are above the industry-wide median levels presented in EPA`s Report to Congress on Cement Kiln Dust. Under the Clean Water Act, EPA has established limits for metals concentrations in sewage sludge that is applied to the land for beneficial use of the nitrogen in the sludge. The limits for land application of sewage sludge were established based on the results of exposure risk assessments. A comparison of the median industry-wide metals concentrations in CKD to the metals concentration limits for land application of sewage sludge indicates that all trace metal concentrations IN CKD are below the corresponding sewage sludge land application limit, with the exception of the median level of arsenic from one data set. EPA has determined that land application of CKD with metals concentration limits at or below the industry-wide median concentrations does not pose a significant human cancer or non-cancer health risk. Therefore, with appropriate limits, CKD can be beneficially reused for land application on agricultural land in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.

Schreiber, R.J.; Smeenk, S.D. [Schreiber, Yonley and Associates, St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Coated glass in the automotive industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic coatings on glasses have reached the level where they will certainly be applied in the automotive industry in order to solve such glazing problems as heat load, heat loss, glare, UV adsorption, disturbed reflections, electromagnetic influence and thermal insulation. Their widespread use will depend on optimising the solution to problems of solar control and heatable glasses while the glass is also capable of the other functions required of it, thus justifying the relatively high cost that is predicted. There remain unsolved problems in optical limits and colour matching. When these are solved solar control glasses are likely to give real advantages in terms of air conditioning and comfort, and heatable glasses will be used in association with electrical power for demisting and deicing. Particular attention is being directed to a class of infrared reflecting and heatable glasses, obtained by selectively coating transparent plastic films that are embedded or bonded in laminated or tempered glasses. Fabricating this type of glasses has mainly been useful for two reasons: (I) to develop versatile techniques to make solar control IR reflecting and heatable glasses for all kinds and dimensions of vehicle glazing; and (2) to assess whether these glasses are really feasible alternatives to directly coated glasses. This paper describes results of some solar control experiments in Fiat cars: to ascertain the actual internal temperature differences found when glazing vehicles with the absorbing and reflecting IR glasses currently available; and to obtain results with a similar purpose using heatable glasses. There is also discussion of how the glasses could be used in glazing all or parts of a car's windows / especially addressing problems of glare. Suggestions are made of the directions of this research in the future.

G. Manfre

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Probing the glass transition from structural and vibrational properties of zero-temperature glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that the density dependence of the glass transition temperature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) systems can be predicted from properties of the zero-temperature ($T=0$) glasses. Below a crossover density $\\rho_s$, LJ and WCA glasses show different structures, leading to different vibrational properties and consequently making LJ glasses more stable with higher glass transition temperatures than WCA ones. Above $\\rho_s$, structural and vibrational quantities of the $T=0$ glasses show scaling collapse. From scaling relations and dimensional analysis, we predict a density scaling of the glass transition temperature, in excellent agreement with simulation results. We also propose an empirical expression of the glass transition temperature using structural and vibrational properties of the $T=0$ glasses, which works well over a wide range of densities.

Lijin Wang; Ning Xu

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI); Sitzman, Gary W. (Walled Lake, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

First-order study of property/composition relationships for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order composition variability study (CVS-I) was conducted for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) program to preliminarily characterize the effects on key glass properties of variations i selected glass (waste and frit) components. The components selected were Si0[sub 2],B[sub 2]O[sub 3],A1[sub 2]O[sub 3], Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], ZrO[sub 2], Na[sub 2]O,Li[sub 2]O,CaO,MgO, and Others (all remaining waste components). A glass composition region was selected for study based on the expected range of glass compositions and the results of a previous series of scoping and solubility studies. Then, a 23-glass statistically-designed mixture experiment was conducted and data obtained for viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and durability [Materials Characterization Center (MCC-1) 28-day leach test and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT)]. These data were modeled using first-order functions of composition, and the models were used to investigate the effects of the components on glass and melt properties. The CVS-I data and models will also be used to support the second-order composition variability study (CVS-II).

Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.; Bates, S.O.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

First-order study of property/composition relationships for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order composition variability study (CVS-I) was conducted for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) program to preliminarily characterize the effects on key glass properties of variations i selected glass (waste and frit) components. The components selected were Si0{sub 2},B{sub 2}O{sub 3},A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O,Li{sub 2}O,CaO,MgO, and Others (all remaining waste components). A glass composition region was selected for study based on the expected range of glass compositions and the results of a previous series of scoping and solubility studies. Then, a 23-glass statistically-designed mixture experiment was conducted and data obtained for viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and durability [Materials Characterization Center (MCC-1) 28-day leach test and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT)]. These data were modeled using first-order functions of composition, and the models were used to investigate the effects of the components on glass and melt properties. The CVS-I data and models will also be used to support the second-order composition variability study (CVS-II).

Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.; Bates, S.O.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Study of the mechanisms of wax prevention in a pipeline with glass inner layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms of wax prevention in a pipeline with a glass inner layer have been studied by simulating crude oil production by a pump well, and transport of crude oil and formation water in glass and steel tubes in a laboratory. It is clearly demonstrated that the water wetting property of glass and steel is the key factor in controlling the ability of wax to be deposited on the walls of glass and steel tubes. When the water content of crude oils A and B was more than 60%, the oils and formation water flowed as a plug and o/w emulsion, and a stable water film was formed between the oil and the wall of the glass tube. The film prevented the oil being deposited on the wall of the glass tube, consequently, the amount of wax deposited on the wall was reduced. The mechanisms of wax deposition on the wall of glass and steel tubes are molecular diffusion and shear dispersion.

Mingyuan Li; Jianguo Su; Zhaoliang Wu; Yaodong Yang; Shuling Ji

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of defense-waste glass produced by full-scale vitrification equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three full-scale vitrification processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory produced over 67,000 kg of simulated nuclear-waste glass from March 1979 to August 1980. Samples were analyzed to monitor process operation and evaluate the resulting glass product. These processes are: Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter (SC/ICM); Spray Calciner/Calcine-Fed Ceramic Melter (SC/CFCM); and Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM). Waste components in the process feed varied less than +- 10%. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM which use separate waste and frit feed systems showed larger glass compositional variation than the LFCM, which processed only premixed feed during this period. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM product contained significant amounts of acmite crystals, while the LFCM product was largely amorphous. In addition, the lower portion of all SC/ICM-filled canisters contained a zone rich in waste components. A product chemical durability as determined by pH4 and soxhlet leach tests varied considerably. Aside from increased durability under pH4 conditions with decreasing waste content, glass composition, microstructure and melting process did not correlate with glass durability. For all samples analyzed, the weight loss under pH4 conditions ranged from 17.7 to 85.2 wt %. Soxhlet conditions produced weight losses from 1.78 to 3.56 wt %.

Lukacs, J.M.; Petkus, L.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparison of TCLP and long-term PCT performance on low-level mixed waste glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating technologies for conversion of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) into a form suitable for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the preferred technologies since it is capable of consistently producing a durable, leach resistant wasteform, while simultaneously minimizing disposal volumes. Since vitrification of LLMW is a relatively new concept, final wasteform specifications have not been developed. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed the Product Consistency Test (PCI), which is a 7-day leaching procedure for glass. Comparison indicates that both tests have merit where LLMW glasses are concerned. The TCLP is an important test for determining the release of metals and for allowing the wasteform to be delisted while the PCT is more useful for determining consistent production of durable glass. It is a better indicator of the behavior of glass in disposal site conditions. Most aggressive leaching of common oxide glasses occurs under caustic rather than acidic conditions, therefore it is necessary to perform both tests. Further tests will be conducted using additional glass compositions and variations in the TCLP and the PCT.

Cicero, C.A.; Andrews, M.K.; Bickford, D.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of O2 in combustion products Excess air used Recommended airtemperature of the air or combustion products and nodules tocombustion products of coal, additional air from various

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

Jones, Travis E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States) [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass April 22, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels - so thin they're about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. DuPont is working on new photovoltaic technology that will let manufacturers of copper indium gallium selenide, or CIGS, solar cells and organic light emitting diodes, or OLED, displays protect products with thin layers of ceramic and polymer material instead of glass. These ultra-thin protective films could help prevent deterioration from moisture. Because of their potential to reduce the cost of producing solar energy, "thin-film PV modules are projected to be the fastest-growing segment of

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441

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass April 22, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels - so thin they're about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. DuPont is working on new photovoltaic technology that will let manufacturers of copper indium gallium selenide, or CIGS, solar cells and organic light emitting diodes, or OLED, displays protect products with thin layers of ceramic and polymer material instead of glass. These ultra-thin protective films could help prevent deterioration from moisture. Because of their potential to reduce the cost of producing solar energy, "thin-film PV modules are projected to be the fastest-growing segment of

442

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

443

In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to obtain Si02.33a0, In his conclusions Hebuffat does not consider it of importance whether alit consists of pure Si02.3CaO or a crystalline compound of Si02.2CaO with 3a0 and an aluminate. He says the aluminate in Portland dement can­ not be Al 203.30a..., Erd- meyer, Nev/berry's, Zulkowski, Rebuff at, Meyers, Richardson, Michaelis and Meade• d. Work of the Carbegie Institute of Washington on CaO #Si0 2 series and binary compounds of Al 2°3> Si0 2, MgO, CaO. On the presence of free lime in cement...

Wright, Claude W.

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Sorption of Selenite and Selenate to Cement Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption of selenite and selenate to ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), “monosulfate” (3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·12H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (C?S?H) was investigated in order to understand Se immobilization by cement in hazardous wastes. ... Selenite is suggested to sorb by surface reactions, and for ettringite, a sorption maximum of 0.03 mol kg-1 was determined. ... Distribution ratios (Rd) for selenite were 0.18, 0.38, and 0.21 m3 kg-1 for ettringite, monosulfate, and C?S?H, respectively. ...

Isabel Baur; C. Annette Johnson

2003-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

445

Patch microstructure in cement-based materials: Fact or artefact?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The appearance of patch microstructure, i.e. broad dense and porous regions separated by sharp and distinct boundaries and occurring randomly in bulk and interfacial transition zones, has been reported previously in various site- and laboratory-mixed concretes and mortars. In this paper, evidence is presented to show that patch microstructure is an artefact of sample preparation and does not reflect the true nature of the hydrated cement paste. The appearance of dense patches comes from paste areas that have been ground and polished beyond the epoxy resin intrusion depth. In a backscattered electron image, pores not filled with epoxy are not visible because the signal is generated from the base or side walls of the pores. A modified method for epoxy impregnation, which can achieve a much deeper epoxy penetration than conventional vacuum impregnation, is presented.

Wong, H.S. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: hong.wong@imperial.ac.uk; Buenfeld, N.R. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

Preparation, properties and chemistry of glass- and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals and coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An overview is given outlining the materials and technologies that have been employed in the preparation of glass- and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals and coatings. Metal/non-metal bonding theories are summarized...

I. W. Donald

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Characterization of New Glass Coated Foam Glass Insulating Tiles by Standard Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A good thermal insulation of buildings is today more and more...1). Among insulating materials, foam glasses are increasing their importance because of...2). Foam glasses are fiber-free inorganic insulation mater...

Andrea Ventrella; Federico Smeacetto…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Round-robin testing of a reference glass for low-activity waste forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A round robin test program was conducted with a glass that was developed for use as a standard test material for acceptance testing of low-activity waste glasses made with Hanford tank wastes. The glass is referred to as the low-activity test reference material (LRM). The program was conducted to measure the interlaboratory reproducibility of composition analysis and durability test results. Participants were allowed to select the methods used to analyze the glass composition. The durability tests closely followed the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A, except that tests were conducted at both 40 and 90 C and that parallel tests with a reference glass were not required. Samples of LRM glass that had been crushed, sieved, and washed to remove fines were provided to participants for tests and analyses. The reproducibility of both the composition and PCT results compare favorably with the results of interlaboratory studies conducted with other glasses. From the perspective of reproducibility of analysis results, this glass is acceptable for use as a composition standard for nonradioactive components of low-activity waste forms present at >0.1 elemental mass % and as a test standard for PCTS at 40 and 90 C. For PCT with LRM glass, the expected test results at the 95% confidence level are as follows: (1) at 40 C: pH = 9.86 {+-} 0.96; [B] = 2.30 {+-} 1.25 mg/L; [Na] = 19.7 {+-} 7.3 mg/L; [Si] = 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mg/L; and (2) at 90 C: pH = 10.92 {+-} 0.43; [B] = 26.7 {+-} 7.2 mg/L; [Na] = 160 {+-} 13 mg/L; [Si] = 82.0 {+-} 12.7 mg/L. These ranges can be used to evaluate the accuracy of PCTS conducted at other laboratories.

Ebert, W. L.; Wolf, S. F.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

450

68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 6870  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 68­70 The behaviour of a simulant Magnox waste glass

Sheffield, University of

451

Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

Canonico, J.S.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Development of Vitrification Process and Glass Formulation for Nuclear Waste Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vitrification of high-level waste is the internationally recognized standard to minimize the impact to the environment resulting from waste disposal as well as to minimize the volume of conditioned waste to be disposed of. COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level waste industrially for over 20 years and is currently operating three commercial vitrification facilities based on a hot metal crucible technology, with outstanding records of safety, reliability and product quality. To further increase the performance of vitrification facilities, CEA and COGEMA have been developing the cold crucible melter technology since the beginning of the 1980s. This type of melter is characterized by a virtually unlimited equipment service life and a great flexibility in dealing with various types of waste and allowing development of high temperature matrices. In complement of and in parallel with the vitrification process, a glass formulation methodology has been developed by the CEA in order to tailor matrices for the wastes to be conditioned while providing the best adaptation to the processing technology. The development of a glass formulation is a trade-off between material properties and qualities, technical feasibility, and disposal safety criteria. It involves non-radioactive and radioactive laboratories in order to achieve a comprehensive matrix qualification. Several glasses and glass ceramics have thus been studied by the CEA to be compliant with industrial needs and waste characteristics: glasses or other matrices for a large spectrum of fission products, or for high contents of specifics elements such as sodium, phosphate, iron, molybdenum, or actinides. New glasses or glass-ceramics designed to minimize the final wasteform volume for solutions produced during the reprocessing of high burnup fuels or to treat legacy wastes are now under development and take benefit from the latest CEA hot-laboratories and technology development. The paper presents the CEA state-of-the-art in developing matrices or glasses and provides several examples.

Petitjean, V.; Fillet, C.; Boen, R.; Veyer, C.; Flament, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Doping of Glass with Lithium Ion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our discovery that the Li+ uptake by the glass walls of the vessels used in the experiments can be used for doping purposes was purely surreptitious. ...

Greg Moakes; Lawrence A. Bottomley; Jiri Janata

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

Transparant ductility: Reinforcing a structural glass girder:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Transparency and light are hot items in building design and massive structural elements often form an unwelcome necessity for architects. The structural use of glass… (more)

Rademakers, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

120 Years of Optical Glass Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An elegant, century-old mathematical relationship, tying the physical properties of a multicomponent glass to those of its chemical components, still provides a powerful tool...

Dragic, Peter D; Ballato, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure....

457

Analysis and Research on the Thermal Properties of Energy-efficient Building Glass: A Case Study in PVB Laminated Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of PVB-laminated glass is introduced as an energy-efficient building glass. Based on tests and calculations of the shading coefficients of flat glass, LOW-E coated glass and PVB-laminated glass with different thickness, their effects...

Chen, Z.; Meng, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Copyright the Mathematical Association of America 2003. All rights reserved. Alice through Looking Glass after Looking Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass after Looking Glass: The Mathematics of Mirrors and Kaleidoscopes Roe Goodman 1. ALICE Alice book called Alice Through Looking Glass After Looking Glass. The book opens with Alice in her chamber in front of a peculiar cone­shaped arrangement of three looking glasses. She steps through one

Goodman, Roe

459

Baryon stopping in the Color Glass Condensate formalism: A phenomenological study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The net-baryon production at forward rapidities is investigated considering the Color Glass Condensate formalism. We assume that at large energies the coherence of the projectile quarks is lost and that the leading baryon production mechanism changes from recombination to independent fragmentation. The phenomenological implications for net-baryon production in $pp/pA/AA$ collisions are analysed and predictions for LHC energies are presented.

F. O. Duraes; A. V. Giannini; V. P. Goncalves; F. S. Navarra

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

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461

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z