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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Clean Metal Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

mcvision.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap ITP Metal Casting: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices ITP...

3

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program lehighfs.pdf More Documents...

5

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

6

Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Light Metal Castings FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestructive Evaluation NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings...

7

NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

8

Formation of zirconium metallic glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Bulk metallic glasses are commonly produced by the rapid cooling of liquid alloys. They have emerged over ... a novel class of materials, with attractive properties and technological promise. The bulk metallic glasses so far produced contain three or more component elements. These complex compositions are necessary ...

Jianzhong Zhang; Yusheng Zhao

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Preparation of actinide metal targets using special casting techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various casting techniques and mold design have been evaluated at Rocky Flats for preparing actinide metal targets. A tilt-pour casting technique is used for targets > 0.040 in. thick, and an injection casting technique has been developed for targets neptunium, and uranium metal ingots and disks ranging from 0.0050.600 in. thickness have been cast.

W.V. Conner

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ITP Metal Casting: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The project examined cases where metal casters had implemented ITP research results and detailed the benefits they received due to that implementation.

11

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ITP Metal Casting: Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Castings are essential building blocks of U. S. industry. More than 90% of all mnaufactured, durable good and 100% of all manufacturing machinery contain castings.

13

Method and mold for casting thin metal objects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting December 18, 2009 - 2:43pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes. One example of this technology is being used by General Motors to make lightweight engine blocks for the fuel-efficient vehicles they manufacture. A government-funded effort to support development of foam metal casting helped reduce an estimated 9.4 million tons of solid waste between 1994 and 2005, which saved industry an estimated 3 trillion Btu.

15

Material accountancy for metallic fuel pin casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. The pin casting operation, although only one of several operations in FCF, was the first to be on-line. As such, it has served to demonstrate the material accountancy system in many of its facets. This paper details, for the operation of the pin casting process with depleted uranium, the interaction between the mass tracking system (MTG) and some of the ancillary computer codes which generate pertinent information for operations and material accountancy. It is necessary to distinguish between two types of material balance calculations -- closeout for operations and material accountancy for safeguards. The two have much in common, for example, the mass tracking system database and the calculation of an inventory difference, but, in general, are not congruent with regard to balance period and balance spatial domain. Moreover, the objective, assessment, and reporting requirements of the calculated inventory difference are very different in the two cases.

Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.; Beitel, J.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH)

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ITP Metal Casting: Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A partial listing of these projects is provided below. Products and Markets ' Casting Conversions Materials Technology ' Development of Material Data Bases for HPNb and HPNb+...

20

Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

Allen, D.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

Jones, Travis E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States) [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

Carter, Jesse

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass MARCH 14, 2007 Bookmark and Share Structural modeling of the metallic glass: (a) A...

24

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in...

25

Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1987-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Neutron Brillouin scattering in a metallic glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dispersion of collective modes in a metallic glass (Mg{sub 70}Zn{sub 30}) measured earlier at the thermal neutron time-of-flight spectrometer IN4 of the HFR of the ILL could be extended towards lower momentum transfers down to the first pseudo-Brillouin zone for the first time. This extension to momentum transfer not accessible up to now was possible using the highly resolving time-of-flight spectrometer HET of the new spallation source ISIS. In the region of overlap the two parts of the dispersion determined with different samples of the same metallic glass on different instruments agree very well. Also the earlier discrepancies with the dispersion determined for this metallic glass from a computer simulation could be nearly completely eliminated due to a more recent and more complete investigations of this glass.

Suck, J.B. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik); Egelstaff, P.A. (Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics); Robinson, R.A.; Sivia, D.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Taylor, A.D. (Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Preparation, properties and chemistry of glass- and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals and coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An overview is given outlining the materials and technologies that have been employed in the preparation of glass- and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals and coatings. Metal/non-metal bonding theories are summarized...

I. W. Donald

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Casting of metallic fuel containing minor actinide additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant attribute of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is the transmutation of long-lived minor actinide fission products. These isotopes require isolation for thousands of years, and if they could be removed from the waste, disposal problems would be reduced. The IFR utilizes pyroprocessing of metallic fuel to separate auranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from nonfissionable constituents. These materials are reintroduced into the fuel and reirradiated. Spent IFR fuel is expected to contain low levels of americium, neptunium, and curium because the hard neutron spectrum should transmute these isotopes as they are produced. This opens the possibility of using an IFR to trnasmute minor actinide waste from conventional light water reactors (LWRs). A standard IFR fuel is based on the alloy U-20% Pu-10% Zr (in weight percent). A metallic fuel system eases the requirements for reprocessing methods and enables the minor actinide metals to be incorporated into the fuel with simple modifications to the basic fuel casting process. In this paper, the authors report the initial casting experience with minor actinide element addition to an IFR U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel.

Trybus, C.L.; Henslee, S.P. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Sanecki, J.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for forming glass-to-metal seals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH); Massey, Richard T. (Hamilton, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Adhesion of Evaporated Metal Films on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Adhesion of Evaporated Metal Films on Glass P. Benjamin C. Weaver The adhesion of...deposited by vacuum techniques on to a glass surface have been examined. It has been...intermediate oxide layer at the metal/glass interface is necessary for good adhesion...

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

32

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

ITP Metal Casting: Energy Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities- 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report represents an energy benchmark for various metalcasting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casti

34

Nanomechanical studies of metallic glasses at ambient and elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk metallic glasses, though attractive for use in structural applications for their high strength and elastic limit, display several unacceptable features upon deformation, including quasi-brittle failure along shear ...

Packard, Corinne E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Atomistic mechanisms of cyclic hardening in metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics with an embedded-atom method potential is used to simulate the nanoindentation of Cu[subscript 63.5]Zr[subscript 36.5] metallic glasses. In particular, the effects of cyclic loading within the nominal ...

Deng, Chuang

36

Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

1984-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

Glass Forming Ability and Relaxation Behavior of Zr Based Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic glasses can be considered for many commercial applications because of the higher mechanical strength, corrosion and wear resistance when compared to crystalline materials. To consider them for novel applications, the challenge of preparing...

Kamath, Aravind Miyar

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus The Package Matters Disarming Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing Discovering New Talents for Diamond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure MARCH 29, 2010 Bookmark and Share Diamond anvil cell used for high-pressure experiments Metallic glasses are emerging as potentially useful materials at the frontier of materials science research. They combine the advantages-and avoid many of the problems of-normal metals and glasses, two classes of materials with a very wide range of applications. For example, metallic

39

Graded pitch electromagnetic pump for thin strip metal casting systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal strip casing system is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks having a graded pole pitch, polyphase ac winding and being arranged on opposite sides of a movable heat sink. A nozzle is provided for depositing liquid metal on the heat sink such that the resulting metal strip and heat sink combination is subjected to a longitudinal electromagnetic field which increases in wavelength in the direction of travel of the heat sink, thereby subjecting the metal and heat sink to a longitudinal force having a magnitude which increases in the direction of travel. 4 figs.

Kuznetsov, S.B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Bulk Metallic Glass Nanowire Architecture for Electrochemical Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

bulk metallic glasses; nanowires; electrocatalysts; fuel cells; PEMFC; DAFC ... (8) Thus, there has been considerable interest in the development of nanowire fuel cell catalysts. ... To develop such catalysts, several characteristics have to be taken into consideration for their synthesis and assembly. ...

Marcelo Carmo; Ryan C. Sekol; Shiyan Ding; Golden Kumar; Jan Schroers; Andr D. Taylor

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Icosahedral order and defects in metallic liquids and glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular-dynamics simulations of 500 particles have been performed to study the icosahedral order and the defects in the supercooled liquid and glass states of metallic Mg3Ca7. Not only are Frank-Kasper polyhedra and Bernal hole polyhedra detected, but also a variety of defective icosahedra. Especially, the number of the type of defective icosahedron defined by eight 1551 bonds, two 1661 bonds, and two 1441 bonds is much greater than the number of any kind of Frank-Kasper and Bernal polyhedra. This strongly supports the physical picture of liquids and glasses being a disordered, entangled array of +72 and -72 disclination lines in an icosahedral medium.

D. W. Qi and S. Wang

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

Seidel, Bobby R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tracy, Donald B. (Firth, ID); Griffiths, Vernon (Butte, MT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

MICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS M. Kanik.S. Abstract-- A novel use of bulk metallic glasses in microresonator applications is reported and a method scale glass blowmolding using quartz [2] and Pyrex [3], as well as the isotropic etching of silicon

M'Closkey, Robert T.

45

Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which ensures the superpositioning of the first peak in the structure factor with twice the Fermi momentum, was used to calculate the interatomic potential of these alloys. The importance of Pd to the stability of the alloys is evidenced by the fact that replacing Ni and Pd places the nearest neighbor distances at more attractive positions in this potential.

Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot-cast multicrystalline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402­407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot silicon (mc-Si) ingot casting for cost-effective solar cell wafer production. Highly sensitive to the invited talk ``Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade multicrystalline silicon'' by A.A. Istratov, T

47

Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:January 2015 All Issues submit...

49

Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 2014 Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest...

50

Devitrification kinetics and phase selection mechanisms in Cu-Zr metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic glasses have been a promising class of materials since their discovery in the 1960s. Indeed, remarkable chemical, mechanical and physical properties have attracted considerable attention, and several excellent reviews are available. Moreover, the special group of glass forming alloys known as the bulk metallic glasses (BMG) become amorphous solids even at relatively low cooling rates, allowing them to be cast in large cross sections, opening the scope of potential applications to include bulk forms and net shape structural applications. Recent studies have been reported for new bulk metallic glasses produced with lower cooling rates, from 0.1 to several hundred K/s. Some of the application products of BMGs include sporting goods, high performance springs and medical devices. Several rapid solidification techniques, including melt-spinning, atomization and surface melting have been developed to produce amorphous alloys. The aim of all these methods is to solidify the liquid phase rapidly enough to suppress the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. Furthermore, the production of amorphous/crystalline composite (ACC) materials by partial crystallization of amorphous precursor has recently given rise to materials that provide better mechanical and magnetic properties than the monolithic amorphous or crystalline alloys. In addition, these advances illustrate the broad untapped potential of using the glassy state as an intermediate stage in the processing of new materials and nanostructures. These advances underlie the necessity of investigations on prediction and control of phase stability and microstructural dynamics during both solidification and devitrification processes. This research presented in this dissertation is mainly focused on Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al alloy systems. The Cu-Zr binary system has high glass forming ability in a wide compositional range (35-70 at.% Cu). Thereby, Cu-Zr based alloys have attracted much attention according to fundamental research on the behaviors of glass forming alloys. Further motivation arising from the application of this system as a basis for many BMGs and ACC materials; the Cu-Zr system warrants this attention and offers great potential for the development of new materials. However, the prediction and control of microstructural evolution during devitrification remains challenging because of the complex devitrification behavior of the Cu-Zr binary alloy which is arising from the competition of metastable and stable phases and diversity of crystal structures. This dissertation details a systematic fundamental investigation into the mechanisms and kinetics of the various crystallization transformation processes involved in the overall devitrification response of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al glasses. Various isothermal and nonisothermal treatments are employed, and the structural response is characterized using bulk X-ray and thermal analysis methods as well as nanoscale microscopic analysis methods, revealing structural and chemical details down to the atomic-scale. By carefully combining techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantify the characterization transformations, this research has uncovered numerous details concerning the atomistic mechanisms of crystallization and has provided much new understanding related to the dominant phases, the overall reaction sequences, and the rate-controlling mechanisms. As such this work represents a substantial step forward in understanding these transformations and provides a clear framework for further progress toward ultimate application of controlled devitrification processing for the production of new materials with remarkable properties.

Kalay, Ilkay

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

Kim, Choong Paul (Northridge, CA); Hays, Charles C. (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

A survey of foundries that cast red brass products to ascertain an effective pouring rate of molten metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SURVEY OF FOUNDRIES THAT CAST RED BRASS PRODUCTS TO ASCERTAIN AN EFPECTIVE POURING RATE OF MOLTEN METAL A Thesis by RONALD KEE TOM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject: Industrial Technology A SURVEY OF FOUNDRIES THAT CAST RED BRASS PRODUCTS TO ASCERTAIN AN EFFECTIVE POURING RATE OF MOLTEN METAL A Thesis by RONALD KEE TOM Approved as to style and content by...

Tom, Ronald Kee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to MgZnCa bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to Mg­Zn­Ca bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a , Yufeng Zheng a: Magnesium alloy Bulk metallic glass Mechanical property Corrosion Cytotoxicity a b s t r a c t Mg­Zn­Ca bulk, mechanical testing, corrosion and cytotoxicity tests. It was found that the Mg66Zn30Ca4 sample presents

Zheng, Yufeng

54

Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers 7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers June 17, 2011 - 5:41pm Addthis Check out a short animation of a 3D plasmon ruler as it delivers optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein and read more below. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The discovery of a new property of glass offers new insight into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which are in products such as anti-theft tags and power transformers. A new ruler could help provide scientists with unprecedented details into a variety of biological events, including the interaction between DNA and enzymes, protein folding and cell membrane vibrations.

56

Molten metal holder furnace and casting system incorporating the molten metal holder furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom heated holder furnace (12) for containing a supply of molten metal includes a storage vessel (30) having sidewalls (32) and a bottom wall (34) defining a molten metal receiving chamber (36). A furnace insulating layer (42) lines the molten metal receiving chamber (36). A thermally conductive heat exchanger block (54) is located at the bottom of the molten metal receiving chamber (36) for heating the supply of molten metal. The heat exchanger block (54) includes a bottom face (65), side faces (66), and a top face (67). The heat exchanger block (54) includes a plurality of electrical heaters (70) extending therein and projecting outward from at least one of the faces of the heat exchanger block (54), and further extending through the furnace insulating layer (42) and one of the sidewalls (32) of the storage vessel (30) for connection to a source of electrical power. A sealing layer (50) covers the bottom face (65) and side faces (66) of the heat exchanger block (54) such that the heat exchanger block (54) is substantially separated from contact with the furnace insulating layer (42).

Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Heavy Metals in Glass Beads Used in Pavement Markings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pavement markings are vital for safely navigating roadways. The nighttime visibility of pavement markings is enhanced by addition of retroreflective glass beads, most of which are made from recycled glass. Concern has been raised over the presence...

Mangalgiri, Kiranmayi

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

58

In-situ measurements of surface tension-driven shape recovery in a metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new technique, involving nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy at high temperature under an inert atmosphere, is used to study deformation of a Pt-based metallic glass. As temperature is increased into ...

Schuh, Christopher A.

59

Metallic glass electronic structure peculiarities revealed by UHV STM/STS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy investigation of metallic glass surface. The topography and electronic structure of Ni63.5Nb36.5 have been studied. A great nu...

A. I. Oreshkin; N. S. Maslova; V. N. Mantsevich; S. I. Oreshkin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Molten Metal Solidifies into a New Kind of Glass | Advanced Photon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Molten Metal Solidifies into a New Kind of Glass JULY 25, 2013 Bookmark and Share Microstructure of an Al91Fe7Si2 alloy after electron...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Soft magnetic composites manufactured by warm co-extrusion of bulk metallic glass and steel powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soft magnetic composites of Fe-based bulk metallic glass and low-alloy steel have been manufactured by warm co-extrusion of precursor powders at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region of the glass. Composites were manufactured with amorphous volume fractions of 75%, 67%, and 100%. Full consolidation of the constituent powders was observed with the bulk metallic glass remaining substantially amorphous. The composite electrical resistivity was observed to be anisotropic with a resistivity of 79 {mu}{Omega} cm measured transverse to the extrusion axis in a sample with 75% amorphous volume fraction. A 0-3 connectivity pattern with the low-resistivity steel phase embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected high-resistivity bulk metallic glass phase was observed with scanning electron microscopy. This confirms that the flow characteristics of the bulk metallic glass and the steel powders were comparable during extrusion at these temperatures. The saturation magnetization of 1.3 T was consistent with the volume weighted average of the saturation magnetization of the two phases. A relatively high quasistatic coercivity of 8 Oe was measured and is likely due to slight crystallization of the bulk metallic glass as well as domain wall pinning at prior particle boundaries. Careful control of the thermal environment during the extrusion process is required to minimize glass crystallization and achieve the desired balance of magnetic and electrical properties.

Johnson, Francis; Raber, Thomas R.; Zabala, Robert J.; Buresh, Steve J.; Tanico, Brian [GE Global Research, Ceramic and Metallurgy Technologies, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Measurement of local internal friction in metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), an advanced scanning probe microscopy technique, has been used to measure local elastic properties with a spatial resolution given by the tip-sample contact radius. AFAM is based on inducing out-of-plane vibrations in the specimen. The vibrations are sensed by the AFM cantilever from by the photodiode signal when its tip is in contact with the material under test. To measure local damping, the inverse quality factor Q{sup ?1} of the resonance curve is usually evaluated. Here, from the contact-resonance spectra obtained, we determine the real and imaginary part of the contact stiffness k* and from these two quantities the local damping factor Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} is obtained which is proportional to the imaginary part ? of the contact stiffness. The evaluation of the data is based on the cantilever's mass distribution with damped flexural modes and not on an effective point-mass approximation for the cantilevers motion. The given equation is simple to use and has been employed to study the local Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} of amorphous PdCuSi metallic glass and its crystalline counterpart as a function of position of the AFM tip on the surface. The width of the distribution changes dramatically from the amorphous to the crystalline state as expected from the consequences of the potential-energy landscape picture. The center value of the distribution curve for Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} coincides very well with published data, based on global ultrasonic or internal friction measurements. This is compared to Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} measured in crystalline SrTiO{sub 3}, which exhibits a narrow distribution, as expected.

Wagner, H.; Bchsenschtz-Gbeler, M.; Luo, Y.; Samwer, K. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitt, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Kumar, A. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Arnold, W., E-mail: w.arnold@mx.uni-saarland.de [I. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitt, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Department of Materials and Materials Technology, Saarland University, Campus D 2.2, D-66123 Saarbrcken (Germany)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Proposed Testing to Assess the Accuracy of Glass-To-Metal Seal Stress Analyses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The material characterization tests conducted on 304L VAR stainless steel and Schott 8061 glass have provided higher fidelity data for calibration of material models used in Glass - T o - Metal (GTM) seal analyses. Specifically, a Thermo - Multi - Linear Elastic Plastic ( thermo - MLEP) material model has be en defined for S S304L and the Simplified Potential Energy Clock nonlinear visc oelastic model has been calibrated for the S8061 glass. To assess the accuracy of finite element stress analyses of GTM seals, a suite of tests are proposed to provide data for comparison to mo del predictions.

Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.; Gibson, Cory S; Bencoe, Denise N.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Real-time, high-resolution study of nanocrystallization and fatigue cracking in a cyclically strained metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit greater elastic limit and stronger resistance to plastic deformation than their crystalline metal counterparts. Their capacity to withstand plastic straining is further enhanced at submicrometer ...

Wang, Cheng-Cai

65

Marshmallow Under Pressure Glass jar with a metal lid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Put the straw in the hole and use clay to seal around the edge so air can't escape around the straw 7 the marshmallow into the glass jar and screw the lid on, making sure that there is a tight seal 4. Select a nail. What else can create pressure? 7. Can air create pressure? 8. Is a marshmallow solid? 9. What

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

66

Shear bands in a bulk metallic glass after large plastic deformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A transmission electron microscopy investigation is conducted to trace shear bands in a Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 18.7}Ni{sub 12}Al{sub 16.3} bulk metallic glass after experiencing 4% plastic deformation. Shear band initiation, secondary shear band interactions, mature shear band broadening and the interactions of shear bands with shear-induced nanocrystals are captured. Results suggest that the plasticity of the bulk metallic glass is enhanced by complex shear bands and their interactions which accommodate large plastic strain and prevent catastrophic shear band propagation.

Qu, D.D.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Shen, J. (Harbin); (Sydney)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Metal thin film growth on multimetallic surfaces: From quaternary metallic glass to binary crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this thesis mainly focuses on the nucleation and growth of metal thin films on multimetallic surfaces. First, we have investigated the Ag film growth on a bulk metallic glass surface. Next, we have examined the coarsening and decay of bilayer Ag islands on NiAl(110) surface. Third, we have investigated the Ag film growth on NiAl(110) surface using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). At last, we have reported our investigation on the epitaxial growth of Ni on NiAl(110) surface. Some general conclusions can be drawn as follows. First, Ag, a bulk-crystalline material, initially forms a disordered wetting layer up to 4-5 monolayers on Zr-Ni-Cu-Al metallic glass. Above this coverage, crystalline 3D clusters grow, in parallel with the flatter regions. The cluster density increases with decreasing temperature, indicating that the conditions of island nucleation are far-from-equilibrium. Within a simple model where clusters nucleate whenever two mobile Ag adatoms meet, the temperature-dependence of cluster density yields a (reasonable) upper limit for the value of the Ag diffusion barrier on top of the Ag wetting layer of 0.32 eV. Overall, this prototypical study suggests that it is possible to grow films of a bulk-crystalline metal that adopt the amorphous character of a glassy metal substrate, if film thickness is sufficiently low. Next, the first study of coarsening and decay of bilayer islands has been presented. The system was Ag on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 185 K to 250 K. The coarsening behavior, has some similarities to that seen in the Ag(110) homoepitaxial system studied by Morgenstern and co-workers. At 185 K and 205 K, coarsening of Ag islands follows a Smoluchowski ripening pathway. At 205 K and 250 K, the terrace diffusion limited Ostwald ripening dominants. The experimental observed temperature for the transition from SR to OR is 205 K. The SR exhibits anisotropic island diffusion and the OR exhibits 1D decay of island length while keeping the corresponding island width constant. Third, LEED indicates that, up to about 6 BL (12 ML), the Ag film adopts the (110) structure on lattice matched NiAl(110) surface, supporting the previous assignment based upon island heights measured in STM. Starting at 4.5 to 6 BL, (111) diffraction pattern is detected. This is also in agreement with previous STM study. Careful examinations of the LEED patterns reveal the slight difference in lattice constants between bulk Ag and bulk NiAl. At last, we performed STM studies of Ni deposition on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 200 K to 400 K. Ni forms 'dense' Ni(100)-like islands on NiAl(110) with a zig-zag shaped stripe feature which is probably due to strain relief. DFT analysis provides insights into the island growth shapes, which are rationalized by the thermodynamics and kinetics of the film growth process. For thick Ni films (coverage exceeding 6 ML), a Ni(111)-like structure developed. Traditional MF theory is applied to analyze island density at 200 K. Deviation from homogeneous nucleation behavior for island size distribution and island density reveals the presence of heterogeneous nucleation mediated by the Ni antisite point defects on NiAl(110) surface.

Jing, Dapeng

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Prompt Neutron Time Decay in Single HEU and DU Metal Annular Storage Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous measurements of highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage castings performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the Y-12 National Security Complex showed a prompt neutron time decay that is not exponential. These measurements showed that multiple time constants originating from multiplication, time-of-flight, scattering in the assembly and room return could be associated with this prompt neutron decay. In this work, the contribution not associated with neutron multiplication was investigated via measurements with a depleted uranium (DU) casting. The measurements at ORNL used an annular (5.0-in OD, 3.5-in ID, 6.0-in H) DU casting with a time-tagged 252Cf source, centered vertically on the axis, and four closely coupled 1 1 6-in.-long plastic scintillators with -in.- thick lead shielding adjacent to the outer surface of the casting. This setup was identical to the configuration used in the previously performed measurements with HEU castings at Y-12. The time correlation between fission events and detections in the plastic scintillators was measured, as well as the time distribution of coincidences between multiple detectors within a 512-ns time window. The measurement results were then compared to MCNP-PoliMi calculations and the previous HEU measurements. Time constants from decay fits to the HEU and DU data were compared to characterize the contributions resulting from multiplication, time-of-flight, and scattering.

Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with regulatory and competitive pressures to control emissions and reduce operating costs, metal and glass manufacturers are considering a variety of options for reducing overall energy consumption. As 38% of the energy used in U.S. industrial plants is consumed for process heating applications, metal and glass manufacturers are discovering that process heating technologies provide significant opportunities for improving industrial productivity, energy efficiency, and global competitiveness. This fact sheet is the first in a series to describe such opportunities that can be realized in industrial systems by conducting plant-wide assessments (PWA).

70

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk December 2011 Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Bulk metallic glass Corrosion Biocompatibility Electrochemical characterization Biomedical applications The aim of this work is to investigate the corrosion

Zheng, Yufeng

71

Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2 M. Z. Li,2,* and W the degree of local fivefold symmetry (LFFS) as the structural indicator to predict plastic deformation of local structures and find that the plastic events prefer to be initiated in regions with a lower degree

Wang, Wei Hua

72

Direct measurement of the kinetics of volume and enthalpy relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural relaxation of glasses below their glass transition is a well-studied phenomenon that still poses several open issues. With the advent of bulk metallic glasses with exceptionally low glass transition temperatures, new options are available that are based on the experimental assessment of the time dependence of several different thermodynamic quantities by direct measurements with high accuracy. In this contribution the first direct measurement of the isothermal relaxation of the volume and the enthalpy of an Au-based bulk metallic glassformer are reported and discussed with respect of the characteristics describing the underlying processes.

Bnz, J.; Wilde, G. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Mnster, 48149 Mnster (Germany)] [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Mnster, 48149 Mnster (Germany)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Sharp semiconductor-to-metal transition of VO{sub 2} thin films on glass substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Outstanding phase transition properties of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films on amorphous glass were achieved and compared with the ones grown on c-cut sapphire and Si (111) substrates, all by pulsed laser deposition. The films on glass substrate exhibit a sharp semiconductor-to-metal transition (?4.3?C) at a near bulk transition temperature of ?68.4?C with an electrical resistance change as high as 3.2??10{sup 3} times. The excellent phase transition properties of the films on glass substrate are correlated with the large grain size and low defects density achieved. The phase transition properties of VO{sub 2} films on c-cut sapphire and Si (111) substrates were found to be limited by the high defect density.

Jian, Jie; Chen, Aiping [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Zhang, Wenrui [Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arc welding GTAW Gas tungsten arc welding HAZ Heat affected zone HF High frequency MMC Metal matrix composite MMCs Metal matrix composites NDE Non-destructive examination SAW Submerged arc welding SMAW Shielded metal arc... limited their applications. Further, the use of composite materials requires us to stay from the established processes and areas of practice that were relevant to more conventional engineering materials. Except for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Micro-Scratch Study of a Magnetron-Sputtered Zr-Based Metallic-Glass Film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the micro-scratch technique, the tribological behavior of ZrCuAlNi metallic-glass coatings on 316L stainless steel was studied. With the application of ramping normal loads, the critical normal loads of about 110 mN were determined, at which the coefficient of friction increased sharply and the indenter penetration depth exceeded the film thickness. No clear evidence of coating debonding has been found, which, together with the observation of multiple shear bands, indicates good adhesion and ductility of the metallic-glass coating. When subjected to constant normal loads, the coefficient of friction increased rapidly once the critical normal load was passed. The scratch results and the scanning-electron microscopy observations indicated good adhesion between the coating and the substrate, which may be due to the good interfacial bonding and low coating residual stress.

Liu, F. X. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yang, F. Q. [University of Kentucky; Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Jiang, W. H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guan, Y F [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sergic, O. [CSM Instruments Inc.; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sedimentation behavior of noble metal particles in simulated high-level waste borosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solubility of noble metal elements (NME) in the melted borosilicate glass is much smaller than its normal concentration of the high level liquid waste. Thus most of NME show small particles in the melted glass and tend to sediment in the bottom region of the vitrification melter due to their higher density than that of glass. Experiments of the sedimentation of NME particles in the melted glass were carried out under static condition. Three conditions of initial NME concentration (1.1, 3.0, 6.1 wt % with an equivalent for each oxide) in the simulated glass were set and held at 1100 C. degrees up to 2880 hours. The specimen with 1.1 wt % initial NME concentration indicated zone settling, and the settling rate of the interface is constant: 2.4 mm/h. This sedimentation behavior is the type of rapid settling. Following the rapid settling, the settling rate goes gradually slower; this is the type of compressive settling. The specimens with 3.0 wt % and 6.1 wt % initial NME concentration showed compression settling from the beginning. From the settling curve of the interface, the maximum concentration of NME in sediment was estimated to be around 23- 26 wt %. Growth of NME particles was observed by holding at 1100 C. degrees for up to 2880 hours. The viscosity becomes higher as NME concentration increases and the dependence on shear rate becomes simultaneously stronger. The effect of the particle growth to viscosity appears to be not significant.

Nakajima, M.; Ohyama, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Miyauchi, A.; Yamashita, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1109 (Japan); Komamine, S.; Ochi, E. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, Bussan-Bldg. Bekkan, 1-1-5 Nishi-Shinbashi Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oxygen impurity and microalloying effect in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen impurity and microalloying effect in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloy C.T. Liu*, M composition Zr­10 at.%Al­5% Ti­17.9% Cu­14.6% Ni (BAM-11) was used to study the effects of oxygen impurities and microalloying on the microstructure and mechanical properties. Oxygen impurity at a level of 3000 appm

Pennycook, Steve

79

The effects of a high temperature crystallization heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of MBF-75 metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION HEAT TREATMENT ON THE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF MBF-75 METALLIC GLASS A thesis by STEPHEN OAL OMENS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION HEAT TREATMENT ON THE CORROSION EEHAVIOR OF MBF-75 METALLIC GLASS A Thesis by STEPHEN DAL OWENS...

Owens, Stephen Dal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: a foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension-enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. Each of the task areas includes specific subtasks which are described.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Peculiarities and application perspectives of metal-ion implants in glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion implantation in insulators causes modifications in the refractive-index as a result of radiation damage, phase separation, or compound formation. As a consequence, light waveguides may be formed with interesting applications in the field of optoelectronics. Recently implantation of metals ions (e.g. silver, copper, gold, lead,...) showed the possibility of small radii colloidal particles formation, in a thin surface layer of the glass substrate. These particles exhibit an electron plasmon resonance which depends on the optical constants of the implanted metal and on the refractive-index of the glass host. The non-linear optical properties of such colloids, in particular the enhancement of optical Kerr susceptibility, suggest that the, ion implantation technique may play an important role for the production of all-optical switching devices. In this paper an analysis of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field will be presented in the framework of ion implantation in glass physics and chemistry.

Mazzoldi, P.; Gonella, F. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Arnold, G.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaglin, G. [Venice Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica; Bertoncello, R. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Inorganica, Metallorganica e Analitica

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic June 2010 The corrosion properties of two Zr-based bulk metallic glass, Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 LM1 and Zr potential, LM1b showed superior corrosion resistance to LM1. Under identical sample preparation and testing

Zheng, Yufeng

83

Strip casting apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

1988-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nanometer-scale tunnel formation in metallic glass by helium ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have shown that upon high fluence helium ion irradiation, metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 45}Ti{sub 5} becomes highly porous at the depth of the helium projected range. The resulting porous region is characterized by the formation of a tunnel like structure and self-linkage of nanometer size gas bubbles. Furthermore, the irradiation leads to the formation of nanometer size Cu{sub x}Zr{sub y} crystals that are randomly distributed. The results of this study indicate that the He-filled bubbles have attractive interactions and experience considerable mobility. Movement of the bubbles is believed to be assisted by ballistic collisions.

Shao Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Gorman, Brian P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Xie Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Structure of Cu64.5Zr35.5 Metallic glass by reverse Monte Carlo simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) have been widely used to generate three dimensional (3D) atomistic models for glass systems. To examine the reliability of the method for metallic glass, we use RMC to predict the atomic configurations of a known structure from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and then compare the structure obtained from the RMC with the target structure from MD. We show that when the structure factors and partial pair correlation functions from the MD simulations are used as inputs for RMC simulations, the 3D atomistic structure of the glass obtained from the RMC gives the short- and medium-range order in good agreement with those from the target structure by the MD simulation. These results suggest that 3D atomistic structure model of the metallic glass alloys can be reasonably well reproduced by RMC method with a proper choice of input constraints.

Fang, Xikui W. [Ames Laboratory; Huang, Li [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory; Ding, Z. J. [University of Science and Technology of China

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

Rate-dependent deformation behavior of Zr-based metallic-glass coatings examined by nanoindentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zr-based metallic-glass coatings with micrometer-scale thickness are prepared by the radio-frequency magnetron-sputtering technique on silicon substrates. Using the load- and displacement-sensing nanoindentation technique, we have examined the dependence of their deformation behavior, especially the indentation hardness, on the strain rate and maximum indentation depth. For shallow indentation in which the substrate effect can be neglected, the increase of the penetration rate leads to the decrease of the hardness. This seemingly "negative" strain-rate-sensitivity is actually a result of the dependence of the degree of elastic deformation on the effective strain rate. The coating interface will block the shear-band propagation and promote the shear-band multiplication, so that the plastic flow is much easier to occur as the increase of the maximum penetration depth from a few percent of, to that comparable to, the coating thickness. We use a power-law viscoplastic constitutive relationship to illustrate key issues related to the indentation response of rate-dependent materials, while a phenomenological viscoplastic model with strain softening behavior is used to understand the unique features of the inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses. The scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to examine the shear bands and pileup around the indents.

Liu, F. X. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

GLASS: gas-phase metallicity and radial gradients in an interacting system at z~2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially resolved gas-phase metallicity for a system of three galaxies at z=1.85 detected in the Grism Lensed-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). The combination of HST's diffraction limit and strong gravitational lensing by the cluster MACS J0717+3745 results in a spatial resolution of ~200-300 pc, enabling good spatial sampling despite the intrinsically small galaxy sizes. The galaxies in this system are separated by 50-200 kpc in projection and are likely in an early stage of interaction, evidenced by relatively high specific star formation rates. Their gas-phase metallicities are consistent with larger samples at similar redshift, star formation rate, and stellar mass. We obtain a precise measurement of the metallicity gradient for one galaxy and find a shallow slope compared to isolated galaxies at high redshift, consistent with a flattening of the gradient due to gravitational interaction. An alternative explanation for the shallow metallicity gradient and elevated star formation rate is ra...

Jones, Tucker; Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso; Brammer, Gabriel; Bradac, Marusa; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matthew; Pentericci, Laura; Trenti, Michele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Subcritical Delamination of Dielectric and Metal Films from Low-k Organosilicate Glass (OSG) Thin Films in Buffered pH Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subcritical Delamination of Dielectric and Metal Films from Low-k Organosilicate Glass (OSG) Thin Inc., Dallas, TX 75243, USA ABSTRACT Understanding subcritical fracture of low-k dielectric materials importance. Subcritical delamination of dielectric and metal barrier films from low-k organosilicate glass

89

Smoothing metallic glasses without introducing crystallization by gas cluster ion beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that 30?keV Ar cluster ion bombardment of Ni 52.5Nb10Zr15Ti15Pt7.5 metallic glass (MG) can remove surface mountain-like features and reduce the root mean square surface roughness from 12?nm to 0.7?nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals no crystallization after cluster ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that although damage cascades lead to local melting the subsequent quenching rate is a few orders of magnitude higher than the critical cooling rate for MG formation thus the melted zone retains its amorphous nature down to room temperature. These findings can be applied to obtain ultra-smooth MGs without introducing crystallization.

Lin Shao; Di Chen; Michael Myers; Jing Wang; Buddhi Tilakaratne; Wei-Kan Chu; Guoqiang Xie; Arezoo Zare; Don A. Lucca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Corrosion behavior of TiZrNiCuBe metallic glass coatings synthesized by electrospark deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrospark deposition was applied to successfully deposit TiZrNiCuBe metallic glass coating on 304L stainless steel. The coating was fully amorphous with the thickness of ?380?m. The corrosion behavior was investigated in 1, 6 and 11.5mol/L HNO3. The optimal corrosion resistance was achieved in 6mol/L HNO3 for the coating. The corrosion mechanism was discussed based on the effect of the structural heterogeneity on the corrosion resistance. It was found that the heterogeneous surface structure deteriorated the corrosion resistance. We believe that the coating will find a wide range of applications for protecting working parks in corrosive environments.

Congbo Li; Dehua Chen; Weiwei Chen; Lu Wang; Dawei Luo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Smoothing metallic glasses without introducing crystallization by gas cluster ion beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that 30 keV Ar cluster ion bombardment of Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} metallic glass (MG) can remove surface mountain-like features and reduce the root mean square surface roughness from 12 nm to 0.7 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals no crystallization after cluster ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, although damage cascades lead to local melting, the subsequent quenching rate is a few orders of magnitude higher than the critical cooling rate for MG formation, thus the melted zone retains its amorphous nature down to room temperature. These findings can be applied to obtain ultra-smooth MGs without introducing crystallization.

Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Myers, Michael; Wang, Jing [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Chu, Wei-Kan [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Xie, Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Zare, Arezoo; Lucca, Don A. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)] [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of high strain rates on peak stress in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass George Sunny,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and excellent processing ability.1­3,9,10 Recent advances in the development of multi- component metallic glass Yuan,1 Vikas Prakash,1,a and John Lewandowski2 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222, USA 2 Department of Materials Science

Rollins, Andrew M.

93

Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ???? 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article ?¢????Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature?¢???, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8????10^2 ???µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

Nieh, T.G.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Incorporation of Fines and Noble Metals into HLW Borosilicate Glass: Industrial Responses to a Challenging Issue - 13056  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early stages of spent fuel reprocessing, the fuel rods are cut and dissolved to separate the solid metallic parts of the rods (cladding and end pieces) from the radioactive nitric acid solution containing uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products (FP). This solution contains small, solid particles produced during the shearing process. These small particles, known as 'fines', are then separated from the liquid by centrifugation. At the La Hague plant in France, the fines solution is transferred to the vitrification facilities to be incorporated into borosilicate glass along with the highly radioactive FP solution. These fines are also composed of Zr, Mo and other noble metals (i.e. Ru, Pd, Rh, etc.) that are added before vitrification to the the FP solution that already contained noble metals. As noble metals has the potential to modify the glass properties (including viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.) and to be affected by sedimentation inside the melter, their behavior in borosilicate glass has been studied in depth over the years by the AREVA and CEA teams which are now working together in the Joint Vitrification Laboratory (LCV). At La Hague, the R7 vitrification facility started operation in 1989 using induction-heated metallic melter technology and was quickly followed by the T7 vitrification facility in 1992. Incorporating the fines into glass has been a challenge since operation began, and has given rise to several R and D studies resulting in a number of technological enhancements to improve the mixing capability of the melters (multiple bubbling technology and mechanical stirring in the mid-90's). Nowadays, the incorporation of fines into R7T7 glass is well understood and process adaptations are deployed in the La Hague facilities to increase the operating flexibility of the melters. The paper will briefly describe the fines production mechanisms, give details of the resulting fines characteristics, explain how the metallic particles can influence the glass properties and challenge vitrification technologies and finally, give a rundown of the R and D efforts which have produced innovative solutions contributing to the operational excellence of AREVA's vitrification facilities in the La Hague reprocessing plant. (authors)

Chauvin, E.; Chouard, N.; Prod'homme, A. [AREVA, AREVA NC, Paris (France)] [AREVA, AREVA NC, Paris (France); Boudot, E. [AREVA, AREVA NC, La Hague (France)] [AREVA, AREVA NC, La Hague (France); Gruber, Ph.; Pinet, O. [CEA Marcoule LCV, France (France)] [CEA Marcoule LCV, France (France); Grosman, R. [AREVA, SGN, Paris (France)] [AREVA, SGN, Paris (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solid-state NMR characterisation of transition-metal bearing nuclear waste glasses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Alkali borosilicate glass is used to immobilise high-level radioactive waste generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. However, poorly soluble waste products such as (more)

Greer, Brandon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of high strain rates on peak stress in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of Zr{sub 41.25}Ti{sub 13.75}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} (LM-1) has been extensively characterized under quasistatic loading conditions; however, its mechanical behavior under dynamic loading conditions is currently not well understood. A Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and a single-stage gas gun are employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of LM-1 in the strain-rate regime of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5}/s. The SHPB experiments are conducted with a tapered insert design to mitigate the effects of stress concentrations and preferential failure at the specimen-insert interface. The higher strain-rate plate-impact compression-and-shear experiments are conducted by impacting a thick tungsten carbide (WC) flyer plate with a sandwich sample comprising a thin bulk metallic glass specimen between two thicker WC target plates. Specimens employed in the SHPB experiments failed in the gage-section at a peak stress of approximately 1.8 GPa. Specimens in the high strain-rate plate-impact experiments exhibited a flow stress in shear of approximately 0.9 GPa, regardless of the shear strain-rate. The flow stress under the plate-impact conditions was converted to an equivalent flow stress under uniaxial compression by assuming a von Mises-like material behavior and accounting for the plane strain conditions. The results of these experiments, when compared to the previous work conducted at quasistatic loading rates, indicate that the peak stress of LM-1 is essentially strain rate independent over the strain-rate range up to 10{sup 5}/s.

Sunny, George; Yuan Fuping; Prakash, Vikas [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222 (United States); Lewandowski, John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Deposition and characterization of metal sulfide dielectric coatings for hollow glass waveguides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by chemical bath deposition for solar energy related applications," Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 52 coatings for Ag/dielectric hollow glass waveguides," in Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications for hollow glass waveguides," in Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications III, Proc. SPIE 4957, 97

100

The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O'Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Surface treatment of glass-reinforced plastics: Structural study of silane finish layers on the surface of glass fillers. Modification of finishes by transition metal salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure and chemical composition of glass fiber surface treatment substances and their influence on composite materials...

O. E. Fedorova; T. L. Ragulina

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Casting methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

105

The effect of structural relaxation on SANS and its anisotropy in a metallic glass (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

small-angle-neutron scattering (SANS) intensity from ribbons ofmetallic glasses [I]which we attributed baisse de l'intensité diffusée. Abstract. 2014 We report a large decrease in small-angle-neutron scattering (SANS) after relaxation- annealing below Tg in glassy Pd80Si12Ge8 ribbons. We had previously

Boyer, Edmond

106

Evidence for viscous flow nature in Zr{sub 60}Al{sub 15}Ni{sub 25} metallic glass subjected to cold rolling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure changes of Zr{sub 60}Al{sub 15}Ni{sub 25} metallic glass upon cold rolling and their influences on the thermally induced crystallization kinetics are investigated. The results show that atomic redistribution occurs within the localized zones in the glassy matrix, resulting from the softening of the shear modulus, which retards the crystallization behaviors during the subsequent heating. The present work provides direct evidence for the viscous flow nature in a metallic glass subjected to plastic deformation, during which the softened zones act as potential shear transformation zones.

Yan Zhijie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Hao Weixin; Hu Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Song Kaikai; Eckert, Juergen [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Stoica, Mihai; Scudino, Sergio [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Environmental Effects on Subcritical Delamination of Dielectric and Metal Films from Organosilicate Glass (OSG) Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Effects on Subcritical Delamination of Dielectric and Metal Films from Organosilicate., Dallas, TX 75243, USA ABSTRACT Subcritical delamination of dielectric and metal films from organosilicate/SiNx. For both sets of experiments, subcritical crack growth in OSG is found to be described by a model

108

GlassMelt&Sealing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

109

EFFECTS OF ION IRRADIATION ON Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 (BAM-11) BULK METALLIC GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses are intriguing candidates for nuclear applications due to their inherent amorphous structure, but their radiation response is largely unknown due to the relatively recent nature of innovations in bulk metallic glass fabrication. Here, microstructural and mechanical property evaluations have been performed on a Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glass (BAM-11) irradiated with 3 MeV Ni+ ions to 0.1 and 1.0 dpa at room temperature and 200 C. Nanoindentation hardness and Young s modulus both decreased by 6 to 20% in samples irradiated at room temperature, with the sample irradiated to 1.0 dpa experiencing the greatest change in mechanical properties. However, no significant changes in properties were observed in the samples irradiated at 200 C, and transmission electron microscopy showed no visible evidence of radiation damage or crystallization following ion irradiation at any of the tested conditions. These results suggest that BAM-11 bulk metallic glass may be useful for certain applications in nuclear environments.

Perez-Bergquist, Alex G [ORNL] [ORNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL] [ORNL; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Crystallization of Zr2PdxCu(1-x) and Zr2NixCu(1-x) Metallic Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One interesting aspect of rretallic glasses is the numerous instances of the deviation of the phase selection from the amorphous state to thermodynamically stable phases during the crystallization process. Their devitrification pathways allow us to study the relationship between the original amorphous structure and their crystalline counter parts. Among the various factors of phase selections, size and electronic effects have been most extensively studied. Elucidating the phase selection process of a glassy alloy will be helpful to fill in the puzzle of the changes from disordered to ordered structures. In this thesis, Two model Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) glassy systems were investigated since: (1) All of the samples can be made into a homogenous metallic glass; (2) The atomic radii differ from Pd to Cu is by 11%, while Ni has nearly the identical atomic size compare to Cu. Moreover, Pd and Ni differ by only one valence electron from Cu. Thus, these systems are ideal to test the idea of the effects of electronic structure and size factors; (3) The small number of components in these pseudo binary systems readily lend themselves to theoretical modeling. Using high temperature X-ray diffraction {HTXRD) and thermal analysis, topological, size, electronic, bond and chemical distribution factors on crystallization selections in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} metallic glass have been explored. All Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} compositions share the same Cu11b phase with different pathways of meta-stable, icosahedral quasicrystalline phase (i-phase), and C16 phase formations. The quasicrystal phase formation is topologically related to the increasing icosahedral short range order (SRO) with Pd content in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1x)} system. Meta-stable C16 phase is competitive with C11b phase at x = 0.5, which is dominated by electronic structure rather than size effects. Cu-rich and Ni-rich compositions in Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} trend to divitrify to C11b or C16 phases respectively. In the proposed pseudo binary phase diagram, the domain of C16, C11b and co-existence phases are mainly related with the topology in the amorphous structure and formation enthalpies of crystalline phases.

Min Xu

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Role of Partial Crystallinity on Hydrogen Permeation in FeNiBMo Based Metallic Glass Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potentially exciting material for membrane separations are metallic glass materials due to their low cost, high elastic toughness and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement as compared to crystalline Pd-based membrane systems. However, at elevated temperatures and extended operation times structural changes including partial crystallinity may appear in these amorphous metallic systems. This study reports on the investigation of time and temperature dependent crystalline phase formation in conjunction with in situ crystallization/hydrogen permeation experiments at elevated temperatures. At temperatures near 400 C a FeNi crystalline phase appears as 22 vol.% inside the host amorphous matrix and the resulting composite structure remains stable over 3 h at temperature. The hydrogen permeation at 400 C of the partially crystalline material is similar to the fully amorphous material near 5 x 10{sup -9} mol H{sub 2}/m s Pa{sup 1/2}, while ambient temperature electrochemical permeation at 25 C revealed an order of magnitude decrease in the permeation of partially crystalline materials due to differences in the amorphous versus crystalline phase activation energy for hydrogen permeation.

Brinkman, K.; Su, D.; Fox, E.; Korinko, P.; Missimer, D.; Adams, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

Mangels, John A. (Flat Rock, MI); Dickie, Ray A. (Birmingham, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

glass jewelry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

various personal adornments decorated with glass or made of glass, beads, finger rings, pendants, necklaces,...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50keV at a fluence of 8נ1015ions/cm2 to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other.

Lu Huang; Chao Zhu; Claudiu I. Muntele; Tao Zhang; Peter K. Liaw; Wei He

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effect of pre-oxidation and environmental aging on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealing glass with metallic interconnect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two ferritic stainless steel coupons for strength evaluation. The steel coupons were pre-oxidized at elevated temperatures to promote thick oxide layers to simulate long-term exposure conditions. In addition, seals to as-received metal coupons were also tested after aging in oxidizing or reducing environments to simulate the actual SOFC environment. Room temperature tensile testing showed strength degradation when using pre-oxidized coupons, and more extensive degradation after aging in air. Fracture surface and microstructural analysis confirmed that the cause of degradation was formation of SrCrO4 at the outer sealing edges exposed to air.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Line patterning of (Sr,Ba)Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} crystals in borate glasses by transition metal atom heat processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some NiO-doped Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3},La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SrO-BaO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses giving the formation of strontium barium niobate Sr{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) crystals with a tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure through conventional crystallization in an electric furnace have been developed, and SBN crystal lines have been patterned on the glass surface by heat-assisted (250-300 deg. C) laser irradiation and scanning of continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (wavelength: 1064 nm). The surface morphology and the quality of SBN crystal lines are examined from measurements of confocal scanning laser micrographs and polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra. The surface morphology of SBN crystal lines changes from periodic bump structures to homogeneous structures, depending on laser scanning conditions. It is suggested that the line patterned at the laser irradiation condition of laser power P=1 W and of laser scanning speed S=1 {mu}m/s in 2NiO-4La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-16SrO-16BaO-32Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass has a possibility of the orientation of SBN crystals along the laser scanning direction. The present study demonstrates that the transition metal atom heat processing (i.e., a combination of cw Nd:YAG laser and Ni{sup 2+} ions) is a novel technique for spatially selected crystallization of SBN crystals in glass. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the polarization optical (a) and confocal scanning laser (b) micrographs for the sample obtained by heat-assisted (300 deg. C) Nd:YAG laser irradiation with a laser power of P=1 W and laser scanning speed of S=1 {mu}m/s in Glass C. The figure demonstrates that the transition metal atom heat processing (i.e., a combination of cw Nd:YAG laser and Ni{sup 2+} ions) is a novel technique for spatially selected crystallization of SBN crystals in glass.

Sato, M.; Honma, T.; Benino, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Komatsu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)], E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously contained hazardous or non-hazardous chemicals

Baker, Chris I.

118

Super ionic conductive glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been numerous developments in the current project over the last three months. The most appropriate geometries for performing the interfacial heat transfer studies have been discussed with both of our Industrial Partners. Both companies have molds which may be available for adaptation to record the thermal history during casting required for determining interfacial heat transfer coefficients. The details of what instrumentation would be the most appropriate remain to be worked out, but the instrumentation would likely include thermocoupling in the mold cavity as well as in the mold wall, as well as pressure sensors in the squeeze casting geometry molds and ultrasonic gap monitoring in the low pressure and gravity fed permanent mold geometry molds. The first advisory committee meeting was held on February 6th, and the steering committee was apprised of the objectives of the program. The capabilities of the Industrial Partners were reviewed, as well as the need for the project to make use of resources from other CMC projects. The second full Advisory Committee Meeting will be held in early May.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, Shouwei; Cookson, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Process and apparatus for casting multiple silicon wafer articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus of casting silicon produced by the reaction between SiF.sub.4 and an alkaline earth metal into thin wafer-shaped articles suitable for solar cell fabrication.

Nanis, Leonard (Palo Alto, CA)

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sol-GelGlasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

123

Glass Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late Bronze Age glasses. Journal of Archaeological Science781 - 789. Turner, W.E.S. 1954 Studies in ancient glassesand glass making processes. Part I: Crucibles and melting

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

silica glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...any amorphous, pale yellow to pale green natural silica glass such as moldavite, Libyan Desert glass, contains nearly 98% silica. RI:...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Schaeffer, Jon Conrad (Greenville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Synchrotron x-ray scattering investigations of oxygen-induced nucleation in a Zr-based glass-forming alloy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metallic glass-forming alloy VIT-105 (Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}) was used to study the effect of oxygen on nucleation. Ex situ synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments performed on as-cast samples showed that oxygen leads to the formation of tetragonal and/or cubic phases, depending on oxygen content. The samples crystallized into either a primitive tetragonal phase or the so-called fcc 'big cube' phase in a glassy matrix. A subsequent discussion on the role of oxygen in heterogeneous nucleation in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses is presented.

Wall, J. J.; Almer, J. D.; Vogel, S. C.; Liaw, P. K.; Choo, H.; Liu, C. T.; LANL; Univ. of Tennessee; ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Feasibility of Casting Sculpture in Kirksite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

given to the various zinc die-casting alloys. Kirksite consists of 91 percent zinc, 4 percent aluminum, 4 percent copper, and 1 percent magnesium. It is a bluish- white metal commonly used commercially by the automobile industry in the production... of zinc extant is an idol found in a prehistoric Dacian settle- ment in Transylvania. This idol was alloyed with lead and had a I physical makeup resembling zinkstuhl, a modern zinc alloy. The ancients probably were unacquainted with zinc; however...

Fox, Lewis Howard

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

Scribner, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms Bond switching underpins warping of strong metallic glasses Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences Director Takeshi Egami, left,...

131

Glass balls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a building with 100 floors in it, and glass balls, and an integer k with the following property. If one drops a glass ball from the floor number k or higher,...

132

Venetian glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a term used for imitation pearl made of hollow, iridescent glass, which is filled with wax to increase...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets ofWhen the current data on glass were compared with the metal

Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, D.P.

1984-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Classification of oxide glasses: A polarizability approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classification of binary oxide glasses has been proposed taking into account the values obtained on their refractive index-based oxide ion polarizability {alpha}{sub O2-}(n{sub 0}), optical basicity {lambda}(n{sub 0}), metallization criterion M(n{sub 0}), interaction parameter A(n{sub 0}), and ion's effective charges as well as O1s and metal binding energies determined by XPS. Four groups of oxide glasses have been established: glasses formed by two glass-forming acidic oxides; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic oxide and modifier's basic oxide; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic and conditional glass-forming basic oxide; glasses formed by two basic oxides. The role of electronic ion polarizability in chemical bonding of oxide glasses has been also estimated. Good agreement has been found with the previous results concerning classification of simple oxides. The results obtained probably provide good basis for prediction of type of bonding in oxide glasses on the basis of refractive index as well as for prediction of new nonlinear optical materials.

Dimitrov, Vesselin [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, The Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata-ken 940-2188 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@chem.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Glass Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Structure and Crystallization of Glasses. By WernerVogel. Pp. 246. (Pergamon: Oxford and New York, October 1971. ... account of the experimental work on liquid-liquid separation and nucleation and crystal growth in glasses carried out by the author and his colleagues in the laboratories of VEB Jena ...

R. W. DOUGLAS

1972-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Optical Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... space of time. In the forefront of such vital industries is the manufacture of optical glass. However great the other resources in men and material may be, it would be ... be, it would be quite impossible to wage successful warfare without adequate supplies of optical glass ior binocular field- ...

1919-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Glass Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... WE have received from the Department of Glass Technology, University of Sheffield, a copy of vol. ii. of Experimental Researches ... that department. The papers included have already appeared in the Journal of the Society of Glass Technology. They range over a somewhat wide field of the ...

1920-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tempered Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... year (NATURE, vol. xxxi. p. 7). It consists in the production of glass which appears to be of a very homogeneous character and of considerable strength and hardness ... which we propose to refer shortly, is that of keeping the whole body of the glass at a uniform temperature during the operations of heating and coolingthat is to say ...

1885-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ultra Large Castings For Lightweight Vehicle Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Die Casting process for their potential to enable the production of aluminum and magnesium primary automotive cast structural components with consistent and predictable...

147

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Glass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

industry sectors. Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis (2007) Documents for historical reference Energy and Environmental Profile of the Glass Industry (2002) Glass Industry...

152

Through a glass darkly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closeup Through a glass darklyThrough a glass darkly James E. Hall Keywords: AKAP2; AQP0;Medicine Closeup Through a glass darkly GLUT1 Glucose

Hall, James E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of Glass-Forming Metallic Film on the Fatigue Behavior of C-2000 Ni-Based Alloy , C. L. Chiang1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, glass-forming films are anticipated to be ideal coating materials to improve the fatigue resistance , C. L. Chiang1,2 , J. P. Chu2 , Y. F. Gao1 , and P. K. Liaw1 1 Dept. Materials Science & Engrg., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, U.S.A. 2 Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan

Gao, Yanfei

155

Crystallization of niobium germanosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Niobium germanosilicate glasses are potential candidates for the fabrication of transparent glass ceramics with interesting non-linear optical properties. A series of glasses in the (Ge,Si)O{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-K{sub 2}O system were prepared by melting and casting and their characteristic temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis. Progressive replacement of GeO{sub 2} by SiO{sub 2} improved the thermal stability of the glasses. Depending on the composition and the crystallization heat-treatment, different nanocrystalline phases-KNbSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, K{sub 3}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 13} and K{sub 3.8}Nb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 20.4} could be obtained. The identification and characterization of these phases were performed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The 40 GeO{sub 2}-10 SiO{sub 2}-25 Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-25 K{sub 2}O (mol%) composition presented the higher ability for volume crystallization and its nucleation temperature was determined by the Marotta's method. An activation energy for crystal growth of {approx}529 kJ/mol and a nucleation rate of 9.7x10{sup 18} m{sup -3} s{sup -1} was obtained, for this composition. Transparent glass ceramics with a crystalline volume fraction of {approx}57% were obtained after a 2 h heat-treatment at the nucleation temperature, with crystallite sizes of {approx}20 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy. - Abstract: TEM image and XRD pattern of the glass ceramic produced (circles indicate nanocrystals).

Santos, Rodrigo [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, Luis F., E-mail: luis.santos@ist.utl.p [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, Rui M. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais/ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico/TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Deubener, Joachim [Institute of Non-Metallic Materials, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wondraczek, Lothar [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization of Al-Mn particles in AZ91D investment castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese is currently added to Mg-Al alloys in order to improve the corrosion behavior of cast components. A part of this manganese is dissolved in the magnesium matrix and the balance is found as fine Al(Mn,Fe) particles dispersed within castings. For AZ91D specimens prepared using the plaster mould investment casting process, these particles were observed in very large quantity at the surface of castings. These particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. It was found that they consist of Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} phase and that their morphology and size depend on local solidification conditions. Their presence at the surface of the castings is related to low solidification rates and reduced thermal gradients at the mould/metal interface.

Lun Sin, S. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Dube, D. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada)], E-mail: dominique.dube@gmn.ulaval.ca; Tremblay, R. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies has formed apartnership with the U.S. metalcasting industry to accelerate the development of technoloiges and processes that will improve the industry's energy efficiency and environmental performance.

158

ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

defects. An appropriate blend of statistical, shop floor layout, computer numerical control, and scheduling techniques is not currently used to optimize operating...

159

ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. metalcasting industry will exhibit increased strength, vitality and innovation, contributing to the nations economy and security.

160

Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (~17 wt%) and high alkali (~80 wt%) low activity Hanford waste, known as AZ102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (SO3) content of 21 and 4.2 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7M Na) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 7 days in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their CCC-treated counterparts met the DOE LAW requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO3 (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium, surrogate for Tc-99, all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition (slurry feed) was melted continuously in the JHM and CCIM, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste.

Day, Delbert E.; Brow, R. K.; Ray, C. S.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Reis, Signo T.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Johnson, Fabienne; Hansen, E. K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Colored optical glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory manufactures various types of colored optical glasses: yellow, orange, and red glasses and glasses that are transparent in the IR region, as well as...

Mogilnaya, L G; Zinoveva, O B; Firsova, Yu A; Gulyukin, M N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

Dr. Von L. Richards

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Surface tension-driven shape-recovery of micro/nanometer-scale surface features in a Pt(57.5)Ni(5.3)Cu(14.7)P(22.5) metallic glass in the supercooled liquid region: A numerical modeling capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experiments in the literature show that micro/nano-scale features imprinted in a Pt-based metallic glass, Pt57.5Ni5.3Cu14.7P22.5 [Pt subscript 57.5 Ni subscript 5.3 Cu subscript 14.7 P subscript 22.5], using ...

Henann, David Lee

167

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Unsaturated drip tests on sludge based SRL glass : the effects of prior vapor hydration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a sludge-based Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) waste glasses exposed to as much as 7 years of unsaturated test conditions is reported. This test series included both as-cast glass and glass that had been pre-altered by exposure to 200 C water vapor. Actinides (except neptunium) are retained in alteration products and released primarily as solution-borne colloids and particulate when fresh glass is reacted. Pre-altered glass, however, rapidly releases most elements (including actinides) in a nearly congruent manner when first exposed to dripping water. Normalized boron release from the aged glass is more rapid than that of any other element by an order of magnitude. The response of pre-altered glass, as determined by cumulative boron release, follows a power-law behavior with time, corresponding roughly to t{sup 1/4}. This is consistent with a diffusion transport through clay alteration phases on the glass surface.

Fortner, J. A.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Process development of thin strip steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A World of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This clear molten liquid began to transform agriculture and horticulture. The use of glass houses to promote the precocious growth...enclosed coaches, watch-glasses, lighthouses, and street lighting. The sextant required glass, and the precision chronometer...

Alan Macfarlane; Gerry Martin

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

A World of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transform agriculture and horticulture. The use of glass houses...appeared. Glass cloches and greenhouses improved the cultivation...lighthouses, and street lighting. The sextant required glass...lanterns, lighthouses, and greenhouses, and finally through cameras...

Alan Macfarlane; Gerry Martin

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Plastic Flow in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1964 research-article Plastic Flow in Glass D. M. Marsh The classical brittle fracture...account for the mechanical properties of glasses, but the widespread evidence of plastic flow in all glass fracture phenomena even at room temperature...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Poisson's Ratio and the Densification of Glass under High Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of a relatively low atomic packing density, (C{sub g}) glasses experience significant densification under high hydrostatic pressure. Poisson's ratio ({nu}) is correlated to C{sub g} and typically varies from 0.15 for glasses with low C{sub g} such as amorphous silica to 0.38 for close-packed atomic networks such as in bulk metallic glasses. Pressure experiments were conducted up to 25 GPa at 293 K on silica, soda-lime-silica, chalcogenide, and bulk metallic glasses. We show from these high-pressure data that there is a direct correlation between {nu} and the maximum post-decompression density change.

Rouxel, T.; Ji, H. [Applied Mechanics Laboratory of the University of Rennes 1, LARMAUR, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Hammouda, T. [Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, CNRS-OPG , Universite Blaise Pascal, 5 rue Kessler, 63038 Clermont-Ferrand cedex (France); Moreac, A. [IPR, CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Type of phytoremediation Cost effective form of environmental remediation (Glass 1999) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al -using hyperaccumulator plant biomass to produce a bio-ore for commercial use -Li et al. look at using Ni

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

178

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Kaiser, Chair An orthopedic plaster or fiberglass cast is1 - Introduction 1.1 Background A plaster or fiberglass castunderstand how well a plaster or fiberglass cast fits over

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics Diverging views on glass transition Gregory B. mc.mckenna@ttu.edu T he glass transition is one of the most intriguing phenomena in the world of soft condensed matter. Despite decades of study, many aspects of the behaviour of glass-forming liquids remain elusive

Weeks, Eric R.

180

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Porosity on the Stiffness of Cast Steel RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the location, amount, and size characteristics of micro- and macroporosity, an integrated design process service perfor- mance.[2] It is anticipated that such a design process will guide and improve inspection in cast metal due to porosity or inclusions are not considered directly in part design. Instead, ad

Beckermann, Christoph

182

Glass capable of ionic conduction and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Sulfide glasses capable of conducting alkali metal ions are prepared from a nonmetal glass former such as GeS[sub 2], B[sub 2]S[sub 3] and SiS[sub 2] in mixture with a glass modifier such as Na[sub 2]S or another alkali metal sulfide. A molten mixture of the constituents is rapidly quenched to below the glass transition temperature by contact with a metal mold. The rapid quench is sufficient to prevent crystallization and permit solidification as an amorphous solid mixture. An oxygen-free atmosphere is maintained over the mixture to prevent oxidation. A new glass system of (1-X) Na[sub 2]O:XB[sub 2]S[sub 3] is disclosed. 4 figs.

Susman, S.; Delbecq, C.J.; Volin, K.J.; Boehm, L.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Glass Cookware Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

184

Manual HVOF thermal spray repair of nickel aluminum bronze castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manual high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spray repairs were accomplished on a large nickel aluminum bronze propeller castings. The repairs were done on three different configurations of surface defects of up to 100 square inches and as deep as 90 mils. Nickel aluminum bronze alloy powder, sieve sized for the HVOF process, was sprayed. High quality, high coating density, repairs were achieved even on porous areas of the castings. Prior to performance of the repairs, a procedure was qualified in accordance with MIL-STD-1687 and a mock-up simulating the repair was produced. After HVOF spraying of the mock-up, the sprayed surface was sanded, milled, and drilled to determine how finishing of the actual castings would be done. After successful procedure qualification, the HVOF equipment was moved to the job site, metal masking was devised for the spray areas and grit blasting and manual HVOF spraying was done. Results of HVOF coating chemical analyses, bend tests, coating tensile bond strength tests, coating microscopic examinations, and mock-up evaluations are reported along with the spray procedures and techniques used in the repairs.

Brenna, R.T.; McCaw, R.L.; Pugh, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

Sikka, V.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Glass Stronger than Steel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass Stronger than Steel Glass Stronger than Steel Stories of Discovery & Innovation Glass Stronger than Steel Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of R. Ritchie and M. Demetriou Highly magnified image shows a sharp crack introduced into palladium-based metallic glass and the extensive plastic shielding, marked by the white shear lines extending out from the crack, prevent the crack from opening the glass any further. Inset is a magnified view of the shear lines (arrow) developed during plastic sliding. 03.28.11 Glass Stronger than Steel A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech. Drop a glass and it breaks, right? But there's a kind of glass that while

187

Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

Montgomery, L.C.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum metal matrix Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites, Nanophase aluminum alloys, Bulk metallic glasses... of Missouri 1993 Young Metallurgist Award from the Indian...

189

ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 industrialbandwidth.pdf More Documents &...

190

Flux and the Continuous Casting of Steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......removed by the cooling water. It is the loss of heat...in the space above the pool of liquid steel. Some...casting is cooled by water jets. The casting then...of liquid steel in the pooL The stage, from the...provided that the overall conservation of energy is satisfied......

D. R. BLAND

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION Richard Hardin1 , K.K. Choi1 , and Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting Process Design, Optimization, Reliability-Based Design Optimization purpose reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) software tool previously developed at the University

Beckermann, Christoph

192

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

193

Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maryland. merit08mccarty6.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra Large Castings For Lightweight Vehicle Structures Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project (AMD 304)...

194

Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

high volume casting process capable of producing large, thin-walled aluminum or magnesium castings.* HPDCs are not suitable for most primary automotive body structural...

195

Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass Sector (NAICS 3272, 327993) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

196

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting???¢????????s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125???????°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU???¢????????s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Frequency-dependent conductivity of electron glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of dc and frequency-dependent conductivity in the quantum limiti.e., ??>kBTfor a broad range of dopant concentrations in nominally uncompensated, crystalline phosphorous-doped silicon and amorphous niobium-silicon alloys are reported. These materials fall under the general category of disordered insulating systems, which are referred to as electron glasses. Using microwave resonant cavities and quasioptical millimeter-wave spectroscopy we are able to study the frequency-dependent response on the insulating side of the metal-insulator transition. We identify a quantum critical regime, a Fermi glass regime, and a Coulomb glass regime. Our phenomenological results lead to a phase diagram description, or taxonomy, of the electrodynamic response of electron glass systems.

E. Helgren; N. P. Armitage; G. Grner

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

Glass/ceramic coatings for implants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Condensed matter: Through a glass, lightly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... allow detection of atomic jump rates. The authors use an unusual spin alignment echo (SAE) technique to detect Be hopping in the bulk metallic glass. They consider with care ... of the echo decay from the 9Be atoms; its pure exponential form confirms that the SAE technique detects unconstrained hopping that contributes fully to long-range atomic transport and is not ...

A. Lindsay Greer

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

A study on the oxidation characteristics of cast irons containing aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal-oxidation characteristics of cast irons containing aluminum (5-15% Al) from 700 to 1000{degrees}C in air have been studied. In addition to mass-gain measurements, the morphology and composition of the oxide scales have been examined by SEM-EDX system and XRD analysis. A normal Fe-5Al-C alloy does not develop protective, adherent scales. Even the addition of misch metal and calcium silicide to such an alloy does not improve its oxidation resistance. But aluminum cast iron develops considerable oxidation resistance only when a sufficient quantity of silicon is also present in the alloy. Treatment of the alloy with misch metal and calcium silicide together assists in protective scale formation. Among the alloys investigated Fe-15Al-Si-C treated with misch metal and calcium silicide shows minimum oxidation at 1000{degrees}C.

Ghosh, S.; Prodhan, A. [National Metallurigical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India); Mohanty, O.N. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)] [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beck, Horace C. 1934 Glass before 1500 BC. Ancient Egypt7 - 21. Cooney, John 1960 Glass sculpture in ancient Egypt.Journal of Glass Studies 2, pp. 10 - 43. 1976 Glass.

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Chapter 14 - Glass Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Glass has established itself as an essential material in our lives. The composition of glass depends on what it is used for, but the majority of glass in circulation is of the soda-limesilicate type. It is a material that is eminently recyclable, in the sense that it merely needs to be remelted and reformed to produce another glass article. However, glass must be color-sorted and processed to remove contaminants to ensure it is compatible with the product being manufactured. The key benefit of recycling via remelting is the reduced energy demand. However, because differences in color composition can arise between recovered glass and manufacturing output, alternative outlets are also often necessary. This chapter examines both the recycling of glass back into glass manufacture and these alternatives.

Thomas D. Dyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Kevin Glass | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glass kglass Primary tabs View(active tab) Track Kevin Glass Staff Member Title: Scientist Address: P.O. Box 999 K8-83 City: Richland State: WA Zip Code: 99352 Phone: (509)...

204

DRAFT Glass.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

205

MECS 2006- Glass  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

206

A Materials Science Driven Pattern Generation Solution to Fracturing Computer Generated Glass for Films and Games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include some plastics like polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), laminated, toughened glasses, safety glasses, other ceramics, most non-metals, and some metals when subjected to low temperatures. Brittleness, ductility, malleability, plasticity, stiffness...]. Their formula accurately models the brittle materials tested: flat PMMA and glass plates of various thickness. The continuous line in Figure 26 (B) is n=1.7(V^)1/2, where n is the number of radial cracks. 26 II.3. Visual Effects Approaches to Fracturing...

Monroe, David Charles

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

1990-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

GRAIN REFINEMENT OF PERMANENT MOLD CAST COPPER BASE ALLOYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys. Aluminum promoted b phase formation and modified the grain structure from dendritic to equiaxed. Lead or bismuth reduces the size of grains, but not change the morphology of the structure in Cu-Zn alloys. The grain size of the Cu-Zn-alloy can be reduced from 3000 mm to 300 mm after the addition of aluminum and lead. Similar effects were observed in EnviroBrass III after the addition of aluminum and bismuth. Boron refined the structure of yellow brasses in the presence of iron. At least 50 ppm of iron and 3 ppm of boron are necessary to cause grain refinement in these alloys. Precipitation of iron from the melt is identified as the cause of grain refinement. Boron initiates the precipitation of iron which could not be explained at this time. On the other hand zirconium causes some reduction in grain size in all four alloys investigated. The critical limit for the zirconium was found to be around 100 ppm below which not much refinement could be observed. The mechanism of grain refinement in the presence of zirconium could not be explained. Grain refinement by boron and iron can remain over a long period of time, at least for 72 hours of holding or after remelting few times. It is necessary to have the iron and boron contents above the critical limits mentioned earlier. On the other hand, refinement by zirconium is lost quite rapidly, some times within one hour of holding, mostly due to the loss of zirconium, most probably by oxidation, from the melt. In all the cases it is possible to revive the refinement by adding more of the appropriate refining element. Cooling curve analysis (thermal analysis) can be used successfully to predict the grain refinement in yellow brasses. The precipitation of iron in the liquid metal causes the metal to solidify without undercooling. Absence of this reaction, as indicated by the time-temperature (t-T) and its first derivative (dt/dT) curves, proved to be an indicator of refinement. The viability of the technique as an on-line quality control tool was proved in two foundries. The method can also correctly predict the onset of fading. Th

M. SADAYAPPAN, J.P. THOMSON, M.ELBOUJDAINI, G. PING GU, M. SAHOO

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modeling the glass forming ability of metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare Earth Elements..without the use of rare earth elements in Bulk Metallicwithout the Use of Rare Earth Elements details the design

Cheney, Justin Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices ? High Alloy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program This subtask under ESMARRT Material...

212

Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

213

Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. lm027sun2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting...

214

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 68% of the aluminum produced in the United States is first cast into ingots prior to further processing into sheet, plate, extrusions, or foil. The direct chill (DC) semi-continuous casting process has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of ingots due largely to its robust nature and relative simplicity. Though the basic process of DC casting is in principle straightforward, the interaction of process parameters with heat extraction, microstructural evolution, and development of solidification stresses is too complex to analyze by intuition or practical experience. One issue in DC casting is the formation of stress cracks [1-15]. In particular, the move toward larger ingot cross-sections, the use of higher casting speeds, and an ever-increasing array of mold technologies have increased industry efficiencies but have made it more difficult to predict the occurrence of stress crack defects. The Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap [16] has recognized the challenges inherent in the DC casting process and the control of stress cracks and selected the development of 'fundamental information on solidification of alloys to predict microstructure, surface properties, and stresses and strains' as a high-priority research need, and the 'lack of understanding of mechanisms of cracking as a function of alloy' and 'insufficient understanding of the aluminum solidification process', which is 'difficult to model', as technology barriers in aluminum casting processes. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks from the current level of 5% to 2%. Decreasing stress crack incidence is important for improving product quality and consistency as well as for saving resources and energy, since considerable amounts of cast metal could be saved by eliminating ingot cracking, by reducing the scalping thickness of the ingot before rolling, and by eliminating butt sawing. Full-scale industrial implementation of the results of the proposed research would lead to energy savings in excess of 6 trillion Btu by the year 2020. The research undertaken in this project aimed to achieve this objective by a collaboration of industry, university, and national laboratory personnel through Secat, Inc., a consortium of aluminum companies. During the four-year project, the industrial partners and the research team met in 16 quarterly meetings to discuss research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot production. The project focused on the development of a fundamental understanding of ingot cracking and detailed models of thermal conditions, solidification, microstructural evolution, and stress development during the initial transient in DC castings of the aluminum alloys 3004 and 5182. The microstructure of the DC casting ingots was systematically characterized. Carefully designed experiments were carried out at the national laboratory and university facilities as well as at the industrial locations using the industrial production facilities. The advanced computational capabilities of the national laboratories were used for thermodynamic and kinetic simulations of phase transformation, heat transfer and fluid flow, solidification, and stress-strain evolution during DC casting. The achievements of the project are the following: (1) Identified the nature of crack formation during DC casting; (2) Developed a novel method for determining the mechanical properties of an alloy at the nonequilibrium mushy zone of the alloy; (3) Measured heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) between the solidifying ingot and the cooling water jet; (4) Determined the material constitutive model at high temperatures; and (5) Developed computational capabilities for the simulation of cracking formation in DC casting ingot. The models and the database de

Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J. (ANL)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers. 19 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pressurized heat treatment of glass-ceramic to control thermal expansion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or isostructural), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10?12 to 1012?K/s. Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016?Pa?s. Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

John C. Mauro; Douglas C. Allan; Marcel Potuzak

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The X-ray Telescope of CAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

M. Kuster; H. Bruninger; S. Cbrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. Rodrguez; L. Strder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Viscosity Measurements with Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 May 1925 research-article Viscosity Measurements with Glass Vaughan H. Stott Edith Irvine D. Turner The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Richard Serra - Philip Glass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In dieser Arbeit soll den Gemeinsamkeiten im Werk von Richard Serra und Philip Glass nachgegangen werden. Ausgehend von der Analyse von Serras Arbeiten werden die (more)

Vogl, Christiane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

300-500C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

ITP Glass: Glass Industry Technology Roadmap; April 2002  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Glass is a unique material that has been produced for thousands of years. The glass industry's products are an integral part of the American economy and everyday life. Glass products are used in food and beverage packaging, lighting, communications, etc.

225

A206 74th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society: Abstracts DIFFERENTIATION OF Fe-Ni SPHERULES IN IMPACT GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Ni SPHERULES IN IMPACT GLASS M. Schaffer, T. Kasama, R. E. Dunin-Borkowski , A. N. MacDonald and C. Bender Koch. University of Copenhagen, Denmark Metallic, micron sized Fe-Ni spherules are frequently reported from glasses indicator of impact details unexploited. In this work on the impact glass from Wabar we report

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

226

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (?¢????Energy SMARRT?¢???) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU?¢????s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU?¢????s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immunology Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass R. H. Purcell J. R. Valdesuso W. L...human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific...

R. H. Purcell; J. R. Valdesuso; W. L. Cline; W. D. James; R. M. Chanock

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Glass-Making  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... director of Messrs. Pilkington Brothers, Ltd., on The Making of a Sheet of Glass. Major Weeks first gave a brief outline of some fundamental scientific considerations, with ... the raw materials are introduced at one end of a continuous furnace and the molten glass withdrawn at the other. The various processes necessary for the manufacture of sheet and ...

1933-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Glass Research Association  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... widely known that among the industries which have been profoundly influenced by the war the glass and glassware industry of the United Kingdom occupies a foremost place. Not only have ... certain special sections of this industry, previously non-existent in the country, to supply glass and glassware, ...

EDWARD MEIGH

1919-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Glass for Optical Purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE importance of an adequate supply of optical glass of all the principal types cannot be overestimated. The improvement of the microscope has ... improvement of the microscope has been and is still retarded for the want of suitable glasses, the construction of large telescopes is limited by the capacity of the glassmaker to ...

S. D. CHALMERS

1914-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Glass for Reflectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... "for the 4-foot disc of glass for the Paris reflector, in place of that which has so recently resulted in ... in place of that which has so recently resulted in failure, the St. Gobain Glass Company require twelve months' time to perfect (although, be it remembered, the quality ...

HENRY BESSEMER

1878-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Decorative Glass Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of a number of processes employed for the purpose of producing architectural decorative work in glass. Beginning with an account of the various kinds of ... . Beginning with an account of the various kinds of glass available for such work, and indulging in a retrospect of ...

W. R.

1909-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Structure of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Introduction of certain cations in soda or potash glass contracts or expands the network proportionally to the concentration, each oxide having its own ... constant over a wide range of compositions. The factors are different for soda and potash glasses, but they remain constant when

I. NRAY-SZAB

1959-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Notes on Glass1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A CERTAIN amount of experimental work on glass-ware of various kinds has been carried out recently at the National Physical Laboratory, ... known some of the results. Chemical investigations have for some years been dependent on German glass; the publication of the analyses and of test results may, it is hoped, ...

1915-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Glass former composition and method for immobilizing nuclear waste using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alkoxide glass former composition has silica-containing constituents present as solid particulates of a particle size of 0.1 to 0.7 micrometers in diameter in a liquid carrier phase substantially free of dissolved silica. The glass former slurry is resistant to coagulation and may contain other glass former metal constituents. The immobilization of nuclear waste employs the described glass former by heating the same to reduce the volume, mixing the same with the waste, and melting the resultant mixture to encapsulate the waste in the resultant glass.

Cadoff, Laurence H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Smith-Magowan, David B. (Washington, DC)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Glass: Recent Research and Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE systematic study of glass and the subject of ... and the subject of glass technology is a field with which the University of Sheffield is particularly associated, Sheffield ...

1956-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - a356 solidification cast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 10 Capabilities and Integration Potential of Current Casting Design Software Summary: and engineering information, simulation of the casting process...

240

YAG laser-induced structural modification in transition metal ion containing 40K{sub 2}O-40Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20SiO{sub 2} glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glasses with the compositions of 40K{sub 2}O-40Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20SiO{sub 2} (in mol%) containing different concentrations (0.01, 1 and 2 mol%) of NiO were prepared by a melt quenching technique. The glasses were irradiated with a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm, and a metastable crystalline phase of KNbO{sub 3} was obtained. In 2 mol% NiO-doped glass, lines with a width of {approx}10 {mu}m are successfully patterned by laser irradiations with a power of 0.9 W and a scanning speed of 15 {mu}m/s. It is found from micro-Raman scattering spectra that the lines are composed of the metastable crystalline phase of KNbO{sub 3}. The crystallization mechanism in Nd:YAG laser-induced crystallization in the glasses is discussed in comparison with the usual crystallization in an electric furnace.

Venkataraman, B. Harihara [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Komatsu, Takayuki [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)], E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ligands can be used to tune the energy difference of selected crystallographic...casting a Ag cuboid. Cyan and green dots denote (anti-)connectors...likely a consequence of surface energy minimization of...properties Next we used electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS...

Wei Sun; Etienne Boulais; Yera Hakobyan; Wei Li Wang; Amy Guan; Mark Bathe; Peng Yin

242

Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ligands can be used to tune the energy difference of selected crystallographic...casting of Ag cuboid. Cyan and green dots denote (anti-)connectors...likely a consequence of surface energy minimization of Ag...properties Next, we used electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS...

Wei Sun; Etienne Boulais; Yera Hakobyan; Wei Li Wang; Amy Guan; Mark Bathe; Peng Yin

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Categorization and Decision Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Programming, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D

Maddox, W. Todd

244

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Designing and constructing, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D., Chotibut, T

Maddox, W. Todd

245

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 (512) 232-2883 e-mail: glass@mail.utexas.edu EDUCATION 2006 ­ Cognitive include: Designing and constructing experiments, statistical #12;Glass, Brian 2 analysis, manuscript

Maddox, W. Todd

246

Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hyde, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004 Modeling the Effects of Mold Topography on Aluminum Cast Surfaces Lijian Tan1 , Nicholas Zabaras1 1 14853, USA Keywords: Aluminum Solidification; Mold topography; Cast Surfaces Abstract The air

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

249

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bruninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzn; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodrguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cardinal Glass Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cardinal Glass Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cardinal Glass Industries Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344 Product: Minnesota-based glass products maker. The...

252

Glass blowing on a wafer level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. Shelby, Introduction to Glass Science and Technology. :Properties of Corning Glasses [Online]. Available: http://1981. [15] R. H. Doremus, Glass Science. New York: Wiley,

Eklund, E. Jesper; Shkel, Andrei M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Atomization of metal (Materials Preparation Center)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a color video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was cast at the Ames Laboratorys Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov WARNING - AUDIO IS LOUD.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Speaker(s): Boris Lamontagne Date: June 22, 2012 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Selkowitz At the National Research Council, Canada we are developing a new type of smart glass based on micro-blinds (MEMS). The micro-blinds are tiny stressed metallic foils curling up once released or rolling down once actuated using electrostatic forces. Such smart glass is characterized by fast switching speed, UV-temperature insensitive and neutral appearance. Recent results will be presented as a well as our demo. Transmittance and thermal characteristics will also be addressed. There are various possible applications in building, automotive, aerospace as well as in display sectors. A video briefly describing the technology is

256

Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.] [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

260

Crystalline fragments in glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nature of tetrahedral molecular fragments is investigated in SiSe2 glasses using the molecular-dynamics method. The glass consists of both edge-sharing (ES) and corner-sharing tetrahedra. The ES tetrahedra are the building blocks of chain-like-molecular fragments. The two-edge-sharing tetrahedra are the nucleus, and corner-sharing configurations provide connecting hinges between fragments. Statistics of rings and fragments reveals that threefold and eightfold rings are most abundant, chainlike fragments that are typically 1015 long occur mostly in eightfold rings, and the longest fragments occur in elevenfold rings.

Giomal A. Antonio; Rajiv K. Kalia; Aiichiro Nakano; Priya Vashishta

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Laser:powder:substrate interactions in laser cladding and casting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser cladding and the recently developed laser casting technique are similar in their physical mechanisms. A transition from cladding to casting and vice versa can be achieved by proper control of the process parameters, both for preplaced and blown powder. In the present work, the preplaced powder technique is studied at a fundamental level. Its physical nature is responsible for a large operating window of dilution free cladding on the one hand and bond free casting on the other.

A.F.H. Kaplan; John Powell; Hans Gedda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A New Type of Submerged-Arc Flux-Cored Wire Used for Hardfacing Continuous Casting Rolls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is expected that the welding hardfacing of continuous casting rolls has better welding performance and higher wear resistance. A new type of submerged-arc hardfacing flux-cored wire has been developed through nitrogen replacing part of carbon and addition of the nitrogen-fixing elements of niobium and titanium. And microstructure, degree of hardness and high-temperature wear resistance of its deposited metal samples were also investigated. It is found that the microstructure is martensite, residual austenite and carbonitride precipitates. As a result, the hardfacing metal with homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles had high hardness and excellent wear-resisting property during high-temperature wear, which could significantly extend the service life of continuous casting rolls.

Ke YANG; Zhi-xi ZHANG; Wang-qin HU; Ye-feng BAO; Yong-feng JIANG

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Leaching of Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resistance to aqueous corrosion is the most important requirement of glasses designed to immobilize high level radioactive wastes. Obtaining a highly durable nuclear waste glass is complicated by the requirement ...

L. L. Hench

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Virtual Aluminum Castings An Industrial Application of Integrated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virtual Aluminum Castings An Industrial Application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Home Author: J. Allison, M. Li, C. Wolverton, X. Su Year: 2006 Abstract: The...

265

Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin-Wall Magnesium Applications Enabling Production of Lightweight Magnesium Parts for Near-Term Automotive Applications, April 2013...

266

Advanced precision expendable pattern casting technology. 1994 Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Casting technology is described. The following areas are reported on: precision pattern production; pattern coating; sand fill and compaction; pattern gating; mechanical properties; and technology transfer efforts.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Borosilicate Microporous Glasses for Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of microporous borosilicate glasses are described. Glasses with an optimum pore distribution are recommended for production and application.

S. L. Zakharov

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sources of Weakness in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1964 research-article Sources of Weakness in Glass C. Gurney The theoretical strength of glass is of the order of 2 to 5 MLb./in.$^2$ At room temperature, common glasses with undamaged surfaces give breaking stresses of about...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

271

Assessment of Computer Simulation Software and Process Data for High Pressure Die Casting of Magnesium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer software for the numerical simulation of solidification and mold filling is an effective design tool for cast structural automotive magnesium components. A review of commercial software capabilities and their validation procedures was conducted. Aside form the software assessment, the program addressed five main areas: lubricant degradation, lubricant application, gate atomization, and heat transfer at metal mold interfaces. A test stand for lubricant application was designed. A sensor was used for the direct measurement of heat fluxes during lubricant application and casting solidification in graphite molds. Spray experiments were conducted using pure deionized water and commercial die lubricants. The results show that the sensor can be used with confidence for measuring heat fluxes under conditions specific to the die lube application. The data on heat flux was presented in forms suitable for use in HPDC simulation software. Severe jet breakup and atomization phenomena are likely to occur due to high gate velocities in HPDC. As a result of gate atomization, droplet flow affects the mold filling pattern, air entrapment, skin formation, and ensuing defects. Warm water analogue dies were designed for obtaining experimental data on mold filling phenomena. Data on break-up jet length, break-up pattern, velocities, and droplet size distribution were obtained experimentally and was used to develop correlations for jet break-up phenomena specific to die casting gate configurations.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Hatfield, Edward C [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Kuwana, Kazunori [University of Kentucky; Viti, Valerio [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Hassan, Mohamed I [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Saito, Kozo [University of Kentucky

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Color Glass Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stonea cementitious waste formare being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Changes in the Atomic Structure through Glass Transition Observed by X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The glass transition involves a minor change in the internal energy, and yet the physical and mechanical properties of a glass change dramatically. In order to determine the evolution of the atomic structure through the glass transition, we employed in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements as a function of temperature on a model material: Zr-Cu-Al metallic glass. We found that the thermal expansion at the atomic level is smaller than the macroscopic thermal expansion, and significantly increases above the glass transition temperature. The observed changes in the pair-distribution function (PDF) are explained in terms of the fluctuations in the local atomic volume and their change through the glass transition.

Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Brief paper: Adaptive robust stabilization of continuous casting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous casting processes can suffer from a disturbance effect, called ''dynamic bulging'', that causes large oscillations of the mold level, significantly reduces the quality of the final product and may cause instability and damages. In this paper ... Keywords: Adaptive systems, Continuous casting, Disturbance rejection, Stability of linear plants, Time-delay systems

Christian Furtmller; Patrizio Colaneri; Luigi del Re

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Automatic 3D modeling of palatal plaster casts Marco Andreetto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic 3D modeling of palatal plaster casts Marco Andreetto Dept. of Information Engineer-form surfaces of anatomi- cal interest. 1. Introduction Plaster models derived from palate's impressions. A data-base with the 3D models of the plaster casts, which could be called a "virtual gypsotheque", can

Abu-Mostafa, Yaser S.

280

A boosting discriminative model for moving cast shadow detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moving cast shadow causes serious problem while segmenting and extracting foreground from image sequences, due to the misclassification of moving shadow as foreground. This paper proposes a boosting discriminative model for moving cast shadow detection. ... Keywords: boosting, discriminative random fields, graph cut, shadow detection

Yufei Zha; Ying Chu; Duyan Bi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High thermal expansion, sealing glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

Simancik, F. [Inst. of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Schoerghuber, F. [Illichmann GmbH, Altmuenster (Austria)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Influence of Casting Conditions on the Microstructure of As-Cast U-10Mo Alloys: Characterization of the Casting Process Baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sections of eight plate castings of uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) were sent from Y-12 to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for microstructural characterization. This report summarizes the results from this study.

Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysicists cast doubt Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C... , Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy dental castings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C... , Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco......

287

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

288

Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent experiment that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method of casting silicon into thin sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon (Si) is cast into thin shapes within a flat-bottomed graphite crucible by providing a melt of molten Si along with a relatively small amount of a molten salt, preferably NaF. The Si in the resulting melt forms a spherical pool which sinks into and is wetted by the molten salt. Under these conditions the Si will not react with any graphite to form SiC. The melt in the crucible is pressed to the desired thinness with a graphite tool at which point the tool is held until the mass in the crucible has been cooled to temperatures below the Si melting point, at which point the Si shape can be removed.

Sanjurjo, Angel (San Jose, CA); Rowcliffe, David J. (Los Altos, CA); Bartlett, Robert W. (Tucson, AZ)

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Epsilon Metal Waste Form for Immobilization of Noble Metals from Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epsilon metal (?-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass and thus the processing problems related there insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high reaction temperatures to form the alloy, expected to be 1500 - 2000C making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Rohatgi, Aashish; Zumhoff, Mac R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Epsilon metal waste form for immobilization of noble metals from used nuclear fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Epsilon metal (?-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass, thus the processing problems related to their insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high alloying temperatures, expected to be 15002000C, making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

Jarrod V. Crum; Denis Strachan; Aashish Rohatgi; Mac Zumhoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of a low loss magnetic composite utilizing amorphous metal flake. Third semi-annual progress report, 19 September 1979-18 March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of casting amorphous metal ribbon in the shape of a helix with properties suitable for motor applications. The tasks include (1) determination of the casting parameters required to produce a helical ribbon, (2) evaluation of magnetic properties and methods for bonding, and (3) developing methods for patterning a wheel for producing motor slots in as-cast ribbon.

Johnson, L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A guide to determining places in the glass-making process where energy can be saved and means by which energy can be saved.

295

Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); Argetsinger, Edward R. (Albany, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

297

Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

299

Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

Williams, R.S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor IST Press, 2000 #12;Collaborative Design of... The GLASS the glass chair, but also for the numerous discussions on glass production processes. And last · Carmo Valente Chapter 4. GLASS: BEAUTY WITH STRENGTH Sushil Kumar Mendiratta Chapter 5. The IDEA

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

302

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Color Glass Condensate and Glasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I review the Color Glass Condensate theory of gluon saturation, and its application to the early stages of heavy ion collisions.

Francois Gelis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Glass as a structural material.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Glass can be beautiful and strong, so why is it not used more often as a structural material? Most often the reasoning is because people (more)

White, Rachel Lynn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanfords (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Young

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and workers in the field. Another original premise of this project was that foam pattern and coating properties could be used to efficiently control metal fill. After studying the structure of EPS foam in detail for the period of this contract, we have come to the conclusion that EPS foam has an inherent variability at a scale that influences metal fill behavior. This does not allow for the detailed fine control of the process that we originally envisioned. We therefore have sought other methods for the control of the metal fill event. Of those, we now believe that the magnetic metal pump shows the most promise. We have conducted two casting trials using this method and preliminary results are very encouraging. A conclusion of our report is that, while every effort should continue to be made to produce uniform foam and coatings, the use of the magnetic metal pump should be encouraged and closed loop control mechanisms should be developed for this pouring method.

Ronald Michaels

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Efficient Breach Theory Through the Looking Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Signet 1960).Theory Through the Looking Glass such an award a put by theTheory Through the Looking Glass Consider also the hoary

Adler, Barry E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Immobilization of Chloroperoxidase on Aminopropyl-Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immobilization of Chloroperoxidase on Aminopropyl-Glass Tenshuk A. Kadima Michael A. Pickard...89362 was covalently bound to aminopropyl-glass by using a modification of an established method. Acid-washed glass was derivatized by using aminopropyltriethoxysilane...

Tenshuk A. Kadima; Michael A. Pickard

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 October 1970 research-article Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products A. J. Majumdar Glass fibre reinforced cements and gypsum plaster...discontinuous and irregular. The dispersion of glass fibre in the matrix is not easy. When chopped...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retention in Hanford LAW Glass - Phase 1 Final Report. VSL-rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-rayfor NIST SRM 610617 Glasses Following ISO Guidelines," 35[

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Report: EM Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Strategic Vision-Casting Subcommittee Background: In the course of developing the Environmental Management Advisory Board's (EMAB) fiscal year (FY) 2008 review topics, EM leadership and Board members recognized a need to re-examine the program's strategy and vision for the future, in order to better position EM and continue its momentum for clean-up and closure. This endeavor will also ensure that the next administration and current stakeholders are aligned with EM's proposed priorities, funding requirements, and commitments for 2009 and beyond. Consequently, the Board formed a Strategic Vision-Casting Subcommittee that was charged with the assignment of reviewing EM's current and past missions and strategic visions to assess

313

Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan This work plan proposes to build a systematic knowledge base for the thermal aging behavior of cast stainless steels (CASSs) within a limited time of five years. The final output of execution of the plan is expected to provide conclusive predictions for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the extended service life up to and beyond 60 years. Mechanical and microstructural data obtained through accelerated aging experiment and computational simulation will be the key input for the prediction of CASS behaviors and for the integrity analyses for various CASS components. While the accelerated aging experiment and computational simulation results will comprise the main components of the knowledge base

314

Kin selection, genomics and caste-antagonistic pleiotropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Special feature 1001 14 70 Kin selection, genomics and caste-antagonistic pleiotropy David...evolution of social behaviours. The genomics revolution now provides the opportunity...Outlook: kin selection and social insect genomics The revolution in social insect genomics...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

Humbert, Matthew S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Melt-solid interactions in laser cladding and laser casting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data in conjunction with mathematical models are used to explain various aspects of laser casting and laser cladding by the preplaced powder method. For increasing ... the powder bed is analyzed to i...

H. Gedda; A. Kaplan; J. Powell

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Marry for What? Caste and Mate Selection in Modern India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyzes how preferences for a noneconomic characteristic (e.g., caste) can affect equilibrium patterns of matching, and empirically evaluates this in the context of middle-class Indian arranged marriages. We ...

Banerjee, Abhijit

319

Methods for manufacturing monocrystalline or near-monocrystalline cast materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a monocrystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Art and Form in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... book. The new edition has been brought up to date, the historical section on glass manufacture now concludes with a brief reference to the float process first announced a year ... a year or so ago and the beautiful collection of photographs illustrating the use of glass in buildings has been changed considerably. Many of the photographs are of things which ...

R. W. DOUGLAS

1962-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Types of Optical Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN view of the interest shown in new optical glasses recently produced in Great Britain and in the United States, we wish to summarize ... probable lines of development. Advances in lens design have led to a demand for new glasses with optical properties different from those available hitherto as outlined in a recent paper by ...

W. M. HAMPTON; R. E. BASTICK; W. N. WHEAT

1944-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

Structure and Density of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SiO2-B2O3 mixed glasses show a linear relation between v and R, which is the number of oxygen ... where the chemical symbols stand for the gram atoms present in a given quantity of glass (for example, 100 gm.) of the respective elements. For SiO2-B2O 3- ...

I. NRAY-SZAB

1958-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Glass-making in England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... trouble to look through a catalogue of works in English dealing with the subject of glass will be struck with its poverty. For the most part, books on ... will be struck with its poverty. For the most part, books on glass have been written by collectors and admirers of ...

W. E. S. TURNER

1923-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Third International Congress on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Third International Congress on Glass was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission ... was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission on Glass, the annual meeting of which was held on July 3. 179 delegates attended from ...

1953-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Metal Aminoboranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

326

Apatite- and monazite-bearing glass-crystal composites for the immobilization of low-level nuclear and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that glass-crystal composite waste forms can be produced from waste streams containing high proportions of phosphorus, transition metals, and/or halides. The crystalline phases produced in crucible-scale melts include apatite, monazite, spinels, and a Zr-Si-Fe-Ti phase. These phases readily incorporated radionuclide and toxic metals into their crystal structures, while corrosion tests have demonstrated that glass-crystal composites can be up to 300-fold more durable than simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses, such as SRL 202U.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Wolf, S.F.; DiSanto, T.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nanophase Glass Ceramics for Capacitive Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Glass ceramics are candidate dielectric materials for high energy storage capacitors. Since energy density depends primarily on dielectric permittivity and breakdown strength, glass ceramics with (more)

Rangarajan, Badri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under Alkaline Conditions at 40C: Implications for a Chemical Affinity-Based Aluminoborosilicate Waste Glass Dissolution under...

331

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their...

332

A Topological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose and study a model with glassy behavior. The state space of the model is given by all triangulations of a sphere with $n$ nodes, half of which are red and half are blue. Red nodes want to have 5 neighbors while blue ones want 7. Energies of nodes with different numbers of neighbors are supposed to be positive. The dynamics is that of flipping the diagonal of two adjacent triangles, with a temperature dependent probability. We show that this system has an approach to a steady state which is exponentially slow, and show that the stationary state is unordered. We also study the local energy landscape and show that it has the hierarchical structure known from spin glasses. Finally, we show that the evolution can be described as that of a rarefied gas with spontaneous generation of particles and annihilating collisions.

Jean-Pierre Eckmann

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuel oil is used in the glass industry (less than 2 percent of total energy). Natural gas is usually the fuel of choice as it is cleaner and in some cases, more cost-effective,...

336

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg EDCE Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1 ENAC/EDCE 2011In contemporary architecture glass is increasinglyIn contemporary architecture glass is increasingly applied for structural components such as beamsapplied for structural components such as beams. However glass

338

Microporous glasses for reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The preparation, heat-treatment and leaching of phase separable borosilicate glasses which are of interest as possible semipermeable membranes for reverse osmosis applications are described. It is shown that ... ...

P. W. McMillan; C. E. Matthews

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Viscosity Measurements in Molten Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relations existing between viscosity determinations and the various stages of glass manufacture are pointed out and explained with reference to a typical viscosity?temperature curve. The rotation viscometer employed in making such determinations is described. Curves are shown for four representative types of glasses: a lead a lime a lead borosilicate and a hard borosilicate and the use to which such comparison curves may be put is indicated.

Howard R. Lillie

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

Elsholz, William E. (Acampo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

Karimian, Majid [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Idris, M. H. [Dept. of Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Johor Bauru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

Casting of particle-based hollow shapes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the production of hollow articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is coated onto a prewarmed continuous surface in a relatively thin layer so that the slurry is substantially uniformly coated on the surface. The heat of the prewarmed surface conducts to the slurry to initiate a reaction which causes the slurry to set or harden in a shape conforming to the surface. The hardened configurations may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

Menchhofer, Paul (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fluid casting of particle-based articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the production of articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is introduced into an immiscible, heated fluid. The slurry sets or hardens into a shape determined by the physical characteristics of the fluid and the manner of introduction of the slurry into the fluid. For example, the slurry is pulse injected into the fluid to provide spherical articles. The hardened spheres may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

Menchhofer, Paul (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Casting of particle-based hollow shapes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the production of hollow articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is coated onto a prewarmed continuous surface in a relatively thin layer so that the slurry is substantially uniformly coated on the surface. The heat of the prewarmed surface conducts to the slurry to initiate a reaction which causes the slurry to set or harden in a shape conforming to the surface. The hardened configurations may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

Menchhofer, Paul (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Casting a Light on California | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California October 28, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Combined, the six projects will produce 2,837 megawatts of energy, enough to power 851,500 to 2.1 million homes, as well as create 3,700 new construction jobs and more than six hundred permanent plant operations positions. Yesterday, Secretary Salazar joined Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, an innovative "power tower" project in San Bernardino County, California. Located in Southern California's Mojave Desert, Ivanpah will use solar "power tower" technology to produce up to 370 megawatts of clean,

346

Casting a Light on California | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California October 28, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Combined, the six projects will produce 2,837 megawatts of energy, enough to power 851,500 to 2.1 million homes, as well as create 3,700 new construction jobs and more than six hundred permanent plant operations positions. Yesterday, Secretary Salazar joined Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, an innovative "power tower" project in San Bernardino County, California. Located in Southern California's Mojave Desert, Ivanpah will use solar "power tower" technology to produce up to 370 megawatts of clean,

347

Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resins property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for aircooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; A. Eslamian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6-07 Day and Peeler Session 6 FeP Glass EM-31 Tech Exchange Final new.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development and Demonstration and Demonstration DE Day (Missouri S & T) DE Day (Missouri S & T) DK Peeler (SRNL) DK Peeler (SRNL) November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Participating Organizations Print Close Incentive * Iron phosphate glasses retain high concentrations of some waste components that are difficult to dissolve into borosilicate melts - Sulfates, phosphates, heavy metals (Cr, Bi, Mo) and halides (F, Cl) * Translates into significant increases in waste loading (WL) or reduced canister counts for specific waste streams * Key questions: - Which Hanford HLW/LAW or INL waste streams would benefit from increased waste loadings offered by FeP glass systems? * Example: SO 3 limited wastes - Borosilicate glasses  1 -

349

The effect of regimes and methods of glass forming on the tin content in float glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the tin content in glass is derived as a function of the iron oxidecontent in the glass composition, regimes and methods of forming, ... The ways of reducing the tin content in glass in the cour...

V. I. Kondrashov; V. S. Bezlyudnaya; Yu. V. Zverev

350

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tape-cast sensors and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Plaster Casts at Berkeley. Collections of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology & Department of Classics at UC Berkeley. An Exhibition of Rare Plaster Casts of Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. 2nd edition 2005, pp. vi + 76 + ii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Britain: An Oxford Story of Plaster Casts from the Antique (sculptor Lysistratos took plaster impressions not only fromPlaster Casts at Berkeley COLLECTIONS OF THE HEARST MUSEUM

Miller, Stephen G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental...

354

A radiochemical study of the mechanism of polishing glass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In an effort to determine whether glass flows when polished uranium glasses were fused to non uranium glasses and polishings carried out in a direction (more)

Smith, John Graham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Optically transparent glass with vertically alignedcomposition of biosoluble glass fiber Korean ApplicationS. Jin, Optically Transparent Glass with Vertically Aligned

Kim, Jin Yeol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a fractured Roman glass. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta,Santarini (2008). SON68 nuclear glass dissolution kinetics:B. (2006). Nuclear waste glasses How durable? Elements, 2,

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Small Glass-Melting Furnaces for Clear, Tinted, and Specialized Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the design and application areas of small-sized glass-melting furnaces for melting various-purpose glasses are supplied.

A. A. Dymov; V. A. Fedorova

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Developments of cast superalloys and technology for gas turbine blades in BIAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1960's many important subjects relating to cast turbine blades including alloy developments, directional solidification (DS) and single crystal (SC) technique and casting technology for blades have been ...

R. Z. Chen

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Metal inks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Multiple reentrant glass transitions in confined hard-sphere glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass forming liquids exhibit a rich phenomenology upon confinement. This is often related to the effects arising from wall-fluid interactions. Here we focus on the interesting limit where the separation of the confining walls becomes of the order of a few particle diameters. For a moderately polydisperse, densely packed hard-sphere fluid confined between two smooth hard walls, we show via event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the emergence of a multiple reentrant glass transition scenario upon a variation of the wall separation. Using thermodynamic relations, this reentrant phenomenon is shown to persist also under constant chemical potential. This allows straightforward experimental investigation and opens the way to a variety of applications in micro- and nanotechnology, where channel dimensions are comparable to the size of the contained particles. The results are in-line with theoretical predictions obtained by a combination of density functional theory and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition.

S. Mandal; S. Lang; M. Gross; M. Oettel; D. Raabe; T. Franosch; F. Varnik

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Maty et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Valid from Michaelmas 2009 1 2P3 Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between microstructure and a phase diagram Practical Skills 1. Melting and casting methods 2 handled tongs. 2. Remove the crucibles from the furnace after 1hour and stir with a graphite rod. Replace there is no possibility for any materials to be set alight by the molten alloy or any chance of contact with personnel. 5

Paxton, Anthony T.

366

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM K.D. Carlson1 , C: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed and hot tears in squeeze casting of magnesium alloys. Introduction Both shrinkage porosity and hot tears

Beckermann, Christoph

367

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Unique properties of lunar impact glass: Nanophase metallic Fe synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...National Laboratory ( http://eande.lbl.gov/ECS/aerogels/satoc.htm ). Silbond H-5 was mixed with an equal volume...Silica sol as a nanoglue: flexible synthesis of composite aerogels. Science, 284, 622-624. Nagata, T., Fisher, R.M...

Yang Liu; Lawrence A. Taylor; James R. Thompson; Darren W. Schnare; Jae-Sung Park

369

Diffusion mechanisms in metallic supercooled liquids and glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... K for 9Be). It was shown recently that the 9Be spin alignment echo technique (SAE) is very effective in detecting Be hopping in glassy Vit1 and Vit4 with atomic ... Vit1 and Vit4 with atomic jump rates as low as 0.1 s-1. The SAE technique is based on the JeenerBroekaert sequence 90x?145y?45 ...

X.-P. Tang; Ulrich Geyer; Ralf Busch; William L. Johnson; Yue Wu

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electron-Transport in La100-Xalx Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as that of the energy derivative of the d-band densi- ty of states at the Fermi energy. A counterexample, how- ever, is provided by amorphous La-Ga alloys which exhib- it a negative thermopower but which are expected to have a positive derivative of the d...-band density of states at the Fermi energy. A similar counterexample is provided by the positive thermopower of amorphous Ca-Al alloys" which have a large d-band density-of-states contribution with a negative derivative at the Fermi surface. For the Ca...

DELGADO, R.; ARMBRUSTER, H.; Naugle, Donald G.; TSAI, CL; JOHNSON, WL; WILLIAMS, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

Madan, A.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Glass Transition in Confined Geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending mode-coupling theory, we elaborate a microscopic theory for the glass transition of liquids confined between two parallel flat hard walls. The theory contains the standard MCT equations in bulk and in two dimensions as limiting cases and requires as input solely the equilibrium density profile and the structure factors of the fluid in confinement. We evaluate the phase diagram as a function of the distance of the plates for the case of a hard sphere fluid and obtain an oscillatory behavior of the glass transtion line as a result of the structural changes related to layering.

Simon Lang; Vitalie Botan; Martin Oettel; David Hajnal; Thomas Franosch; Rolf Schilling

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die lubricants and technical support. Experiments conducted with these lubricants demonstrated good protection of the substrate steel. Graphite and boron nitride used as benchmarks are capable of completely eliminating soldering and washout. However, because of cost and environmental considerations these materials are not widely used in industry. The best water-based die lubricants evaluated in this program were capable of providing similar protection from soldering and washout. In addition to improved part quality and higher production rates, improving die casting processes to preserve the life of the inserts will result in energy savings and a reduction in environmental wastes. Improving die life by means of optimized cooling line placement, baffles and bubblers in the die will allow for reduced die temperatures during processing, saving energy associated with production. The utilization of optimized die lubricants will also reduce heat requirements in addition to reducing waste associated with soldering and washout. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.1 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on commercial introduction in 2010, a market penetration of 70% by 2020 is 1.26 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.025 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

CYRANO CAST LIST: All Cast members need to be measured in the costume shop before semester break. Please  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/s CHERESTANI); Katherine Schooler FULMINA; Jenna Jo Pawlicki TERRAMOTA; Marley Boone Peter Pan Cast List PETER Schenfisch MICHAEL: Forest Colson MR. DARLING: Avery Bell MRS. DARLING/ CAPTAIN HOOK: Jacqueline Wheeler SMEE/Ensemble Michael Barbour Launce/Ensemble Jacqueline Wheeler Lucetta/Ensemble Sarah Matthews Duke/Ensemble Jeremy

Liu, Taosheng

377

Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. Buchenau...transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of...Supplement No. 126, 1997 Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers U. BUCHENAU......

U. Buchenau

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological...

Arcak, Cory

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others.

Farmer, J

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1 concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5 and 10 of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Muller and L. B. Ioffe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Mu¨ller and L. B. Ioffe Department December 2004) We establish the connection between the presence of a glass phase and the appearance correlations in a systematic way, we show that in the case of strong disorder a continuous glass transition

Müller, Markus

383

Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T phase diagram for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 January 1980 research-article Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion...Ubbelohde G. Manfre The development of glass fibre compositions having sufficient alkali...resistance were used in an initial evaluation of glass compositions, which were then further...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

On the Strength and Structure of Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article On the Strength and Structure of Glass J. E. Gordon D. M. Marsh Margaret E. M. L. Parratt The strength of glass is known to be very variable and also...been revealed on the surface of drawn glasses. These crack systems are correlated...

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Monte Carlo Simulation of Isopentane Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Monte Carlo Simulation of Isopentane Glass S. Yashonath C. N. R. Rao Monte Carlo...quenching the liquid, we have obtained the glass-transition temperature from the temperature...distribution functions suggest a structure of the glass primarily influenced by geometrical factors...

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Identifying the Bose glass phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introducing disorder into the Bose-Hubbard model at integer fillings leads to a Bose glass phase, along with the Mott insulator and superfluid phases. We suggest a new order parameter: the determinant of the one body density matrix, which is nonzero only within the Mott-insulator phase. Alongside the superfluid fraction, it is then possible to distinguish the three phases. The Bose glass phase is the only phase which has vanishing determinant and superfluid fraction. The vanishing of the determinant in the Bose glass phase occurs due to the partial fragmentation of the condensate into localized fragments, each with zero superfluid response, which implies the presence of unoccupied sites and hence the presence of lines of zeros in the one body density matrix. In the superfluid phase, the determinant vanish for another reason - due to the macroscopic occupation of a single particle state. Finally, we suggest the enhancement of the three body decay rate in the Bose glass phase, as an experimental indicator for the presence of localized fragments.

R. Pugatch; N. Bar-gill; N. Katz; E. Rowen; N. Davidson

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

One-way glass for microwaves using nonreciprocal metamaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a class of nonreciprocal metamaterials based on composite assemblies of metallic and biased ferrimagnetic elements. We show that such structures act as ultrathin one-way glasses due to the competition between two modes at the surface of the ferrimagnetic elementsa low-loss surface wave that transmits the signal on the other side of the structure and a surface spin-wave resonance that produces strong isolation levels. These findings can be adapted to existing metamaterial geometries, offering a blueprint to achieve unidirectional propagation in a variety of artificial media at radio, microwave, and millimeter wave frequencies.

A. Degiron and D. R. Smith

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Extraction of Proteins Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead method is preferred. Some researchers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of Proteins ­ Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead. glass beads (106 micron glass bead, Sigma cat. No. G4649) 7. Tabletop centrifuge 8. Vortex 9 µl glass beads (106 micron glass beads, Sigma, cat. G4649). 8. Vortex at top speed for 5 minutes. 9

390

METALLURGICAL EVALUATION OF CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS AND THEIR WELDMENTS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FINAL REPORT FINAL REPORT VOLUME 1 METALLURGICAL EVALUATION OF CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS AND THEIR WELDMENTS SUBMITTED TO U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Award Number - DE-FC36-00 ID13975 OCTOBER 1, 2000 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2005 SONGQING WEN CARL D. LUNDIN GREG BATTEN MATERIALS JOINING GROUP MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE CARL D. LUNDIN PROFESSOR OF METALLURGY MATERIALS JOINING GROUP MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE 37996-2200 TELEPHONE (865) 974-5310 FAX (865) 974-0880 lundin@utk.edu This is Volume 1of 5 of the final report for The Department of Energy Grant # DE-FC36-00 ID13975 entitled "Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steel Castings." ii FOREWARD

391

Selecting copper and copper alloys; Part 2: Cast products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides an introduction to the properties, characteristics, and applications of cast coppers and copper alloys. An overview of alloy families is presented since it is impractical to describe all 130 standard grades in detail. However, additional technical information is readily available from the Copper Development Assn. Inc. (CDA) and the resources listed in the references and bibliography at the end of the article. Copper casting alloys are primarily selected for either their corrosion resistance, or their combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The materials also feature good castability, high machinability, and, compared with other corrosion-resistant alloys, reasonable cost. Additional benefits include biofouling resistance--important in marine applications--and a spectrum of attractive colors. Many of the alloys also have favorable tribological properties, which explains their widespread use for sleeve bearings, wear plates, gears, and other wear-prone components.

Peters, D.T. (Copper Development Association Inc., New York, NY (United States)); Kundig, K.J.A. (Kundig (Konrad J.A.), Randolph, NJ (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Laser-Ultrasonic Inspection of MG/AL Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-ultrasonics is used to assess the metallurgical bond between Mg/Al materials in die-cast Magnesium/Aluminum composite. The acoustic impedances of Mg, Al and air are such that the amplitude of ultrasonic echoes reflected back from a void is many times larger than the amplitude of those reflected back from a well-bonded interface. In addition, the polarity of echoes from a void is inverted compared to that from a well-bonded interface. Laser-ultrasonic F-SAFT is also used for imaging tilted Mg/Al interfaces. Experimental setup, signal processing and results for detecting voids in the Mg/Al interface of cast parts are presented.

Blouin, Alain; Levesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre [Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council Canada, 75 de Mortagne blvd, Boucherville, Quebec, J4B 6Y4 (Canada); Baril, Eric [Noranda Inc., 2250 Alfred Nobel blvd, St-Laurent, Quebec, H4S 2C9 (Canada); Fischersworring-Bunk, Andreas [BMW Group, Hufelandstr.8a, 80788 Munich (Germany)

2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets Kent D. Carlson dataset; Ni-based alloys N3M, CW6MC and CW12MW can be represented by the benchmark CW12MW dataset; and Ni-based alloys M30C and M35-1 can be represented by the benchmark M35-1 dataset. While these alloy groupings

Beckermann, Christoph

394

3D Rendering and Ray Casting Michael Kazhdan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Rendering and Ray Casting Michael Kazhdan (600.357 / 600.457) HB Ch. 13.7, 14.6 FvDFH 15.5, 15.10 #12;Rendering · Generate an image from geometric primitives Rendering Geometric Primitives (3D) Raster Image (2D) #12;3D Rendering Example What issues must be addressed by a 3D rendering system? #12;Overview

Kazhdan, Michael

395

Glasses for solar energy conversion systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar technologies are projected to increase tremendously over the next 10 years. Glasses are playing an important role as transparent materials of photovoltaic (PV) cells and concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Glasses are materials of short energy payback time and environmental compatibility suitable for sustainable energy concepts. The paper reviews recent solar applications. Surface structuring and coating of glasses are shown to improve energy efficiency for solar conversion systems substantially. Encapsulated glass-to-glass PV modules and solar photocatalytic glass surfaces are identified as elements of a green architecture combining renewable power generating and destruction of air pollutants of urban environments. Emerging solar technologies for power generation, including transparent PV modules, solar chimney and thermoelectric systems may become significant areas of future solar glass applications.

J. Deubener; G. Helsch; A. Moiseev; H. Bornhft

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Axion helioscopes update: the status of CAST and IAXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost 35 years since their suggestion as a good solution to the strong CP-problem, axions remain one of the few viable candidates for the Dark Matter, although still eluding detection. Most of the methods for their detection are based on their coupling to photons, one of the most sensitive ones being the helioscope technique. We report on the current status of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope and the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II, where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV, are presented. Currently, CAST is expecting to improve its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 after the upgrade of the X-ray detectors and with the implementation of a second X-ray optic. At the same time, it is exploring other possibilities at the low energy physics frontier. On the other hand IAXO, the fourth generation axion helioscope, aims to improve CAST's perf...

Dafni, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Axion helioscopes update: the status of CAST and IAXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost 35 years since their suggestion as a good solution to the strong CP-problem, axions remain one of the few viable candidates for the Dark Matter, although still eluding detection. Most of the methods for their detection are based on their coupling to photons, one of the most sensitive ones being the helioscope technique. We report on the current status of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope and the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II, where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV, are presented. Currently, CAST is expecting to improve its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 after the upgrade of the X-ray detectors and with the implementation of a second X-ray optic. At the same time, it is exploring other possibilities at the low energy physics frontier. On the other hand IAXO, the fourth generation axion helioscope, aims to improve CAST's performance in terms of axion-photon coupling by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude. The details of the project building a dedicated magnet, optics and X-ray detectors are given.

T. Dafni; F. J. Iguaz; on behalf of the CAST; IAXO collaborations

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH)

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make CuAlNi shape-memory wires and NiNbSn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, P. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Coated glass in the automotive industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic coatings on glasses have reached the level where they will certainly be applied in the automotive industry in order to solve such glazing problems as heat load, heat loss, glare, UV adsorption, disturbed reflections, electromagnetic influence and thermal insulation. Their widespread use will depend on optimising the solution to problems of solar control and heatable glasses while the glass is also capable of the other functions required of it, thus justifying the relatively high cost that is predicted. There remain unsolved problems in optical limits and colour matching. When these are solved solar control glasses are likely to give real advantages in terms of air conditioning and comfort, and heatable glasses will be used in association with electrical power for demisting and deicing. Particular attention is being directed to a class of infrared reflecting and heatable glasses, obtained by selectively coating transparent plastic films that are embedded or bonded in laminated or tempered glasses. Fabricating this type of glasses has mainly been useful for two reasons: (I) to develop versatile techniques to make solar control IR reflecting and heatable glasses for all kinds and dimensions of vehicle glazing; and (2) to assess whether these glasses are really feasible alternatives to directly coated glasses. This paper describes results of some solar control experiments in Fiat cars: to ascertain the actual internal temperature differences found when glazing vehicles with the absorbing and reflecting IR glasses currently available; and to obtain results with a similar purpose using heatable glasses. There is also discussion of how the glasses could be used in glazing all or parts of a car's windows / especially addressing problems of glare. Suggestions are made of the directions of this research in the future.

G. Manfre

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GASAR porous metals process control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GASAR porous metals are produced by melting under a partial pressure of hydrogen and then casting into a mold that ensures directional solidification. Hydrogen is driven out of solution and usually grows as quasi-cylindrical pores normal to the solidification front. Experiments with pure nickel have been carried out under processing conditions of varying H{sub 2} partial pressure, total pressure (H{sub 2} + Ar), and superheat. An analysis that considers heterogeneous bubble nucleation was developed that identifies processing conditions in which hydrogen bubbles are stable in the liquid before solidification. It is hypothesized that these conditions lead to low porosity because these bubbles float out of the melt and escape the advancing solidification front. Experimental data are shown to support this hypothesis.

Apprill, J.M.; Poirier, D.R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Maguire, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gutsch, T.C. [California State Univ., Chico, CA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparison of TCLP and long-term PCT performance on low-level mixed waste glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating technologies for conversion of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) into a form suitable for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the preferred technologies since it is capable of consistently producing a durable, leach resistant wasteform, while simultaneously minimizing disposal volumes. Since vitrification of LLMW is a relatively new concept, final wasteform specifications have not been developed. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed the Product Consistency Test (PCI), which is a 7-day leaching procedure for glass. Comparison indicates that both tests have merit where LLMW glasses are concerned. The TCLP is an important test for determining the release of metals and for allowing the wasteform to be delisted while the PCT is more useful for determining consistent production of durable glass. It is a better indicator of the behavior of glass in disposal site conditions. Most aggressive leaching of common oxide glasses occurs under caustic rather than acidic conditions, therefore it is necessary to perform both tests. Further tests will be conducted using additional glass compositions and variations in the TCLP and the PCT.

Cicero, C.A.; Andrews, M.K.; Bickford, D.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Probing the glass transition from structural and vibrational properties of zero-temperature glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that the density dependence of the glass transition temperature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) systems can be predicted from properties of the zero-temperature ($T=0$) glasses. Below a crossover density $\\rho_s$, LJ and WCA glasses show different structures, leading to different vibrational properties and consequently making LJ glasses more stable with higher glass transition temperatures than WCA ones. Above $\\rho_s$, structural and vibrational quantities of the $T=0$ glasses show scaling collapse. From scaling relations and dimensional analysis, we predict a density scaling of the glass transition temperature, in excellent agreement with simulation results. We also propose an empirical expression of the glass transition temperature using structural and vibrational properties of the $T=0$ glasses, which works well over a wide range of densities.

Lijin Wang; Ning Xu

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Li corrosion resistant glasses for headers in ambient temperature Li batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing 10 to 50 mol% CaO, 10 to 50 mol% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 30 to 60 mol% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0 to 30 mol% MgO are provided. These compositions are capable of forming a stable glass-to-metal seal possessing electrical insulating properties for use in a lithium battery. Also provided are lithium cells containing a stainless steel body and molybdenum center pin electrically insulated by means of a seal produced according to the invention.

Hellstrom, E.E.; Watkins, R.D.

1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Challenges and Capabilities for Inspection of Cast Stainless Steel Piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the utility, effectiveness and limitations of NDE techniques as related to the inservice inspection of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes results from recent assessments built upon early work with low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) coupled with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) signal processing, and has subsequently evolved into an approach using low frequency phased array technology as applied from the outer diameter surface of the piping. In addition, eddy current examination as performed from the inner diameter surface of these piping welds is also reported. Cast stainless steel (CSS) pipe specimens were examined that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and have inside/outside surface geometrical conditions that simulate several PWR primary piping weldments and configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were also examined to understand inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of UT responses from different locations. The advanced UT methods were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at low frequencies and composite volumetric images of the samples were generated with 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz arrays. Eddy current studies were conducted on the inner diameter surface of these piping welds using a commercially available instrument and a cross point probe design operating at a frequency of 250 kHz. Results from the laboratory studies indicate that 500 kHz phased array methods are capable of detecting flaws greater than 30% through-wall in the cast specimens. Length-sizing of flaws is possible, but no diffracted signals could be observed to support time-of-flight depth sizing. The work with eddy current examinations on the inner diameter surface indicate that, while certain cast austenitic microstructures provide excessive background noise due to permeability variations, surface-breaking flaws are quite easily detected. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830; NRC JCN Y6604; Mr. Wallace Norris, NRC Project Monitor.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance characteristics of the waste form more predictable/flexible. However, in the future, the glass phase still needs to be accurately characterized to determine the effects of waste loading and additives on the glass structure. Initial investigations show a borosilicate glass phase rich in silica. Second, the normalized concentrations of elements leached from the waste form during static leach testing were all below 0.6 g/L after 28d at 90 C, by the Product Consistency Test (PCT), method B. These normalized concentrations are on par with durable waste glasses such as the Low-Activity Reference Material (LRM) glass. The release rates for the crystalline phases (oxyapatite and powellite) appear to be lower (more durable) than the glass phase based on the relatively low release rates of Mo, Ca, and Ln found in the crystalline phases compared to Na and B that are mainly observed in the glass phase. However, further static leach testing on individual crystalline phases is needed to confirm this statement. Third, Ion irradiation and In situ TEM observations suggest that these crystalline phases (such as oxyapatite, ln-borosilicate, and powellite) in silicate based glass ceramic waste forms exhibit stability to 1000 years at anticipated doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy). This is adequate for the short lived isotopes in the waste, which lead to a maximum cumulative dose of {approx}7 x 10{sup 9} Gy, reached after {approx}100 yrs, beyond which the dose contributions are negligible. The cumulate dose calculations are based on a glass-ceramic at WL = 50 mass%, where the fuel has a burn-up of 51GWd/MTIHM, immobilized after 5 yr decay from reactor discharge.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI); Sitzman, Gary W. (Walled Lake, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of Vitrification Process and Glass Formulation for Nuclear Waste Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vitrification of high-level waste is the internationally recognized standard to minimize the impact to the environment resulting from waste disposal as well as to minimize the volume of conditioned waste to be disposed of. COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level waste industrially for over 20 years and is currently operating three commercial vitrification facilities based on a hot metal crucible technology, with outstanding records of safety, reliability and product quality. To further increase the performance of vitrification facilities, CEA and COGEMA have been developing the cold crucible melter technology since the beginning of the 1980s. This type of melter is characterized by a virtually unlimited equipment service life and a great flexibility in dealing with various types of waste and allowing development of high temperature matrices. In complement of and in parallel with the vitrification process, a glass formulation methodology has been developed by the CEA in order to tailor matrices for the wastes to be conditioned while providing the best adaptation to the processing technology. The development of a glass formulation is a trade-off between material properties and qualities, technical feasibility, and disposal safety criteria. It involves non-radioactive and radioactive laboratories in order to achieve a comprehensive matrix qualification. Several glasses and glass ceramics have thus been studied by the CEA to be compliant with industrial needs and waste characteristics: glasses or other matrices for a large spectrum of fission products, or for high contents of specifics elements such as sodium, phosphate, iron, molybdenum, or actinides. New glasses or glass-ceramics designed to minimize the final wasteform volume for solutions produced during the reprocessing of high burnup fuels or to treat legacy wastes are now under development and take benefit from the latest CEA hot-laboratories and technology development. The paper presents the CEA state-of-the-art in developing matrices or glasses and provides several examples.

Petitjean, V.; Fillet, C.; Boen, R.; Veyer, C.; Flament, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reaction-Forming Method for Producing Near Net-Shape Refractory Metal Carbides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reaction forming refractory metal carbides. The method involves the fabrication of a glassy carbon preform by casting an organic, resin-based liquid mixture into a mold and subsequently heat treating it in two steps, which cures and pyrolizes the resin resulting in a porous carbon preform. By varying the amounts of the constituents in the organic, resin-based liquid mixture, control over the density of the carbon preform is obtained. Control of the density and microstructure of the carbon preform allows for determination of the microstructure and properties of the refractory metal carbide material produced. The glassy carbon preform is placed on a bed of refractory metal or refractory metal--silicon alloy. The pieces are heated above the melting point of the metal or alloy. The molten metal wicks inside the porous carbon preform and reacts, forming the refractory metal carbide or refractory metal carbide plus a minor secondary phase.

Palmisiano, Marc N.; Jakubenas, Kevin J.; Baranwal, Rita

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ITP Metal Casting: Theoretical/Best Practice Energy Use in Metalcastin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TheoreticalBest Practice Energy Use In Metalcasting Operations J. F. Schifo J.T. Radia KERAMIDA Environmental, Inc. Indianapolis, IN May 2004 Prepared under Contract to Advanced...

414

FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 3. Automotive Metals- Cast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

415

ITP Metal Casting: Theoretical/Best Practice Energy Use in Metalcasting Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This study determined the theoretical minimum energy requirements for melting processes for all ferrous and noferrous engenieering alloys. Also the report details the Best Practice energy consumption for the industry.

416

FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 3. Automotive Metals-Cast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

417

Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1996--31 December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Solarex`s accomplishments during this phase of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) program. During this reporting period, Solarex researchers converted 79% of production casting stations to increase ingot size and operated them at equivalent yields and cell efficiencies; doubled the casting capacity at 20% the cost of buying new equipment to achieve the same capacity increase; operated the wire saws in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; purchased additional wire saws; developed and qualified a new wire-guide coating material that doubles the wire-guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; ran an Al paste back-surface-field process on 25% of all cells in manufacturing; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; substituted RTV adhesive for the 3M Very High Bond tape after several field problems with the tape; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; demonstrated the use of light soldering for solar cells; demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers; and presented three PVMaT-related papers at the 25th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference.

Wohlgemuth, J. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using ultrasonics was approached. Residual stresses in castings are developed for various reasons. The presence of these stresses, coupled with applied stresses in service, sometimes results in the yield of material and subsequent failure of component.... Present work was focussed on development of an ultrasonic technique using critically refracted longitudinal (L g waves for evaluating residual stresses in ductile cast iron. An L probe suitable to work with ductile cast iron was designed and fabricated...

Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970's. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Honeck, H.C. (Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970`s. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Honeck, H.C. [Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characterization of New Glass Coated Foam Glass Insulating Tiles by Standard Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A good thermal insulation of buildings is today more and more...1). Among insulating materials, foam glasses are increasing their importance because of...2). Foam glasses are fiber-free inorganic insulation mater...

Andrea Ventrella; Federico Smeacetto

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Die casting research. Annual progress report, June 29, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr carbide and other CVD coatings were evaluated for improving wear resistance of Al and Zn die casting dies; die cavity instrumentation was also studied.

Brevick, J.; Mobley, C.; Shivpuri, R.; Goodwin, F.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cooling slope casting to produce EN AW 6082 forging stock for manufacture of suspension components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential of cooling slope casting process to produce EN AW 6082 forging stock for the manufacture of EN AW 6082 suspension components was investigated. EN AW 6082 billets cast over a cooling plate offer a fine uniform structure that can be forged even without a separate homogenization treatment. This is made it possible by the limited superheat of the melt at the start of casting and the fractional solidification that occurs already on the cooling plate. Suspension parts forged from cast and homogenized billets with or without Cr all showed a uniform structure, and the hardness reached HV 110 after the standard artificial ageing treatment.

Yucel BIROL; Seracettin AKDI

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy-graphite castings technical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 8 Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during Casting of Steel: Comparison with Experiments Summary: Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum casting technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

summarizes attempts of incorporating fly ash into aluminum castings to decrease the energy content, material... . It is shown that fly ash can be incorporated in aluminum...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum die casting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

summarizes attempts of incorporating fly ash into aluminum castings to decrease the energy content, material... . It is shown that fly ash can be incorporated in ... Source:...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum shape casting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

summarizes attempts of incorporating fly ash into aluminum castings to decrease the energy content, material... . It is shown that fly ash can be incorporated in aluminum...

431

Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

432

68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 6870  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 68­70 The behaviour of a simulant Magnox waste glass

Sheffield, University of

433

Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN); Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN); Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermochemistry of phosphorus oxynitrides: PON and LiNaPON glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature solution calorimetry has been very useful in elucidating the energetics of many oxide materials. Recently, a sodium molybdate melt, 3Na{sub 2}O{center{underscore}dot}4MoO{sub 3}, has been shown to be very effective for nitride calorimetry. This methodology has now been used to determine the energetics of formation of phosphorus oxynitride PON samples and of a series of LiNaPON oxynitride glasses. The magnitude of the energetics of nitrogen/oxygen substitution within PON and LiNaPON glasses has been correctly evaluated by using N-N, O-O, P-N, and P-O bond strengths. The in-situ precipitation of metallic particles from corresponding oxides in LiNaPON glasses has been predicted from high-temperature solution calorimetry results and appropriate thermodynamic cycles. The results constitute the first set of energetic data on nitridophosphates.

Tessier, F.; Navrotsky, A.; Le Sauze, A.; Marchand, R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Doping of Glass with Lithium Ion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our discovery that the Li+ uptake by the glass walls of the vessels used in the experiments can be used for doping purposes was purely surreptitious. ...

Greg Moakes; Lawrence A. Bottomley; Jiri Janata

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transparant ductility: Reinforcing a structural glass girder:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Transparency and light are hot items in building design and massive structural elements often form an unwelcome necessity for architects. The structural use of glass (more)

Rademakers, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

120 Years of Optical Glass Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An elegant, century-old mathematical relationship, tying the physical properties of a multicomponent glass to those of its chemical components, still provides a powerful tool...

Dragic, Peter D; Ballato, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to provide models and parameter values that can be used to calculate the dissolution rates for the different modes of water contact. The analyses were conducted to identify key aspects of the mechanistic model for glass dissolution to be included in the abstracted models used for PA calculations, evaluate how the models can be used to calculate bounding values of the glass dissolution rates under anticipated water contact modes in the disposal. system, and determine model parameter values for the range of potential waste glass compositions and anticipated environmental conditions. The analysis of a bounding rate also considered the effects of the buildup of glass corrosion products in the solution contacting the glass and potential effects of alteration phase formation. Note that application of the models and model parameter values is constrained to the anticipated range of HLW glass compositions and environmental conditions. The effects of processes inherent to exposure to humid air and dripping water were not modeled explicitly. Instead, the impacts of these processes on the degradation rate were taken into account by using empirically measured parameter values. These include the rates at which water sorbs onto the glass, drips onto the glass, and drips off of the glass. The dissolution rates of glasses that were exposed to humid air and dripping water measured in laboratory tests are used to estimate model parameter values for contact by humid air and dripping water in the disposal system.

W. Ebert

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

ITP Materials: Poster - Development of Materials Resistant to Metal Dusting Degradation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

metal dusting phenomenon metal dusting phenomenon in simulated process environments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ITP Materials, Sensors, and Automation, and Glass Project and Portfolio Review Meeting, June 21-24, Arlington, Virginia. K. Natesan, Z. Zeng, and D. L. Rink Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 Introduction Metal dusting is a metal loss process that occurs in hot reactive gases The prerequisite for metal dusting is that carbon activity in the gas phase has to be >>1 Metal ends up as fine powder Pitting and crevice attack are common forms

444

METAL MEDIA FILTERS, AG-1 SECTION FI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One application of metal media filters is in various nuclear air cleaning processes including applications for protecting workers, the public and the environment from hazardous and radioactive particles. To support this application the development of the ASME AG-1 FI Standard on Metal Media has been under way for more than ten years. Development of the proposed section has required resolving several difficult issues associated with operating conditions (media velocity, pressure drop, etc.), qualification testing, and quality acceptance testing. Performance characteristics of metal media are dramatically different than the glass fiber media with respect to parameters like differential pressures, operating temperatures, media strength, etc. These differences make existing data for a glass fiber media inadequate for qualifying a metal media filter for AG-1. In the past much work has been conducted on metal media filters at facilities such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to qualify the media as High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters. Particle retention testing has been conducted at Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility and at Air Techniques International (ATI) to prove that the metal media meets or exceeds the 99.97% particle retention required for a HEPA Filter. Even with his testing, data was lacking to complete an AG-1 FI Standard on metal media. With funding secured by Mississippi State University (MSU) from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a research test stand is being designed and fabricated at MSU's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) Facility to obtain qualification data on metal media. This in turn will support required data needed for the FI Standard. The paper will discuss in detail how the test stand at MSU will obtain the necessary data to complete the FI Standard.

Adamson, D.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

445

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis and Research on the Thermal Properties of Energy-efficient Building Glass: A Case Study in PVB Laminated Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of PVB-laminated glass is introduced as an energy-efficient building glass. Based on tests and calculations of the shading coefficients of flat glass, LOW-E coated glass and PVB-laminated glass with different thickness, their effects...

Chen, Z.; Meng, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Copyright the Mathematical Association of America 2003. All rights reserved. Alice through Looking Glass after Looking Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass after Looking Glass: The Mathematics of Mirrors and Kaleidoscopes Roe Goodman 1. ALICE Alice book called Alice Through Looking Glass After Looking Glass. The book opens with Alice in her chamber in front of a peculiar cone­shaped arrangement of three looking glasses. She steps through one

Goodman, Roe

448

Effects of tuff waste package components on release from 76-68 simulated waste glass: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental matrix has been conducted that will allow evaluation of the effects of waste package constituents on the waste form release behavior in a tuff repository environment. Tuff rock and groundwater were used along with 304L, 316, and 1020M ferrous metals to evaluate release from uranium-doped MCC 76-68 simulated waste glass. One of the major findings was that in the absence of 1020M mild steel, tuff rock powder dominates the system. However, when 1020M mild steel is present, it appears to dominate the system. The rock-dominated system results in suppressed glass-water reaction and leaching while the 1020M-dominated system results in enhanced leaching - but the metal effectively scavenges uranium from solution. The 300-series stainless steels play no significant role in affecting glass leaching characteristics. 6 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

McVay, G.L.; Robinson, G.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Textures in Strip-Cast Aluminum Alloys: Their On-Line Monitoring and Quantitative Effects on Formability. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum sheets produced by continuous casting (CC) provide energy and economic savings of at least 25 and 14 percent, respectively, over sheets made from conventional direct chill (DC) ingot casting and rolling. As a result of the much simpler production route in continuous casting, however, the formability of CC aluminum alloys is often somewhat inferior to that of their DC counterparts. The mechanical properties of CC alloys can be improved by controlling their microstructure through optimal thermomechanical processing. Suitable annealing is an important means to improve the formability of CC aluminum alloy sheets. Recrystallization of deformed grains occurs during annealing, and it changes the crystallographic texture of the aluminum sheet. Laboratory tests in this project showed that this texture change can be detected by either laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy or resonance EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) spectroscopy, and that monitoring this change allows the degree of recrystallization or the ''recrystallized fraction'' in an annealed sheet to be ascertained. Through a plant trial conducted in May 2002, this project further demonstrated that it is feasible to monitor the recrystallized state of a continuous-cast aluminum sheet in-situ on the production line by using a laser-ultrasound sensor. When used in conjunction with inline annealing, inline monitoring of the recrystallized fraction by laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy offers the possibility of feed-back control that helps optimize processing parameters (e.g., annealing temperature), detect production anomalies, ensure product quality, and further reduce production costs of continuous-cast aluminum alloys. Crystallographic texture strongly affects the mechanical anisotropy/formability of metallic sheets. Clarification of the quantitative relationship between texture and anisotropy/formability of an aluminum alloy will render monitoring and control of its texture during the sheet production process even more meaningful. The present project included a study to determine how the anisotropic plastic behavior of a continuous-cast AA 5754 aluminum alloy depends on quantifiable texture coefficients. Formulae which show explicitly the effects of texture on the directional dependence of the q-value (a formability parameter) and of the uniaxial flow stress, respectively, were derived. Measurements made on a batch of as-received AA 5754 hot band and its O-temper counterpart corroborate the validity of these formulae. On the other hand, these measurements also indicate that some microstructure(s) other than texture could play a significant role in the plastic anisotropy of the AA 5754 alloy. For the q-value of a set of O-temper samples of this alloy, the additional microstructure that affects plastic anisotropy was shown to be grain shape. A formula that captures both the effects of crystallographic texture and grain shape on the q-value of the O-temper material was derived. A simple quadratic plastic potential that delivers this q-value formula was written down. Verification of the adequacy of this plastic potential, however, requires further investigations.

Man, Chi-Sing

2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

1.5.1.2.1 Spin glass, cluster glass, mictomagnetism and reentrant spin glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume B Alloys and Compounds of d-Elements with Main Group Elements. Part 1 of Volume 32 Magnetic Properties of Metals of Landolt-Brnstein - Group III Condensed Matter.

Y. Nakai; Y. Tsunoda

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Stress-corrosion fatiguecrack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the work was to determine the rate and mechanisms of subcritical crack growth in this metallic glassStress-corrosion fatigue­crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal V. Schroeder 1 , R. Results indicate that crack growth in aqueous solution in this alloy is driven by a stress-assisted anodic

Ritchie, Robert

452

Development of Cost-Effective Low-Permeability Ceramic and Refractory Components for Aluminum Melting and Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent review by the U.S. Advanced Ceramics Association, the Aluminum Association, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (DOE/OIT) described the status of advanced ceramics for aluminum processing, including monolithics, composites, and coatings. The report observed that monolithic ceramics (particularly oxides) have attractive properties such as resistance to heat, corrosion, thermal shock, abrasion, and erosion [1]. However, even after the developments of the past 25 years, there are two key barriers to commercialization: reliability and cost-effectiveness. Industry research is therefore focused on eliminating these barriers. Ceramic coatings have likewise undergone significant development and a variety of processes have been demonstrated for applying coatings to substrates. Some processes, such as thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines, exhibit sufficient reliability and service life for routine commercial use. Worldwide, aluminum melting and molten metal handling consumes about 506,000 tons of refractory materials annually. Refractory compositions for handling molten aluminum are generally based on dense fused cast silica or mullite. The microstructural texture is extremely important because an interlocking mass of coarser grains must be bonded together by smaller grains in order to achieve adequate strength. At the same time, well-distributed microscopic pores and cracks are needed to deflect cracks and prevent spalling and thermal shock damage [2]. The focus of this project was to develop and validate new classes of cost-effective, low-permeability ceramic and refractory components for handling molten aluminum in both smelting and casting environments. The primary goal was to develop improved coatings and functionally graded materials that will possess superior combinations of properties, including resistance to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting. When these materials are successfully deployed in aluminum smelting and casting operations, their superior performance and durability will give end users marked improvements in uptime, defect reduction, scrap/rework costs, and overall energy savings resulting from higher productivity and yield. The implementation of results of this program will result in energy savings of 30 trillion Btu/year by 2020. For this Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) project, riser tube used in the low-pressure die (LPD) casting of aluminum was selected as the refractory component for improvement. In this LPD process, a pressurized system is used to transport aluminum metal through refractory tubes (riser tubes) into wheel molds. It is important for the tubes to remain airtight because otherwise, the pressurized system will fail. Generally, defects such as porosity in the tube or cracks generated by reaction of the tube material with molten aluminum lead to tube failure, making the tube incapable of maintaining the pressure difference required for normal casting operation. Therefore, the primary objective of the project was to develop a riser tube that is not only resistant to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting, but is also less permeable, so as to achieve longer service life. Currently, the dense-fused silica (DFS) riser tube supplied by Pyrotek lasts for only 7 days before undergoing failure. The following approach was employed to achieve the goal: (1) Develop materials and methods for sealing surface porosity in thermal-shock-resistant ceramic refractories; (2) Develop new ceramic coatings for extreme service in molten aluminum operations, with particular emphasis on coatings based on highly stable oxide phases; (3) Develop new monolithic refractories designed for lower-permeability applications using controlled porosity gradients and particle size distributions; (4) Optimize refractory formulations to minimize wetting by molten aluminum, and characterize erosion, corrosion, and spallation rates under realistic service conditions; and (5) Scale up the processing methods to full-sized components and perform field testi

Kadolkar, Puja [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Magnetism in amorphous transition metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overall features of magnetism in amorphous transition metals have been investigated on the basis of a finite-temperature theory of the local-environment effect. It is shown that the simple ferromagnetism of Fe, Co, and Ni is drastically changed by structural disorder; amorphous transition metals form spin glasses (SGs) for compositions near amorphous Fe (6.7?N?7.35), ferromagnets for compositions near amorphous Co (7.35?N?9.0), and paramagnetisms for compositions near amorphous Ni (9.0?N?10.0) where N is the number of d electrons. The SG is accompanied by formation of local ferromagnetic clusters for N?7.2, and shows reentrant behavior at the ferromagnetic boundary N?7.35. The ferromagnetism in amorphous transition metals is shown to be well explained by the main-peak position in the noninteracting densities of states. It is found that structural disorder enhances the Curie temperatures (TC) in the range 7.9?N?8.5 as compared with bcc and fcc structures. These results explain recent experimental data for the SG in Fe-rich amorphous alloys and the high TC in amorphous Co-Y alloys, but they are quite different from the early picture obtained for amorphous transition-metalmetalloid alloys.

Y. Kakehashi

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain...

455

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport in a machinable glass-ceramic, Journal of Non-in soda-lime-silicate glasses by reaction with hydrogen,1971. [16] I. Fanderlik, Glass Science and Technology, Vol.

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fiscal Year 2010 Summary Report on the Epsilon-Metal Phase as a Waste Form for 99 Tc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epsilon metal (?-metal) is generated in nuclear fuel during irradiation. This metal consists of Pd, Ru, Rh, Mo, and some Te. These accumulate at the UO2 grain boundaries as small (ca 5 m) particles. These metals have limited solubility in the acid used to dissolve fuel during reprocessing and in typical borosilicate glass. These must be treated separately to improve overall waste loading in glass. This low solubility and their survival in 2 Gy-old natural reactors led us to investigate them as a waste form for the immobilization of 99Tc and 107Pd, two very long-lived isotopes.

Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Zumhoff, Mac R.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

The quantum Biroli-Mzard model: glass transition and superfluidity in a quantum lattice glass model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the quantum version of a lattice model whose classical counterpart captures the physics of structural glasses. We discuss the role of quantum fluctuations in such systems and in particular their interplay with the amorphous order developed in the glass phase. We show that quantum fluctuations might facilitate the formation of the glass at low enough temperature. We also show that the glass transition becomes a first-order transition between a superfluid and an insulating glass at very low temperature, and is therefore accompanied by phase coexistence between superfluid and glassy regions.

Laura Foini; Guilhem Semerjian; Francesco Zamponi

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method for heating and forming a glass sheet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hydration Aging of Nuclear Waste Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Nuclear Waste Glass 10...STEINDLER Chemical Engineering...60439 The aging of simulated nuclear waste glass by...nuclear waste forms can meet...simulated aging reac-tions...whether a waste formn can...pro-jected Nuclear Regulatory...STEINDLEt Chemical Engineering...Basisfor Waste Form Integrity...

J. K. BATES; L. J. JARDINE; M. J. STEINDLER

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Vibration of Glasses containing Effervescing Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of the phenomena, he says:We must consider what passes in the communication of vibrations through the liquid from one side of the glass to the other. The glass ... it is clear, that if any considerable part of a system be unsusceptible of regular vibration, the whole must be so. The phenomenon, then, according to this explanation, ...

ALLEN BEAZELEY

1872-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Materials science: To the heart of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... collaborate with archaeologists. One of the best disposal options is to trap the waste in glass and bury it. So when the civilizations of the Middle East first learnt how ... bury it. So when the civilizations of the Middle East first learnt how to make glass at least 4,500 years ago, they unwittingly launched an experiment on the long- ...

Philip Ball

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Manufacture of Sheet and Plate Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... lantern slides and films, the methods in use for the manufacture of sheet and plate glass. The principal raw materials used in the manu facture of sheet and plate ... . The principal raw materials used in the manu facture of sheet and plate glass are sand, soda ash and limestone. These materials, perhaps with the addition of ...

S. E.

1934-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

464

Origin of Libyan Desert Silica-Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of germanium, using a modified method of Schneider and Sandell4, in Libyan Desert silica-glass, Libyan Desert sandstone, a Libyan Desert quartzite, two Libyan Desert sands, Aouelloul crater ... Desert sandstone, a Libyan Desert quartzite, two Libyan Desert sands, Aouelloul crater 'impactite' glass, two obsidians, the average for tektites from eleven different localities, including all known ...

ALVIN J. COHEN

1959-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

New Process of Making Plate Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , Lancashire, have just announced the successful development of a new process of making plate glass. In the new process the plate ... . In the new process the plate glass is produced with a fire-polished finish, so that the lengthy grinding and polishing ...

1959-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electromagnetic confinement and movement of thin sheets of molten metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus capable of producing a combination of magnetic fields that can retain a metal in liquid form in a region having a smooth vertical boundary including a levitation magnet that produces low frequency magnetic field traveling waves to retain the metal and a stabilization magnet that produces a high frequency magnetic field to produce a smooth vertical boundary. As particularly adapted to the casting of solid metal sheets, a metal in liquid form can be continuously fed into one end of the confinement region produced by the levitation and stabilization magnets and removed in solid form from the other end of confinement region. An additional magnet may be included for support at the edges of the confinement region where eddy currents loop.

Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

MINWALL HJ

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

469

Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of porosity becomes especially critical. An integrated design process is emerging in which a casting process] It is anticipated that such a design process will also help guide and improve casting inspection procedures INHOMOGENEITIES due to porosity are currently not considered in the design of structural components made from

Beckermann, Christoph

470

Modelling the environmental impact of an aluminium pressure die casting plant and options for control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes a model (MIKADO) to analyse options to reduce the environmental impact of aluminium die casting. This model will take a company perspective, so that it can be used as a decision-support tool for the environmental management of a ... Keywords: Aluminium die casting plant, Environmental decision-support tool, Environmental impact assessment, Integrated Assessment Model, Modelling

Belmira Neto; Carolien Kroeze; Leen Hordijk; Carlos Costa

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Metrological analysis of a procedure for the automatic 3D modeling of dental plaster casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metrological analysis of a procedure for the automatic 3D modeling of dental plaster casts Nicola to an automatic procedure recently proposed for the 3D modeling of dental plaster casts. This contribution derives of an automatic 3D modeling procedure recently proposed and it shows the accuracy of 3D modeling dental plaster

Abu-Mostafa, Yaser S.

472

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

473

Crystallization in heat-treated fluorochlorozirconate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystallization phenomena of fluorochlorozirconate glasses were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and inelastic neutron scattering. The precipitation of barium chloride nanoparticles from the glass matrix upon heat treatment was found to be suppressed when re-melting the glass with a reducing agent but not if the agent was present in the initial synthesis. Addition of small amounts of oxide to the predominantly fluoride melt was found to maintain the presence of nanoparticles but not to induce the predicted phase transition of the barium chloride nanoparticles from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure. Inelastic neutron scattering performed on an as-made glass and a heat-treated glass showed an increase in hardness , consistent with a more ordered structure.

Johnson, Jackie A. [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Weber, Rick [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; SCHWEIZER, Stefan [Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics, 06120 Halle, Germany

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

Bliss, Mary

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

17 - Immobilisation of Radioactive Waste in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclide immobilisation mechanisms are examined for vitreous wasteforms. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are described in detail, including the ability of cations to enter into the glass network structure. The role of various cations is considered, including boron, intermediates, and modifiers and elements difficult to immobilise. Selection rules for designing nuclear wasteform silicate glasses are outlined. Glass composite materials to immobilise glass-immiscible waste components are discussed. Both one- and two-stage vitrification technologies are described. An overview is given of the development of vitrification technology, including current operational data on radioactive waste vitrification facilities. Calcination processes are considered in detail, including typical properties of waste calcination products. Recent developments in vitrification are given, including descriptions of cold crucible induction-heated melters and in situ vitrification. Limitations caused by radionuclide volatility are examined. Acceptance criteria are given for vitreous wasteforms.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Glass cullet as a new supplementary cementitious material (SCM).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Finely ground glass has the potential for pozzolanic reactivity and can serve as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). Glass reaction kinetics depends on both temperature (more)

Mirzahosseini, Mohammadreza

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Glass...

478

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

479

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

480

Pressure Temperature Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pressure Temperature Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Glass Buttes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

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