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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of...

2

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

3

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

4

Metal Casting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 7   General characteristics of casting processes...Characteristic Casting process Green sand Resin-bonded sand Plaster Lost foam Investment Permanent mold Die Part Material (casting) All All Zn to Cu Al to cast iron All Zn to cast iron Zn to Cu Porosity and voids (a) C??E D??E D??E C??E E B??C A??C Shape (b) See Fig. 1 for shapes All All...

5

METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

Magel, T.T.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

History of Metal Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Chronological list of developments in the use of materials...iron China 224 B.C. Colossus of Rhodes destroyed Greece 200??300 A.D. Use of mercury in gilding (amalgam gilding) Roman world 1200??1450 A.D. Introduction of cast iron (exact date and place unknown) Europe Circa 1122 A.D. Theophilus's On Divers italic> the first

7

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic...

8

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic...

9

Advances in Metal Casting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2013... process controls), environmental controls, sustainability, health and safety. ... A Study on Applicastion of the Squeeze Casting Process to the...

10

Casting and Solidification of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Casting methoding engineers will be targeted, although management at any level will find the course intelligible and valuable to ... ENERGY MANAGEMENT.

11

Subcritical Measurments Multiple HEU Metal Castings  

SciTech Connect

Experiments with the standard annular highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal castings at the Y-12 National Security Complex were performed in which up to five castings ({approx}90 kg) were assembled in a tightly packed array with minimal spacing between castings. The fission chain multiplication process was initiated by a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf spontaneously fissioning neutron source or by time and directionally tagged neutrons from a small portable DT neutron generator. The prompt neutron time behavior was measured with plastic scintillation detectors sensitive to the fast neutron (>1 MeV) and gamma ray without distinction. These experiments were performed to provide data to benchmark methods for the calculation of the prompt neutron time behavior. Previous measurements with a single casting have been reported. This paper presents the experimental results for multiple castings.

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

SciTech Connect

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advances in Metal Casting Technologies - Molding, Properties and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Shot Blasting is a practice commonly used in the metal casting industry to remove sand, small particulates and peen surface. In this experiment...

18

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting December 18, 2009 - 2:43pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes. One example of this technology is being used by General Motors to make lightweight engine blocks for the fuel-efficient vehicles they manufacture. A government-funded effort to support development of foam metal casting helped reduce an estimated 9.4 million tons of solid waste between 1994 and 2005, which saved industry an estimated 3 trillion Btu.

19

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

20

Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CLEAN METAL NUCLEATED CASTING OF SUPERALLOYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional Turbine Rotor Production & Need for Ingot Casting Innovation. The production of large gas turbine rotor forgings made from high temperature...

22

Mechanical Properties of Thin Film Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of these and other properties, thin film metallic-glasses (TFMGs) are a promising structural material for fabricating the next generation of micro- and...

23

Advances in Metal Casting Technologies: Materials & Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Fe-19Cr-13Ni Based Heat Resistant Cast Steel: Doo Hyun Kim1; Wee-Do Yoo1; Jong Hoon Lee1; 1Korea Institute...

24

Liquid Metal Processing and Casting 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic, Slag and Refractory Reactions with Liquid Metals - Refining, Evaporation and Gas/Metal Reactions - Fundamentals of Reactions involving Liquid...

25

Load relaxation studies of a metallic glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of load relaxation studies of a commercial metallic glass as a function of temperature are reported. The data suggest that metallic glasses exhibit deformation behavior with flow laws similar to those governing plastic deformation in crystalline solids. The lack of appreciable work hardening in annealed material and the identification of an anelastic component are also indicated by the experimental observations. (GHT)

Hadnagy, T.D.; Krenisky, D.J.; Ast, D.G.; Li, C.Y.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses with High Plasticity Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic Deformation of a Metallic Glass Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses.

27

Oxidation Behavior of Metallic Glass - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

28

Fabrication of Bulk Metallic Glass Foams via Severe Plastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

29

Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Fabricated within the Supercooled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, lightweight magnesium base Bulk Metallic Glass Composites ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation...

30

CASTING SLIPS FOR FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY METAL WARE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is given for slip casting tungsten metal. The composition consists essentially of tungsten metal with an average particle size of 0.9 micron, an organic vehicle such as methyl chloroform, o-xylene, n-butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, and 1, 1, 2, 2-tetrachlorethane, and a suspending agent such as ethyl cellulose, with the approximate ratio of said vehicle to the tungsten metal being 12 cc of a solution containing from 5 to about 20 grams of said ethyl cellulose in 400 cc of said organic vehicle per 100 grams of metal. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

SciTech Connect

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Sumpman, Wayne C. (North Huntingdon, PA); Baker, Robert J. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Plum Borough, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and Ultrafine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding (HPS) ... Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic Glasses.

35

Fabrication of metallic glass structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

Cline, C.F.

1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Prediction of ignition of glass-metal mixture  

SciTech Connect

The integral fast reactor concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process will be demonstrated using the fuel cycle facility (FCF) located at ANL's Idaho facility. One of the processing steps is the casting of metal-fuel alloy slugs. Although alternate techniques are being developed, the current reference calls for casting the metal into quartz molds. During the slug demolding process, however, some of the fuel alloy remains attached to the quartz and becomes waste. Other finely divided particles of alloy from this operation also become mixed with the glass-fuel waste. This waste material is temporarily stored in cylindrical cans filled with argon gas to prevent oxidation and pyrophoric ignition. However, this mixture may come into contact with air as result of an accident and ignite. The ignition of the mixture depends significantly on the heat transfer characteristics of the waste can, which loses heat to the environment by natural convection and radiation. Heat is generated in the fuel by self-heating due both to its plutonium content and residual fission products and by heating due to oxidation. If the heat generation rate is higher than the heat loss rate, the system may experience a breakaway oxidation reaction, which is termed ignition.

Parlatan, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Charak, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Method for forming glass-to-metal seals  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH); Massey, Richard T. (Hamilton, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bulk Metallic Glasses Deform via Slip Avalanches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inelastic deformation of metallic glasses occurs via slip events with avalanche dynamics similar to those of earthquakes. For the first time in these materials, measurements have been obtained with sufficiently high temporal resolution to extract both the exponents and the scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics and dynamics of the slips according to a simple mean-field model. These slips originate from localized deformation in shear bands. The mean-field model describes the slip process as an avalanche of rearrangements of atoms in shear transformation zones (STZs). Small slips show the predicted power-law scaling and correspond to limited propagation of a shear front, while large slips are associated with uniform shear on unconstrained shear bands. The agreement between the model and data across multiple independent measures of slip statistics and dynamics provides compelling evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

James Antonaglia; Wendelin J. Wright; Xiaojun Gu; Rachel R. Byer; Todd C. Hufnagel; Michael LeBlanc; Jonathan T. Uhl; Karin A. Dahmen

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

Gwyn, Mike

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Metallic Glass: A Crystal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metallic Glass: A Crystal at Heart June 16, 2011 Menlo Park, Calif.-Glass, by definition, is amorphous; its atoms lack order and are arranged every which way. But when scientists...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Metallic Glasses for Electro-Catalytic Applications - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by these characteristics, we have explored the use of a number of metallic glasses as electro-catalysts in direct alcohol fuel cells. We demonstrate that...

42

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cavitation in Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have undertaken a series of molecular dynamics simulations of cavitation under hydrostatic tension in a binary metallic glass analog using pair-wise...

43

In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano-materials under High Pressure via Synchrotron Techniques. Author(s)...

44

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research  

SciTech Connect

Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

Jensen, D. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology] [comp.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Controlled Shear Band and Fracture in Bulk Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic Alloy at 573...

47

Work-Hardenable Ductile Ti-based Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with unique supercooled liquid ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation...

48

Mechanical Properties of Al-Ni-Zr Bulk Metallic Glasses Interpreted ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

49

Fabrication of Cu-Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Vertical Twin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

50

Investigation of Torsion Fracture on Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

51

Crack-resistance Curve of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Al Bulk Metallic Glass with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

52

Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

Brow, R.K.; Day, D.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mapping the Strain Distributions in Deformed Bulk Metallic Glasses ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent relatively new class of ... Evolution of Internal Strain with Temperature in Depleted Uranium in the ... Structural Effects upon Macroscopic Phenomena in Strained Ordered Oxide Films.

54

Nanomechanical studies of metallic glasses at ambient and elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses, though attractive for use in structural applications for their high strength and elastic limit, display several unacceptable features upon deformation, including quasi-brittle failure along shear ...

Packard, Corinne E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

1984-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

High strength glass-ceramic to metal seals  

SciTech Connect

In many applications, ceramics are joined to other materials, especially metals. In such cases, interfacial strength is as important as the strength of each constituent material. Examples are presented for tailoring materials and processes to optimize the glass-ceramic-to-metal seal. Means for detecting defects, nondestructively, are also identified.

Haws, L D; Kramer, D P; Moddeman, W E; Wooten, G W

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus The Package Matters Disarming Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing Discovering New Talents for Diamond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure MARCH 29, 2010 Bookmark and Share Diamond anvil cell used for high-pressure experiments Metallic glasses are emerging as potentially useful materials at the frontier of materials science research. They combine the advantages-and avoid many of the problems of-normal metals and glasses, two classes of materials with a very wide range of applications. For example, metallic

58

Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate R_c below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing R_c, and thus good glass-formers possess small values of R_c. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change R_c significantly. These studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

Kai Zhang; Minglei Wang; Stefanos Papanikolaou; Yanhui Liu; Jan Schroers; Mark D. Shattuck; Corey S. O'Hern

2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pulsed Neutron Measurments With A DT Neutron Generator for an Annular HEU Uranium Metal Casting  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed with a single annular, stainless-steel-canned casting of uranium (93.17 wt% 235U) metal ( ~18 kg) to provide data to verify calculational methods for criticality safety. The measurements used a small portable DT generator with an embedded alpha detector to time and directionally tag the neutrons from the generator. The center of the time and directional tagged neutron beam was perpendicular to the axis of the casting. The radiation detectors were 1x1x6 in plastic scintillators encased in 0.635-cm-thick lead shields that were sensitive to neutrons above 1 MeV in energy. The detector lead shields were adjacent to the casting and the target spot of the generator was about 3.8 cm from the casting at the vertical center. The time distribution of the fission induced radiation was measured with respect to the source event by a fast (1GHz) processor. The measurements described in this paper also include time correlation measurements with a time tagged spontaneously fissioning 252Cf neutron source, both on the axis and on the surface of the casting. Measurements with both types of sources are compared. Measurements with the DT generator closely coupled with the HEU provide no more additional information than those with the Cf source closely coupled with the HEU and are complicated by the time and directionally tagged neutrons from the generator scattering between the walls and floor of the measurements room and the casting while still above detection thresholds.

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel ...  

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Relationship between the shear viscosity and heating rate in metallic glasses below the glass transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that first-order irreversible structural relaxation with distributed activation energies must lead to a linear decrease of the logarithm of Newtonian shear viscosity with the logarithm of heating rate upon linear heating of glass. Such a behavior is indeed observed in the experiments on metallic glasses. Structural relaxation-induced viscous flow leads to infra-low-frequency Maxwell viscoelastic internal friction, which is predicted to increase with the heating rate.

Khonik, Vitaly A.; Kobelev, N. P. [Department of General Physics, State Pedagogical University, Lenin Street 86, 394043 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Institute for Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow District (Russian Federation)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, Robert C. (Clinton, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, R.C.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, Robert C. (Clinton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fractal nature of medium-range order in metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atomic structure of metallic glasses has been a long-standing scientific mystery. Unlike crystalline metals, where long-range ordering is established by periodic stacking of fundamental building blocks known as unit cells, a metallic glass has no long-range translational order, although some degrees of short- and medium-range order do exist.1,2,3 Previous studies1,2,3,4 have identified solute-centered clusters, characterized by short-range order (SRO) in favor of unlike bonds, as the fundamental building blocks of metallic glasses. However, how these building blocks are connected or packed to form the medium range order (MRO) remains an open question.1,2,3 Here, based on neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments, we propose a new packing scheme - the self-similar packing of atomic clusters. We show that MRO has the characteristics of a fractal network with a dimension of 2.38, and is described by a power-law correlation function over the medium-range length scale. Our finding provides a new prospective of order in disordered materials and has broad implications for understanding the structure-property relationship in metallic glasses, particularly those involving change in length scales due to phase transformation and mechanical deformation.

Ma, Dong [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Amorphous Metallic Glass as New High Power and Energy Density Anodes For Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the use of aluminum based amorphous metallic glass as the anode in lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Amorphous metallic glasses have no long-range ordered microstructure; the atoms are less closely ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

67

SP-29: Oxidation Behavior of Zr56Al16Co28 Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The oxidation behavior of Zr56A16Co28 bulk metallic glass was ... A high resistance against oxidation in Zr56Al16Co28 bulk metallic glasses...

68

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

Seidel, Bobby R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tracy, Donald B. (Firth, ID); Griffiths, Vernon (Butte, MT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Metal casting industry of the future: An integrated approach to delivering energy efficiency products and services  

SciTech Connect

The Industries of the Future process is driven by industry. Through technology roadmaps, industry participants set technology priorities, assess the progress of R and D, and ultimately lead the way in applying research results. This approach to private-public partnerships ensures the most strategic allocation possible of limited resources for the development of new technologies and the enhancement of industrial processes. Based on industry`s request, OIT`s role is to help facilitate the Industries of the Future strategy and to support the development and deployment of technologies that will shape the future of the metal casting industry. Part of this role is to encourage industry to undertake long-term, sector-wide technology planning and to selectively cost-share with OIT in collaborative R and D activities that match OIT`s mission. OIT metal casting research requires a dollar for dollar industry cost share.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Impact Resistance of Carbon Fiber and Metallic Glass Fiber Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of thin metallic sheets with carbon fiber composite results in a ... Ceramic Textile Composites under In Situ Loading at Ultrahigh Temperatures.

71

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Oxidation Resistance of Zr- and Ti- Based Bulk Metallic Glasses in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Bulk Metallic Glasses IX. Presentation Title, Oxidation Resistance of Zr- and...

75

Devitrification kinetics and phase selection mechanisms in Cu-Zr metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic glasses have been a promising class of materials since their discovery in the 1960s. Indeed, remarkable chemical, mechanical and physical properties have attracted considerable attention, and several excellent reviews are available. Moreover, the special group of glass forming alloys known as the bulk metallic glasses (BMG) become amorphous solids even at relatively low cooling rates, allowing them to be cast in large cross sections, opening the scope of potential applications to include bulk forms and net shape structural applications. Recent studies have been reported for new bulk metallic glasses produced with lower cooling rates, from 0.1 to several hundred K/s. Some of the application products of BMGs include sporting goods, high performance springs and medical devices. Several rapid solidification techniques, including melt-spinning, atomization and surface melting have been developed to produce amorphous alloys. The aim of all these methods is to solidify the liquid phase rapidly enough to suppress the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. Furthermore, the production of amorphous/crystalline composite (ACC) materials by partial crystallization of amorphous precursor has recently given rise to materials that provide better mechanical and magnetic properties than the monolithic amorphous or crystalline alloys. In addition, these advances illustrate the broad untapped potential of using the glassy state as an intermediate stage in the processing of new materials and nanostructures. These advances underlie the necessity of investigations on prediction and control of phase stability and microstructural dynamics during both solidification and devitrification processes. This research presented in this dissertation is mainly focused on Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al alloy systems. The Cu-Zr binary system has high glass forming ability in a wide compositional range (35-70 at.% Cu). Thereby, Cu-Zr based alloys have attracted much attention according to fundamental research on the behaviors of glass forming alloys. Further motivation arising from the application of this system as a basis for many BMGs and ACC materials; the Cu-Zr system warrants this attention and offers great potential for the development of new materials. However, the prediction and control of microstructural evolution during devitrification remains challenging because of the complex devitrification behavior of the Cu-Zr binary alloy which is arising from the competition of metastable and stable phases and diversity of crystal structures. This dissertation details a systematic fundamental investigation into the mechanisms and kinetics of the various crystallization transformation processes involved in the overall devitrification response of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al glasses. Various isothermal and nonisothermal treatments are employed, and the structural response is characterized using bulk X-ray and thermal analysis methods as well as nanoscale microscopic analysis methods, revealing structural and chemical details down to the atomic-scale. By carefully combining techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantify the characterization transformations, this research has uncovered numerous details concerning the atomistic mechanisms of crystallization and has provided much new understanding related to the dominant phases, the overall reaction sequences, and the rate-controlling mechanisms. As such this work represents a substantial step forward in understanding these transformations and provides a clear framework for further progress toward ultimate application of controlled devitrification processing for the production of new materials with remarkable properties.

Kalay, Ilkay

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fatigue Behavior of Tough Fe-Based Bulk-Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fracture Mechanics Model of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Bulk-Metallic ... Air- Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc.

77

Al-Based Metallic Glass Incorporated Novel Ag Electrode for Si ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and good corrosion/oxidation resistances in the supercooled liquid state. ... Al- Based Metallic Glass Incorporated Novel Ag Electrode for Si Solar Cell ... Interfacial Free Energy and Local Order of Metallic Liquids from Elements to Alloys ... Predicting the Production of Glass Former Alloys by Mathematical Simulation of...

78

Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts. Foundry operations include mixing and mold formation, core making, metal pouring, shakeout, finishing, and painting. Cutting, shaping, and welding are the principal metal fabrication operations. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that paint-related wastes are generated in large quantities, and that significant waste reduction and cost savings could be realized by installing a dry powder coating system or by replacing conventional air spray paint guns with high-volume low-pressure spray guns. This research brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Fleischman, M.; Harris, J.J.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These parameters should be measured to achieve better simulation fidelity. Information on all the mentioned parameters is virtually nonexistent. Presently, all the parameters within the casting model are estimates based on pure U, or another alloy such as U-Ni.

Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Molten metal holder furnace and casting system incorporating the molten metal holder furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom heated holder furnace (12) for containing a supply of molten metal includes a storage vessel (30) having sidewalls (32) and a bottom wall (34) defining a molten metal receiving chamber (36). A furnace insulating layer (42) lines the molten metal receiving chamber (36). A thermally conductive heat exchanger block (54) is located at the bottom of the molten metal receiving chamber (36) for heating the supply of molten metal. The heat exchanger block (54) includes a bottom face (65), side faces (66), and a top face (67). The heat exchanger block (54) includes a plurality of electrical heaters (70) extending therein and projecting outward from at least one of the faces of the heat exchanger block (54), and further extending through the furnace insulating layer (42) and one of the sidewalls (32) of the storage vessel (30) for connection to a source of electrical power. A sealing layer (50) covers the bottom face (65) and side faces (66) of the heat exchanger block (54) such that the heat exchanger block (54) is substantially separated from contact with the furnace insulating layer (42).

Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glass object, be it glass block or glass vessel. Thisglass would have been reheated and cast, probably into blocks

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes: Literature review on cast tooling  

SciTech Connect

This report is a literature review on cast tooling with the general focus on AISI H13 tool steel. The review includes processing of both wrought and cast H13 steel along with the accompanying microstructures. Also included is the incorporation of new rapid prototyping technologies, such as Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering, into the investment casting of tool steel. The limiting property of using wrought or cast tool steel for die casting is heat checking. Heat checking is addressed in terms of testing procedures, theories regarding the mechanism, and microstructural aspects related to the cracking.

Baldwin, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hochanadel, P.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers 7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers June 17, 2011 - 5:41pm Addthis Check out a short animation of a 3D plasmon ruler as it delivers optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein and read more below. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The discovery of a new property of glass offers new insight into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which are in products such as anti-theft tags and power transformers. A new ruler could help provide scientists with unprecedented details into a variety of biological events, including the interaction between DNA and enzymes, protein folding and cell membrane vibrations.

84

Method and apparatus for performing in-situ vacuum-assisted metal to glass sealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for assembling and fusing glass to metal in a glass-metal electrical component is disclosed. The component includes a metallic shell formed with upper and lower cylindrical recesses connected together by longitudinal passages, a pair of metal rings and plural metal pins assembled to define electrical feed-throughs. The component parts are assembled on a fixture having a sleeve-like projection and a central mounting projection establishing concentric nesting surfaces to which the metal rings are slip-fitted in concentric alignment with each other spaced from sidewalls of the lower recess. The pins are in electrical contact with the metal rings. A glass pre-form is seated within the upper recess. The assembled structure is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass pre-form which flows under gravity through the passages into the lower recess to provide an insulative seal between the metal parts. The gravity flow of glass is assisted by applying vacuum to the lower recess, ensuring that all spaces between the metal parts are filled with sealing glass without formation of bubbles.

Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Method and apparatus for performing in-situ vacuum-assisted metal to glass sealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for assembling and fusing glass to metal in a glass-metal electrical component is disclosed. The component includes a metallic shell formed with upper and lower cylindrical recesses connected together by longitudinal passages, a pair of metal rings and plural metal pins assembled to define electrical feed-throughs. The component parts are assembled on a fixture having a sleeve-like projection and a central mounting projection establishing concentric nesting surfaces to which the metal rings are slip-fitted in concentric alignment with each other spaced from sidewalls of the lower recess. The pins are in electrical contact with the metal rings. A glass pre-form is seated within the upper recess. The assembled structure is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass pre-form which flows under gravity through the passages into the lower recess to provide an insulative seal between the metal parts. The gravity flow of glass is assisted by applying vacuum to the lower recess, ensuring that all spaces between the metal parts are filled with sealing glass without formation of bubbles.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH); Massey, Richard T. (Hamilton, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Short range chemical ordering in bulk metallic glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We provide direct experimental evidence for a non-random distribution of atomic constituents in Zr-based multi-component bulk metallic glasses using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The Ti content around the open-volume regions is significantly enhanced at the expense of Cu and Ni, indicating that Cu and Ni occupy most of the volume bounded by their neighboring atoms while Ti and Zr are less closely packed and more likely to be associated with open-volume regions. Temperature-dependent measurements indicate the presence of at least two different characteristic sizes for the open volume regions. Measurements on hydrogen-charged samples show that the larger open-volume regions can be filled by hydrogen up to a critical density. Beyond this critical density, local atomic-scale open-volume damage is created in the sample to accommodate additional hydrogen. The onset of this local damage in positron annihilation data coincides with the onset of volume expansion in X-ray diffraction data.

Sterne, P A; Asoka-Kumar, P; Hartley, J H; Howell, R H; Nieh, T G; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Dauskardt, R H

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

87

Investigation on Aluminum-Based Amorphous Metallic Glass as New Anode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum based amorphous metallic glass powders were produced and tested as the anode materials for the lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Ground Al??Ni₁?La₁? was found to have a ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

88

Stability of Ni-Nb-based and Zr-based bulk metallic glasses against environmental degradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The ternary (Ni8Nb5)99.5Sb0.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was synthesized in this thesis and the corrosion, oxidation and high temperature induced crystallization behaviors are investigated. The (more)

L, Junxia (???)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Corrosion and Cytotoxicity of a Ni-free Zr-Al-Fe-Cu Bulk Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion resistance was studied using polarization technique in phosphate buffered saline solution ... Cell viability, adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of osteoblasts, endothelial cells and .... Joining of Active Bulk Metallic Glasses in Air.

90

Subcriticality Measurements with HEU (93.2) Metal Annular Storage Castings  

SciTech Connect

These carefully performed and documented measurements with unreflected and unmoderated highly enriched uranium (HEU) castings can be used to benchmark calculational methods for the time decay of the fission chain multiplication process as measured with small (1 x 1 x 6 in. thick plastic scintillators with 1/4-in.-thick lead on all detector surfaces) detectors adjacent to the tightly fitting stainless steel cans that contained the HEU ({approx}93 wt%) metal. Prompt time decay measurements were performed stimulating the fission chain multiplication process with a timed, tagged Cf spontaneous fission source that emitted fission-spectrum neutrons and a time and directionally tagged 14.1-MeV neutrons from the DT reaction in a steady state generator with an embedded alpha detector. Time decay measurements were performed with HEU masses varying from 18 to 90 kg for a wide variety of source-detector-casting configurations. The use of a DT generator provided no addition information about the fission chain behavior beyond that provided by a time-tagged Cf spontaneous fission source. The main quantities obtained in the measurements were (1) the time distribution of the counts in a detector after a neutron fission in the Cf source or after the alpha detection coincident with the emission of a neutron from the DT generator (the equivalent of a pulsed neutron measurement with a randomly pulsed source) and (2) the time distribution of counts in one detector after a count in another detector (the equivalent of a two-detector Rossi-alpha measurement). Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP-PoliMi coupled gamma-neutron transport code generally agreed with the measurement results except for some differences early in the fission chain decay process. The measurements that were performed with the HEU about 1 m above the floor were considerably affected by room return neutrons at times as early as 100 ns, and at times after 300 ns, a major portion of the time response was associated with the interaction of the HEU assemblies with the floor. This room-return effect increased with the size of the assembly because the larger assemblies subtend a larger solid angle to a neutron returning from the floor.

Henkel, James J [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition, we will discuss how the atomic structure evolves during glass transition ... Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding ( HPS).

92

Prompt Neutron Time Decay in Single HEU and DU Metal Annular Storage Castings  

SciTech Connect

Previous measurements of highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage castings performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the Y-12 National Security Complex showed a prompt neutron time decay that is not exponential. These measurements showed that multiple time constants originating from multiplication, time-of-flight, scattering in the assembly and room return could be associated with this prompt neutron decay. In this work, the contribution not associated with neutron multiplication was investigated via measurements with a depleted uranium (DU) casting. The measurements at ORNL used an annular (5.0-in OD, 3.5-in ID, 6.0-in H) DU casting with a time-tagged 252Cf source, centered vertically on the axis, and four closely coupled 1 1 6-in.-long plastic scintillators with -in.- thick lead shielding adjacent to the outer surface of the casting. This setup was identical to the configuration used in the previously performed measurements with HEU castings at Y-12. The time correlation between fission events and detections in the plastic scintillators was measured, as well as the time distribution of coincidences between multiple detectors within a 512-ns time window. The measurement results were then compared to MCNP-PoliMi calculations and the previous HEU measurements. Time constants from decay fits to the HEU and DU data were compared to characterize the contributions resulting from multiplication, time-of-flight, and scattering.

Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fracture toughness and crack-resistance curve behavior in metallic glass-matrix composites  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to assess the fracture toughness of bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites; results are compared with similar measurements for other monolithic and composite BMG alloys. Mechanistically, plastic shielding gives rise to characteristic resistance?curve behavior where the fracture resistance increases with crack extension. Specifically, confinement of damage by second?phase dendrites is shown to result in enhancement of the toughness by nearly an order of magnitude relative to unreinforced glass.

Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Suh, Jin-Yo; Kozachkov, Henry; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Synthesis of bulk metallic glass foam by powder extrusion with a fugitive second phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glass foams with 12 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length having a density of 4.62 g/cm{sup 3} (approximately 58.3% of theoretical) were fabricated by extruding a powder mixture comprised of 60 vol % Ni{sub 59}Zr{sub 20}Ti{sub 16}Si{sub 2}Sn{sub 3} metallic glass blended with 40 vol % brass followed by dissolution of the fugitive brass in an aqueous HNO{sub 3} solution. The final structure consists of continuously connected, high aspect ratio metallic glass struts surrounded by {approx}40 vol % of homogeneously distributed ellipsoid-shaped pores having nominal diameters between 10 and 50 {mu}m.

Lee, Min Ha; Sordelet, Daniel J. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Correlation of Atomic Cluster Symmetry and Glass-Forming Ability of Metallic Glass  

SciTech Connect

Local structures play a crucial role in glass formation and properties. In addition to topological short-range order, the geometric property of site symmetry is another important but less known characteristic of local structures. It is shown that the observed sharp increase of glass forming ability of Ce{sub 70-x}Al{sub 10}Cu{sub 20}Co{sub x} upon Co addition is correlated with a dramatic increase of Al site symmetry, as reflected by decreasing quadrupole frequency measured by {sup 27}Al NMR. The result is consistent with the structure model of Al-centered icosahedral clusters as the predominant structural building blocks.

Xi Xuekui; Li Lilong; Wu Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States); Zhang Bo; Wang Weihua [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Metal thin film growth on multimetallic surfaces: From quaternary metallic glass to binary crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work presented in this thesis mainly focuses on the nucleation and growth of metal thin films on multimetallic surfaces. First, we have investigated the Ag film growth on a bulk metallic glass surface. Next, we have examined the coarsening and decay of bilayer Ag islands on NiAl(110) surface. Third, we have investigated the Ag film growth on NiAl(110) surface using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). At last, we have reported our investigation on the epitaxial growth of Ni on NiAl(110) surface. Some general conclusions can be drawn as follows. First, Ag, a bulk-crystalline material, initially forms a disordered wetting layer up to 4-5 monolayers on Zr-Ni-Cu-Al metallic glass. Above this coverage, crystalline 3D clusters grow, in parallel with the flatter regions. The cluster density increases with decreasing temperature, indicating that the conditions of island nucleation are far-from-equilibrium. Within a simple model where clusters nucleate whenever two mobile Ag adatoms meet, the temperature-dependence of cluster density yields a (reasonable) upper limit for the value of the Ag diffusion barrier on top of the Ag wetting layer of 0.32 eV. Overall, this prototypical study suggests that it is possible to grow films of a bulk-crystalline metal that adopt the amorphous character of a glassy metal substrate, if film thickness is sufficiently low. Next, the first study of coarsening and decay of bilayer islands has been presented. The system was Ag on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 185 K to 250 K. The coarsening behavior, has some similarities to that seen in the Ag(110) homoepitaxial system studied by Morgenstern and co-workers. At 185 K and 205 K, coarsening of Ag islands follows a Smoluchowski ripening pathway. At 205 K and 250 K, the terrace diffusion limited Ostwald ripening dominants. The experimental observed temperature for the transition from SR to OR is 205 K. The SR exhibits anisotropic island diffusion and the OR exhibits 1D decay of island length while keeping the corresponding island width constant. Third, LEED indicates that, up to about 6 BL (12 ML), the Ag film adopts the (110) structure on lattice matched NiAl(110) surface, supporting the previous assignment based upon island heights measured in STM. Starting at 4.5 to 6 BL, (111) diffraction pattern is detected. This is also in agreement with previous STM study. Careful examinations of the LEED patterns reveal the slight difference in lattice constants between bulk Ag and bulk NiAl. At last, we performed STM studies of Ni deposition on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 200 K to 400 K. Ni forms 'dense' Ni(100)-like islands on NiAl(110) with a zig-zag shaped stripe feature which is probably due to strain relief. DFT analysis provides insights into the island growth shapes, which are rationalized by the thermodynamics and kinetics of the film growth process. For thick Ni films (coverage exceeding 6 ML), a Ni(111)-like structure developed. Traditional MF theory is applied to analyze island density at 200 K. Deviation from homogeneous nucleation behavior for island size distribution and island density reveals the presence of heterogeneous nucleation mediated by the Ni antisite point defects on NiAl(110) surface.

Jing, Dapeng

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Presented as part of the symposium on Iron-Based Amorphous Metals held at MS&T'07 in Detroit, Michigan, September 1620, 2007.

98

Rapid Relaxation and Embrittlement of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Electropulsing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical relaxation and embrittlement of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glasses were achieved rapidly by the direct current electropulsing treatment. The temperature profile was recorded by an infrared camera and it was found to be non-uniform in the treated specimen. Specifically, temperatures below the glass transition temperature, near and above the crystallization temperature could be ach- ieved, respectively, at different locations in the same treated specimen. Two sets of nanoindentation were conducted. While the first set investigated the mechanical properties of three individually elec- tropulsed specimens with different conditions, the second set indented a single treated specimen along its temperature gradient. Both sets of indentation revealed that by Joule heating to different tempera- tures, relaxation, embrittlement, and crystallization were significantly accelerated by electrical pulses. Results suggest that electropulsing provides an opportunity to simultaneously achieve plastic forming and mechanical property control of metallic glasses.

Yiu, P [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan; Chen, Y. C. [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology; Chu, J. P. [National Taiwan Ocean University; Chang, S Y [National Chung Hsing University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Jang, J. S.C. [National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan; Hsueh, C. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

100

Correlation between the extraordinary Hall constant and electrical resistivity minima in Co-rich metallic glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hall effect has been studied in some Co-rich ferromagnetic metallic glasses which show resistivity (rho) minima at low temperatures. It is found that the extraordinary Hall constant (R-s) shows a corresponding minimum. The scaling relation R(s)similar torho(n) holds with nsimilar or equal to2 showing the dominance of quantum transport in these high-resistive disordered systems. The temperature dependences of magnetization and electrical resistivity are also interpreted in terms of existing theories.

Majumdar, AK; Khatua, PK; Rathnayaka, KDD; Naugle, Donald G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welding of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is an alternative to their mechanical joining, since they are difficult to machine. Published literature in fusion welding of similar composites shows metallurgical problems. This study investigates the weldability of A359/SiC/10p aluminum SiC MMC. Statistical experiments were performed to identify the significant variables and their effects on the hardness, tensile and bending strengths, ductility, and microstructure of the weld. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used to predict the preheat temperature field across the weld and the weld pool temperature. Welding current, welding speed, and the preheat temperature (300-350??C) affected the weld quality significantly. It was seen that the fracture of the welded specimens was either in the base MMC or in the weld indicating a stronger interface between the weld and the base MMC. Oxides formation was controlled along the weld joint. Low heat inputs provided higher weld strengths and better weld integrity. It was found that the weld strengths were approximately 85% of the parent material strength. The weld region had higher extent of uniform mixing of base and filler metal when welded at low currents and high welding speeds. These adequate thermal conditions helped the SiC particles to stay in the central weld region. The interface reaction between the matrix and SiC particles was hindered due to controlled heat inputs and formation of harmful Al4C3 flakes was suppressed. The hardness values were found to be slightly higher in the base metal rich region. There was no significant loss in the hardness of the heat affected zone. The ductility of the weld was considerably increased to 6.0-7.0% due to the addition of Al-Si filler metal.

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methods and apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold. 6 figs.

Seidel, B.R.; Tracy, D.B.; Griffiths, V.

1989-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Optimization of neutron tomography for rapid hydrogen concentration inspection of metal castings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen embrittlement describes a group of phenomena leading to the degradation of metal alloy properties. The hydrogen concentration in the alloy can be used as an indicator for the onset of embrittlement. A neutron tomography system has been optimized to perform nondestructive detection of hydrogen concentration in titanium aircraft engine compressor blades. Preprocessing of back projection images and postprocessing of tomographic reconstructions are used to achieve hydrogen concentration sensitivity below 200 ppm weight. This paper emphasizes the postprocessing techniques which allow automated reporting of hydrogen concentration.

Gibbons, M. R., LLNL

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

Casting Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   General characteristics of casting processes...casting processes Characteristic Casting process Green sand Resin-bonded sand Plaster Lost foam Investment Permanent mold Die Part Material (casting) All All Zn to Cu Al to cast iron All Zn to cast iron Zn to Cu Porosity and voids (a) C-E D-E D-E C-E E B-C A-C Shape (b) All All All All All Not T3, 5,...

105

Cyclic nanoindentation studies on CrN thin films prepared by RF sputtering on Zr-based metallic glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclic nanoindentation tests were carried out to study the influence of the chromium nitride thin films on the mechanical properties of Zr-based metallic glass. Chromium nitride thin coatings have been deposited on Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} metallic glass substrate by RF sputtering. The deposition process was done at room temperature under nitrogen reactive gas using a metallic chromium target. The CrN films have a thickness of 300 nm. Several cyclic nanoindentation measurements were conducted on CrN films and Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} metallic glass substrate samples at various loading rate values. We have found that the coated metallic glass sample shows high mechanical properties such as hardness and reduced elastic modulus. Cyclic nanoindentation results show a hardening behaviour for these CrN coatings. Moreover, the CrN coated on Zr-based metallic glass was found to have a high value of resistance to crack propagation, as being analysed through the SEM pictures of the residual Vickers indentation impressions.

Jellad, A.; Benameur, T. [Laboratoire de Genie Mecanique LGM-MA05, ENIM, Av. Ibn El Jazzar, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Labdi, S. [Laboratoire d'etudes des Milieux Nanometriques, UEVE, Bd F. Mitterand, 91025 Evry Cedex (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Uranium at Y-12: Casting | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Casting Uranium at Y-12: Casting Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:42pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Buttons and other recycled metal are used in casting components for...

107

MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

1962-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Micro-nano scale ripples on metallic glass induced by laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

A Zr{sub 47.7}Cu{sub 31}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 12.3} bulk metallic glass was irradiated directly by KrF excimer laser pulses with wavelength 248 nm and duration 10 ns. Scanning electronic microscope photographs indicated that many ripples in micro-nano scale would be generated on the edge of the irradiated area under the action of the higher intensity laser pulse. Detailed observation demonstrated that the ripples exhibited fluidity and became closer and closer out from interior. Theoretical analysis revealed the formation mechanism of the ripples, including melting, subsequent propagation of capillary waves and final solidification.

Liu, W. D.; Ye, L. M. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, K. X. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nanometer-scale tunnel formation in metallic glass by helium ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that upon high fluence helium ion irradiation, metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 45}Ti{sub 5} becomes highly porous at the depth of the helium projected range. The resulting porous region is characterized by the formation of a tunnel like structure and self-linkage of nanometer size gas bubbles. Furthermore, the irradiation leads to the formation of nanometer size Cu{sub x}Zr{sub y} crystals that are randomly distributed. The results of this study indicate that the He-filled bubbles have attractive interactions and experience considerable mobility. Movement of the bubbles is believed to be assisted by ballistic collisions.

Shao Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Gorman, Brian P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Xie Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Bulk Metallic Glasses VII. Presentation Title, Air-Oxidation of a...

111

Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Free Volume Evolution in Metallic Glasses Subjected to Mechanical Deformation Qi-Kai Li1;2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Volume Evolution in Metallic Glasses Subjected to Mechanical Deformation Qi-Kai Li1;2 and Mo of Sciences, Beijing 100080, P. R. China We define the Turnbull-Cohen free volume as the critical excess of the Voronoi volume of an atom less its core volume. Using molecular dynamics simulation we calculated the free

Li, Mo

113

System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Direct Casting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 10   Alternative sheet, strip, and slab casting techniques...Armco Single roll Allegheny-Ludlum Single roll Argonne National Labs Electromagnetic levitation United Technologies Single roll LTV Drum in drum Japan Nippon Steel Twin roll Kawasaki Steel Twin roll Nippon Kokan Twin roll Nippon Metals Twin roll Kobe Twin roll Nippon Yakin Twin roll France IRSID Twin...

115

Comparison of Wax and 3D Printed Investment Casting Pattern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Advances in Metal Casting Technologies. Presentation Title, Comparison of...

116

CAST SHOP TECHNOLOGY: V: Cast House Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 1997 TMS Annual Meeting: Wednesday Session. CAST SHOP TECHNOLOGY: Session V: Cast House Safety. Sponsored by: LMD Aluminum...

117

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ???? 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article ?¢????Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature?¢???, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8????10^2 ???µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

Nieh, T.G.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ???? 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article ?¢????Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature?¢???, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8????10^2 ???µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

Nieh, T.G.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Chemistry of glass-ceramic to metal bonding for header applications. I. Effect of treatments on Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276 metallic surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Auger electron spectroscopy and depth Auger profiling were used to study the surfaces of Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276. The metal surfaces were processed in the same manner as is presently being used in the manufacturing of glass-ceramic headers. At each step in the process, samples were studied with Auger spectroscopy to determine their resultant elemental surface composition and film thickness. In addition, the effect of a final plasma cleaning operation on the metal surface was examined. The results show that the type and concentration of surface species and the thickness of the surface oxides are dependent on the processing technique.

Kramer, D P; Craven, S M; Schneider, R E; Moddeman, W E; Brohard, D W

1984-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Investment Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...In investment casting, also called the "lost wax" process, a ceramic slurry is applied around a pattern, usually made of wax, and hardened to make a mold. The pattern is removed, usually by heat, and molten alloy is poured into the space formerly

123

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

124

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O' Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Casting methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Linking high and low temperature plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: thermal activation, extreme value statistics and kinetic freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At temperatures well below their glass transition, the deformation properties of bulk metallic glasses are characterised by a sharp transition from elasticity to plasticity, a reproducible yield stress, and an approximately linear decrease of this stress with increasing temperature. In the present work it shown that when the well known properties of the under-cooled liquid regime, in terms of the underlying potential energy landscape, are assumed to be also valid at low temperature, a simple thermal activation model is able to reproduce the observed onset of macro-scopic yield. At these temperatures, the thermal accessibility of the complex potential energy landscape is drastically reduced, and the statistics of extreme value and the phenomenon of kinetic freezing become important, affecting the spatial heterogeneity of the irreversible structural transitions mediating the elastic-to-plastic transition. As the temperature increases and approaches the glass transition temperature, the theory is able to smoothly transit to the high temperature deformation regime where plasticity is known to be well described by thermally activated viscoplastic models.

P. M. Derlet; R. Maa

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining of Investment Casting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining of Investment Casting Superalloys in a Large Production EB Furnace. Janine C. Borofka. Axe1 Johnson Metals, Inc.

130

Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters  

SciTech Connect

In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.

Sundaram, S. K.; Perez, Joseph M.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

132

Results of drip tests on sludge-based and actinide-doped glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reaction of three differs simulated nuclear waste glasses is being evaluated using a test method that slowly drips water onto a glass/metal assembly. The tests have been in progress for up to eight years and are being performed with as-cast and glass aged by reaction with water vapor. Results are presented for the cumulative release of Np, Pu, and Am as a function of time; also reported are the particulate species that have been detected suspended in solution. A significant difference is noted in the suspended species depending on the glass composition, and on whether the glass is aged. With as-cast glass, the radioactivity is associated with the suspended particles, while with the aged glass, the solution has a high initial anion content, and the transuranic elements appear to be dissolved in solution, since they pass through filters with small pore sizes. Examples are given of possible tests to evaluate the interaction between these test solutions and potential engineered barrier components.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Role of Partial Crystallinity on Hydrogen Permeation in FeNiBMo Based Metallic Glass Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A potentially exciting material for membrane separations are metallic glass materials due to their low cost, high elastic toughness and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement as compared to crystalline Pd-based membrane systems. However, at elevated temperatures and extended operation times structural changes including partial crystallinity may appear in these amorphous metallic systems. This study reports on the investigation of time and temperature dependent crystalline phase formation in conjunction with in situ crystallization/hydrogen permeation experiments at elevated temperatures. At temperatures near 400 C a FeNi crystalline phase appears as 22 vol.% inside the host amorphous matrix and the resulting composite structure remains stable over 3 h at temperature. The hydrogen permeation at 400 C of the partially crystalline material is similar to the fully amorphous material near 5 x 10{sup -9} mol H{sub 2}/m s Pa{sup 1/2}, while ambient temperature electrochemical permeation at 25 C revealed an order of magnitude decrease in the permeation of partially crystalline materials due to differences in the amorphous versus crystalline phase activation energy for hydrogen permeation.

Brinkman, K.; Su, D.; Fox, E.; Korinko, P.; Missimer, D.; Adams, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

J8: Micro Fabrication of Metallic and Oxide Glasses for Terahertz ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array Structure ... E11: Evolution of the Grain Boundary Character Distribution During Grain ... for High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation .... H2: Triboluminescent Smart Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring.

135

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive progress in development of an HTC (heat transfer coefficient) Evaluator and in the preparation of the experiments at CMI and Amcast have been achieved in the last three months. The interface of the HTC Evaluator has been developed in Visual C++ for the PC platform. It provides a tool to collect and store the published data on heat transfer coefficients in a database for further analysis. It also supports the mathematical model for evaluation of heat transfer coefficients. More than 100 papers related to this project have been cited and most of them have been collected. The preparation of the experiments at CMI is almost completed. A hockey-puck mold has been selected for the experiments for squeeze casting and semi-solid casting. A direct cavity pressure measurement system was purchased from Kistler. The pressure probes and data acquisition software as well as the necessary accessories have been delivered. The instrumented mold modification has been designed and the modifications completed. At Amcast Automotive, a new wheel-like mold for low-pressure permanent mold casting was designed. The CAD file for mold fabrication has been generated. The modeling of the casting has been done. An extensive survey on the ultrasonic gap formation measurement was fulfilled. It is concluded that the ultrasonic probe is capable of measuring a gap under the authors` casting conditions. In the last three months, four project meetings has been organized and held with the industrial partners.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cast Irons - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... Processing, Microstructure and Properties of Cast Irons and Cast and Forged Specialty Steels: Cast Irons Sponsored by: MS&T Organization

137

Use of metallic glasses for fabrication of structures with submicron dimensions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Patterned structures of submicron dimension formed of supported or unsupported amorphous metals having submicron feature sizes characterized by etching behavior sufficient to allow delineation of sharp edges and smooth flat flanks, resistance to time-dependent dimensional changes caused by creep, flow, in-diffusion of unwanted impurities, out-diffusion of constituent atoms, void formation, grain growth or phase separation and resistance to phase transformations or compound formation.

Wiley, John D. (Madison, WI); Perepezko, John H. (Madison, WI)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

Mangels, John A. (Flat Rock, MI); Dickie, Ray A. (Birmingham, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass  

SciTech Connect

We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

SciTech Connect

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1996-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

COST SAVING THROUGH APPLICATION OF THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Bendix now makes four component parts for one precision mechanical assembly from investment castings rather than from wrought-stock machined and welded assemblies--a conversion based directly on the cost saving potential. With proper evaluation of metal components for casting suitability and usage, manufacturers may realize cost saving far beyond their expectations.

Cromwell, W. E.; Tiehen, G. L.; Paul, J. P.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inhomogeneity and glass-forming ability in the bulk metallic glass Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} as seen via x-ray spectroscopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core-level photoemission spectroscopy and anomalous x-ray scattering (AXS) measurements were performed for the Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} (PNCP) excellent metallic glass to investigate the chemical nature and local atomic structure, and the results were compared to those in Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 40}P{sub 20}. The P 2p core levels clearly separate into two states, indicating that the P atoms have two different chemical sites, which is a strong experimental proof for the existence of an elastic inhomogeneity. From the AXS close to the Pd K edge, a specific Pd-P-Pd atomic configuration was observed, which is related to the stable state in the P 2p core levels. All of the core levels measured in PNCP have the deepest binding energies among these glasses, indicating the most stable electronic states. Local structure around the P atoms is discussed by the AXS data and a metastable crystal appeared in a supercooled metallic alloy close to PNCP.

Hosokawa, S. [Center for Materials Research Using Third-Generation Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Sato, H.; Nakatake, M. [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Ichitsubo, T.; Matsubara, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Happo, N. [Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Berar, J.-F.; Boudet, N. [Institut Neel, CNRS, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Usuki, T. [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Pilgrim, W.-C. [Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Nishiyama, N. [R and D Institute of Metals and Composites for Future Industries, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SLIP CASTING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

Allison, A.G.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermodynamic approach to glass-forming ability of water-quenched Pd-P-based and Pt{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}P{sub 25} bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

Despite its importance, a thermodynamic approach to determining the glass-forming ability (GFA) of bulk metallic glass (BMG) remains a goal to be achieved. We examined the GFA of water-quenched Pd-P-based and Pt{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}P{sub 25} BMG's in which their molten alloys were sufficiently treated with a dehydrated B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux prior to and during quenching to room temperature. This allowed us to envisage the applicability of the classical steady-state homogeneous nucleation theory because the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation worked effectively. GFA was examined by comparing the critical cooling rate R{sub c}{sup h} for glass formation with the maximum diameter d{sub max} of glass. To calculate R{sub c}{sup h}, the homogeneous nucleation rate I{sub ss}(T), and the growth rate u{sub c}(T) were estimated as functions of the undercooling temperature of molten alloys. Then, the free energy difference {Delta}G{sub L-x}(T) between the liquid and crystalline phases, and the viscosity {eta}(T) of the liquid were experimentally determined while the surface energy {sigma}{sub sL}(T) at the liquid-nucleus interface was estimated by calculation. The d{sub max} of rod BMG's correlated strongly to R{sub c}{sup h} through the relation R{sub c}{sup h} {approx_equal}d{sub max}{sup -3}/10 mm{sup 3} Ks{sup -1}.

Haruyama, O.; Watanabe, T.; Yuki, K.; Horiuchi, M. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda 278-8510 (Japan); Kato, H. [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nishiyama, N. [RIMCOF Tohoku University Laboratory, The Materials Process Technology Center, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Casting & Solidification 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 4, 2012 ... Study on Electromagnet-Air Knife DC Casting Process of Large-Size AA .... High shear melt conditioning of aluminum alloy melts disperses...

147

cast shop technology i  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guy Leblanc, and Vincent J. Newberry. Laboratory Investigations About the Influence of Starting Conditions on Butt Curl and Swell of DC Cast Sheet Ingots [

148

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: III: Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal fly ash, an industrial waste by-product, is produced during combustion of ... DIE CASTING FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS--A Status Report: Hubert...

149

Copper Casting Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Compositions, uses, and characteristics of copper alloy castings...operating at moderate-to-high speeds, as in electric motors and appliances. Alloy C93200 is

150

Investment Casting - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2007 ... PDF PRIMER: Investment Casting The basic process for producing superalloy components of a complex shape, 0, 1218, Lynette Karabin...

151

Effect of pre-oxidation and environmental aging on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealing glass with metallic interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two ferritic stainless steel coupons for strength evaluation. The steel coupons were pre-oxidized at elevated temperatures to promote thick oxide layers to simulate long-term exposure conditions. In addition, seals to as-received metal coupons were also tested after aging in oxidizing or reducing environments to simulate the actual SOFC environment. Room temperature tensile testing showed strength degradation when using pre-oxidized coupons, and more extensive degradation after aging in air. Fracture surface and microstructural analysis confirmed that the cause of degradation was formation of SrCrO4 at the outer sealing edges exposed to air.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fracturing of simulated high-level waste glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

Waste-glass castings generated from engineering-scale developmental processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are generally found to have significant levels of cracks. The causes and extent of fracturing in full-scale canisters of waste glass as a result of cooling and accidental impact are discussed. Although the effects of cracking on waste-form performance in a repository are not well understood, cracks in waste forms can potentially increase leaching surface area. If cracks are minimized or absent in the waste-glass canisters, the potential for radionuclide release from the canister package can be reduced. Additional work on the effects of cracks on leaching of glass is needed. In addition to investigating the extent of fracturing of glass in waste-glass canisters, methods to reduce cracking by controlling cooling conditions were explored. Overall, the study shows that the extent of glass cracking in full-scale, passively-cooled, continuous melting-produced canisters is strongly dependent on the cooling rate. This observation agrees with results of previously reported Pacific Northwest Laboratory experiments on bench-scale annealed canisters. Thus, the cause of cracking is principally bulk thermal stresses. Fracture damage resulting from shearing at the glass/metal interface also contributes to cracking, more so in stainless steel canisters than in carbon steel canisters. This effect can be reduced or eliminated with a graphite coating applied to the inside of the canister. Thermal fracturing can be controlled by using a fixed amount of insulation for filling and cooling of canisters. In order to maintain production rates, a small amount of additional facility space is needed to accomodate slow-cooling canisters. Alternatively, faster cooling can be achieved using the multi-staged approach. Additional development is needed before this approach can be used on full-scale (60-cm) canisters.

Peters, R.D.; Slate, S.C.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Facilities and Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Drop-Tube Processing of Ni-Si Alloys: Andrew Mullis1; Leigang Cao1; Robert Cochrane1; 1University of Leeds We present the results of...

155

Metallic Glass I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... With the increasing free volume (FV) content, more local atomic clusters .... of Science and Technology Beijing; 2 City University of Hong Kong

156

Bulk Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W.H. Jiang, G.J. Fan, F.X. Liu, G.Y. Wang,. H. Choo, and P.K. Liaw. Mechanical Behaviors. Mechanical Properties and Devitrification Behavior of Cu-Zr-Ti-NM.

157

Processing, Microstructure and Properties of Cast Irons and Cast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Process Design of the Ductile Cast Iron Cylinder Head for Marine Diesel Engine ... Heavy Section Ductile Iron Castings for Use in Wind Turbine Generators.

158

Effect Of Casting Mould on Mechanical Properties Of 6063 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sand-mould process is known to induce peculiar microstructures depending on average grain size, grain size ... Direct Laser Deposition of Bulk Metallic Glasses.

159

Grain Refinement and Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Program Organizers: Trond Furu, Hydro ... Full scale DC casting trials of 6xxx alloy were performed. ... Small polyhedral silicon particles and globular aluminum grains were formed in the region near the probe (zone one).

160

Casting Flow Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 1 Simplified flow diagram of the basic operations for producing a steel casting. Similar diagrams can be applied to other ferrous and nonferrous alloys produced by sand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method of casting aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

Poco, J.F.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Method of casting aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps  

SciTech Connect

Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Schaeffer, Jon Conrad (Greenville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sol-GelGlasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

165

Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties  

SciTech Connect

The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5% in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Computer cast blast modelling  

SciTech Connect

Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

Chung, S. [ICI Explosives Canada, North York, ON (Canada); McGill, M. [ICI Explosives USA, Dallas, TX (United States); Preece, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

MEP Advisory Board Webcast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Circuit Board Assemblies Plastics Glass Printed Art Metal Die Casting Sand Casting CNC Machining Extrusions ECP: Services Overview ...

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

MICROWAVE HEATING SIMULATION OF METALS AND DIELECTRIC CERAMICS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research objectives proposed to study metal processing using a modular industrial microwave oven. The intent of the oven was to perform casting for metal (more)

Warren, Brian C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures  

SciTech Connect

We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy  

SciTech Connect

The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

Huang Hu; Zhao Hongwei; Shi Chengli; Wu Boda; Fan Zunqiang; Wan Shunguang; Geng Chunyang [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Renmin Street 5988, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of Casting Conditions and Composition on Microstructural Gradients in Roll Cast Aluminum Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Twin Roll Casting (TRC) is a process by which thin strip is produced directly from molten metal. This process has many advantages over traditional Direct Chill (DC) casting where metal is cast into large slabs or ingots and subsequently hot and cold rolled into strips. While the DC casting involves large capital investment and energy consumption, TRC produces strip with thickness in the range of 10 mm to 2.5 mm in one operation without hot rolling, with less cost, energy usage and equipment requirements. In TRC AA3105, high solidification and post-solidification cooling rates lead to high manganese supersaturation throughout the as-cast strip and very fine constituent particles near strip surface. After 90% cold rolling, the TRC material shows sluggish recrystallization kinetics and a very coarse grain structure, due to concurrent forming dispersoids and/or fine constituent particles. These particles interfere with the nucleation process by preventing migration of the boundaries associated with potential nuclei, resulting in fewer recrystallization nuclei and slower nucleation rate. In addition, the fine particles can impede grain growth by exerting a pinning pressure on moving boundaries. The current study investigated the microstructure evolution in TRC AA3105 during different thermo-mechanical treatments. A systematic study of the effects of different homogenization treatments on second phase particles was carried out. The heating rate effect on recrystallization was studies using an infrared heating furnace. The effect of second phase particles on recrystallization behavior was summarized and experimental results were presented. It was shown that a desirable, fine recrystallized grain size could be obtained by either of two means- rapid heating rate ot the annealing tempeature, or by a pre-cold work homogenization heat treatment.

Burton R. Patterson

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Defects and Properties of Cast Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... In many instances the mechanism for the generation of the defects arises from a combination of...

179

Advances in Metal Casting Technologies: Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Deposition of Thin Films via Sputtering: Ulises Barajas1; Sugeily Flores- Bonano,1; Vernica Santiago-Torres1; O. Marcelo Surez1; 1University of Puerto Rico

180

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cast Shop for Aluminum Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizer(s), Trond Furu, Hydro ... Review at Several US Aluminum Die Cast Manufacturers Using Unique, Non-Wetting, Micro-Porous Refractory Products.

182

'Spin Casting' And 'Cold Deformation'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

183

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

"Freckles" in Cast and Wrought Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

alloy 718 investment casting, one in an alloy 706 forging. ... The freckle that was found in a large, structural, investment casting is illustrated in Figure 1.

185

Traditional Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Glass product types and applications...plates, cups, bowls, serving dishes Fiberglass Wool: insulation, filters Textile: plastic or rubber tire reinforcements, fabrics,

186

Glass Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14   Compositional ranges for insulation-type glasses...from materials melted in a cupola with coke as fuel, all iron oxide

187

Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Glass and Optical Materials: Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses Program Organizers: Jincheng Du, University of North Texas; John Kieffer,...

188

Ohno continuous casting  

SciTech Connect

Production of net-shape products directly from the liquid is an attractive manufacturing route for alloys that are difficult to process or that cannot be rolled, drawn, or extruded. Developed at the Chiba Institute of Technology in Japan, the Ohno Continuous Casting (OCC) approach not only provides significant cost savings, but also has the potential to create new products. OCC process equipment includes a melting furnace, crucible, mold level-control block, cooling device, and pinch rolls. OCC is currently used to produce copper rods and wires for audio and video cables, and aluminum alloy welding rods for hard-surfacing applications. For example, Mitsui Engineering and Ship Building Co. has used OCC to produce copper tubing products with internal fins and partitions for applications such as heat exchanger tubes and induction coils.

Soda, H.; McLean, A. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Motoyasu, G.; Ohno, A. [Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Chameleon foreCAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark energy models, such as the chameleon, where the acceleration of the expansion of the universe results from the dynamics of a scalar field coupled to matter, suffer from the potential existence of a fifth force. Three known mechanisms have been proposed to restore General Relativity in the solar system and the laboratory, which are the symmetron/Damour-Polyakov effect, the Vainshtein property and the chameleon screening. Here, we propose to probe the existence of chameleons in the laboratory, considering their particle physics consequences. We envisage the resonant and non-resonant production of chameleons in the sun and their back-conversion into X-ray photons in a solar helioscope pipe such as the one used by CAST. A detection of these X-rays would indicate the existence of chameleons. We focus on a template model for the solar magnetic field: a constant magnetic field in a narrow shell surrounding the tachocline. The X-ray photons in a helioscope pipe obtained from back-conversion of the chameleons created inside the sun have a spectrum which is peaked in the sub-keV region, just below the actual sensitivity range of the present axion helioscopes. Nevertheless they are detectable by present day magnetic helioscopes like CAST and Sumico, which were built originally for solar axions. We also propose a chameleon-through-a-wall experiment whereby X-ray photons from a synchroton radiation source could be converted into chameleons inside a dipole magnet, then pass a wall which is opaque to X-rays before being back-converted into X-ray photons in a second magnet downstream. We show that this could provide a direct signature for the existence of chameleon particles.

Philippe Brax; Axel Lindner; Konstantin Zioutas

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modeling Investment Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once the finite-element meshes of the metal, mold, mold wrap, and furnace are created, they are assembled into a final model as shown in Figure 6. It is then...

191

Infofrax: Cbr in fused cast refractory manufacture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper describes a CBR application in manufacturing industry, a domain where CBR has by and large proved its applicability and success. The paper details a thorough understanding of the field of fused cast manufacturing basically seen from the perspective of glass furnace, where quality of glass produced is straightaway related to the refractory blocks used in furnace linings. The applicability of CBR paradigm is revisited in the present context. The CBR process needed is conceptualized and designed. The paper states in detail the evolution of the system starting from tackling hurdles of the knowledge acquisition and refining, facing a number of pitfalls in the prototype phase, to final implementation of InfoFrax, a CBR system specially devised for the project, and overall description of the same covering architecture, and usage. The paper also reports the immediate effects of the software in form of direct user feedback, expectations from the existing system and some directions of future work already underway in the project. 1

Deepak Khemani; Radhika Selvamani B; A Rabi Dhar; Michael S. M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microstructural Characterization of Cast 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

structural hardware. The mechanical properties of cast 718 have greatly .... hrs, Furnace Cool lOO'F/hr to 115O'F/8 hrs, Air Cool. (in a suitable protective.

193

Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, S. Marvin (Kingston, TN); Rexford, Donald (Pattersonville, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cast Alloy Compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Nominal Compositions of Cast Nickel-Base Superalloys...5.0 8.0 2.0 8.0 6.0 ? ? ? 5.0 1.5 0.1 ?. ? ? MC-NG ? 4.0 1.0 5.0 5.0 4.0 4.0 ? 6.0 0.5 0.1 ? ? ? MC-102 ? 20.0 6.0 2.5 0.6 ? 6.0 ? ? ? 0.04 ? ? 0.25 Si, 0.30 Mn MK-4 9.4??9.6 6.4??6.6 0.6 6.4??6.6 7.2??7.5 3.0??3.2 5.60 0.6??0.9 0.15??0.2 0.02??0.03 50??60 ppm MX-4 16.5 2 2 6 8.25 5.95 3 5.55 ---- 0.15 0.03...

195

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

WEB RESOURCE: Magnesium Cast Products Flow Chart - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 18, 2007 ... The following flow charts attempt to list important cast magnesium products being made as die castings, sand and permanent mold castings...

197

Glass and Optical Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NMR Insight into Glass Formers and Modifiers NMR Studies on Biomaterials and Bioactive Glasses Non-Linear Optical Properties in Glasses.

198

Blasting casting to raise productivity  

SciTech Connect

Normally, surface mines employ draglines or truck and shovel systems to remove overburden. Blasting merely fragments and displaces the overburden enough to allow for easy digging. But during the past two decades, the effect of inflation and increased labor costs have encouraged unconventional methods of overburden removal. All of us are aware of the tremendous inflationary effects on costs of equipment, fuel, labor, interest, insurance, environmental compliance, etc. This has allowed the authors to take a new look at the use of explosives as an effective alternate method of overburden removal. This technique is known by several names, but basically blast casting or just casting best describes it. Other terms in vogue are explosive casting, controlled trajectory blasting, trajectory control blasting, and whatever terminology comes to mind.

Pilshaw, S.R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ultra Large Castings to Produce Low Cost Aluminum Vehicle Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through a cooperative effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT), Alcoa is developing a casting process to produce ultra large thin wall components. The casting process is a low pressure, metal mold, multiport injection vertical casting process. The specific system for demonstration of the process is located at Alcoa's Technology Center and will be capable of producing parts extending 3 M long, 1.7 M wide and 0.4 M high. For example, single castings of car floor pan frames or side wall aperture structures are candidates for this installation. This shall provide a major opportunity to reduce the cost of lightweight transportation vehicle structures by (a) reducing the components or part count and (b) reducing the cost of assembly. To develop and demonstrate the process, an inner panel of the Chrysler minivan liftgate will be first produced on this system. Through computer analyses, the cast inner panel design was developed to satisfy both structural performance and casting process requirements. Currently, this is an 11 part assembly of steel components. At the time of this abstract, the numerous system components are in various phases of fabrication and site preparation is fully underway, with system shakedown beginning in the second quarter of 1999. Successful demonstration of caster system operation is anticipated to occur during the third quarter and production of a high quality product during the fourth quarter. Although the process is targeted toward reducing the cost of lightweight trucks, buses and autos, consideration is being given to application in the aircraft industry.

T. N. Meyer; M. J. Kinosz; E. M. Bradac; M. Mbaye; J. T. Burg; M. A. Klingensmith

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel  

SciTech Connect

This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

Dr. Von L. Richards

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. B. Adams and J. A. Pask, "Fundamentals of Glass-to-Metalapplied glass. The same fundamentals and requirements applyand R. M. Fulrath, "Fundamentals of Glass-to-Metal Bonding:

Pask, J.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

MS&T '04 Volume 2: Continuous Casting Fundamentals, Engineered  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous Casting Fundamentals I Initial Solidification and Interfacial .... Continuous Casting Fundamentals II Mold Fluid Flow and Water Spray Cooling.

204

Characterization of Vacuum Die Cast Inconel 718 and Derivatives ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and evaluation of investment cast Inconel 718 as a processing ... investment cast structural applications that several technical issues were...

205

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fisher4Cast Users' Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the Users' Manual for the Fisher Matrix software Fisher4Cast and covers installation, GUI help, command line basics, code flow and data structure, as well as cosmological applications and extensions. Finally we discuss the extensive tests performed on the software.

Bruce A. Bassett; Yabebal Fantaye; Rene Hlozek; Jacques Kotze

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Land-based turbine casting initiative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet goals for the ATS program, technical advances developed for aircraft gas turbine engines need to be applied to land-based gas turbines. These advances include directionally solidified and single crystal castings, alloys tailored to exploit these microstructures, complex internal cooling schemes, and coatings. The proposed program to scale aircraft gas turbine casting technology up to land based gas turbine size components is based on low sulfur alloys, casting process development, post-cast process development, and establishing casting defect tolerance levels. The inspection side is also discussed.

Mueller, B.A.; Spicer, R.A. [Howmet Corp., Whitehall, MI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting  

SciTech Connect

The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

R. Allen Miller

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K. [National Institute of Rock Mechanics, KGF (India)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydroxyls and Glass Surface Reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

213

Simulation of Dimensional Changes and Hot Tears During Solidification of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect

During solidification, contractions or distortions of the steel, known as ???¢????????dimensional changes,???¢??????? can cause the final product to vary significantly from the original pattern. Cracks in the casting that form during the late stages of solidification, called ???¢????????hot tears,???¢??????? occur when contractions can no longer be accommodated by residual liquid metal flow or solid metal displacement. Dimensional changes and hot tears are major problems in the steel casting industry. These occurrences are difficult to anticipate and correct using traditional foundry engineering methods. While dimensional changes are accommodated using pattern allowances, the desired dimensions are often inaccurate. Castings that form hot tears must then be scrapped or weld repaired, expending unnecessary energy. Correcting either of these problems requires a tedious trial-and-error process that may not necessarily yield accurate results. A model that predicts hot tears and dimensional changes during steel casting solidification has been successfully developed and implemented in commercial casting and stress analysis software. This model is based on a visco-plastic constitutive model with damage, where the damage begins to form when liquid feed metal is cut off to a solidifying region. The hot tear prediction is a locater for hot tear initiation sites, and not a full tear prediction: casting regions with relatively high damage values indicate where a casting is more likely to tear. In addition to model development, experimental castings were designed and produced, to provide both hot tear and dimensional change data during casting solidification and cooling. In both experimental castings and industrial production castings, regions of high damage were seen to correlate reasonably well with hot tear locations. Reasonable prediction of dimensional changes was also seen. The predictive capability of the model will improve with the development of more accurate high-temperature mechanical properties. The hot tear/dimensional change model provides the steel casting industry with a tool that will result in a reduction of scrapped castings and re-work/repair due to dimensional changes or hot tears, and also an increase in casting yield due to a reduction in the use of padding and improved placement of risers, leading to better riser efficiency. This new technology is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU???¢????????s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nondestructive Evaluation: Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of a number of projects that were initiated to support the Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Roadmap. The majority of these projects fall within the purview of the Research Technical Advisory Committee. These multiyear and multifaceted projects address a number of important issues dealing with cast stainless steel and other emerging industry needs. The first objective of the project is to maintain the cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) roadmap that outlines an ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

shape casting: the 2nd international symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling the Influence of Multi-Component and Multi-Phase Microstructures on Pore Formation in Cast Aluminum Alloys [pp. 225-232] Peter Lee, Junsheng...

217

Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase-Field Model for Multicomponent Alloys Coupled to Thermodynamic .... Modeling of Porosity Formation and Feeding Flow in Steel Casting [pp.

218

Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evolution of Nodular Cast Iron for the Case of Automobile Crankshaft by the Croning Process [pp. .... Numerical Simulation Steam Generator Repairs [pp.

219

VIDEO: Manufacture and Casting of Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2007 ... This video gives a basic look at the equipment and operations in the manufacture and casting of superalloys. CITATION: Dr. Alan Partridge,...

220

Ma'aden Open Mould Casting Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper will describe Ma'aden experience in ingot casting machines: commissioning and start-up, the challenges faced specially with De-molding machines,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High Speed Single Crystal Casting Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and regulation of convection ... produced by an ordinary casting method because the solidification time is so long as to .... Water Cooled Chillplate. 1 t'Elevator.

222

Shape Casting: 5th International Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Draft Melting Procedure for Al alloys Additive Manufacturing Supports the Production of Complex Castings Analysis of Heterogeneous Nucleation in Ductile...

223

ARTICLES: Investment Casting of Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2007 ... The directory below provides citation information and links to a number of articles on investment casting of superalloys which have been...

224

ductility prediction for magnesium casting using microstructure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... Dog-bone shaped AM50 casting samples are used in the experimental part of the work. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are...

225

High Temperature Deformation of Inconel 718 Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the computer model to yield the predicted cooling history of the casting, determine the numerically ... 10% HN03, and 5% acetic acid. Figure 1 shows a typical...

226

Grain Refinement, Alloying, Solidification and Shape Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Bars 200 mm long with a double T cross section (suitable for tensile testing) were sand cast under controlled processing conditions. Chillers of...

227

Cast Aluminum Housings in Electrical Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Cast aluminum and its alloys are often used as enclosures for electrical appliances and similar devices. Electrical faults can often be analyzed...

228

CAST SHOP TECHNOLOGY: II: Equipment and Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses important criteria for the optimum energy and melt rate ... Hydro Aluminium embarked on an extensive R & D thin gauge casting program in...

229

Spray casting project final report  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DOE Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

coated glass products. The Glass IOF is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) which...

231

Light Metals Division Symposium in Honor of Prof. John T. Berry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Shape Casting IV: Light Metals Division Symposium in Honor of Prof

232

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

Sikka, V.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Silica-alumina trihydrate filled epoxy castings resistant to arced SF.sub.6  

SciTech Connect

A cured, insulating, casting composition, having a coefficient of linear thermal expansion of below about 38 .times. 10.sup.-6 in./in./.degree. C and being resistant to arced sulfur hexafluoride gas, in contact with a metal surface in a sulfur hexafluoride gas environment, is made from hydantoin epoxy resin, anhydride curing agent and a filler combination of fused silica and alumina trihydrate.

Chenoweth, Terrence E. (Monroeville, PA); Yeoman, Frederick A. (Murrysville, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of NZP ceramic based {open_quotes}cast-in-place{close_quotes} diesel engine port liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BSX (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6-2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24}) and CSX (Ca{sub l-x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) type NZP ceramics were fabricated and characterized for: (i) thermal properties viz., thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, thermal stability and thermal shock resistance; (ii) mechanical properties viz., flexure strength and elastic modulus; and (iii) microstructures. Results of these tests and analysis indicated that the BS-25 (x=0.25 in BSX) and CS-50 (x=0.50 in CSX) ceramics had the most desirable properties for casting metal with ceramic in place. Finite element analysis (FEA) of metal casting (with ceramic in place) was conducted to analyze thermomechanical stresses generated and determine material property requirements. Actual metal casting trials were also conducted to verify the results of finite element analysis. In initial trials, the ceramic cracked because of the large thermal expansion mismatch (hoop) stresses (predicted by FEA also). A process for introduction of a compliant layer between the metal and ceramic to alleviate such destructive stresses was developed. The compliant layer was successful in preventing cracking of either the ceramic or the metal. In addition to these achievements, pressure slip casting and gel-casting processes for fabrication of NZP components; and acoustic emission and ultrasonics-based NDE techniques for detection of microcracks and internal flaws, respectively, were successfully developed.

Nagaswaran, R.; Limaye, S.Y.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Improving the Efficiency of Die Casting Machine Hydraulic Systems with the Retrofit of Adjustable Frequency Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Die casting is a common method of light metal processing which is used to produce accurately dimensioned, sharply defined metal parts. Most die casting machines in use today utilize a complex hydraulic system to perform the necessary work required for the process. The pressure and flow rate demands on the hydraulic system vary significantly throughout the cycle. Many older systems are greatly oversized so that they are able to meet the peak hydraulic demand at any point. These systems operate inefficiently because there is typically no way to limit the hydraulic capacity during periods of low demand. As a result, fluid is throttled to lower pressures and excess fluid flow is routed directly back to the system reservoir, wasting motor energy and increasing the thermal load on the cooling system. One option for improving the efficiency of older die casting machines currently in use is the retrofit of an adjustable frequency drive, or AFD. An AFD allows the speed of the pump motor to be varied, changing the pump output to suit the cycle demands. This minimizes the amount of wasted energy without affecting other process parameters. This paper will discuss the die casting process and examine the energy savings potential of retrofitting die casting machines with adjustable frequency drives.

Ambs, L.; Kosanovic, D.; Edberg, C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Blast casting requires fresh assessment of methods  

SciTech Connect

The article says that because blast casting differs from conventional blasting, our ideas about explosive products, drilling, and initiating methods must change. The author discusses how to select a casting explosive and what factors are important in its selection. He also looks at how to determine the best blasthole diameter and burden blasting pattern.

Pilshaw, S.R.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Smaller is Stronger in Amorphous Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Chengcai Wang, Zhiwei Shan, Jun Sun, Ju Li, Evan Ma. On-Site Speaker (Planned) .... Metallic Glasses for Electro-Catalytic Applications Micro- Scale...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Estimation of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Squeeze Casting of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The casting-die interfacial heat transfer coefficient(IHTC) in 5-step casting was .... from First-Principles: Solid-Solution Strengthening, Softening, and Cross-Slip.

242

Cost of Poor Quality in Aluminium Cast House Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Cast Shop for Aluminum Production. Presentation Title, Cost of Poor Quality in Aluminium Cast House Processes. Author(s), Narasimharaghavan...

243

Mechanical Properties of Counter-gravity Cast IN718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key Words: Counter-gravity, investment casting, superalloys, IN718, inert ... using the Counter-gravity Low-pressure Inert-atmosphere (CLI) investment casting...

244

Glass Cookware Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

245

Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters. Part 6, Noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition, and formic acid/denitration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary step in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed preparation for the immobilization of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) is reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), permitting steam stripping of the Hg. Denitrition and associated NOx evolution is a secondary effect of the use of formic acid as the mercury-reducing agent. Under certain conditions the presence of transition or noble metals can result in significant formic acid decomposition, with associated CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} evolution. These processes can result in varying redox properties of melter feed, and varying sequential gaseous evolution of oxidants and hydrogen. Electrochemical methods for monitoring the competing processes are discussed. Laboratory scale techniques have been developed for simulating the large-scale reactions, investigating the relative effectiveness of the catalysts, and the effectiveness of catalytic poisons. The reversible nitrite poisoning of formic acid catalysts is discussed.

Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.; Hsu, C.L.W.; Eibling, R.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation of Vitreloy 106a (Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3-wt%), ARLloy #1 (Hf71.3Cu16.2Ni7.6Ti2.2Al2.6 -wt%), and both of these amorphous alloys blended with crystalline phases of W, Cu and Ni. Novel instrumented extrusions and a host of postprocessing material characterizations were used to evaluate processing conditions and material properties. The results show that ECAE consolidation at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region gives near fully dense (>99%) and well bonded millimeter scale BAM and AMMCs. The mechanical properties of the ECAE processed BMG are comparable to cast material: Ï?f = 1640 MPa, ?µf = 2.3%, E = 80 GPa for consolidated Vitreloy 106a as compared to Ï?f = 1800 MPa, ?µf = 2.5%, E = 85 GPa for cast Vitreloy 106, and Ï?f = 1660 MPa, ?µf = 2.0%, E = 97 GPa for ARLloy #1 as compared to Ï?f = 2150 MPa, ?µf oxides and crystalline phase morphology and chemistry. It is demonstrated that the addition of a dispersed crystalline phase to an amorphous matrix by ECAE powder consolidation increases the plasticity of the amorphous matrix by providing locations for generation and/or arrest of adiabatic shear bands. The ability of ECAE to consolidated BAM and AMMCs with improved plasticity opens the possibility of overcoming the size and plasticity limitations of the monolithic bulk metallic glasses.

Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting???¢????????s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125???????°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU???¢????????s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Glass Stronger than Steel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Stronger than Steel Glass Stronger than Steel Stories of Discovery & Innovation Glass Stronger than Steel Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of R. Ritchie and M. Demetriou Highly magnified image shows a sharp crack introduced into palladium-based metallic glass and the extensive plastic shielding, marked by the white shear lines extending out from the crack, prevent the crack from opening the glass any further. Inset is a magnified view of the shear lines (arrow) developed during plastic sliding. 03.28.11 Glass Stronger than Steel A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech. Drop a glass and it breaks, right? But there's a kind of glass that while

251

Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Schneider, Ken C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

A high resolution finite volume method for efficient parallel simulation of casting processes on unstructured meshes  

SciTech Connect

We discuss selected aspects of a new parallel three-dimensional (3-D) computational tool for the unstructured mesh simulation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) casting processes. This tool, known as {bold Telluride}, draws upon on robust, high resolution finite volume solutions of metal alloy mass, momentum, and enthalpy conservation equations to model the filling, cooling, and solidification of LANL castings. We briefly describe the current {bold Telluride} physical models and solution methods, then detail our parallelization strategy as implemented with Fortran 90 (F90). This strategy has yielded straightforward and efficient parallelization on distributed and shared memory architectures, aided in large part by new parallel libraries {bold JTpack9O} for Krylov-subspace iterative solution methods and {bold PGSLib} for efficient gather/scatter operations. We illustrate our methodology and current capabilities with source code examples and parallel efficiency results for a LANL casting simulation.

Kothe, D.B.; Turner, J.A.; Mosso, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferrell, R.C. [Cambridge Power Computer Assoc. (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Examination of the solidification macrostructure of spheroidal and flake graphite cast irons using DAAS and ESBD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation focuses on the study of the solidification macrostructure of sand cast flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons. The macrostructure is revealed by using a special technique developed earlier by the authors, called Direct Austempering After Solidification. The observations make use of conventional metallography and Electron Back Scattering Diffraction. The latter technique allows a more detailed observation of the morphology of the austenite grains and the microstructure of the matrix. The results of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction validate the observations made using the macrographic technique. It is verified that the solidification of both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons is dominated by the growth of large austenite dendrites that form a grain pattern similar to that usually found in most metallic alloys.

Rivera, G. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Calvillo, P.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Boeri, R. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: boeri@fi.mdp.edu.ar; Houbaert, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Sikora, J. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: jsikora@fi.mdp.edu.ar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Caste Structures and E-Governance in a Developing Country  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Castes, or endogamous kinship relationships, are prevalent in communities across the world and particularly in developing countries. Caste plays a strong role in determining community structures and political power. However, the role of caste as a factor ... Keywords: India, Structuration, caste, development, e-governance, technology

Rahul De'

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Glass molding process with mold lubrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

Davey, Richard G. (Toledo, OH)

1978-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

DRAFT Glass.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

259

Analysis of Glass Breakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure Analysis of Glass Breakage Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

260

Certain aspects of the melting, casting and welding of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two alloys under development for castings are IC221M, (nominal composition Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.4Mo-1.7Zr wt %), and IC396M (nominal composition Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-3Mo-0.85Zr wt %). These alloys can be melted and cast using the techniques normally used for Ni-based materials. Oxidation of the liquid alloys can be controlled by vacuum processing or inert gas cover during processing. The liquid alloys can react with silica and zircon sands during casting, but this can be controlled through the use of appropriate mold washes like carbon-based materials. Welding studies showed that these alloys are susceptible to solidification cracking in weld fusion zones; the cracks are generally associated with occurrence of Ni-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic in interdendritic regions of the weld. Amount of eutectic in the weld microstructures increases with Zr concentration in weld filler metal. Weld filler metal Zr concentrations of 3 wt % and higher prevented solidification cracking of weld deposits on the base casting alloys; This is consistent with accepted phenomonological theory of this process. A weld filler metal with a composition of Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-3.0Zr wt % was prepared and used to gas tungsten arc weld together 15-mm-thick plates of the IC221M alloy. This weldment was free of cracks. Weldment tensile specimens were machined from the plate and tested at 21, 800, and 900 C. Weldment yield strength at elevated temperatures was higher than room temperature and nearly comparable with that of the base IC221M alloy. Evaluation of the cast Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for furnace furniture, turbocharger rotors, and manufacturing tooling is also briefly discussed.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

Stoddard, Nathan G. (Gettysburg, PA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Residual Stress Determination in Cast Bi-Metallic Joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

265

International Symposium on Liquid Metal Processing and Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 22, 2009 ... Compact fluorescent lighting in guest rooms and offices .... environmentally responsible fossil energy production will be necessary to provide a...

266

Advances in Metal Casting Technologies: Modeling/Simulation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 31, 2013... a rheology-viscosity sub-model to address the interference between ... In this work, the effect of electromagnetic turbulent inhibitors on the...

267

CAST SHOP TECHNOLOGY: IV: Metal Treatment-Fluxing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flowfield in the HI10 HYCAST reactor is investigated both theoretically and ... This paper will summarize the theory behind the direct shearing approach and...

268

CAST SHOP TECHNOLOGY: VII: Metal Treatment--Inclusion Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the morphological aspects of the major inclusions commonly seen in AA3104 can stock alloy. The potential sources which may introduce...

269

Process Simulation Role in the Development of Metal Casting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PI-10: Coupled Composition-Microstructure Modeling of a U-Pu-Zr Fuel PI-11: Creating an Integrated, Community-Sourced, First-Principles Data Repository.

270

Metal-Casting Process Design: Postmortem and Predictive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, there are domains in which the descriptive information required cannot be ... troubleshooting by using the clustered structure to retrieve similar objects,...

271

LIGHT METALS 2007 Volume 3: Cast Shop Technology TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Christoph Krutlein, Georg Rombach, Patrick Pouly, Paul De Vries, and Jan Luyten ... Todd M. Gansemer, Brian C. Reynolds, Jim N. Hart, and D. Corleen...

272

Metal-Casting Process Design: Postmortem and Predictive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Then, when designing a new part, the engineer can query the system for parts designed in the past that are similar to the current design. The information...

273

Symposium D: Bulk Metallic Glasses and Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 3, 2010 ... The distribution of electron beams produced by the two kinds of arrays was diagnosed by plasma radiation and Cerenkov radiation. With the...

274

Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of UPuZr alloys  

SciTech Connect

Computational simulations of gravity casting processes for metallic UPuZr nuclear fuel rods have been performed using a design-of-experiments technique to determine the fluid flow, liquid heat transfer, and solid heat transfer parameters which most strongly influence the process solidification speed and fuel rod porosity. The results are used to make recommendations for the best investment of experimental time and effort to measure process parameters.

J. Crapps; D. S. DeCroix; J. D. Galloway; D. A. Korzekwa; R. Aikin; R. Fielding; R. Kennedy; C. Unal

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

Meyer, Thomas N. (3987 Murray Highlands Cir., Murrysville, PA 15668-1747); Viswanathan, Srinath (1104 Albermarle La., Knoxville, TN 37923)

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Deformation and Void Structure in Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

277

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method for making glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is discussed for making better quality molten borosilicate glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (?¢????Energy SMARRT?¢???) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU?¢????s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU?¢????s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Deformation mechanisms and lattice strain evolution in metallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lattice strain measurements show that the crystalline phase yields at an applied stress of ~ 450 MPa and the metallic glass matrix yields at ~ 1,450 MPa.

282

Mechanical Properties of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... moduli and Vicker's hardness, as well as high transparency in the UV/visible region, ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

283

About - Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

from the repository at OSTI. The Glass Publications Portal is sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program. In...

284

Properties of RS5 and Other Superalloys Cast Using Thermally ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

investment casting methods. The characteristics of ... K.A. Green, M. McLean, S. Olson, and J.J. Schirra ... used to evaluate the soundness of investment castings.

285

Heat Treatment of High Pressure Die Castings; Challenges and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive Heat Exchangers High Temperature Creep Characterization of A380 Cast...

286

Pressurized heat treatment of glass-ceramic to control thermal expansion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Polycrystalline Grain Controlled Castings for Rotating Compressor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray and zyglo quality were found to be satisfactory. Subsequently,. Grainex as well as conventionally cast Mod 5A rotors .... ture limited and sizing is often limited by tensile strength related burst ... of cooling gamma prime, and small discrete.

288

Importance of glass and brass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of scientific instruments in the scientific revolution, especially brass and glass. Precise lenses and lens grinding, glass vessels for chemical experiments, the advances in astronomy, microscopy and many other areas due to glass...

Dugan, David

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Glass forming ability of the Mo-Pd system studied by thermodynamic modeling and ion beam mixing  

SciTech Connect

Glass forming ability/range of the Mo-Pd binary metal system was studied by thermodynamic calculations employing Miedema's model and ion beam mixing of multiple metal layers. The thermodynamic calculations predict a narrow composition range of 8-26 at% Pd, within which metallic glass formation is energetically favored, whereas the experimental results showed that ion beam mixing was able to synthesize metallic glasses within a composition range 13-30 at% Pd, which was well in accordance with the prediction. Besides, in the Mo{sub 70}Pd{sub 30} multilayered films, with varying the irradiation dose, a dual-phase metallic glass was formed, and it could be considered as an intermediate state. The possible mechanism for the formation of the metallic glasses was also discussed in terms of the atomic collision theory.

Ding, N.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

MST: Organizations: Ceramic and Glass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation and machining, to complete component fabrication and testing. Our Mission Our ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic products meet customer needs in defense, energy,...

293

Nanostructured Composites and Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and hardness one order of magnitude higher than that of conventional metal oxide aerogels. The applications of the robust and controllable nanotubular metal

294

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Process for slip casting textured tubular structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

Steinlage, Greg A. (West Lafayette, IN); Trumble, Kevin P. (West Lafayette, IN); Bowman, Keith J. (West Lafayette, IN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bruninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzn; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodrguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Novel refractory alkaline earth silicate sealing glasses for planar solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel refractory Sr-Ca-Y-B-Si sealing glass (glass-ceramic) was developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objective was to develop sealing glass with desired thermal properties and minimal interfacial reactions with SOFC components, ceramic electrolyte and metallic interconnect. The current glass was different from conventional sealing glass in that the sealing temperatures were targeted higher (>950 degree C) and hence more refractory. Six glasses were formulated and made by conventional glass-making process. Thermal properties were characterized in the glass state and the sintered (crystallized) state. The effect of formulation on thermal properties was discussed. Candidate glasses were also aged for 1000 to 2000 h at elevated temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements showed minimal change after aging. A candidate glass (YSO-1) was used in sealing ceramic electrolyte to a metallic interconnect from 900 degree C to 1050 degree C in air. The interfacial microstructure was characterized and SrCrO4 was identified near the metal interface. Possible reaction mechanism for the chromate formation was discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Numerical simulation of MHD for electromagnetic edge dam in continuous casting.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model was developed to predict eddy currents and fluid flows in molten steel. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in electromagnetic (EM) edge dams (EMDs) designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy-current distribution and the electromagnetic forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free surfaces. Results of the numerical simulation compared measurements obtained from a static test.

Chang, F. C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

1963-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nondestructive Evaluation: Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of a project that was initiated in part to support the Change Initiative associated with PWR Stainless Steel NDE Capability and Performance Demonstration Initiative, but it also falls in line with a project funded through the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Technical Innovation program. This multiyear and multifaceted project addresses important issues dealing with cast stainless steel and other emerging industry needs. The first objective of the project is t...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

Doru M. Stefanescu

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nondestructive Evaluation: Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of a project that was initiated in part to support the Change Initiative associated with the PWR Stainless Steel Nondestructive Evaluation Capability and Performance Demonstration Initiative and also falls in line with a project currently funded through the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI Program on Technology Innovation. This multiyear, multifaceted project addresses important issues dealing with cast stainless steel and other emerging industry needs. The first ob...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Waste glass weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Terahertz Properties of Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of advances in THz-TDS spectroscopy of selected glass families ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate ... Molecular Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in...

306

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W. [and others

1996-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect

The design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems use is described. The objective of this development was to examine the feasibility of producing lenses with a cost effectiveness superior to that of lenses made by casting of acrylic. The procedure used in executing this development, the method used in cost effectiveness evaluation, results obtained and recommendations for further work are presented.

Matalon, L. A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Practice of overburden casting at the Trapper Mine - Craig, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Enfield Pit was chosen to test overburden casting at the Trapper Mine in Colorado. Seam and overburden geology, and drilling and blasting patterns are described. Tables summarize the costs involved in cast blasting. The primary problem encountered was coal losses along the open face due to high powder factors and heave of the overburden. It was concluded that cast blasting has the potential of considerable savings in overburden stripping. 3 figures, 2 tables.

Dupree, P.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method of forming a relatively stable slip of silicon metal particles and yttrium containing particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method concerns forming a relatively stable slip of silicon metal particles and yttrium containing particles. In one embodiment, a casting slip of silicon metal particles is formed in water. Particles of a yttrium containing sintering aid are added to the casting slip. The yttrium containing sintering aid is a compound which has at least some solubility in water to form Y.sup.+3 ions which have a high potential for totally flocculating the silicon metal particles into a semiporous solid. A small amount of a fluoride salt is added to the casting slip which contains the yttrium containing sintering aid. The fluoride salt is one which will produce fluoride anions when dissolved in water. The small amount of the fluoride anions produced are effective to suppress the flocculation of the silicon metal particles by the Y.sup.+3 ions so that all particles remain in suspension in the casting slip and the casting slip has both an increased shelf life and can be used to cast articles having a relatively thick cross-section. The pH of the casting slip is maintained in a range from 7.5 to 9. Preferably, the fluoride salt used is one which is based on a monovalent cation such as sodium or ammonia. The steps of adding the yttrium containing sintering aid and the fluoride salt may be interchanged if desired, and the salt may be added to a solution containing the sintering aid prior to addition of the silicon metal particles.

Dickie, Ray A. (Birmingham, MI); Mangels, John A. (Flat Rock, MI)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Simulation of Aluminum Shape Casting Processing: From Alloy - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 24, 2007 ... "The objective of the TMS Symposium on the "Simulation of Aluminum Shape Casting Processing" From Alloy Design to Mechanical Properties"...

316

Effect of Casting Speed on Temperature Difference between Copper ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DRI Carburization in the Reduction and Transition Zones of a Shaft Furnace MIDREX Type Effect of Casting Speed on Temperature Difference between...

317

Interplay of Flow and Solidification in a Horizontal Centrifugal Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DRI Carburization in the Reduction and Transition Zones of a Shaft Furnace MIDREX Type Effect of Casting Speed on Temperature Difference between...

318

Microstructure Characterization of Welds in a Haynes 282 Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion and Materials Degradation in Microturbines Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys Effect of Al-Substitution and...

319

Impact of Casting Superheat on the Mechanical Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion and Materials Degradation in Microturbines Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys Effect of Al-Substitution and...

320

Continuous Casting Simulation of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel Via ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Continuous Casting Simulation of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel Via ... Applications of Thermo-Chemical and Thermo-Physical Models in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Centrifugal And Gravity Casting Technique over ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work an attempt is made to study the effect of centrifugal and gravity casting ... A Minimum Pollution, Low Energy Process for the Recovery of Cobalt and...

322

Prediction of Residual Stress in Grey Cast Iron: Experiment and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

323

Effect of Casting Conditions on Microstructural Evolution and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

324

Mold Fluxes for Continuous Casting of Steels with High Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

325

Optimizing the Squeeze Casting Process of Carbon Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

326

Main Factors Influencing the Qualitative Properties of Casts in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

327

Analyzing Casting Problems by the On-line Monitoring of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these instances, the control system initiates an automatic termination of the cast .... from the DSPC operating management, operating crews, maintenance staff...

328

An Investigation of Microstructure and HAZ Microfissuring of Cast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bristol Aerospace Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Abstract. The effect of microstructure on the HAZ of cast a.lloy 7 18 has been examined in this study.

329

Niobium Alloying in Grey Cast Iron for Vehicle Brake Discs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Niobium Alloying in Grey Cast Iron for Vehicle Brake Discs. Author(s) ... Microtexture Analysis of a Hot Rolled Silicon Electric Steel Niobium

330

Casting simulation software cuts energy use and waste generation ...  

Casting simulation software cuts energy use and waste generation in half. Caterpillar Inc. Peoria, IL. Argonne and Caterpillar (Peoria, Ill.) have developed ...

331

Visualization for Runner System Design in Die Casting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research focuses on the development of a die casting runner system design process, and the visualization of this process. It provides a simple and (more)

Ning, Zhaohui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Sensitivity of Investment Casting Simulations to the Accuracy of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SENSITIVITY OF INVESTMENT CASTING SIMULATIONS TO THE ACCURACY OF. THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTY VALUES. X. L. Yang1, P. D. Lee1,...

333

Impact and Fracture Toughness of Investment Cast, Plasma Sprayed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impact and Fracture Toughness of Investment Cast,. Plasma Sprayed, and Wrought Alloy 718. G. K. Bouse. Howmet Corporation. Operhall Research Center .

334

Development of a Improved Heat Treatment for Investment Cast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a Improved Heat Treatment for Investment Cast Inconel718 ( PWA 649). John J. Schirra. United Technologies Corporation - Pratt & Whitney.

335

Characterization of the Dendritic Microstructure of Investment Cast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DENDRITIC MICROSTRUCTURE. OF INVESTMENT CAST ALLOY 718. Y.K. Ko and J.T. Berry. Department of Metallurgical and.

336

Microstructure Analysis of Fine Grain Alloy 718 Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investment castings of superalloys such as alloy 718 have been used for many years in radial turbine wheels( I-3). Development of techniques to minimize...

337

Cast Shop for Aluminum Production - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Advanced Compact Filter: ( ACF) An Efficient and Flexible Filtration Process AlTi5B1 Grain Refiners on the Casting of DIN 226 Aluminum...

338

Residual Stresses in Semi-permanent Mold Engine Head Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One casting was quenched using water and the other was air quenched. ... the intake and exhaust valve ports indicating the main differences in strain/stress...

339

Improving Pouring Technology of Large Steel Castings by Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

340

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Cast Alloy 718 Effects of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF CAST ALLOY 718. EFFECTS OF. HOMOGENIZATION, GRAIN SIZE AND &PHASE. Giiran sjoberg* and Daniel c o r m * *.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

Chillar, Rahul [S. P. College of Engineering, Andheri (W), Mumbai - 400 058 (India); Agrawal, S. C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai - 400 005 (India)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Argonne Software Licensing: Glass Furnace Model (GFM)  

The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) Version 4.0, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) glass furnace simulation code was developed at Argonne ...

344

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind...

345

Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Method and apparatus for strip casting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45[degree] below top dead center for optimum conditions. 2 figures.

Follstaedt, D.W.; Powell, J.C.; Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

1991-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reconciling the CAST and PVLAS Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PVLAS experiment has recently claimed evidence for an axion-like particle in the milli-electron-Volt mass range with a coupling to two photons that appears to be in contradiction with the negative results of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions. The simple axion interpretation of these two experimental results is therefore untenable and it has posed a challenge for theory. We propose a possible way to reconcile these two results by postulating the existence of an ultralight pseudo-scalar particle interacting with two photons and a scalar boson and the existence of a low scale phase transition in the theory.

R. N. Mohapatra; Salah Nasri

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reconciling the CAST and PVLAS Results  

SciTech Connect

The PVLAS experiment has recently claimed evidence for an axionlike particle in the milli-electron-volt mass range with a coupling to two photons that appears to be in contradiction with the negative results of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions. The simple axion interpretation of these two experimental results is therefore untenable and it has posed a challenge for theory. We propose a possible way to reconcile these two results by postulating the existence of an ultralight pseudoscalar particle interacting with two photons and a scalar boson and the existence of a low scale phase transition in the theory.

Mohapatra, R. N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Nasri, Salah [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

350

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Smart Glass Based on Micro-Blinds (MEMS) Speaker(s): Boris Lamontagne Date: June 22, 2012 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Selkowitz At the National Research Council, Canada we are developing a new type of smart glass based on micro-blinds (MEMS). The micro-blinds are tiny stressed metallic foils curling up once released or rolling down once actuated using electrostatic forces. Such smart glass is characterized by fast switching speed, UV-temperature insensitive and neutral appearance. Recent results will be presented as a well as our demo. Transmittance and thermal characteristics will also be addressed. There are various possible applications in building, automotive, aerospace as well as in display sectors. A video briefly describing the technology is

351

Optical and structural analysis of lead bismuth silicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

Glasses having compositions 20PbO(79.5-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}xSiO{sub 2} (x = 10,30,50) doped with 0.5 mole% of Nd{sup 3+} ions were prepared by melt quench technique. The spectroscopic properties of the glasses were investigated using optical absorption and fluorescence spectra. The structural investigations of these glasses were carried out by recording the IR spectra. The variation of {Omega}{sub 2} with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content has been attributed to changes in the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and to the changes in the rare earth oxygen covalency. Heavy metal oxide glasses have been used as potential candidate in solid state laser, solar concentrators, optical detector, optical fiber and fluorescent display devices.

Bhardwaj, S.; Shukla, R. [Department of physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology Murthal, Sonipat, Haryana (India); Sanghi, S.; Agarwal, A.; Pal, I. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumented indentation has yielded mixed results when used to measure surface residual stresses in metal films. Relative to metals, many glasses and ceramics have a low modulus-to-yield strength (E/sy) ratio. The advantage of this characteristic for measuring residual stress using instrumented indentation is demonstrated by a series of comparative spherical and conical tip finite element simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) a material with E/s{sub y} = 24-similar to glass and (ii) a material with E/s{sub y} = 120-similar to metal films. In both cases, compressive residual stress shifts the simulated load-displacement response toward increasing hardness, irrespective of tip geometry. This shift is shown to be entirely due to pile up for the ''metal'' case, but primarily due to the direct influence of the residual stress for the ''glass'' case. Hardness changes and load-displacement curve shifts are explained by using the spherical cavity model. Supporting experimental results on stressed glasses are provided.

Tandon, Rajan; Buchheit, Thomas E.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Versa Glass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 43220 Product Versa is manufacturing a new technology privacy glass in Ohio that is LEED and has cleantech properties References Versa Glass1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

355

Superhydrophobic Transparent Glass Thin Films  

Glass used in building materials (curtain walls), windshields, goggles, glasses,optical lenses, and similar applications must be durable and transparent. To meetthis challenge, ORNL researchers have invented a method to produce ...

356

A simple monatomic ideal glass former: the glass transition by a first-order phase transition above the melting point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A liquid can form under cooling a glassy state either as a result of a continuous slowing down or by a first order polyamorphous phase transition. The second scenario has so far always been observed below the melting point where it interfered with crystalline nucleation. We report the first observation of the liquid-glass transition by a first order phase transition above the melting point. The observation was made in a molecular dynamics simulation of a one-component system with a model metallic pair potential. This is also the first observation of a simple monatomic ideal glass former -- a liquid that avoids crystallization at any cooling rate. Besides its conceptual importance, this result indicates a possibility of existence of metallic ideal glass formers.

Mns Elenius; Tomas Oppelstrup; Mikhail Dzugutov

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Semi-supervised cast indexing for feature-length films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cast indexing is a very important application for content-based video browsing and retrieval, since the characters in feature-length films and TV series are always the major focus of interest to the audience. By cast indexing, we can discover the main ...

Wei Fan; Tao Wang; JeanYves Bouguet; Wei Hu; Yimin Zhang; Dit-Yan Yeung

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A boosting discriminative model for moving cast shadow detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving cast shadow causes serious problem while segmenting and extracting foreground from image sequences, due to the misclassification of moving shadow as foreground. This paper proposes a boosting discriminative model for moving cast shadow detection. ... Keywords: boosting, discriminative random fields, graph cut, shadow detection

Yufei Zha; Ying Chu; Duyan Bi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University] [Case Western Reserve University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass.

362

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

363

A Study on Applicastion of the Squeeze Casting Process to the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore, in this study, squeeze casting was introduced to substitute die casting process for the large Al motor rotor. Numerical analysis was performed to...

364

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Polymers, Ceramics and Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 18, 2010 ... Novel Forming Techniques in Fabrication of Powder-based Metals via Current Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS): D. Elting1; E. Villar1;...

366

Method of casting silicon into thin sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon (Si) is cast into thin shapes within a flat-bottomed graphite crucible by providing a melt of molten Si along with a relatively small amount of a molten salt, preferably NaF. The Si in the resulting melt forms a spherical pool which sinks into and is wetted by the molten salt. Under these conditions the Si will not react with any graphite to form SiC. The melt in the crucible is pressed to the desired thinness with a graphite tool at which point the tool is held until the mass in the crucible has been cooled to temperatures below the Si melting point, at which point the Si shape can be removed.

Sanjurjo, Angel (San Jose, CA); Rowcliffe, David J. (Los Altos, CA); Bartlett, Robert W. (Tucson, AZ)

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Erosion of white cast irons and stellite  

SciTech Connect

The erosion behavior of dual-phase alloys containing large, hard carbides has been investigated. A series of high Cr-Mo white cast irons with a systematic variation of carbide volume fraction (CVF) and powder metallurgy specimens of Stellite 6 were eroded with alumina, crushed quartz and rounded quartz particles. These erodents were chosen because quartz has a hardness between that of the matrix and the Cr-rich carbides, whereas the hardness of alumina is comparable to that of the carbides. In addition, comparison of the results with crushed quartz and alumina allows an evaluation of the effect of particle hardness while the differences between the rounded and crushed quartz results can be attributed to the shape difference. For all erodents and alloys, the dependence of erosion on angle of incidence was weak. With alumina and rounded quartz erodents, the erosion rate increased with increasing CVF, while the reverse was true with crushed quartz. The crushed quartz erodent gave an erosion rate only slightly lower than that of alumina, indicating that the carbide erosion resistance is not a strong function of erodent particle hardness in this range of hardness. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the eroded surfaces showed that erosion of the highest-CVF white cast iron alloy with alumina or rounded quartz resulted in depression of the large primary carbides, while with crushed quartz many of the carbides protruded above the matrix. The SEM and erosion rate observations show that with crushed quartz the carbides are more erosion resistant than the eutectic matrix and that the carbides therfore contribute to erosion resistance, while with the other erodents the reverse is true. 17 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Aptekar, S.S.; Kosel, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Metal Aminoboranes  

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be ...

369

Direct conversion of plutonium-containing materials to borosilicate glass for storage or disposal  

SciTech Connect

A new process, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), has been invented for the direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, and residue into borosilicate glass. The glass should be acceptable for either the long-term storage or disposition of plutonium. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into homogeneous glass (1) simplifies safeguards and security; (2) creates a stable chemical form that meets health, safety, and environmental concerns; (3) provides an easy storage form; (4) may lower storage costs; and (5) allows for future disposition options. In the GMODS process, mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids containing plutonium are fed directly into a glass melter where they are directly converted to glass. Conventional glass melters can accept materials only in oxide form; thus, it is its ability to accept materials in multiple chemical forms that makes GMODS a unique glass making process. Initial proof-of-principle experiments have converted cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, and other materials to glass. Significant technical uncertainties remain because of the early nature of process development.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations. For 17-4PH stainless steel parts, the alloy shrinkage factors were over-predicted, as compared with experimental data. Additional R&D focus was placed on obtaining material property data for filled waxes, waxes that are common in the industry. For the first time in the investment casting industry, the thermo-mechanical properties of unfilled and filled waxes were measured. Test specimens of three waxes were injected at commercial foundries. Rheometry measurement of filled waxes was conducted at ORNL. The analysis of the rheometry data to obtain viscoelastic properties was not completed due to the reduction in the budget of the project (approximately 50% funds were received).

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Changes in the Atomic Structure through Glass Transition Observed by X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect

The glass transition involves a minor change in the internal energy, and yet the physical and mechanical properties of a glass change dramatically. In order to determine the evolution of the atomic structure through the glass transition, we employed in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements as a function of temperature on a model material: Zr-Cu-Al metallic glass. We found that the thermal expansion at the atomic level is smaller than the macroscopic thermal expansion, and significantly increases above the glass transition temperature. The observed changes in the pair-distribution function (PDF) are explained in terms of the fluctuations in the local atomic volume and their change through the glass transition.

Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Cast Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect

Casting of austenitic stainless steels offers the possibility of directly producing large and/or relatively complex structures, such as the first wall shield modules or the diverter cassette for the ITER fusion reactor. Casting offers major cost savings when compared to fabrication via welding of quarter modules machined from large forgings. However, the strength properties of such cast components are typically considered inferior to those of conventionally forged and annealed components. To improve and validate cast stainless steel as a substitute for wrought stainless steel, a development and testing program was initiated, utilizing nitrogen and manganese additions to promote improved performance. This paper focuses on the response of the first set of developmental alloys to neutron-irradiation and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. These cast materials may also have applications for different components in light water reactors. Results showed that all steels exhibited irradiation-induced hardening and a corresponding drop in ductility, as expected, although there is still considerable ductility in the irradiated samples. The cast steels all exhibited reduced hardening in comparison to a wrought reference steels, which may be related to a larger grain size. Higher nitrogen contents did not negatively influence irradiation performance. Regarding stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, the large difference in grain size limits the comparison between wrought and cast materials, and inclusions in a reference and archive cast alloy tests complicate analysis of these samples. Results suggest that the irradiated archive heat was more susceptible to cracking than the modified alloys, which may be related to the more complex microstructure. Further, the results suggest that the modified cast steel is at least as SCC resistant as wrought 316LN. The beneficial effect of nitrogen on the mechanical properties of the alloys remains after irradiation and is not detrimental to SCC resistance.

Teysseyre, Sebastien [University of Michigan; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July of 2002, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to develop and commercialize new cast stainless steels invented and initially tested on a prior CRADA. This CRADA is a direct follow-on project to CRADA ORNL-99-0533 for diesel engine exhaust component and gas turbine engine structural component applications. The goal of this new CRADA was to develop and commercialize the newly discovered cast stainless steels (primarily CF8C-Plus) with improved performance and reliability, as lower-cost upgrade alternatives to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys.

Maziasz, P.J.; Shingledecker, J.P.; Evans, N.D.; Pollard, M.J. (Caterpillar, Inc.)

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

HANFORD'S SIMULATED LOW ACTIVITY WASTE CAST STONE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanfords (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Y.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Glass Plates under Micro-indentation Incorporation in Glass Ionomer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of nanocrystalline calcium de?cient hydroxyapatite gnCDHAl incorporation in glass ..... K., Nishino, M., 2003. Toughness, bonding and ?uoride release.

376

Report: EM Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting Management Analysis and Strategic Vision-Casting September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Strategic Vision-Casting Subcommittee Background: In the course of developing the Environmental Management Advisory Board's (EMAB) fiscal year (FY) 2008 review topics, EM leadership and Board members recognized a need to re-examine the program's strategy and vision for the future, in order to better position EM and continue its momentum for clean-up and closure. This endeavor will also ensure that the next administration and current stakeholders are aligned with EM's proposed priorities, funding requirements, and commitments for 2009 and beyond. Consequently, the Board formed a Strategic Vision-Casting Subcommittee that was charged with the assignment of reviewing EM's current and past missions and strategic visions to assess

377

Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan This work plan proposes to build a systematic knowledge base for the thermal aging behavior of cast stainless steels (CASSs) within a limited time of five years. The final output of execution of the plan is expected to provide conclusive predictions for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the extended service life up to and beyond 60 years. Mechanical and microstructural data obtained through accelerated aging experiment and computational simulation will be the key input for the prediction of CASS behaviors and for the integrity analyses for various CASS components. While the accelerated aging experiment and computational simulation results will comprise the main components of the knowledge base

378

Molten Mold Flux Technology for Continuous Casting of the ULC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat flux from the molten steel to the cupper plate of the casting mold was .... of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD.

379

Optimizing a Drifter Cast Strategy with a Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment design problem-that of drifter cast strategy-is discussed. Different optimization techniques used as part of preparations for the Semaphore-93 air-sea experiment, during which drifters were deployed, are examined. The ...

Fabrice Hernandez; Pierre-Yves Le Traon; Norman H. Barth

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Shape Casting: The John Campbell Symposium TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W. Sun, H.E. Littleton, and C.E. Bates. The Five Feeding Mechanisms [pp. 93] ... Pressure in Cast Aluminum Alloys [pp. 113] J.T. Berry, R. Luck, and R.P. Taylor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

Humbert, Matthew S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The External and Internal shrinkages in Aluminum Gravity Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The External and Internal shrinkages in Aluminum Gravity Castings. Author(s), Fu-Yuan Hsu, Shin-Wei Wang, Huey-Jiuan Lin. On-Site...

383

Mikro Systems Develops Unique Ceramic Core Casting Technology...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mikro Systems, Inc. Ceramic casting core with an intricate, fine-featured trailing edge. R&D Opportunity A key limitation of turbine efficiency has been the failure of parts at...

384

An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings  

SciTech Connect

An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Defect Analysis by Casting Simulation Software in Rolling Roll ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an Solidifying Crystalline Interface.

386

Transport and Entrapment of Particles in Steel Continuous Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an...

387

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

388

Precipitation of heterogeneous nanostructures: Metal nanoparticles and dielectric nanocrystallites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous precipitation of nanocrystallites of metallic Bi and anatase was observed in CaO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramics. Addition of AlN reduced the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Bi metal nanoparticles, which were uniformly dispersed in the glass. After heat-treatment of the Bi-precipitated glass around the glass transition temperature, nanocrystalline anatase precipitated out without aggregation of the Bi metal particles. It was found that the anatase nanocrystal size was affected by the distance between a nanocrystal and a precipitated Bi nanoparticle. The glass-ceramic produced is a functional material containing a random dispersion of different types of nanoparticles with different dielectric constants.

Masai, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi [Department of Applied Physics, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasyo, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Methods for manufacturing geometric multi-crystalline cast materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semi-conductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a geometrically ordered multi-crystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing low reluctance rims  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and rollers including low reluctance rim structures. The magnetic field and the rollers help contain the molten metal from leaking out of the containment structure.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

Boaz, P.T.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ?10-?m crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation of the crystal-tolerant HLW glasses for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the glass discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the glass beads was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the beads, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the glass bead and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for glass beads and spinel crystals, respectively.

Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Holder for rotating glass body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

Kolleck, Floyd W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) Testing of Waste Glass and K-3 Refractory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Phase IV Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR's) on May 26 1998. The new regulation requires that any waste characteristically hazardous for the metals As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag will have to be treated to meet the LDR Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) for each metal prior to land disposal. Since EPA regulations continue to become more stringent, here-to-fore unpublished TCLP data generated during testing of simulated High Level Waste (HLW) glass, including the Evnironmental Assessment glass and K-3 melter refractory, will be reviewed. The refractory TCLP data compilation includes K-3 refractory in contact with DWPF simulated glass in a pilot scale melter and K-3 refractory in contact with actual mixed waste glass in a 5 ton a day GTS Duratek melter.

Jantzen, C.M.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of cellular glasses for solar mirror panel applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytic technique is developed to compare the structural and environmental performance of various materials considered for backing of second surface glass solar mirrors. Metals, ceramics, dense molded plastics, foamed plastics, forest products and plastic laminates are surveyed. Cellular glass is determined to be a prime candidate due to its low cost, high stiffness-to-weight ratio, thermal expansion match to mirror glass, evident minimal environmental impact and chemical and dimensional stability under conditions of use. While applications could employ this material as a foam core or compressive member of a composite material system, the present analysis addresses the bulk material only, allowing a basis for simple extrapolations. The current state of the art and anticipated developments in cellular glass technology are discussed. Material properties are correlated to design requirements using a Weibull weakest link statistical method appropriate for describing the behavior of such brittle materials. A mathematical model is presented which suggests a design approach which allows minimization of life cycle cost; given adequate information for a specific aplication, this would permit high confidence estimates of the cost/performance factor. A mechanical and environmental testing program is outlined, designed to providea material property basis for development of cellular glass hardware, together with methodology for collecting lifetime predictive data required by the mathematical treatment provided herein. Preliminary material property data from measurements is given.

Giovan, M.; Adams, M.

1979-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... glass is more apt to convert to a low-energy crystalline order ... to study how molecules diffuse during subsequent annealing of the two types of glass ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Glass and Optical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

404

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Compositional Study of Neutron Detecting Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study involves the production and characterization of glass with high concentrations of Gd2O3 in various oxide glass formers, and containing one of...

406

Laboratory Equipment - Ace Glass UV Photochemistry Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Specifications / Capabilities: UV Photchemistry Safety Cabinet Ace Glass Cat. Number 7836-20. ... Power Supply Ace Glass Cat. Number 7830-60. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Chemical Strengthening of Soda Lime Silicate Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

408

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

411

Casting a Light on California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California October 28, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Combined, the six projects will produce 2,837 megawatts of energy, enough to power 851,500 to 2.1 million homes, as well as create 3,700 new construction jobs and more than six hundred permanent plant operations positions. Yesterday, Secretary Salazar joined Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, an innovative "power tower" project in San Bernardino County, California. Located in Southern California's Mojave Desert, Ivanpah will use solar "power tower" technology to produce up to 370 megawatts of clean,

412

Casting a Light on California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California Casting a Light on California October 28, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Combined, the six projects will produce 2,837 megawatts of energy, enough to power 851,500 to 2.1 million homes, as well as create 3,700 new construction jobs and more than six hundred permanent plant operations positions. Yesterday, Secretary Salazar joined Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, an innovative "power tower" project in San Bernardino County, California. Located in Southern California's Mojave Desert, Ivanpah will use solar "power tower" technology to produce up to 370 megawatts of clean,

413

GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method for manufacturing glass frit  

SciTech Connect

A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

Budrick, Ronald G. (Ann Arbor, MI); King, Frank T. (Hillsboro, OR); Nolen, Jr., Robert L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a five research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Peabody Energy studied three experimental cast blasts conducted at the North Antelope Rochelle mine site on July 24,28 and 31 2005. The initial purpose of this research project was to determine the influence that blast initiation sequence have on: NOx production; Face Displacement; Highwall damage; Explosive performance; Vibration emissions; Displacement; Surface swell; and Cast benefit. Two new discoveries on velocity of detonation (VoD) and pressure of detonation (PoD) were made as a result of this research project. Furthermore, a relationship between surface swell velocity and face velocity was also noted. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Madsen, A.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tape-cast sensors and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic means independent of the component thickness at the site. Then, choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined is discussed. The detection of flaws by means of the chosen technique is then detailed.

Kupperman, D.S.

1986-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling the feed of molten metal in a continuous metal casting system comprising a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p{sub c} = p{sub g} {minus} p{sub m} where p{sub c} is the desired pressure in the caster, p{sub g} is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p{sub m} is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristic of the metal being cast. 8 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1989-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Glass in 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... This presentation is an overview of the findings from the June 21-22, 2010 American Ceramic Society Leadership Summit ... Borosilicate Glasses: Steve W. Martin1; Randi Christensen1; Garrett Olson1; 1Iowa State University

422

Thermal insulation of window glass  

SciTech Connect

The thermal insulation of window glass can be increased by a factor of two using spray-on semiconductive SnO/sub 2/: Sb or IN/sub 2/O/sub 3/: Sn coatings. (auth)

Sievers, A.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

Weitz, David [Harvard

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc salt in the castable refractory block and it is released over the same time period as the salt. Therefore, to limit the impact of precipitated Fe on the release of 99Tc, both the amount of precipitated Fe in the BV glass and the diameter of these particles should be minimized.

Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to boroilicate glass using the GMODS process  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium scrap and residue represent major national and international concerns because (1) significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) problems have been identified with their storage; (2) all plutonium recovered from the black market in Europe has been from this category; (3) storage costs are high; and (4) safeguards are difficult. It is proposed to address these problems by conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to a CRACHIP (CRiticality, Aerosol, and CHemically Inert Plutonium) glass using the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). CRACHIP refers to a set of requirements for plutonium storage forms that minimize ES&H concerns. The concept is several decades old. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into a certified, qualified, homogeneous CRACHIP glass creates a stable chemical form that minimizes ES&H risks, simplifies safeguards and security, provides an easy-to-store form, decreases storage costs, and allows for future disposition options. GMODS is a new process to directly convert metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidize organics with the residue converted to glass; and convert chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, and other materials to glass. GMODS is an enabling technology that creates new options. Conventional glassmaking processes require conversion of feeds to oxide-like forms before final conversion to glass. Such chemical conversion and separation processes are often complex and expensive.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.; Elam, K.R.; Ferrada, J.J.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Grain refinement of cast niobium via equal channel angular extrusion/annealing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigated the effectiveness of equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) and annealing to improve the grain morphology and mechanical properties of electron-beam remelted pure niobium. Extrusions were performed at room temperature with a 90o die. Routes 1A, 2C, 4E and 8E were investigated with duplicate billets undergoing routes 1A, 2C and 4E to determine reproducibility. Niobium proved to be very workable during the ECAE process. Hardness increased most dramatically after the first pass and leveled off thereafter. Recrystallization temperatures for the Reference Metals material ranged from a low of 800o C for routes 2C, 4E and 8E to a high of 1000o C for route 1A. For the Wah Chang material, the recrystallization temperatures ranged from a low of 800o C for the 4E ECAE processed material to a high of 950o C for the asreceived material. The initial grain size and orientation have been hypothesized to be influential on recrystallized grain morphology for ECAE/annealing processed niobium. Smaller initial grains produce a smaller and more homogeneous recrystallized grain microstructure. The average grain diameters for the recrystallized 4E ECAE processed Wah Chang material are 13 ?± 6.3 mm for the 1000o C annealed state (no banding) and are 21 ?± 9.5 mm for the 1100o C annealed state (no banding). Reference Metals material that underwent route 4E and annealed at 1000o C resulted in an average grain diameter of 28 mm for billet 2 (banding) and an average grain diameter of 32 mm for billet 19 (slight banding). Reference Metals material that underwent route 8E (no banding) annealed at 1000o C resulted in an average grain diameter of 36 mm. Reference Metals material that underwent route 4E samples annealed at 1100o C resulted in an average grain diameter of 26 mm for billet 2 (banding) and an average grain diameter of 43 mm for billet 19 (slight banding). Route 8E (significant banding) annealed at 1100o C resulted in an average grain diameter of 29 mm. Strain failure decreases from the as-cast material to the worked/recrystallized material while the 0.2% yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increase from the as-cast material to the worked/recrystallized material. Long sub-grains are created in the as-worked material after one and two passes and become more broken up after four passes. Sub-grain boundary angles increase with increasing strain. To produce a fine and homogeneous microstructure from large grained niobium, intermediate annealing should be employed.

Bryant, Don O.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

CloudCast: Cloud Computing for Short-Term Weather Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CloudCast provides clients with personalized short-term weather forecasts based on their current location using cloud services

Dilip Kumar Krishnappa; David Irwin; Eric Lyons; Michael Zink

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced GPU-based ray casting for bricked datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 90s, the Direct Volume Rendering shows itself as an efficient tool for the visual analysis of volumetric datasets. There are approaches that allow for the real-time Ray Casting for visualization of the datasets that can be divided into bricks ...

Nikolay Gavrilov; Vadim Turlapov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Using ToxCast to Predict Chemicals Potential for Developmental,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Because there are so many chemicalsand since traditional chemical toxicity tests using animals is expensive and time consumingonly a small fraction of chemicals have been fully assessed for potential risk. In 2007, EPA scientists began working on ToxCast, a research project to identify and prioritize potentially toxic chemicals using rapid, automated tests called in vitro assays. ToxCast is currently examining over 1,000 chemicals from a broad range of sources, including pesticides, industrial and consumer products, food additives and failed drugs that were never released to the market. Recently, EPA scientists published papers describing first generation predictive models (see graphic 1 for process of developing models) using ToxCast data. These models show how the ToxCast concept can be used to predict the potential for certain chemicals to be toxic to embryonic development, male and female reproductive function, and vascular development. The models support continued development of this new approach to chemical safety assessment.

Vascular Development Toxicity; Developmental Toxicity

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

1985-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Role of Cooling Water in Aluminum Ingot Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 1999 ... The following short course is sponsored by The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division and will be offered during the 1999...

438

Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die lubricants and technical support. Experiments conducted with these lubricants demonstrated good protection of the substrate steel. Graphite and boron nitride used as benchmarks are capable of completely eliminating soldering and washout. However, because of cost and environmental considerations these materials are not widely used in industry. The best water-based die lubricants evaluated in this program were capable of providing similar protection from soldering and washout. In addition to improved part quality and higher production rates, improving die casting processes to preserve the life of the inserts will result in energy savings and a reduction in environmental wastes. Improving die life by means of optimized cooling line placement, baffles and bubblers in the die will allow for reduced die temperatures during processing, saving energy associated with production. The utilization of optimized die lubricants will also reduce heat requirements in addition to reducing waste associated with soldering and washout. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.1 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on commercial introduction in 2010, a market penetration of 70% by 2020 is 1.26 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.025 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6-07 Day and Peeler Session 6 FeP Glass EM-31 Tech Exchange Final new.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development Iron Phosphate Glass Development and Demonstration and Demonstration DE Day (Missouri S & T) DE Day (Missouri S & T) DK Peeler (SRNL) DK Peeler (SRNL) November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Participating Organizations Print Close Incentive * Iron phosphate glasses retain high concentrations of some waste components that are difficult to dissolve into borosilicate melts - Sulfates, phosphates, heavy metals (Cr, Bi, Mo) and halides (F, Cl) * Translates into significant increases in waste loading (WL) or reduced canister counts for specific waste streams * Key questions: - Which Hanford HLW/LAW or INL waste streams would benefit from increased waste loadings offered by FeP glass systems? * Example: SO 3 limited wastes - Borosilicate glasses  1 -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Maty et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analytical Results of DWPF Glass Sample Taken During Pouring of Canister S01913  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) (Macrobatch 3) in December 2001 as part of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 208. Macrobatch 3 consists of the contents of Tank 40 and Tank 8 in approximately equal proportions. A glass sample was obtained while pouring Canister S01913 and was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells for characterization. This report contains observations of the glass sample, results for the density, the chemical composition, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the radionuclide results needed for the Production Record for Canister S01913. The following conclusions are drawn from this work: (1) The glass sample taken during the filling of canister S01913 received at SRNL weighed 33.04 grams and was dark and reflective with no obvious inclusions indicating the glass was homogeneous. (2) The results of the composition for glass sample S01913 are in good agreement ({+-} 15%) with the DWPF SME results for Batch Number 254, the SME Batch that was being fed to the melter when the sample was collected. (3) The calculated WDF was 2.58. (4) Acid dissolution of the glass samples may not have completely dissolved the noble metals rhodium and ruthenium. (5) The PCT results for the glass (normalized boron release of 1.18 g/L) indicate that it is greater than seven standard deviations more durable than the EA glass; thus, the glass meets the waste acceptance criterion for durability. (6) The measured density of the glass was 2.56 {+-} 0.03 g/cm{sup 3}.

Bannochie, C

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Welding and mechanical properties of cast FAPY (Fe-16 at. % Al-based) alloy slabs  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the welding procedure development and weldment properties of an Fe-16 at. % Al alloy known as FAPY. The welding procedure development was carried out on 12-, 25-, and 51-mm (0.5-, 1-, and 2-in.) -thick plates of the alloy in the as-cast condition. The welds were prepared by using the gas tungsten arc process and filler wire of composition matching the base-metal composition. The preheat temperatures varied from room temperature to 350{degrees}C, and the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was limited only for 1 h at 750{degrees}C. The welds were characterized by microstructural. analysis and microhardness data. The weldment specimens were machined for Charpy-impact, tensile, and creep properties. The tensile and creep properties of the weldment specimens were essentially the same as that of the base metal. The Charpy-impact properties of the weldment specimens improved with the PWHT and were somewhat lower than previously developed data on the wrought material. Additional work is required on welding of thicker sections, development of PWHT temperatures as a function of section thickness, and mechanical properties.

Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.; Howell, C.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagant strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Whitaker, Michael J. (North Augusta, SC); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Thermo Mechanical Analysis of Glass-Metallic Composites for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of reliable sealing techniques is crucial for the efficiency and ... Cross-Section of Fe-22Cr-0.04RE Steel Oxidized at 800C in Dry Air.

448

Semi-solid Induction Forging of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

with ~5,000 ppm oxygen content. After processing, a 3.5 mm square beam was bent to nearly 90 without fracturing, a demonstration which is not possible with...

449

A physical model for fracture surface features in metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 30, 2010 ... at a rate of 1000 mm/ min, fracturing the grease in the sample. Photographs were then taken of the fracture surfaces. The photographs were...

450

The Thermophysical Properties of Bulk Metallic Glass-Forming Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure 1. A time-temperature-transformation diagram for the primary ..... an Arrhenius-like effective diffusivity Deff exp(Qeff/kT) with Qeff = 1.2 eV describes...

451

Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions in Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... research activities in several directional substances, e.g., ice, silicon, silica, and ... In this talk, we review recent progress of phase transitions in Ce-

452

Fracture and Fatigue of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on...

453

Tuneable Magnetocaloric Properties of Gd-Based Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonded Magnetocaloric Powders for the Refrigeration Application ... Novel Design of Magnetic Refrigerant Materials towards High Refrigeration Performance.

454

Metallic Glass: A Crystal at Heart | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease Osmosis in Colloidal Suspensions Building a Better Battery A New Method for Measuring X-ray Optics Aberrations New Clues for Asthma Treatment...

455

Metallic Glassy and Glass-polymer Composite Materials Produced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Saccharification Process of Cellulosic Biomass by Microwave Irradiation Novel Lamination Method for Large Armor Panels Raman Spectroscopy for...

456

Automated Materials Design of Metallic Glasses Using Genetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ranging from hard-tissue implants to high-performance transformer cores. Before ... Effect of Discrete Particle Size Distribution of Iron Ore on the Porosity in ...

457

METALLURGICAL EVALUATION OF CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS AND THEIR WELDMENTS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FINAL REPORT FINAL REPORT VOLUME 1 METALLURGICAL EVALUATION OF CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS AND THEIR WELDMENTS SUBMITTED TO U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Award Number - DE-FC36-00 ID13975 OCTOBER 1, 2000 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2005 SONGQING WEN CARL D. LUNDIN GREG BATTEN MATERIALS JOINING GROUP MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE CARL D. LUNDIN PROFESSOR OF METALLURGY MATERIALS JOINING GROUP MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE 37996-2200 TELEPHONE (865) 974-5310 FAX (865) 974-0880 lundin@utk.edu This is Volume 1of 5 of the final report for The Department of Energy Grant # DE-FC36-00 ID13975 entitled "Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steel Castings." ii FOREWARD

458

Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect

A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.] [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect

Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass metal casting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect

This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative processes; Anode design and operation; Cell fundamentals and ... Hot-rolling technologies; Deformation of materials; Primary metal production.

464

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH Han and GB McKenna, Polymers Division, Building 224, Room ...

465

Graphene Reinforced Glass and Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Graphene Reinforced Glass...

466

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

467

B42: Cathode Ray Tube Glasses in Glass Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A10: Mechanical Properties and Weld-Ability of Laser Welded Metal Bellows ..... J5: Electrical Conductivity of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Evaluated by the...

468

High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

470

Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-SelectionCast Stone  

SciTech Connect

Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

471

Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others.

Farmer, J

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the