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1

Pack Cementation Aluminizing of Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Partial list of commercial applications of pack cementation aluminizing...Carbon and stainless steels Steam power and cogeneration Waterwall tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Fluidized bed combustor tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Waste heat boiler tubes Carbon steel Economizer and air preheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Superheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Aerospace (a) Turbine blades...

2

Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi , Gibran L

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Phosphate-bonded glass cements for geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calcium aluminosilicate glasses were found to react with phosphoric acid in three ways depending upon silica content. Above 55% SiO/sub 2/ they are insoluble while below 50% they dissolve readily. The transition compositions release calcium and aluminum ions and a silica gel phase replaces the glass. Activation energies in the order of 10 kcal/mole are associated with the dissolution. Equilibrium studies in the systems CaO-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, and CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O were made to determine the phases which are stable at 200/sup 0/C in excess water. The CaO system shows hydroxylapatite, monetite and monocalcium orthophosphate are the stable phases. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system contains augelite, berlinite, and a high phosphate aluminum hydrate. The quaternary system shows the above phase plus a lime alumina hydrogarnet and crandallite. Cement made from a glass frit of the composition 45% SiO/sub 2/: 24% CaO: 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a compressive strength of 500 psi after several days in steam at 200/sup 0/C and 800 psi after months in steam. Bonding of cements to mild steel are discussed.

Rockett, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels  

SciTech Connect

The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cements curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CSs corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Internal cathodic protection of cement-lined steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

Internally coated, cement-lined, carbon steel pipes have been used extensively for ballast- and service-water systems offshore. Mechanical cracking of the lining, undercutting, and erosion have resulted in corrosion and system leaks. Cathodic protection is one alternative that has been evaluated as a solution. Cathodic protection normally gives limited protection when applied internally to a pipeline system. Tests have been performed to evaluate this hypothesis and the possibility of improved current distribution due to the cement lining. This paper presents the test results as well as a solution to the problem. Internally coated, cement-lined steel pipes are used for ballast-water, service-water, and fire-water systems in the offshore oil and gas production industry.

Jensen, F.O. (Sharpnord Corrosion, P.O. Box 46, 3971 Langesund (NO)); Tems, R.D. (Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., P.O. Box 510, 4001 Stavanger (NO))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The investigation of bioactivity and mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements prepared from Al2O3-SiO2 glass and poly(?-glutamic acid)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theglass ionomer cement as one of the dental cements has been subjected to be widespread application in restoring tooth structure. Most of glass ionomer cements employ the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as the liquid phase, but the presence of PAA inhibits ...

Jinkun Liu, Yoshimitsu Kuwahara, Yuki Shirosaki, Toshiki Miyazaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Cavitation erosion of cobalt based STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface treated low alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

Results are given for erosion-resistance tests involving several STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface-treated alloy steels. It is shown that the cobalt-rich, solid-solution phase of the STELLITE alloys is the basis of their erosion resistance, while the erosion of cemented carbides is predominantly controlled by the binder phase. It is also found that nickel-based tungsten carbides are more erosion-resistant than those based on cobalt. It is demonstrated for the case of the low-alloy steels that surface treatment can improve their erosion rates, and that application of a proprietary nitrocarburizing method to the same steels results in a similar performance improvement only after the initial loss of the compound layer.

Heathcock, C.J. (Cape Town, Univ., Rondebosch, Republic of South Africa); Ball, A.

1981-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature. Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount

10

Glass Stronger than Steel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Stronger than Steel Glass Stronger than Steel Stories of Discovery & Innovation Glass Stronger than Steel Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of R. Ritchie and M. Demetriou Highly magnified image shows a sharp crack introduced into palladium-based metallic glass and the extensive plastic shielding, marked by the white shear lines extending out from the crack, prevent the crack from opening the glass any further. Inset is a magnified view of the shear lines (arrow) developed during plastic sliding. 03.28.11 Glass Stronger than Steel A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech. Drop a glass and it breaks, right? But there's a kind of glass that while

11

Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

Han, Jiabin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fracture energy of glass fiber reinforced cement composites: method of determination  

SciTech Connect

Based on theoretic consideration, fracture energy is a useful index for the evaluation of fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced cement composites. A method for determination of fracture energy is proposed. Fracture energy was obtained from the work required for the fracture, i.e., the area under the load-displacement curve in a tensile test. Two notches were introduced on both sides of the specimen surface in order to obtain a stable load-displacement curve. The value represents a property of the material, while the impact strength and critical stress intensity factor (widely used as indices of fracture energy and fracture toughness, respectively) are not considered to be the material's properties because of the great influence of notch depth on the indices. This study discusses the suitability of the method and the error factors caused in the measurement. 12 references.

Ohigashi, T.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Chloride-Exposed Steel-Reinforced Concrete Service Life ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloride-Exposed Steel-Reinforced Concrete Service Life Prediction Program. Description/Summary: (Return to Cement ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

15

Cement invasion  

SciTech Connect

Damage from cement and cement filtrate has been a much discussed subject since set-through-and-perforate completions were first used. Historically, much of the discussion was similar to that for rotary drilling and drilling mud - it would be nice to prevent all damage, but in the real world, some damage must be tolerated to allow the operator to reap the benefits of cementing. The principal perceived formation damage due to cement invasion is seen by the operator as reducing production. The pure idealist requires full potential production under all alternatives, and would to complete all oil and gas wells free of any formation damage. The more practical idealist holds that damage would result in lower production with the completion method he prefers should be prevented. The pragmatic operator compares the cost of preventing damage to the cost of correcting the damage. Even an extremely high damage ratio is academic if the planned stimulation treatment eliminates the influence the cement invasion might have on production. Formations with permeability high enough to yield economical production without some sort of stimulation or cleanup treatment are unlikely to be subject to significant cement filtrate damage.

Sutton, D.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries  

SciTech Connect

Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOEs Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two commercial installations have been completed; one at Commonwealth and another at PPG. 2. The system is easy to operate and requires no operator training. Calibration is not required. It is certified as eye safe. 3. The system is crosscutting and ERCo is evaluating seven applications, as reported in this report, and other applications to be reported later. 4. A business plan is being completed for each of the near term markets. ERCo is committed to achieving continued commercial success with the LIBS System. 5. A world wide patent has been issued. 6. The energy savings is substantial. The annual energy savings, by 2010, for each industry is estimated as follows: o Secondary Aluminum 1.44 trillion Btus o Glass 17 to 45 trillion Btus o Steel Up to 26 trillion Btus

Robert De Saro

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid Pearlitic Steel Filaments for Tire Cords by Y. S. Yang, S. Y. Park, J. G. Bae, M. C. Kim,...

19

Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The glass waste presents favorable characteristics for incorporation into clayey ceramic ... Codin, Located in Campos (RJ), to Produce Soil-Cement Blocks.

20

Zinc electrode with cement additive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fractography of Thermally Shocked Glass Cookware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractography of fractured glass cookware can be a time consuming process of putting ... to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories Using Steel Blocks.

24

Microstructure of an Oxidation Layer on 12% Cr-steel Evolved at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore the demand to understand corrosion of steel in CO2 at high temperature is still not fully satisfied. ... High Temperature Exposure in an Oil Well Cement.

25

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

27

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Visible Cement Dataset Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. The Visible Cement Dataset is a collection of three-dimensional data sets of hydrating cement, Plaster of Paris, and ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , "Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oilCO, April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROMUniversity of California. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas useTable 2. Cement Industry Electricity and Natural GasFigure 2. Cement Industry End Use Electricity Consumption

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofCost of Conserved Final Energy (US$/GJ) Final CCE includingwithout including non-energy benefits, U.S. steel industry (

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Recycling of Flat Glass Waste into Clayey Ceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporations of the waste, with a particle size less than 74 m (200 mesh), were ... A Kinetics Study on the Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Vanadium from LD ... of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant.

36

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyConcepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energyor Photo: Waste heat recovery at cement plant, image taken

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Optimizing the physical and technological properties of cement additives in concrete mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the physical and technological properties of phosphogypsum, borogypsum, sludges and reactor residue recovered from boric acid factor, lignite ashes, and steel making slags samples were investigated. Physical test results obtained from these cement additives were studied with comparison to the control mix. The optimal values of cementitious additives are replacement of cement and/or of replacement of natural aggregates were conducted.

Demirbas, A. [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty] [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cements resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - First Cement Plants...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in the top 25 percent nationally using EPA's ENERGY STAR Cement Plant Energy Performance Indicator (EPI). EPA's national energy performance rating system, developed in...

43

Steel Cermets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cermets Steel Cermets The documents below provide information about depleted uranium use in steel cermets for spent nuclear fuel. PDF Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide...

44

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software. Description/Summary: ... Type of software: Analysis Software of Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Traditional Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Glass product types and applications...plates, cups, bowls, serving dishes Fiberglass Wool: insulation, filters Textile: plastic or rubber tire reinforcements, fabrics,

47

Glass Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14   Compositional ranges for insulation-type glasses...from materials melted in a cupola with coke as fuel, all iron oxide

48

Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Glass and Optical Materials: Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses Program Organizers: Jincheng Du, University of North Texas; John Kieffer,...

49

China's Cement Production:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

50

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energywaste heat recovery for electricity production in cement plants

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

54

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

AFA Steels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AFA Steels Home AFA Steels Home Contacts Goal Advanced Research Material Projects Related Links CF8C-Plus Steels MSTD Corrosion Science & Technology Group Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL Fossil Energy Program ORNL Industrial Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program Distributed Energy Program Comments AFA: Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels AFA stainless steels boast an increased upper-temperature oxidation, or corrosion, limit that is 100 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit higher than that of conventional stainless steels. These new alloys deliver this superior oxidation resistance with high-temperature strengths approaching that of

57

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry Iron & Steel Industry Equipment WaterIndustry Glass Ethylene Ammonia Paper Aluminium Cement Iron and Steelsteel, aluminum, paper, ammonia and ethylene, and glass in addition to an other industry

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Glass and Optical Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NMR Insight into Glass Formers and Modifiers NMR Studies on Biomaterials and Bioactive Glasses Non-Linear Optical Properties in Glasses.

59

Superior Steel  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

which contains Mississippian to Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) Formations exhibiting coal resources. Superior Steel likely is underlain by the Conemaugh andor the Monogahela...

60

Steels I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... During service, Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels harden as a result of the ... Research supported by ORNL's Shared Research Equipment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ApplicationsintheCementIndustry. MineralEngineeringCement Production,CementIndustryTechnicalConference,gearlessmilldrive,CementIndustryTechnicalConference,

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 12, January-March, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Results from initial tests in the Dynamic Brine Exposure Testing Apparatus (D-BETA) are available. Based upon initial data, the rate at which cement coupons undergo change in the D-BETA is between that of the static tests and the dynamic exposures at East Mesa. Several cementing compositions have been formulated with chemical, physical and mechanical properties to withstand the existing geothermal conditions. The pumpability of three formulations has been demonstrated and the materials have been submitted to NBS for additional evaluation. The effect of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ on different binders were studied at Colorado School of Mines. The results were found to range from deleterious to beneficial. Phosphate-bonded cements have been produced at the University of Rhode Island from a glass containing 7% Na/sub 2/O, 24% CaO, 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 45% SiO/sub 2/. Preliminary tests indicate that the material sets in several hours and appears to have some high temperature stability. Tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate six formulations that are pumpable as long as three hours at 316/sup 0/C. Two formulations, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ZrO/sub 2/, have been chosen for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C. Polymer concentrates containing cement fillers have been found to be hydrothermally stable in 300/sup 0/C brine. Recommended standards for evaluating geothermal well cements have been developed by NBS. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hydroxyls and Glass Surface Reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

70

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

71

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Results Technology Pathways Cement - Results No measured results exist...

74

Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement clinker is manufactured from a finely-ground, homogenized blend of limestone, shale and iron ore sintered in a rotary kiln to temperatures ...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the availability of energy audits. Barriers to Energywith an energy manager program, these audits could helpenergy-efficiency projects particular to the cement industry, audits

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Decontamination of DWPF canisters by glass frit blasting  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant will be incorporated in borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The waste glass will be encapsulated in a 304L stainless steel canister. During the filling operation the outside of the canister will become contaminated. This contamination must be reduced to an accepable level before the canister leaves the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Tests with contaminated coupons have demonstrated that this decontamination can be accomplished by blasting the surface with glass frit. The contaminated glass frit byproduct of this operation is used as a feedstock for the waste glass process, so no secondary waste is created. Three blasting techniques, using glass frit as the blasting medium, were evaluated. Air-injected slurry blasting was the most promising and was chosen for further development. The optimum parametric values for this process were determined in tests using coupon weight loss as the output parameter. 1 reference, 13 figures, 3 tables.

Ward, C.R.; Rankin, W.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... especially around the main hydration peaks. ... at the main hydration peak) seems to create a ... Oil Well Cement, Cement and Concrete Research 40 ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China Title Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in...

80

FLSmidth Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile cover page of document FLSmidth reduces energy at processing facilities saving Titan Florida Cement 55,000 annually. FLSmidth...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodolog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the need to understand the uncertainty of current estimates of cement emissions in China. This paper compares several methodologies for calculating CO2 emissions from cement...

82

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of...

83

DOE Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

coated glass products. The Glass IOF is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) which...

84

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

85

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

86

Chromizing of 3Cr Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N) was chromized by the halide-activated pack cementation (HAPC) process. Key process parameters, i.e., coating temperatures and pack compositions, were investigated. Ammonium chloride-activated packs in the 700-1000 C range produced coatings nominally in the 1-8 {micro}m range, as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coatings applied in the 900-1000 C temperature range resulted in Cr-rich coatings. The predominant phase in the coating was identified as Cr23C6 by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the presence of chromium nitride, Cr2N, was observed in the coating. The power generation industry is faced with an ever-increasing demand for energy while simultaneously having to reduce carbon emissions. These goals can be facilitated by increasing plant efficiency through the use of higher operating temperatures and pressures. Traditional construction materials, e.g., the ferritic Grade 22 high strength low alloy steel, are limited to operations below {approx} 550 C. Therefore, new materials are required for future plants designed to operate up to 650 C and possibly higher. These new materials need to have improved tensile strength, ductility, toughness, corrosion resistance, and creep properties at elevated temperatures. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the oxidation and creep behavior of various coatings on Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N), a super-bainitic steel developed for superior creep properties. Thin, chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings were used to compensate for the reduced corrosion and oxidation resistance that resulted from the low chromium content of the alloy. However, the aluminized Grade 315 alloys performed less-than-favorably under conditions relevant to fossil boilers, leading to the conclusion that higher chromium contents are required for the formation of corrosion-resistant oxide scales in these environments. The halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) process offers a promising low-cost and versatile alternative to CVD as a means of improving corrosion resistance via formation of a protective Cr-containing coating.

Ravi, Vilupanur [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Harrison, Bradley [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Koch, Jordan [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Ly, Alexander [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Schissler, Andrew [California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona); Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recent advances in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the properties of the cured material, the practical use of advanced cementitious materials for geothermal well completions depends primarily upon the ability to predictably extend the thickening times for the precursor slurries at elevated temperatures to times sufficient to permit conventional placement. Ongoing work at Brookhaven National Laboratory being conducted with assistance from the geothermal industry, indicates that lightweight calcium phosphate cement slurries being developed as CO{sub 2{minus}} resistant well completion materials, can be conventional pumped at temperatures > 100{degrees}C without the addition of retarding admixtures. These slurries consist of mullite-shelled hollow microspheres, calcium aluminate cements and polybasic sodium phosphate. When cured in hydrothermal environments, the slurries yield high strength, low permeability cements which bond well to steel casing. Two compositional factors that affect the thickening times were identified. One is the calcium aluminate cement species that serve as the base reagent in the slurry formulation, and the other is the rate of hydrothermal reaction between the microspheres and the polybasic sodium phosphate solution.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Glass Cookware Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

89

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

91

Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

Sugama, T.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

93

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glass object, be it glass block or glass vessel. Thisglass would have been reheated and cast, probably into blocks

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialNo. 16000393, September 9. Energy Technology Support Unit (of China (ITIBMIC). Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

96

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalJ. B. , "Simulated effects of oil-shale development on the

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A nanochemomechanical investigation of carbonated cement paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete, and in particular its principal component, cement paste, has an interesting relation with carbon dioxide. Concrete is a carbon dioxide generator-- it is estimated that 5-10% of atmospheric CO? comes from this ...

Vanzo, James (James F.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. ; and ( 3) an Energy Guide (prepared by LBNL),for Cement Making: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantenergy-efficiency measures in the Focus industry. The Guide

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p. 54S,Colorado's primary oil shale resource for vertical modifiedSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Carbon Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations...Vancouver Island, BC, Canada Rural marine 13 0.5 Detroit, MI Industrial 14.5 0.57 Fort Amidor Pier, CZ Marine 14.5 0.57 Morenci, MI Urban 19.5 0.77 Potter County, PA Rural 20 0.8 Waterbury, CT Industrial 22.8 0.89 State College, PA Rural 23 0.9 Montreal, QC, Canada Urban 23 0.9 Durham, NH Rural 28 1.1...

104

Tool Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Examples of ion implantation in metalforming and cutting applications...tool steel Machining 4140 N 80 3? life Taps HSS Tapping 4140 N 80 3? life HSS Tapping 4130 N 80 5? life HSS Tapping 4140 N 50 10? life M35 Tapping ? N 2 200 4? life M7 Tapping ? N 100 2? life Cutting blade M2 Cutting 1050 N 100 2? life M2 Cutting SAE 950 N 100 4? life Dies D2 Forming 321 SS N 80...

105

Steel project fact sheet: Steel reheating for further processing  

SciTech Connect

Steel reheating is an energy-intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have ben used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NO{sub x} emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Praxair, Inc., supplier of oxygen and other industrial gases to the steel industry, proposes to introduce an innovative oxy-fuel burner technology (using 100% oxygen) to the steel reheating industry. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces or eliminates nitrogen in combustion air and substantially reduces waste heat carried out with flue gas. Based on technology currently used in the glass, hazardous waste, and aluminum industries, Praxair has developed and patented low temperature, oxy-fuel burners that can be used in high temperature industrial furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical and extremely low NO{sub x} emissions are desired. The technical goal of the project is to demonstrate the use of oxy-fuel burners in a slab reheat furnace while reducing energy consumption by 45% and NO{sub x} emissions by 90% within the converted furnace zones. Successful implementation of this technology also will eliminate the need to periodically replace recuperators and install NO{sub x} removal equipment.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DRAFT Glass.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

108

Analysis of Glass Breakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure Analysis of Glass Breakage Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

109

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facility??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. , 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W. [and others

1996-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P.Cement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,203 (1974), E. D. York, Amoco Oil Co. , letter to J, P. Fox,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater sandstones: North Sea. This study attempts to make a large-scale regional examination of the distribution of carbonate cements

Haszeldine, Stuart

116

Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.

Miller, L.G.; Kunze, J.F.; Sanders, R.D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lithium, Potassium, and Sodium Additions to Cement Pastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement and Concrete Research 2004, 34, 2045-2056. 16. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. CRC Press, 1987. 17. ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

119

Deformation and Void Structure in Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

120

Fracturing of simulated high-level waste glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

Waste-glass castings generated from engineering-scale developmental processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are generally found to have significant levels of cracks. The causes and extent of fracturing in full-scale canisters of waste glass as a result of cooling and accidental impact are discussed. Although the effects of cracking on waste-form performance in a repository are not well understood, cracks in waste forms can potentially increase leaching surface area. If cracks are minimized or absent in the waste-glass canisters, the potential for radionuclide release from the canister package can be reduced. Additional work on the effects of cracks on leaching of glass is needed. In addition to investigating the extent of fracturing of glass in waste-glass canisters, methods to reduce cracking by controlling cooling conditions were explored. Overall, the study shows that the extent of glass cracking in full-scale, passively-cooled, continuous melting-produced canisters is strongly dependent on the cooling rate. This observation agrees with results of previously reported Pacific Northwest Laboratory experiments on bench-scale annealed canisters. Thus, the cause of cracking is principally bulk thermal stresses. Fracture damage resulting from shearing at the glass/metal interface also contributes to cracking, more so in stainless steel canisters than in carbon steel canisters. This effect can be reduced or eliminated with a graphite coating applied to the inside of the canister. Thermal fracturing can be controlled by using a fixed amount of insulation for filling and cooling of canisters. In order to maintain production rates, a small amount of additional facility space is needed to accomodate slow-cooling canisters. Alternatively, faster cooling can be achieved using the multi-staged approach. Additional development is needed before this approach can be used on full-scale (60-cm) canisters.

Peters, R.D.; Slate, S.C.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method for making glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is discussed for making better quality molten borosilicate glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

123

Mechanical Properties of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... moduli and Vicker's hardness, as well as high transparency in the UV/visible region, ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

124

About - Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

from the repository at OSTI. The Glass Publications Portal is sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program. In...

125

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Inclusions and Clean Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Behavior of MgO?Al2O3 Based Inclusions in High-Pressure Boiler Steel during Refining Process Control of Inclusions in Bottom Filled Steel Ingots Control of...

127

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Austenitic Stainless Steel Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Austenitic Stainless Steel Handbook is part of an ongoing series of metallurgical reports. It is devoted to iron-based alloys that are considered to be stainless steel but that will remain essentially austenitic at room temperatures and below (the definition of austenitic stainless steel). Because of its attractive cost, wide availability, and ease of fabrication and weldability, austenitic stainless steel is one of the most commonly used materials in the electric power generating, chemical processin...

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Seamless Steel Tubular Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...). The tank also contained the search units.Fig. 6 Seamless and welded austenitic stainless steel tubular products were

131

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Natural Gas Consumption Energy Use Type GWh per year, electricity MW, electricity Million therms per year, natural gas California U.S.gas consumption. Table 2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas use for California and the U.S.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

133

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

Bauer, Roger E. (Kennewick, WA); Straalsund, Jerry L. (Kennewick, WA); Chin, Bryan A. (Auburn, AL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Importance of glass and brass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of scientific instruments in the scientific revolution, especially brass and glass. Precise lenses and lens grinding, glass vessels for chemical experiments, the advances in astronomy, microscopy and many other areas due to glass...

Dugan, David

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Recycling contaminated spent blasting abrasives in Portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology. Final research report  

SciTech Connect

The use of abrasive blasting to remove lead-based paint from steel bridges produces contaminated spent blasting abrasives that may be classified as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency. If the spent abrasives leach lead, chromium, and cadmium greater than the EPA limits, the spent abrasives are classified as hazardous and must be rendered nonhazardous prior to disposal. An alternative to disposing of spent blasting abrasives is to recycle them in an environmentally sound application. This study investigates the feasibility of recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology to produce a usable construction material. Field application guidelines for recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars are established based upon the results of this study.

Salt, B.K.; Carrasquillo, R.L.; Loehr, R.C.; Fowler, D.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sol-GelGlasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

138

MST: Organizations: Ceramic and Glass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation and machining, to complete component fabrication and testing. Our Mission Our ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic products meet customer needs in defense, energy,...

139

Goal 4 Long Life Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies-Rigid: Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beamsperformance of Fast-Setting Hydraulic Cement Concrete (and Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Mixes,

Kohler, Erwin R.; Ali, Abdikarim; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the cement industryprice of electricity paid by the cement industry in 2009 isElectricity Conservation Supply Curve for the Cement Industry .

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

144

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Directional Preparation of Colored Steel Slag Glass-ceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

146

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

147

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

148

Waste glass weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic...

150

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic...

151

Terahertz Properties of Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of advances in THz-TDS spectroscopy of selected glass families ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate ... Molecular Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in...

152

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 e. Ningguo Cement Plant 9100KW Waste Heat Recovery andof the surveyed cement plants have waste heat recovery powerWaste Heat Recovery, and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) for Large Motors/Fans in 35 Cement Plants

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Birch, E. 1990. Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,11 C. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-26 B. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement industry using energy conservation supply curves (energy conservation supply curve for Shandongs cement industry,Energy Conservation Supply Curve This part of the analysis of Shandongs cement industry

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

159

Chloride Ion Diffusion in Cement-Based Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... into Hardened Cement Paste , Fly Ash, Silica Fume ... Diffusion Cell: Effects of Material and Test ... LJ, and Yu, SW, Diffusion in Cementitious Materials: II ...

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Work Plans  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NewsEvents Contact Us CEMENT Letters of IntentAgreements Work Plans GHG Information Energy Footprints Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical...

162

Estimation of the degree of hydration of blended cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The minimum particle size measured was 1 JUn. Air dispersion and laser scattering techniques were used. cement atw/c=0.4. ...

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The use of gasification ash in cement and concrete.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cement is an essential material in todays society because, as a major constituent of concrete, it forms a fundamental element of any housing or (more)

Du Plessis, Hanli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - California Portland...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and plant benchmarking of energy using the ENERGY STAR cement plant energy performance indicator. CPC was among the inaugural group of companies to receive the ENERGY STAR...

166

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Secondary menu...

168

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Background on the 2011 Cement EPI Update | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through informed and realistic goal setting. Download the Measuring Improvment in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry report here. Energy Efficient Products...

170

Transformation Hardening of Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...relations for induction hardening and tempering Electrical and magnetic properties of steels Selection of induction frequency and power The effect of prior microstructure...

171

Types of Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 10   ASTM specifications for structural quality steel plate...bolted, or welded construction of bridges, buildings,

172

Ferrous Alloys: Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... Microstructure and Properties of Low Manganese API X70 Pipeline Steel ... the mean residual relative length change (MRRLC) is 0.1310-5.

173

Specifications for Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 28   ASTM specifications that incorporate AISI-SAE designations...A 29 Carbon and alloy steel bars, hot rolled and cold

174

Sheet Steels II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... The Effect of Carbon Content on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Fe-22Mn TWIP Steel: Eileen Yang1; Hatem Zurob1; Joseph...

175

Steel Process Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... As the axel loads have been continuously increasing with time, so has the desire for premium rail steels with better wear, rolling contact fatigue...

176

Laser Welding of Steel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

welding is particularly suited to the high-production rate requirements in the automobile industry. Some automotive exhaust components use 409 stainless steel and are currently arc...

177

Nonoriented Silicon Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2 Silicon contents, mass densities, and applications of electrical steel sheet and strip...generally used in distribution transformers. Energy savings improve with

178

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. , 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. , 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

Mariano Velez

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andin clinker production. If oil shale is burned separately,in cement production. Assuming that oil shale replaces 8

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,eworrellt@lbl.gov. End Notes Energy Efficiency Improvementthe Cement Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A comparison of glass reaction at high and low glass surface/solution volume  

SciTech Connect

Static leach tests have been performed at glass surface area/leachant volume (SA/V) ratios of 10, 340, 2,000, and 20,000 m[sup [minus]1] to assess the effects of the SA/V on the mechanism and rate of the glass reaction. Tests were performed using actinide-doped borosilicate waste glasses [Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 131 and SRL 202] to monitor the distribution of released radionuclides in tests at different SA/V. Solution results show the major effect of the SA/V to be dilution of reaction of products. Differences in the pH and silicic acid concentrations attained in tests at different SA/V then affect the reaction rate. Tests at low SA/V maintain leachate pH values similar to the initial leachant, while tests at higher SA/V result in higher leachate pH values being attained due to ion-exchange reactions. Transuranics released as the glass corrodes may exist in the leachate in concentrations far above their solubility limits by sorbing onto colloids, although the colloids may eventually settle out of solution. Transuranics also sorb onto the steel reaction vessel. The glass reaction progress can be characterized by three stages: (a) an initial stage where the reaction rate depends on the leachant pH, (b) an intermediate stage where the reaction slows toward a minimum rate as the leachate solution approaches saturation,'' and (c) a long-term stage where the reaction rate may be affected by the formation of secondary phases that control the solution chemistry. Tests at different SA/V cannot always be compared directly because the dominant reaction step and the observed reaction stage (initial, intermediate, or long-term) may not be the same.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Argonne Software Licensing: Glass Furnace Model (GFM)  

The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) Version 4.0, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) glass furnace simulation code was developed at Argonne ...

187

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind...

188

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as glass waste forms by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 2C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Direct conversion of plutonium-containing materials to borosilicate glass for storage or disposal  

SciTech Connect

A new process, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), has been invented for the direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, and residue into borosilicate glass. The glass should be acceptable for either the long-term storage or disposition of plutonium. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into homogeneous glass (1) simplifies safeguards and security; (2) creates a stable chemical form that meets health, safety, and environmental concerns; (3) provides an easy storage form; (4) may lower storage costs; and (5) allows for future disposition options. In the GMODS process, mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids containing plutonium are fed directly into a glass melter where they are directly converted to glass. Conventional glass melters can accept materials only in oxide form; thus, it is its ability to accept materials in multiple chemical forms that makes GMODS a unique glass making process. Initial proof-of-principle experiments have converted cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, and other materials to glass. Significant technical uncertainties remain because of the early nature of process development.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials Barzin Mobasher1 or water with high SO3 content. External sulfate 2007 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), May 7-10, 2007, Covington, the effect of curing (especially in the case of blended cements) and the effect of the pH change during

Mobasher, Barzin

192

Algorithms for raw material dosage control for cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw material used for producing cement is obtained using several components which we must dosages so that the mixture should have a uniform chemical composition. This paper work proposes fuzzy algorithms for performing this process. Using them turns ... Keywords: algorithm, cement, control, dosage, fuzzy, raw material

Stela Rusu-Anghel; Ovidiu Tirian; Osaci Mihaela; Dinis Corina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

194

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites Barzin Mobasher1, Alva Peled 2, Jitendra Pahalijani1 1 Department Engineering Ben-Gurion University, Israel The World of Coal Ash 2005 International Ash Utilization Symposium

Mobasher, Barzin

195

Versa Glass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 43220 Product Versa is manufacturing a new technology privacy glass in Ohio that is LEED and has cleantech properties References Versa Glass1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

196

Superhydrophobic Transparent Glass Thin Films  

Glass used in building materials (curtain walls), windshields, goggles, glasses,optical lenses, and similar applications must be durable and transparent. To meetthis challenge, ORNL researchers have invented a method to produce ...

197

Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass.

198

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to boroilicate glass using the GMODS process  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium scrap and residue represent major national and international concerns because (1) significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) problems have been identified with their storage; (2) all plutonium recovered from the black market in Europe has been from this category; (3) storage costs are high; and (4) safeguards are difficult. It is proposed to address these problems by conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to a CRACHIP (CRiticality, Aerosol, and CHemically Inert Plutonium) glass using the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). CRACHIP refers to a set of requirements for plutonium storage forms that minimize ES&H concerns. The concept is several decades old. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into a certified, qualified, homogeneous CRACHIP glass creates a stable chemical form that minimizes ES&H risks, simplifies safeguards and security, provides an easy-to-store form, decreases storage costs, and allows for future disposition options. GMODS is a new process to directly convert metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidize organics with the residue converted to glass; and convert chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, and other materials to glass. GMODS is an enabling technology that creates new options. Conventional glassmaking processes require conversion of feeds to oxide-like forms before final conversion to glass. Such chemical conversion and separation processes are often complex and expensive.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.; Elam, K.R.; Ferrada, J.J.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Investigations of Localized Corrosion of Stainless Steel after Exposure to Supercritical CO2  

SciTech Connect

Severe localized corrosion of a 316 stainless steel autoclave occurred during investigating Type H Portland cement stability in 0.16 M CaCl{sub 2} + 0.02 M MgCl{sub 2} + 0.82 M NaCl brine in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} containing 4% O{sub 2}. The system operated at 85 C and pressure of 29 MPa. However, no corrosion was observed in the same type of autoclave being exposed to the same environment, containing Type H Portland cement cylindrical samples, also operating at pressure of 29 MPa but at 50 C. The operation time for the 85 C autoclave was 53 days (1272 hours) while that for the 50 C autoclave was 66 days (1584 hours). Debris were collected from the base of both autoclaves and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Corrosion products were only found in the debris from the 85 C autoclave. The cement samples were analyzed before and after the exposure by X-ray florescence (XRF) methods. Optical microscopy was used to estimate an extent of the 316 stainless steel corrosion degradation.

M. Ziomek-Moroz; W. OConnor; S. Bullard

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution directly. The releases of Gd, Hf, and Pu from the glass were also measured. The release of Pu was significantly less than Si at all temperatures and pH values (on a normalized basis). More Gd than Pu or Hf was released from the glass in acidic solutions, but more Pu than Gd or Hf was released in alkaline solutions. Almost all of the released Gd remained in solution in tests conducted in Teflon vessels, whereas about half of the released Pu and Hf became fixed to the Teflon. In tests conducted in Type 304L stainless steel vessels, most of the released Gd, Hf, and Pu became fixed to the steel. The aqueous concentrations of Gd, Hf, and Pu decreased from about 2 x 10{sup -5}, 2 x 10{sup -8}, and 1 x 10{sup -7} M in tests solutions near pH 3.7 to about 1 x 10{sup -9}, 8 x 10{sup -10}, and 1 x 10{sup -8} M in test solutions near pH 10.8, respectively, in the 90 C tests in Teflon vessels (the solutions were not filtered prior to analysis). Vapor hydration tests (VHTs) were conducted at 120 and 200 C with Pu LaBS-B glass and SRL 418 glass, which was made to represent the HLW glass that will be used to macro-encapsulate LaBS glass within the waste form. Some VHTs were conducted with specimens of Pu LaBS-B and SRL 418 glasses that were in contact to study the effect of the solution generated as HLW glass dissolves on the corrosion behavior of Pu LaBS-B glass. Other VHTs were conducted in which the glasses were not in contact. The Pu LaBS-B glass is more durable than the HLW glass under these accelerating test conditions, even when the glasses are in contact. The presence of the SRL 418 glass did not promote the dissolution of the Pu LaBS-B glass significantly. However, Gd, Hf, and Pu were detected in alteration phases formed on the Pu LaBS-B glass surface and in (or on) phases formed by SRL 418 glass degradation, such as analcime. This indicates that Gd, Hf, and Pu were transported from the LaBS glass, through the water film formed on the specimens, and to the SRL 418 glass during the test. The disposition of the PuO{sub 2} inclusion phases as the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolved was not det

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland cement-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is especially suited for white concrete applications where it imparts desirable benefits such as increased long-term strength and improved long-term durability of concrete products. Two U.S. patents entitled have been issued to Albacem covering the technology. Third-party validation testing has confirmed that the pozzolanic product is an excellent, high performance material that conforms to a ASTM standards and improves the strength and durability of concrete. Currently, there are no known significant competing technologies to process glass fiber manufacturing by-products and convert them into value-added products. Most glass fiber-forming and fabrication wastes continue to be disposed in landfills at significant costs and with associated negative environmental impact. It is estimated that in a typical glass fiber manufacturing facility, 10-20% by weight of the processed glass material is sent for disposal to a landfill. Today, supplementary cementing materials or mineral admixtures are key to achieving strong and durable concrete. Recovered materials such as coal fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag and silica fume are widely accepted and used in concrete all over the world, especially in the construction of high performance structures such as massive dams, bridges, subway tunnels, etc. These mineral admixtures are not suitable for white concrete and light-colored architectural concrete applications. Converting waste glass fibers into a high performance white pozzolan would allow white concrete producers to gain from the same durability benefits currently realized by gray concrete producers. Description of the Benefit: Albacems technology will enable the glass fiber industry to eliminate nearly 100% of its glass fiber production waste streams by converting them into viable value-added products. With this technology, the glass industry can prevent the landfilling of about 250,000 tons of waste glass fiber annually. Glass manufacturers will realize improved production efficiency by reducing process costs through the elimination of solid was

Hemmings, Raymond T.

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

208

Nanostructure and Nanomechanics of Cement: Polydisperse Colloidal Packing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement setting and cohesion are governed by the precipitation and growth of calcium-silicate-hydrate, through a complex evolution of microstructure. A colloidal model to describe nucleation, packing, and rigidity of ...

Masoero, Enrico

209

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

210

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

211

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry in India: The PAT Mechanism of the NMEEE Speaker(s): S. S. Krishnan Date: April 13, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133...

212

Analysis of failed Stratapax-steel stud cutter elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stratapax-steel stud bond strengths were evaluated in a quality control test fixture at loads up to 410 MPa. No failures occurred for cutter elements bonded in the first six diffusion bond runs. In the next two bond runs, Stratapax-steel stud cutter elements failed at test loads significantly less than 410 MPa. A failure analysis was performed on several of the failed cutter elements to isolate the material weakness responsible for the low load failures. Three groups of failures were identified: a cobalt depletion region on and immediately beneath the cemented carbide surface of the as-received Stratapax blanks, surface contamination at the carbide-steel bond joint and a weakness within the seel stud near the bond joint. Two additional defects were observed which were of some concern, namely, lamination line defects within the carbide portion of Stratapax blanks and severe grind damage on carbide surfaces of as-received Stratapax blanks. It was recommended that a grind schedule be included as part of the specimen preparation prior to bonding to alleviate the observed failures.

Pope, L.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Glass Plates under Micro-indentation Incorporation in Glass Ionomer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of nanocrystalline calcium de?cient hydroxyapatite gnCDHAl incorporation in glass ..... K., Nishino, M., 2003. Toughness, bonding and ?uoride release.

214

Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining candidates, those of glass-ceramics (devitrified matrices) represent the best compromise for meeting the probable stricter disposal requirements in the future.

Bleier, A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

How to avoid casing collapse during inner string cementing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that in the Mobile Bay area offshore Alabama, inflatable surface packoffs are being used to seal the top of the 20-in. conductor casing-to-drill pipe annulus. With the seal in place, annular pressure is maintained during inner string cementing jobs to counter forces that tend to shorten the drill pipe inner string. Inside pressure also helps protect the casing from collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of a long column of cement. Casing is less resistant than the bottom of the hole and the wellbore, (unless a weak formation breaks down) and can crush under the hydrostatic weight when fluid inside does not offer enough offsetting support. Casing collapse can cause cement to leak into the casing-to-drill pipe annulus, thereby cementing the drill string in the well or otherwise ruining the cement job. In a situation where casing does not have sufficient collapse resistance to withstand hydrostatic pressure loading, a surface packoff can be used to maintain pressure inside the casing throughout the cementing job.

Lubitz, R.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

219

Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

Lin Feng [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: fl2040@columbia.edu; Meyer, Christian [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Continuous steel production and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

Peaslee, Kent D. (Rolla, MO); Peter, Jorg J. (McMinnville, OR); Robertson, David G. C. (Rolla, MO); Thomas, Brian G. (Champaign, IL); Zhang, Lifeng (Trondheim, NO)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

222

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

Boaz, P.T.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the global cement industry, Ann. Rev. Energy Environ.were estimated. Cement industry BERs ranged from 205 kgCO 2carbon intensity, cement industry, Central America, electric

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Li corrosion resistant glasses for headers in ambient temperature Li batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing 10 to 50 mol% CaO, 10 to 50 mol% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 30 to 60 mol% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0 to 30 mol% MgO are provided. These compositions are capable of forming a stable glass-to-metal seal possessing electrical insulating properties for use in a lithium battery. Also provided are lithium cells containing a stainless steel body and molybdenum center pin electrically insulated by means of a seal produced according to the invention.

Hellstrom, E.E.; Watkins, R.D.

1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Treated ceramic microsphere-cement lightweight composites for geothermal cementing systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compressive strength and water permeability of high-temperature light-weight cementing materials containing sillimanite-based hollow microspheres as a filler can be improved by treating the surfaces of the microspheres with a Ca(OH)/sub 2/-saturated solution at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C. The precipitation of an epitaxial layer formed by an interaction between a hot calcium hydroxide solution and the surface of the sphere plays an essential role in developing favorable bonding characteristics at the interfaces and in promoting the hydration of the cement matrix. The properties of the composites include a slurry density of <1.2 g/cc at 25/sup 0/C, a 300/sup 0/C-24 hour compressive strength of >1015 psi (7.0 MPa), a water permeability of <10/sup -4/ Darcy, and a bulk density of <1.0 g/cc. It was observed that tobermorite-truscottite transformation and anorthite formation during autoclave exposure for 180 days in brine at 300/sup 0/C results in slight strength reductions and increased water permeability.

Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Holder for rotating glass body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

Kolleck, Floyd W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

237

Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... glass is more apt to convert to a low-energy crystalline order ... to study how molecules diffuse during subsequent annealing of the two types of glass ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Glass and Optical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

239

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Compositional Study of Neutron Detecting Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study involves the production and characterization of glass with high concentrations of Gd2O3 in various oxide glass formers, and containing one of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Laboratory Equipment - Ace Glass UV Photochemistry Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Specifications / Capabilities: UV Photchemistry Safety Cabinet Ace Glass Cat. Number 7836-20. ... Power Supply Ace Glass Cat. Number 7830-60. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

Chemical Strengthening of Soda Lime Silicate Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

243

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect

Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

The CO2 Abatement Cost Curve for the Thailand's Cement Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract The cement industry is one of the largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitters in the Thai industry. The cement sector accounted for about 20633 kilotonnes (ktonnes) CO2...

247

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cementplantselectricitytariffshavebeen structuredisscheduledaroundanelectricitytariffthatincorporateselectricitypricingpreparedforthestateofCaliforniaanalyzed theresponseofforeigncementplantstomulti? periodtariffs.

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Three cement output projections are developed based onthese three production projections, energy savings and CO2have been a number of projections of Chinas future cement

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is coal-fired power generation. power generation. China Cement (10), 18-heat recovery (WHR) power generation technologies have been

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wasteheatrecoveryfromexhaustgasesmaybeusedtoeconomicallycogenerateelectricityat somecementplants(

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

Knutson,, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

253

Downhole cement test in a very hot hole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of the commercial-sized Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project requires that hydraulic fractures be created between two inclined wellbores at a depth of about 4 km (15,000 ft). Isolation of a section of the open wellbore is necessary for pressurization to achieve the fracture connections. A cemented-in liner/PBR assembly is one of the methods used for zone isolation near the botton of the injection well. A downhole, pumped cement test was first conducted at a wellbore temperature of 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) to determine if a suitable slurry could be designed, pumped, and later recovered to assure the success of the cemented-in liner operation.

Pettitt, R.A.; Cocks, G.G.; Dreesen, D.N.; Sims, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.; Boevers, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not too many years ago energy costs and efficiencies were virtually ignored by corporate decision makers. The prevailing attitude was 'my business is manufacturing and my capital is best spent improving and expanding my manufacturing capacity.' With energy now contributing a significant fraction of the overall product cost in many industries, there is general recognition that control of fuel and electric costs is just as important to remaining competitive as is improving manufacturing methods. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners, the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants.

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixtures sometimes leads to unpredictable concrete performance in the field which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste rheology measurements instead of traditional workability tests (i.e., slump cone test) can have great potential in detecting those incompatibilities in concrete before the concrete is placed, which can, in turn, avoid related workability problems and setting time as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities, based on the determined rheological parameters. The DSR was modified and optimized for cement paste rheology measurements. Two different modes of operations (i.e., static and dynamic methods) with the modified DSR were investigated to measure representative rheological parameters as well as to identify cement and chemical/mineral admixture incompatibility. The conventional plastic viscosity and yield stress are measured in static mode and storage modulus curve, as a function of time, is measured in dynamic mode. The rate of change of plastic viscosity (RPV) as another static rheological parameter and the modeled magnitude parameter ?, from the dynamic rheological method, showed great potentialities as acceptance criteria to identify incompatible mixtures. The heat of hydration data from isothermal conduction calorimeter tests and setting time results for the studied mixtures have strongly supported the rheology based observations as supporting tools. Based on the main tests results, the acceptance criteria were set up using the rheological parameters in accordance with heat of hydration data. This will ultimately help material suppliers, concrete producers, and other users to detect problematic combinations of concrete ingredients before a given concrete mixture is placed.

Jang, Se Hoon

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy saving opportunities through heat recovery from cement processing kilns: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a system for the utilization of dissipated heat from the surfaces of cement processing kilns at the Jordan Cement Factories in heating heavy fuel oil used in the burning process of these kilns. It is proposed that this can be achieved ... Keywords: Jordan, cement, energy efficiency, heat recovery, kilns

I. Al-Hinti; A. Al-Ghandoor; A. Al-Naji; M. Abu-Khashabeh; M. Joudeh; M. Al-Hattab

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

SPE 142421 PP Cementing at High Pressure Zones in KSA Discovering Mystery behind Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at an over-pressurized zone, the formation might be underbalanced before cement becomes strong in the sense for the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A before it was able to develop static gel strength in the hydrostatic pressure had likely caused the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A. Figure#1

Hossain, M. Enamul

259

GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for manufacturing glass frit  

SciTech Connect

A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

Budrick, Ronald G. (Ann Arbor, MI); King, Frank T. (Hillsboro, OR); Nolen, Jr., Robert L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

262

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena [Dipartimento Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lusvardi, Gigliola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 183, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano [ZETADI S.r.l., Via dell'Artigianato 10, Ferno (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Glass in 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... This presentation is an overview of the findings from the June 21-22, 2010 American Ceramic Society Leadership Summit ... Borosilicate Glasses: Steve W. Martin1; Randi Christensen1; Garrett Olson1; 1Iowa State University

265

Thermal insulation of window glass  

SciTech Connect

The thermal insulation of window glass can be increased by a factor of two using spray-on semiconductive SnO/sub 2/: Sb or IN/sub 2/O/sub 3/: Sn coatings. (auth)

Sievers, A.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

Weitz, David [Harvard

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Pull-out and bond degradation of steel rebars in ECE concrete  

SciTech Connect

It is demonstrated in this study that application of electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE) to reinforced concrete alters the pull-out strength and bond between the embedded high strength steel (HSS) and surrounding concrete. Concrete cubes were case using two chloride ion concentrations of 1.7% and 3.0% by weight of cement respectively, and reinforced axially with a central plain steel bar. Two cathodic current densities were used for the ECE studies, with 0.1M sodium borate electrolyte solution and inert titanium anode mesh. Axial pull-out tests were carried out within 24 hours of terminating treatment to investigate the differences in bond stress and bar slip behavior. ECE treated specimens showed significant reductions in pull-out strength, with the degradation in bond being dependent on the applied cathodic current density and initial chloride contamination. At an impressed current density of 3.0 A/m{sup 2}, the 1.7% Cl{sup {minus}} ions specimens showed about 58% loss in bond strength compared with about 44% for specimens premixed with 3.0% Cl{sup {minus}} ion. The bond strength reduction at an impressed current density of 1.0 A/m{sup 2} was about half the reduction at current density of 3.0 A/m{sup 2}. It is predicted the softening effect of the alkali ions on the cement silicate hydrates around the steel-concrete interface will have severe effect on concrete structures reinforced with HSS irrespective of their stress state. Also, concrete structures containing steel rebars with substantial corrosion product coverage are likely to experience pronounced cathodic disbondment during ECE application and within a few days of terminating the treatment.

Ihekwaba, N.M.; Hope, B.B.; Hansson, C.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Recent Developments in Steel Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Technology of Shot Blasting and Pickling in S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel Plate and GR2 Titanium Plate Analysis of Scale Deformation and Fracture in...

269

D. Advanced Steels and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructures and Textures Comparison of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD Molten Mold Flux Technology for...

270

Steel Processing and Production I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... A Study on the Reheat Crack Mechanism of High Strength Hydroelectricity Steel: Xi Zhang1; 1Shougang Research Institute of Technology

271

Physical Metallurgy of Linepipe Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... 8:00 AM Introductory Comments Shale resources have been described as a game ... Production of API HIC Steels for Sour Service Oil and Gas...

272

Steel Product Metallurgy and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Investigation on Precipitates in High Carbon Bearing Steel 100Cr6 ... The Effects of Nb and V Microalloying on Hardenability and Age Hardening in...

273

Process for dezincing galvanized steel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75.degree. C. and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (i) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (ii) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (iii) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (iv) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte.

Morgan, William A. (Hamilton, CA); Dudek, Frederick J. (Arlington Heights, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Process for dezincing galvanized steel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75 C and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (1) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (2) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (3) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (4) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte. 1 fig.

Morgan, W.A.; Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

278

Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current research interest in multi-scale modeling of cement paste requires accurate characterization of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the material, particularly the C-S-H phase. Nanoindentation is evaluated as a tool for measuring both the instantaneous and the short-term viscoelastic properties of cement paste. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based indentation is compared to conventional nanoindentaion in measuring mechanical properties of cement pastes. Time-dependent solutions are derived to characterize creep indentation tests performed on hardened cement paste and to extract the time-dependent properties. The effect of approximating C-S-H viscoelastic properties with a time-independent Poisson's ratio is discussed, and arguments for utilizing a time-independent Poisson's ratio for short-term response are presented. In evaluating AFM as a mechanical characterization tool, various analytical and numerical modeling approaches are compared. The disparities between the numerical self-consistent approach and analytical solutions are determined and reported. The measured elastic Young's modulus values acquired by AFM indentation tests are compared to Young's modulus values from nanoindentation measurements from cement paste. These results show that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of hydrated portland cement has different properties on the nanometric scale than on the micron scale. Packing density of C-S-H particles is proposed as an explanation for the disparity in the measured results. The AFM measured uniaxial viscoelastic compliance values are compared to similar values obtained with traditional nanoindentation for the same material. The comparison of these results shows that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of portland cement has similar but distinct properties on the sub micron scale than on the micron scale. Additionally, the effect of moisture is evaluated by controlling the relative humidity (RH) of the testing environment between 40% and 100% plus, or wet. The viscoelastic compliance appears to be highest at 40% RH and the material appears to be less compliant at higher relative humidity levels. Possible mechanisms controlling the viscoelastic deformation are presented and evaluated in conjunction with the moisture related poromechanical effect.

Jones, Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Steel Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... The Steel Recycling Institute is an industry association that promotes the recycling of steel products. The association website includes pages on...

280

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Steel Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... This video was created by the Steel Manufacturers Association to educate the public on the importance of recycling steel. Shredded cars...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Structural Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... This report is a series fo reprints covering steel's sustainability and how structural steel contributes towards obtaining a LEED rating.

282

Symposium A: Advanced Steels and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 3, 2010 ... A37 Unconventional Method of Nitriding of 316l Austenitic Steel: ... low carbon bainitic steels (ULCB) which were developed for offshore oil...

283

Stainless and High Alloy Steels I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cr ferritic-martensitic steels in steam power and chemical plants to ... steels have shown promise for a number of applications in power generation plants.

284

About The Iron and Steel Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IRON & STEEL SOCIETY (ISS) is a professional and technical society that provides opportunities for networking among iron and steel industry professionals...

285

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Iron and Steel Industries, 1994. Besides steel mills and blast furnaces, the primary metals industry also ...

286

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES Caiti Steele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES Caiti Steele #12;REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES Remote sensing of biomass al., 2010) Remote sensing for mapping Ecological States: Spatially-Explicit Representation of State and Steele, in preparation) #12;REMOTE SENSING OF BIOMASS Can reflectance indices derived from Landsat

288

EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES  

SciTech Connect

The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Skolianos, S. [Physical Metallurgy Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24, Thessaloniki (Greece)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Maty et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosponsoring Societies: Advanced Steel Processing & Products Research Center, Forging Industry Educational and Research Foundation, Forging Industry

292

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

293

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

294

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe-phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe-phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heat or cold storage composition containing a hydrated hydraulic cement  

SciTech Connect

A polyphase composition for the storage of heat or cold is disclosed that utlizes the latent heat of fusion of a salt hydrate continuous phase intimately intermixed with a hydrated hydraulic cement continuous phase and wherein said continuous phases are optionally in contact with a discontinuous crystalline phase comprising a nucleating component and wherein the composition is enveloped, contained, or packaged within a vapor impermeable material.

Boardman, B.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

380E Analysis of the Past and Future Trends of Energy Use in Key Medium- and Large-Sized Chinese Steel Enterprises, 2000-2030 Ali Hasanbeigi, Zeyi Jiang, Lynn Price China Energy...

300

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH Han and GB McKenna, Polymers Division, Building 224, Room ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Graphene Reinforced Glass and Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Graphene Reinforced Glass...

302

Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Immobilization of heavy metals by calcium sulfoaluminate cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of calcium sulfoaluminate cement containing 20% and 30% phosphogypsum, respectively, were investigated for their ability in hazardous waste stabilization. Fourteen series of pastes were prepared, each containing the following soluble salt: Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O; Na{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}.2H{sub 2}O; CrCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O; Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}; Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O; ZnSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O; and CdCl{sub 2}.5H2O. The level of pollution was 0.069 mol of heavy metal per Kg of cement. The study has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, electrical conductivity, and leaching tests. Very good retention of lead, cadmium, zinc and trivalent chromium is observed. The retention of hexavalent chromium depends upon the nature of the binder: the cement containing 20% gypsum develops the best behaviour. This is explained by the microstructure of the hydrated paste: in the paste containing 30% gypsum, delayed ettringite precipitates and damages the hardened paste.

Peysson, S. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pera, J. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: Jean.Pera@insa-lyon.fr; Chabannet, M. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

305

High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy in Iron and Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management: Energy in Iron and Steel ... today imposed by energy, raw materials supply and over supply in the market. ... Through the studies of CCT, TTT and X-ray analysis, it has been successfully...

309

Session F: Iron and Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Precipitated Duplex Stainless Steel: Wee-Do Yoo1; Young Ju Oh1; Won Jon Yang1; Doo Hyun Kim1; Jong Hoon Lee1; 1Korea Institute of Materials Science

310

Smelting Technology and Final Product Quality of Steel Rails Used ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baotou Steel (Group) Corp. is one of the important production bases for steel rails in China. In order to meet the development of railway transportation, steel rails...

311

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations American Iron and Steel Institute For over a century, North American steel producers have worked as partners and members of the American Iron and Steel...

312

Comments of Steele-Waseca Cooperative Electric | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steele-Waseca Cooperative Electric Comments of Steele-Waseca Cooperative Electric Comments of Steele-Waseca Cooperative Electric onImplementing the National Broadband Plan by...

313

Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline using a relevant structural integrity model, such as that in ASME B31.12. A second objective of this project is to enable development of micromechanics models of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels. The focus of this effort is to establish physical models of hydrogen embrittlement in line pipe steels using evidence from analytical techniques such as electron microscopy. These physical models then serve as the framework for developing sophisticated finite-element models, which can provide quantitative insight into the micromechanical state near defects. Understanding the micromechanics of defects can ensure that structural integrity models are applied accurately and conservatively.

Somerday, Brian P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Welding tritium aged stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

Kanne, W.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Grade 91 Steel Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed analysis of service experience with Grade 91 steels, as well as the results of long-term laboratory tests, has demonstrated that there are key issues associated with use of this tempered martensitic steel that require detailed consideration. These issues include:Review of composition effectsInfluence of fabrication variables on propertiesInfluence of heat treatment on propertiesWelding and post-weld heat treatment ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used as the electricity price in electricity conservationof energy. Since average electricity prices and average fuelECSC) with average electricity price for studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), Internationaland MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialAugust 19, 2009. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A case study of ultralightweight cementing practices in the Northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

Wells in the northeastern United States are generally drilled to a depth of from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. They are usually air drilled through several incompetent formations among which are the Marcellus and Coffee shales. Completions in this area are hampered by very low fracture gradients of 0.4 to 0.6 psi/ft, with most of the formations containing a large number of natural fractures. During cementing, pressures in excess of 1,100-psi hydrostatic can result in breakdown of the formation leading to incomplete fillup on the cement job. This paper will discuss the existing completion practices in this area, which include the use of multistage cementing, and the incorporation of cementing baskets and other downhole tools. The current cement systems in use and the problems encountered in using them will also be discussed. Several case histories of new cementing techniques, using ultralightweight foam-cementing systems, will be presented along with the job design used on these wells. Bond logging of the foam-cemented wells creates an array of special problems for the logging companies, due to the ultra-low densities and the high porosities of these special cementing systems. Newly developed techniques for logging these wells will be discussed, along with the bond logs from the case histories.

Edmondson, T.D.; Benge, O.G.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry This paper from Duke University focuses primarily on the development of an updated ENERGY STAR industrial...

320

Production of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud has been successfully developed from a raw mix containing limestone, red mud,shale and fine coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gomes, A. S. 1990. Energy Saving and Environmental ImpactEnergy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential, ProceedingsBirch, E. 1990. Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems, Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures, Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems, Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,Bureau, and (2) the Energy Guide, which discusses a wideair system efficiency. The Energy Guides are researched and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2010. Statistics on Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP.8 S HANDONG CEMENT SECTOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND CARBON11 Shandong energy consumption and

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels [Corrosion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion PerformanceMetal...

328

Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proton Range Uncertainty Due to Bone Cement Injected Into the Vertebra in Radiation Therapy Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We wanted to evaluate the influence of bone cement on the proton range and to derive a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting distorted computed tomography (CT) data as a reference to determine whether the correction is needed. Two CT datasets were obtained with and without a bone cement disk placed in a water phantom. Treatment planning was performed on a set of uncorrected CT images with the bone cement disk, and the verification plan was applied to the same set of CT images with an effective CT number for the bone cement disk. The effective CT number was determined by measuring the actual proton range with the bone cement disk. The effects of CT number, thicknesses, and position of bone cement on the proton range were evaluated in the treatment planning system (TPS) to draw a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting the CT number of bone cement. The effective CT number of bone cement was 260 Hounsfield units (HU). The calculated proton range for native CT data was significantly shorter than the measured proton range. However, the calculated range for the corrected CT data with the effective CT number coincided exactly with the measured range. The conversion factor was 209.6 [HU . cm/mm] for bone cement and predicted the range shift by approximately correcting the CT number. We found that the heterogeneity of bone cement could cause incorrect proton ranges in treatment plans using CT images. With an effective CT number of bone cement derived from the proton range and relative stopping power, a more actual proton range could be calculated in the TPS. The conversion factor could predict the necessity for CT data correction with sufficient accuracy.

Lim, Young Kyung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ui-Jung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho, E-mail: dongho@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Doo Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Sang-Yeob [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Production process for glass sand from the quartz waste from the beneficiation of kingiseppsk phosphorites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a process developed for the production of molding sand from the quartz waste which makes it possible to simplify the system for obtaining glass sand. According to this system, the main operation in the removal of most of the residual phosphate shell and alkaline earth metal oxides from the quartz waste is foam separation, using the residual concentration of reagents in the pulp (tallow and kerosene). After the subsequent washing and hydraulic classification, the sands meet the requirements set for molding sands grade Ob2K. The characteristics of the original flotation tailings and molding sand are presented. The mineralogical analysis of the molding sand showed that the iron-containing impurities are grains of glauconite, films of iron oxide on the surface of the grains, grains of ferrous-dolomite cement, and iron from the apparatus.

Ershov, V.I.; Lezhnev, Y.P.; Novofastovskaya, E.M.; Rants, G.F.; Shalamova, V.G.; Sinyakova, E.I.; Sokolova, E.I.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, T.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

Phillips, T.D.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PCA), 1980. 1979 Energy Report U.S. Portland CementCement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department of1994). Energy Information Admininstration, U.S. Department

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

About The Associate for Iron and Steel Technology - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABOUT THE ASSOCIATION FOR IRON & STEEL TECHNOLOGY ... that provides opportunities for networking among iron and steel industry professionals and...

339

Comparison of proton field-cycling relaxometry and molecular dynamics simulations for protonwater surface dynamics in cement-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. / Cement and Concrete Research 37 (2007) 348­350 #12;Acknowledgements JPK and PJM thank the NANOCEM

Kalinichev, Andrey G.

340

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Industry Analysis Briefs The Energy Information Agency (EIA) is currently updating industry analysis briefs for the most energy-intensive industries in the United States, including aluminum, chemicals, forest products (such as paper and wood products), glass, metal casting, petroleum and coal products, and steel. As soon as the current briefs are available, we will provide the link. Industry Analysis Briefs will have the following content: Economic Profile and Trends Value of Shipments Annual Production Labor Productivity Energy Use Energy Use by Fuel Fuel Consumption by End Use Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Expenditures Onsite Generation (if applicable) Energy Intensity State-Level Information Technologies and Equipment Cogeneration Technologies (if applicable)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to stress within cement matrix and possibly leading to cracks. #12;The aims of this research coloured corrosion products were observed visually on the aluminium encapsulated in OPC. Cracking was alsoCorrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation

Sheffield, University of

343

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

345

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 10, July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Experimental work has been completed at the Colorado School of Mines. Samples of ..beta..-dicalcium silicate-silica cement developed in this program have been submitted for additional evaluation. The initial screening portion of this work has identified several promising systems that will undergo more rigorous testing. Dynamic brine exposure testing of several systems has been initiated at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Facility. Testing at the Niland test site is scheduled to start soon. Property verification tests on cements produced in the materials development phase of the program were initiated at the Bureau of Standards. Preliminary data are available for five cements exposed for 176 h to water at a temperature of 195/sup 0/C. Three of the cements exhibited strength losses during the test. An aluminum hydroxide cement and a polymer cement showed slight increases in strength after the exposure. These and longer-term data will be utilized in the selection of a material for use in the remedial cementing of a hot dry rock well at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

349

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

350

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

351

Steel Winds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steel Winds Steel Winds Facility Steel Winds Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner UPC Wind/BQ Energy Developer UPC Wind/BQ Energy Location Near Lackawanna NY Coordinates 42.81724°, -78.867542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.81724,"lon":-78.867542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

T. Misiak

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

Field Guide: Visual Inspection of Steel Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI report, one in a series of practical guides designed as reference aids for utility personnel working in the field, visually catalogs the various condition issues that commonly affect transmission line steel structures. The scope includes steel poles, lattice structures, connections, foundations, weathering steel, and coatings.ObjectiveStructural conditions commonly encountered by utility personnel in the field ...

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative What is Solar Glass? Solar glass is a type electricity and the rest to let in light. Solar glass is not fully transparent, so it should not be used or patterned to minimize heat gain and control glare are ideal candidates. Solar glass can be made in different

Paulsson, Johan

359

Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

Mendel, J.E.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

Newson, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1986-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

364

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

365

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

366

Mechanical Properties of Thin Film Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of these and other properties, thin film metallic-glasses (TFMGs) are a promising structural material for fabricating the next generation of micro- and...

367

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, One significant limitation to waste loading in glass for Hanford defense wastes is the commonly high Al concentrations. The primary concern is...

368

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector  

developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing material. A scintillating material in the form ...

369

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector ...  

... ORNL invention uses a matrix material developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing ...

370

Advanced Characterization Techniques of Glasses - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Many researchers rely on NMR of glass-forming cations to understand network structure, often in combination with other experimental and...

371

Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrical resistivity of oxide melts is important for the design and operation of electric furnaces. The electrical properties of glass and slag...

372

Properties of Glass-Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Maximum use temperatures of selected glass-ceramics...9608 Corning 1000 1830 ? LAS I ? 1000 1830 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS II (Nb) ? 1100 2010 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS III (Nb,Zr) ? 1200 2190 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS-type ? 1200??1300 2190??2370 ? Cordierite 9606 Corning 1100 2010 Creep over 900 °C (1650 °F)...

373

Performance of steel-polymer and ceramic-polymer layered composites and concrete under high strain rate loadings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results. SP: steel plate, PU: polyurea, KE: Kineticsample configurations: (a) SP-PU-SP (steel - polyurea -steel) (b) SP-PU-SP-PU (steel - polyurea - steel -

Samiee, Ahsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

CF8C-Plus Steels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CF8C-Plus Steels Home CF8C-Plus Steels Home Contacts Goal Related Links AFA Steels Caterpillar MSTD Corrosion Science & Technology Group Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL Fossil Energy Program ORNL Industrial Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program Distributed Energy Program Comments CF8C-Plus cast austenitic steels Phil Maziasz with CF8C-Plus cast austenitic stainless steel Burner housing made of CF8C-Plus steel and designed for the pyrolytic breakdown of carbon particulates trapped in ceramic particulate filters downstream of the burner in a Caterpillar Regeneration System. CF8C-Plus cast austenitic steels are low-cost, high-performance

376

Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses with High Plasticity Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic Deformation of a Metallic Glass Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses.

377

Analytical solution for the pull-out response of FRP rods embedded in steel tubes filled with cement grout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anchorages for FRP tendons. J Compos Constr ASCE 4(2):3947.doi:10.1061/(ASCE) Zhang BR, Benmokrane B, Chennouf A,anchors. J Compos Constr ASCE 5(2): Zhang BR, Benmokrane B,

Wu, Zhimin; Yang, Shutong; Zheng, Jianjun; Hu, Xiaozhi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

379

SODIUM POLYPHOSPHATE-MODIFIED CLASS C/CLASS F FLY ASH BLEND CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors investigated the usefulness of the coal combustion by-products, Class C fly ash (C) and Class F fly ash (F), in developing cost-effective acid-resistant phosphate-based cements for geothermal wells. In the temperature range of 20-100 C, sodium polyphosphate (NaP) as the acidic cement-forming solution preferentially reacted with calcium sulfate and lime in the C as the base solid reactant through the exothermic acid-base reaction route, rather than with the tricalcium aluminate in C. This reaction led to the formation of hydroxyapatite (HOAp). In contrast, there was no acid-base reaction between the F as the acidic solid reactant and NaP. After autoclaving the cements at 250 C, a well-crystallized HOAp phase was formed in the NaP-modified C cement that was responsible for densifying the cement's structure, thereby conferring low water permeability and good compressive strength on the cement. however, the HOAp was susceptible to hot CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution (pH 1.1), allowing some acid erosion of the cement. On the other hand, the mullite in F hydrothermally reacted with the Na from NaP to form the analcime phase. Although this phase played a pivotal role in abating acid erosion, its generation created an undesirable porous structure in the cement. They demonstrated that blending fly ash with a C/F ratio of 70/30 resulted in the most suitable properties for acid-resistant phosphate-based cement systems.

SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; KASPEREIT, D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alteration of basaltic glasses from north-central British Columbia, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence of palagonitization is seen on all glasses studied from three Pleistocene subglacial volcanoes in north-central British Columbia, Canada. Samples from foreset breccias of Tuya Butte are more highly palagonitized than those from the tephra cones of Ash Mountain and Southern Tuya. Extensive palagonitization is generally associated with authigenic mineralization (clays, zeolites). Palagonite composition varies widely relative to glass composition, and palagonite can be broadly categorized as either high-Al or low-Al, depending on whether Al was retained or lost to aqueous solutions during palagonitization. Loss of Al during palagonitization is related to closed-system alteration, including precipitation of aluminosilicate authigenic cements. Microenvironment appears to be more influential than macroenvironment in determining the composition of palagonite. Palagonite rinds are compositionally zoned, generally becoming progressively higher in Al and Ca, and lower in Fe and Mg, towards the innermost (later-formed) portions of the rinds. Phillipsite is the first zeolite formed, followed by chabazite. Analcime and calcite occur in the most highly palagonitized samples. Mass balance considerations indicate higher mass loss where palagonitization has not proceeded to the point where zeolite solubility limits were attained in the local solution. Zeolites occur in closed-system conditions (low flow rates), where little net system mass loss or gain has occurred. The colloidal nature of palagonite allows the effective adsorption of Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba, and REEs.

Jercinovic, M.J. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA)); Keil, K. (Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu (USA)); Smith, M.R.; Schmitt, R.A. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Load relaxation studies of a metallic glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of load relaxation studies of a commercial metallic glass as a function of temperature are reported. The data suggest that metallic glasses exhibit deformation behavior with flow laws similar to those governing plastic deformation in crystalline solids. The lack of appreciable work hardening in annealed material and the identification of an anelastic component are also indicated by the experimental observations. (GHT)

Hadnagy, T.D.; Krenisky, D.J.; Ast, D.G.; Li, C.Y.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

Schumacher, R.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe(II)-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) technology is the modification of conventional solidification/stabilization (S/S). Inorganic pollutants are immobilized by Fe(II)-DS/S while organic pollutants are destroyed. Experimental studies were conducted to identify the active agents for Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) degradation as well as the conditions that enhance the formation of the active agents in the Fe(II)-DS/S system. PCE was chosen as a model chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in this study. First, the conditions that lead to maximizing production of the active agents were identified by measuring the ability of various chemical mixtures to degrade PCE. Results showed that Fe(II), Fe(III), Ca, and Cl were the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement did not form the same solids as those with cement or cement extract. Ferrous hydroxide was identified as a major solid phase formed in systems without cement. Finally, the effect of using different types of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on PCE degradation rate during Fe(II)-DS/S was examined and the solids were examined by instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS). Four different OPC (Txi, Lehigh, Quikrete, and Capitol) showed different PCE degradation behaviors. Pseudo first-order kinetics was observed for Capitol and Txi OPC and second-order kinetics was observed for Quikrete. In the case of Lehigh cement, pseudo first-order kinetics was observed in cement slurry and second-order kinetics in cement extract. Calcium aluminum hydroxide hydrates dominated solids made with Txi, Quikrete, and Lehigh cements and Friedel?s salt was the major phase found in solids made with Capitol cements. Fe tended to be associated with hexagonal thin plate particles, which were supposed to be a LDH.

Ko, Sae Bom

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Method for heating and forming a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters  

SciTech Connect

The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO/sub 3/-HF and H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/ to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated.

Rankin, W.N.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

391

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

Bliss, Mary

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

397

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fred Steinkuehler Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation 20th and State Streets Granite City, Illinois 62040 Dear Mr. Steinkuehler: Enclosed please find your copy of the signed consent forms for the radiological survey of the South Plant Betatron Building. In your letter to me of July 21, 1988, you identified several issues regarding the survey and the consent. I would like to address these concerns below. As noted in the consent form, the purpose of our surveys are only to determine if there is any residual radioactive material on the site that is derived from Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor operations. All data collected during the designation survey is to determine the radiological condition of the portion of the site involved in the predecessor work. No

399

Chalcogenide Glasses Developed for Optical Micro-sensor Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the sensor field, chalcogenide glasses are well established membranes or thin ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and...

400

Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ... and is driven by the stress induced by absorption of ultrafast light in glass.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cost model for a small glass manufacturing enterprise.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cost model developed is for small, glass-manufacturing enterprises to help themdetermine their product costs. It estimates the direct cost in glass manufacturing such as (more)

Gopisetti, Swetha.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ion-Exchanged Glass with High Damage Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

403

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Title Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5022E Year...

404

Infra-red transparent glass as per ancient Indian text ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test results revealed that new glass could be compared with Calcium Fluoride Glass. ... Optical Response of Laser Materials in High Radiation Environments.

405

Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing Units Title Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing...

406

Oxidation Behavior of Metallic Glass - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

407

Fabrication of Bulk Metallic Glass Foams via Severe Plastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of...

408

Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Fabricated within the Supercooled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, lightweight magnesium base Bulk Metallic Glass Composites ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation...

409

Understanding Structure of Glass from Its Response to External Stimuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

410

Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

411

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Glass and Optical Materials. Presentation Title, Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

412

M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and Ultrafine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding (HPS) ... Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic Glasses.

413

China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra Photovoltaic Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name China Glass Solar (aka CG Solar, formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

414

209- Development of Borosilicate Glasses for the Immobilization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

027- Search for the Rigidity Transition and Intermediate Phase in Lithium Oxide Silicate Glass Systems Using .... 101- Viscous Silicate SOFC Glass Sealants.

415

Fogged Glass by Biofilm Formation and Its Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

416

Refractive index of glass and its dipersion for visible light.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classification of optical glass and empirical relations between the refractive index and its dispersion are discussed in terms of moments of the glass's IR and UV absorption spectra. The observed linear dependence of index on dispersion within glass families is shown to arise primarily from the approximately linear superposition of the electronic absorptions of glass former and glass modifiers. The binary classification into crown and flint glasses is also based primarily on electronic spectra: Crown glasses are 'wide-gap' materials with excitation energies greater than {approx}12.4 eV, while flint glasses are their 'narrow-gap' counterpart.

Smith, D. Y.; Karstens, W. (Physics); (Univ. of Vermont); (Saint Michael's Coll.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

418

Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

419

Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

420

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furnace) 1 in iron & steel industry will increase over timecase of iron and steel and cement industries in particular,intensive industry subsectors such as cement, steel and

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effect of pre-oxidation and environmental aging on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealing glass with metallic interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two ferritic stainless steel coupons for strength evaluation. The steel coupons were pre-oxidized at elevated temperatures to promote thick oxide layers to simulate long-term exposure conditions. In addition, seals to as-received metal coupons were also tested after aging in oxidizing or reducing environments to simulate the actual SOFC environment. Room temperature tensile testing showed strength degradation when using pre-oxidized coupons, and more extensive degradation after aging in air. Fracture surface and microstructural analysis confirmed that the cause of degradation was formation of SrCrO4 at the outer sealing edges exposed to air.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

425

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 9, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Work on polymer cements containing mixtures of organosiloxanes and styrene is continuing to show the potential of the system as a high temperature cementing material. Samples exposed for 360 hr to brine at 250/sup 0/C have not shown evidence of hydrolysis and have maintained high strength. At 350/sup 0/C, the compressive strength is > 5000 psi. Preliminary tests to determine the pumpability of the system are in progress. Work on the development of inorganic cementing materials is continuing at six laboratories. Several promising materials have been identified. Tests to measure compressive strengths, bond strengths, permeability, and compatibility with drilling muds are in progress. Consistometer tests have been performed on some materials.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

427

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Energy and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production ofproduction use of carbide slag Cement with low lime saturation factor Calcareous oil shaleoil shale can be used as an alternative feedstock and partial fuel substitute in clinker production.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland Cement Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Lower air temperatures decrease demand for cooling energy and slow the formation of urban smog. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo, though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed, but stabilized within six weeks of casting.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in Chinas cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andHydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 347-355.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

P/M Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Applications for P/M stainless steels...Seatback tray slides 316L Galley latches 316L Jet fuel refueling impellers 316L Foam generators 316L Agriculture Fungicide spray equipment 316L Appliances Automatic dishwasher components 304L Automatic washer components 304L Garbage disposal components 410L Pot handles 316L Coffee filters 316L-Si...

436

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Efflorescence and surface carbonation whitened some gray-cement mixes.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Critical review of glass performance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sutton Steele and Steele Co - TX 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sutton Steele and Steele Co - TX 09 Sutton Steele and Steele Co - TX 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SUTTON, STEELE & STEELE CO. (TX.09) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Sutton, Steele & Steele, Inc. TX.09-1 Location: Dallas , Texas TX.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 TX.09-2 Site Operations: Conducted operations to separate Uranium shot by means of air float tables and conducted research to air classify C-Liner and C-Special materials. TX.09-1 TX.09-3 TX.09-4 TX.09-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote TX.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium TX.09-4 TX.09-5 Radiological Survey(s): Health and Safety Monitoring TX.09-4 TX.09-5 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

440

CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Energy-saving cements obtained from chemical gypsum and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

The main sources, properties and uses of chemical gypsum are reviewed and the possibility of its utilization for the manufacturing process of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is explored. In this process other industrial wastes, as sources of reactive silica and alumina, can be employed. Phosphogypsum, blast-furnace slag and fly ash were the main by-products investigated. The principal properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cements, such as synthesis, hydration and strength, were discussed. Some durability problems and suggested solutions were particularly emphasized.

Beretka, J. [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia); Cioffi, R. [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione] [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione; Marroccoli, M.; Valenti, G.L. [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente] [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Daniel, J. (Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Color Glass Condensate at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Color Glass Condensate formalism and its application to high energy heavy ion collisions at RHIC are discussed. We argue that the RHIC data supports the view that the Color Glass Condensate provides the initial conditions for gold-gold collisions at RHIC while final state (Quark Gluon Plasma) effects are responsible for the high $p_t$ suppression in mid rapidity. At forward rapidities in deuteron-gold collisions, however, Color Glass Condensate is the underlying physics of the observed suppression of the particle spectra and their centrality dependence.

Jamal Jalilian-Marian

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Glass melter off-gas system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

GLASS COMPOSITION AND PROCESS OF MAKING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions are described which are suitable for scintillators of thermal-neutron counters. The glass consists of from 70 to 75 mole% of B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, from 7 to 9 mole% of Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and from 23 to 16 mole% of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ plus Na/sub 2 /O in a mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The process of making the glass from cerous oxalate, ammonium pentaborate, sodium carbonate, and hydrated alumina in a nonoxidizing atmosphere at 1400-1500 deg C is given. (AEC)

Bishay, A.M.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

New high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells: stability and properties. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential high-temperature cements have been formulated and evaluated in terms of their properties for geothermal well cementing. Phase formation and compatibility in two major compositional regions were investigated in the temperature region between 200 and 400/sup 0/C and pressures up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi). These were followed by an evaluation of properties of the cements formed. One area in the system Ca0-Mg0-Si0/sub 2/-H/sub 2/0 centered around the xonotlite-chrysotile join while the other area of interest centered around the anorthite composition in the system Ca0-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O. After numerous exploratory studies, the magnesia-containing mixtures were prepared by mixing a Class J cement with various sources of magnesia such as calcined chrysotile, or magnesium oxide. Calcium oxide and silica fine quartz powder were also added to adjust the compositions. The aluminous system cements were formulated from high-alumina cements which were mixed with various silica sources.

Roy, D.M.; White, E.L.; Langton, C.A.; Grutzeck, M.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Literature survey on cements for remediation of deformed casing in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells have been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal`s portion of The Geysers geothermal field. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields.

Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydraulic behavior of calcium sulfoaluminate-based cements derived from industrial process wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of cements based on calcium sulfoaluminate (C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]) [In this paper, the notation adopted in cement chemistry, vis. C=CO, A=Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], [bar S]=SO[sub 3], S=SiO[sub 2], and H=H[sub 2]O, has been used.] requires lower firing temperatures and lower grinding energy, as compared to ordinary Portland cements (OPC). Some of these low-energy cements can be formulated in order to develop high early strength and other performances similar to OPC. Further interest towards these types of cements relies on the possibility of using industrial process wastes as raw materials for their manufacture. It has been found that a number of industrial wastes and by-products such as phosphogypsum, bauxite fines, fly ash and blast furnace slag, can be employed without negatively affecting the hydraulic behavior of cements of planned C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]:[beta]-C[sub 2]S:C[bar S] weight ratio 1.5:1:1. Blast furnace slag and fly ash can also be advantageously used as blending components of the fired products.

Beretka, J.; Sherman, N. (CSIRO, Highett, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Building); Vito, B. de (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Santoro, L. (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica); Valenti, G.L. (Univ. degli Studi della Basillicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

The hydration of reactive cement-in-polymer dispersions studied by nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of two novel cement-in-polymer (c/p) dispersions, namely cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) and cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol) upon exposure to water at room temperature was investigated by a combination of various NMR methods. The swelling, cracking, and the water ingress were monitored non-destructively using {sup 1}H single point imaging. The hydration of the cement matrix was investigated using {sup 29}Si NMR whilst {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR spectra allowed the quantification of the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of poly(vinyl acetate) into poly(vinyl alcohol). The polymer controls the rate of water ingress and swelling which in turn determines the behaviour of the c/p dispersions upon exposure to water. For the cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol), the rates of water ingress and swelling are much faster than the hydration of the clinker whilst for the cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) the slow rates of the two processes allow the formation of a cementious matrix which assures the stability of the sample.

Olaru, A.M. [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Weichold, O. [DWI an der RWTH Aachen, e. V., Pauwelsstrasse 8, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Adams, A., E-mail: aadams@mc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nondestructive Evaluation: Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of a number of projects that were initiated to support the Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Roadmap. The majority of these projects fall within the purview of the Research Technical Advisory Committee. These multiyear and multifaceted projects address a number of important issues dealing with cast stainless steel and other emerging industry needs. The first objective of the project is to maintain the cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) roadmap that outlines an ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Evaluation of a Surface Treatment on the Performance of Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pack cementation-like Cerium based surface treatments have been found to be effective in enhancing the oxidation resistance of ferritic steels (Crofer 22APU) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The application of either a CeN- or CeO2 based surface treatment results in a decrease in weight gain by a factor of three after 4000 hours exposure to air+3%H2O at 800oC. Similar oxide scales formed on treated and untreated surfaces, with a continuous Cr-Mn outer oxide layer and a continuous inner Cr2O3 layer formed on the surface. However, the thickness of the scales, and the amount of internal oxidation were significantly reduced with the treatment, leading to the decrease in oxidation rate. This presentation will detail the influence of the treatment on the electrical properties of the interconnect. Half-cell experiments (LSM cathode sandwiched between two steel interconnects) and full SOFC button cell experiments were run with treated and untreated interconnects. Preliminary results indicate the Ce treatment can improve SOFC performance.

Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, Adler, T.A.; G.R.; Wilson, R.D.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Focus Transformer Steel - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Strain Gradient and Degradation in Magnetic Properties: Focus Transformer Steel. Author(s), Satish Kumar Shekhawat, Basavaraj V., Vijay

458

Project #3: Analysis of Structural Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... properties Task 5 - Characterize thermal excursions of steel ... 100 105 Yawata "A 514 mod" (WEL-TEN 80C) ... Est. completion date % complete ...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Project #3: Analysis of Structural Steel Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 105 108 Yawata "A 514 mod" (WEL-TEN 80C) 56 Plate 1 ... Task 5 - Characterize thermal excursions of steel ... Analysis completion target date ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Improved Martensitic Steel for High Temperature Applications  

NETL has developed a stainless steel composition and heat treatment process for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed 9 Cr-1 molybdenum alloy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The State of the Indian Steel Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... domestic demand, their competitive position in respect of cost of production, ... In this paper a forecast of the Indian steel industry in the coming five years will...

462

Plate, Bar, and Structural Steels I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... Process to the Characteristics of SCM 440 Steel as Pin Component in Automobilie Chains: Myrna Ariati1; 1University of Indonesia

463

Multiscale Systems Design of Advanced Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and Production Practice of DR Material in Baosteel ... Smelting Technology and Final Product Quality of Steel Rails Used for Passenger Special Line...

464

Symposium A: Advanced Steels and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and Production Practice of DR Material in Baosteel ... Smelting Technology and Final Product Quality of Steel Rails Used for Passenger Special Line...

465

Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry. Presentation Title, Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review.

466

Mechanical Behavior of Tempered Martensitic Steels for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanical Behavior of Tempered Martensitic Steels for Ultrasupercritical Steam Applications. Author(s), Jeffrey A. Hawk, Paul D. Jablonski,...

467

and Large Sized Chinese Steel Enterprises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Past and Future Trends of Energy Use in Key Medium and Large Sized Chinese Steel Enterprises year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory abstract p...

468

Neutron Imaging of Hydrogen in Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research. Presentation Title, Neutron Imaging of Hydrogen in Steels. Author(s)...

469

Hydrogen Embrittlement of a Bainitic Wheel Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Hydrogen Embrittlement of a Bainitic Wheel Steel ... (SSRT) test and hydrogen-induced delayed cracking (HIDC) were investigated in a noval ...

470

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective alumina coating on electrical stability in dual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass was recently proposed as a potential sealant for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The glass contains appreciable amount of alkalis and retains its glassy microstructure at elevated temperatures over time. It is more compliant as compared to conventional glass-ceramics sealants and could potentially heal cracks during thermal cycling. In previous papers the thermal cycle stability, thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and YSZ-coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we report the electrical stability of the compliant glass with aluminized AISI441 interconnect material under DC load in dual environment at 700-800oC. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two aluminized AISI441 metal coupons as well as plain AISI441 substrates. The results showed good electrical stability with the aluminized AISI441 substrate, while unstable behavior was observed for un-coated substrates. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the alumina coating demonstrated good chemical stability with the alkali-containing silicate sealing glass under DC loading.

Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Glass/polymer composites and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

Samuels, W. D. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Hawaii glass project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a glass utilizing the silica waste material from geothermal energy production, and to supply local artists with this glass to make artistic objects. A glass composed of 93% indigenous Hawaiian materials was developed; 24 artists made 110 objects from this glass. A market was found for art objects made from this material.

Miller, N. [comp.; Irwin, B.

1988-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

474

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

475

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

476

Cooperative motions in supercooled liquids and glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Far ir-spectra and heat-capacities for propylene carbonateO. & Suga, H. Heat-capacities and glass transitions of 1-1999). [70] Johari, G. P. Heat capacity and entropy of an

Stevenson, Jacob D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

478

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

479

Preparation of fullerene/glass composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Love, Steven P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Bipolaron Model of Superconductivity in Chalcogenide Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a small bipolaron model for the superconductivity in the Chalcogenide glasses (c-As2Te3 and c-GeTe). The results are agree with the experiments.

Liang-You Zheng; Bo-Cheng Wang; Shan T. Lai

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "glass cement steel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

Harbour, J.R.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

482

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF GLASS. A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography on the electrical properties of glass is presented. The 267 references covering the period from 1930 through 1960 are arranged according to subject. An author index is included. (M.C.G.)

Kepple, R.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms ... for aqueous wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Applications.

484

JOINT SESSION: Bioactive Glasses: Structure and Bioactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Solid state NMR investigating 29Si, 31P and 19F nucleii has been used to characterize both the structure of the glasses and follow the...

485

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z