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  1. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Grenada (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Grenada - a small island nation consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea - three of which are inhabited: Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique.

  2. Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  3. Grenada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Grenada Population 109,590 GDP 790,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GD 3-letter ISO code GRD Numeric ISO...

  4. Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  5. DOE LM/GJ596

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2005 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited....

  6. Uses of Ku70

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Gloria C.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ouyang, Honghai

    2004-10-26

    This invention provides a method of diagnosing a predisposition to cancer in a subject comprising: (a) obtaining a nucleic acid sample from the subject; and; (b) determining whether one or more of the subject's Ku70 alleles or regulatory regions to those alleles are deleted or different from the wild type so as to reduce or eliminate the subject's expression of polypeptide having tumor suppressor activity. This invention also provides a method of assessing the severity of cancer in a subject comprising: (a) obtaining a nucleic acid sample from the subject; and (b) determining whether one or more of the subject's Ku70 alleles or regulatory regions to those alleles are deleted or different from the wild type so as to reduce or eliminate the subject's expression of polypeptide having tumor suppressor activity. This invention also provides a method of assessing the severity of cancer in a subject comprising: determining the subcellular localization of Ku70 in the subject, wherein an abnormal subcellular localization of Ku70 indicates a predisposition to cancer.

  7. Seung-Hoe Ku | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seung-Hoe Ku Contact Information Phone: 609-243-2684 Email: sku

  8. DOE-LM-GJ1021-2005.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monticello Mill Tailings Site Macroinvertebrate Sampling for 2005 September 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1021-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/GJ1021-2005 Office of Legacy Management

  9. DOE-LM-GJ989-2005.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah October 2005 DOE-LM/GJ989-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-07 DOE-LM/GJ989 2005 ESL-RPT-2005-07 Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah October 2005 Prepared for U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S.

  10. 8KU Renewables GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KU Renewables GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: 8KU Renewables GmbH Place: Berlin, Germany Zip: 10117 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Berlin-based start-up renewables...

  11. DOE/GJ/79491-944 CONTRACT NO. DE-ACO1-02GJ79491 WELDON SPRING SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJ/79491-944 CONTRACT NO. DE-ACO1-02GJ79491 WELDON SPRING SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2003 WELDON SPRING SITE REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT WELDON SPRING, MISSOURI JUNE 2004 REV. 0 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project WELDON SPRING SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2003 06/07/04 Printed in the United States of America. Available from the National Technical Information Service, NTIS, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285

  12. A consistent orbital stability analysis for the GJ 581 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joiner, David A.; Sul, Cesar; Kress, Monika E.; Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-06-20

    We apply a combination of N-body modeling techniques and automated data fitting with Monte Carlo Markov Chain uncertainty analysis of Keplerian orbital models to RV data to determine long-term stability of the planetary system GJ 581. We find that while there are stability concerns with the four-planet model as published by Forveille et al., when uncertainties in the system are accounted for, particularly stellar jitter, the hypothesis that the four-planet model is gravitationally unstable is not statistically significant. Additionally, the system including proposed planet g by Vogt et al. also shows some stability concerns when eccentricities are allowed to float in the orbital fit, yet when uncertainties are included in the analysis, the system including planet g also cannot be proven to be unstable. We present revised reduced ?{sup 2} values for Keplerian astrocentric orbital fits assuming four-planet and five-planet models for GJ 581 under the condition that best fits must be stable, and we find no distinguishable difference by including planet g in the model. Additionally, we present revised orbital element estimates for each, assuming uncertainties due to stellar jitter under the constraint of the system being gravitationally stable.

  13. THEORETICAL TRANSIT SPECTRA FOR GJ 1214b AND OTHER 'SUPER-EARTHS' (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect THEORETICAL TRANSIT SPECTRA FOR GJ 1214b AND OTHER 'SUPER-EARTHS' Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THEORETICAL TRANSIT SPECTRA FOR GJ 1214b AND OTHER 'SUPER-EARTHS' We present new calculations of transit spectra of super-Earths that allow for atmospheres with arbitrary proportions of common molecular species and haze. We test this method with generic spectra, reproducing the expected systematics and absorption features, then apply it to the nearby

  14. Gj 832c: A super-Earth in the habitable zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Marshall, J. P.; Bailey, J.; Salter, G. S.; Wright, D.; Tuomi, Mikko; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Anglada-Escud, Guillem; Carter, B. D.; O'Toole, S. J.; Crane, J. D.; Schectman, S. A.; Thompson, I.; Minniti, D.; Jenkins, J. S.; Diaz, M.

    2014-08-20

    We report the detection of GJ 832c, a super-Earth orbiting near the inner edge of the habitable zone of GJ 832, an M dwarf previously known to host a Jupiter analog in a nearly circular 9.4 yr orbit. The combination of precise radial-velocity measurements from three telescopes reveals the presence of a planet with a period of 35.68 0.03 days and minimum mass (m sin i) of 5.4 1.0 Earth masses. GJ 832c moves on a low-eccentricity orbit (e = 0.18 0.13) toward the inner edge of the habitable zone. However, given the large mass of the planet, it seems likely that it would possess a massive atmosphere, which may well render the planet inhospitable. Indeed, it is perhaps more likely that GJ 832c is a 'super-Venus', featuring significant greenhouse forcing. With an outer giant planet and an interior, potentially rocky planet, the GJ 832 planetary system can be thought of as a miniature version of our own solar system.

  15. SECRETLY ECCENTRIC: THE GIANT PLANET AND ACTIVITY CYCLE OF GJ 328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Boss, Alan P.

    2013-09-10

    We announce the discovery of a {approx}2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s{sup -1}. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  16. ASTROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND HABITABLE ZONE OF THE EXOPLANET HOSTING STAR GJ 581

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; McAlister, Harold A.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Subasavage, John P.; Schaefer, Gail; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; Mazingue, Jude; Turner, Nils H.; Farrington, Chris; Goldfinger, P. J.; Ridgway, Stephen

    2011-03-10

    GJ 581 is an M dwarf host of a multiplanet system. We use long-baseline interferometric measurements from the CHARA Array, coupled with trigonometric parallax information, to directly determine its physical radius to be 0.299 {+-} 0.010 R{sub sun}. Literature photometry data are used to perform spectral energy distribution fitting in order to determine GJ 581's effective surface temperature T{sub EFF} = 3498 {+-} 56 K and its luminosity L = 0.01205 {+-} 0.00024 L{sub sun}. From these measurements, we recompute the location and extent of the system's habitable zone and conclude that two of the planets orbiting GJ 581, planets d and g, spend all or part of their orbit within or just on the edge of the habitable zone.

  17. CONTRACTNO.: DE-X13-96GJ87335 TASK ORDER NO.: h

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    March 13,2001 CONTRACTNO.: DE-X13-96GJ87335 TASK ORDER NO.: h l K O I - 0 6 CONTROLNO.: 3100-T01-0440 Project Manager Department of Energy Grand Junction Office 2597 B314 Road Grand Junction, CO 81503 ATTN: Mr. Art Kleinrath SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335-Radon and Direct Gamma Monitoring at the Shiprock, NM Disposal Site Dear Mr. Kleinrath: MACTEC-ERS has completed radon and direct gamma monitoring at the Shiprock, NM disposal site. The attached data summary tables demonstrate that

  18. Microsoft Word - DOE-GJ-97491-952-FINAL DRAFT_S01406.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Interim Remedial Action Report for the Groundwater Operable Unit of the Weldon Spring Site March 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE 952 - /GJ/79491 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy Interim Remedial Action Report for the

  19. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPER-EARTH HOST GJ 1214

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalitha, S.; Singh, K. P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-07-20

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on XMM-Newton observations. We derive an X-ray luminosity of L{sub X} = 7.4 10{sup 25}ergs{sup 1} and a corresponding activity level of log (L{sub X} /L {sub bol}) ? 5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about ?3.5MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3 10{sup 10}gs{sup 1} and has lost a total of ?2-5.6 M {sub ?}.

  20. DIRECT IMAGING DETECTION OF METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF GJ 504 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Spiegel, David S.; Thalmann, Christian; Currie, Thayne; Bonnefoy, Mickal; Zimmerman, Neil; Schlieder, Joshua; Brandner, Wolfgang; Feldt, Markus; Sorahana, Satoko; Kotani, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Egner, Sebastian; Abe, Lyu; Carson, Joseph C.; Goto, Miwa; and others

    2013-11-20

    Most exoplanets detected by direct imaging thus far have been characterized by relatively hot (?1000K) and cloudy atmospheres. A surprising feature in some of their atmospheres has been a distinct lack of methane, possibly implying non-equilibrium chemistry. Recently, we reported the discovery of a planetary companion to the Sun-like star GJ 504 using Subaru/HiCIAO within the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru survey. The planet is substantially colder (<600K) than previously imaged planets, and has indications of fewer clouds, which implies that it represents a new class of planetary atmospheres with expected similarities to late T-type brown dwarfs in the same temperature range. If so, one might also expect the presence of significant methane absorption, which is characteristic of such objects. Here, we report the detection of deep methane absorption in the atmosphere of GJ 504 b, using the Spectral Differential Imaging mode of HiCIAO to distinguish the absorption features around 1.6 ?m. We also report updated JHK photometry based on new K {sub s}-band data and a re-analysis of the existing data. The results support the notion that GJ 504 b has atmospheric properties distinct from other imaged exoplanets, and will become a useful reference object for future planets in the same temperature range.

  1. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  2. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  3. Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nordquist, Christopher Daniel ; Sullivan, Charles Thomas ; Kraus, Garth Merlin ; Austin, Franklin, IV [1] ; Finnegan, Patrick Sean [1] ; Ballance, Mark H. [1] ; Dyck, Christopher William + Show Author Affiliations (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM) Publication Date: 2008-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 966236 Report

  4. QUANTITATIVELY ASSESSING THE ROLE OF CLOUDS IN THE TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Vissher, Channon

    2013-09-20

    Recent observations of the super-Earth GJ 1214b show that it has a relatively featureless transmission spectrum. One suggestion is that these observations indicate that the planet's atmosphere is vertically compact, perhaps due to a water-rich composition that yields a large mean molecular weight. Another suggestion is that the atmosphere is hydrogen/helium-rich with clouds that obscure predicted absorption features. Previous models that incorporate clouds have included their effect without a strong physical motivation for their existence. Here, we present model atmospheres of GJ 1214b that include physically motivated clouds of two types. We model the clouds that are present in chemical equilibrium, as has been suggested to occur on brown dwarfs, which include KCl and ZnS for this planet. We also include clouds that form as a result of photochemistry, forming a hydrocarbon haze layer. We use a photochemical kinetics model to understand the vertical distribution and available mass of haze-forming molecules. We model both solar and enhanced-metallicity cloudy models and determine the cloud properties necessary to match observations. In enhanced-metallicity atmospheres, we find that the equilibrium clouds can match the observations of GJ 1214b if they are lofted high into the atmosphere and have a low sedimentation efficiency (f{sub sed} = 0.1). We find that models with a variety of hydrocarbon haze properties can match the observations. Particle sizes from 0.01 to 0.25 ?m can match the transmission spectrum with haze-forming efficiencies as low as 1%-5%.

  5. METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE TRANSITING HOT NEPTUNE GJ436B?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V.; Tinetti, G.; Kipping, D. M.; Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.; Waldmann, I.; Miller, S.; Fossey, S. J.; Aylward, A.; Ribas, I.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Griffith, C. A.; Carey, S.; Mousis, O.

    2011-04-10

    We present an analysis of seven primary transit observations of the hot Neptune GJ436b at 3.6, 4.5, and 8 {mu}m obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. After correcting for systematic effects, we fitted the light curves using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Combining these new data with the EPOXI, Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based V, I, H, and K{sub s} published observations, the range 0.5-10 {mu}m can be covered. Due to the low level of activity of GJ436, the effect of starspots on the combination of transits at different epochs is negligible at the accuracy of the data set. Representative climate models were calculated by using a three-dimensional, pseudospectral general circulation model with idealized thermal forcing. Simulated transit spectra of GJ436b were generated using line-by-line radiative transfer models including the opacities of the molecular species expected to be present in such a planetary atmosphere. A new, ab-initio-calculated, line list for hot ammonia has been used for the first time. The photometric data observed at multiple wavelengths can be interpreted with methane being the dominant absorption after molecular hydrogen, possibly with minor contributions from ammonia, water, and other molecules. No clear evidence of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is found from transit photometry. We discuss this result in the light of a recent paper where photochemical disequilibrium is hypothesized to interpret secondary transit photometric data. We show that the emission photometric data are not incompatible with the presence of abundant methane, but further spectroscopic data are desirable to confirm this scenario.

  6. THERMOCHEMICAL AND PHOTOCHEMICAL KINETICS IN COOLER HYDROGEN-DOMINATED EXTRASOLAR PLANETS: A METHANE-POOR GJ436b?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Line, Michael R.; Yung, Yuk L.; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Angerhausen, D. E-mail: gv@s383.jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a thermochemical kinetics and photochemical model. We use high-temperature bidirectional reaction rates for important H, C, O, and N reactions (most importantly for CH{sub 4} to CO interconversion), allowing us to attain thermochemical equilibrium, deep in an atmosphere, purely kinetically. This allows the chemical modeling of an entire atmosphere, from deep-atmosphere thermochemical equilibrium to the photochemically dominated regime. We use our model to explore the atmospheric chemistry of cooler (T{sub eff} < 10{sup 3} K) extrasolar giant planets. In particular, we choose to model the nearby hot-Neptune GJ436b, the only planet in this temperature regime for which spectroscopic measurements and estimates of chemical abundances now exist. Recent Spitzer measurements with retrieval have shown that methane is driven strongly out of equilibrium and is deeply depleted on the day side of GJ436b, whereas quenched carbon monoxide is abundant. This is surprising because GJ436b is cooler than many of the heavily irradiated hot Jovians and thermally favorable for CH{sub 4}, and thus requires an efficient mechanism for destroying it. We include realistic estimates of ultraviolet flux from the parent dM star GJ436, to bound the direct photolysis and photosensitized depletion of CH{sub 4}. While our models indicate fairly rich disequilibrium conditions are likely in cooler exoplanets over a range of planetary metallicities, we are unable to generate the conditions for substantial CH{sub 4} destruction. One possibility is an anomalous source of abundant H atoms between 0.01 and 1 bars (which attack CH{sub 4}), but we cannot as yet identify an efficient means to produce these hot atoms.

  7. Dynamical evolution and spin-orbit resonances of potentially habitable exoplanets. The case of GJ 667C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Berghea, Ciprian

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the spin-orbital evolution of the potentially habitable super-Earth GJ 667Cc in the multiple system of at least two exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf. The published radial velocities for this star are re-analyzed and evidence is found for additional periodic signals, which could be taken for two additional planets on eccentric orbits making the system dynamically inviable. Limiting the scope to the two originally detected planets, we assess the dynamical stability of the system and find no evidence for bounded chaos in the orbital motion. The orbital eccentricity of the planets b and c is found to change cyclically in the range 0.06-0.28 and 0.05-0.25, respectively, with a period of approximately 0.46 yr. Taking the eccentricity variation into account, numerical integrations are performed of the spin-orbit interactions of the planet GJ 667Cc with its host star, assuming a terrestrial composition of its mantle. Depending on the interior temperature of the planet, it is likely to be entrapped in the 3:2 (probability 0.51) or even higher spin-orbit resonance. It is less likely to reach the 1:1 resonance (probability 0.24). The estimated characteristic spin-down times are quite short for the two planets, i.e., within 1 Myr for planet c and even shorter for planet b. The rate of tidal dissipation of energy in the planets of GJ 667 is estimated at 10{sup 23.7} and 10{sup 26.7} J yr{sup 1} for c and b, respectively. This raises a question of how such relatively massive, close super-Earths could survive overheating and destruction.

  8. DIRECT IMAGING OF A COLD JOVIAN EXOPLANET IN ORBIT AROUND THE SUN-LIKE STAR GJ 504

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Hori, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Suenaga, T.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Kwon, J.; Kudo, T.; Janson, M.; Brandt, T. D.; Spiegel, D.; Burrows, A.; Turner, E. L.; Moro-Martin, A.; Thalmann, C.; Biller, B.; Henning, T.; Carson, J.; McElwain, M. W.; and others

    2013-09-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages (<50 Myr) and atmospheric properties, with temperatures of 800-1800 K and very red colors (J - H > 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct-imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160{sup +350}{sub -60} Myr, GJ 504b has an estimated mass of 4{sup +4.5}{sub -1.0} Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary of {approx}30 AU predicted for the core accretion mechanism. GJ 504b is also significantly cooler (510{sup +30}{sub -20} K) and has a bluer color (J - H = -0.23 mag) than previously imaged exoplanets, suggesting a largely cloud-free atmosphere accessible to spectroscopic characterization. Thus, it has the potential of providing novel insights into the origins of giant planets as well as their atmospheric properties.

  9. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  10. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION AND SPIN-ORBIT RESONANCES OF POTENTIALLY HABITABLE EXOPLANETS: THE CASE OF GJ 581d

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Berghea, Ciprian; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: ciprian.berghea@usno.navy.mil

    2012-12-20

    GJ 581d is a potentially habitable super-Earth in the multiple system of exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf. We investigate this planet's long-term dynamics with an emphasis on its probable final rotation states acquired via tidal interaction with the host. The published radial velocities for the star are re-analyzed with a benchmark planet detection algorithm to confirm that there is no evidence for the recently proposed two additional planets (f and g). Limiting the scope to the four originally detected planets, we assess the dynamical stability of the system and find bounded chaos in the orbital motion. For the planet d, the characteristic Lyapunov time is 38 yr. Long-term numerical integration reveals that the system of four planets is stable, with the eccentricity of the planet d changing quasi-periodically in a tight range around 0.27, and with its semimajor axis varying only a little. The spin-orbit interaction of GJ 581d with its host star is dominated by the tides exerted by the star on the planet. We model this interaction, assuming a terrestrial composition of the mantle. Besides the triaxiality-caused torque and the secular part of the tidal torque, which are conventionally included in the equation of motion, we also include the tidal torques' oscillating components. It turns out that, depending on the mantle temperature, the planet gets trapped into the 2:1 or an even higher spin-orbit resonance. It is very improbable that the planet could have reached the 1:1 resonance. This improves the possibility of the planet being suitable for sustained life.

  11. DISPLAYING THE HETEROGENEITY OF THE SN 2002cx-LIKE SUBCLASS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS OF THE Pan-STARRS-1 DISCOVERED SN 2009ku

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, G.; Foley, R. J.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Rest, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Smartt, S.; Valenti, S.; Huber, M. E.; Scolnic, D.; Grav, T.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gates, G.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S. E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-10

    SN 2009ku, discovered by Pan-STARRS-1, is a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), and a member of the distinct SN 2002cx-like class of SNe Ia. Its light curves are similar to the prototypical SN 2002cx, but are slightly broader and have a later rise to maximum in g. SN 2009ku is brighter ({approx}0.6 mag) than other SN 2002cx-like objects, peaking at M{sub V} = -18.4 mag, which is still significantly fainter than typical SNe Ia. SN 2009ku, which had an ejecta velocity of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} at 18 days after maximum brightness, is spectroscopically most similar to SN 2008ha, which also had extremely low-velocity ejecta. However, SN 2008ha had an exceedingly low luminosity, peaking at M{sub V} = -14.2 mag, {approx}4 mag fainter than SN 2009ku. The contrast of high luminosity and low ejecta velocity for SN 2009ku is contrary to an emerging trend seen for the SN 2002cx class. SN 2009ku is a counterexample of a previously held belief that the class was more homogeneous than typical SNe Ia, indicating that the class has a diverse progenitor population and/or complicated explosion physics. As the first example of a member of this class of objects from the new generation of transient surveys, SN 2009ku is an indication of the potential for these surveys to find rare and interesting objects.

  12. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another TypeIa Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bauer, A.; Blanc, N.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Kocevski, D.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.

    2006-06-01

    We report the independent discovery and follow-up observations of supernova 2005gj by the Nearby Supernova Factory. This is the second confirmed case of a ''hybrid'' Type Ia/IIn supernova, which like the prototype SN 2002ic, we interpret as the explosion of a white dwarf interacting with a circumstellar medium. Our early-phase photometry of SN 2005gj shows that the strength of the interaction between the supernova ejecta and circumstellar material is much stronger than for SN 2002ic. Our .rst spectrum shows a hot continuum with broad and narrow H{alpha} emission. Later spectra, spanning over 4 months from outburst, show clear Type Ia features combined with broad and narrow H{gamma}, H{beta},H{alpha} and He I {lambda}{lambda}5876,7065 in emission. At higher resolution, P Cygni profiles are apparent. Surprisingly, we also observe an inverted P Cygni profile for [O III] {lambda}5007. We find that the lightcurve and measured velocity of the unshocked circumstellar material imply mass loss as recently as 8 years ago. This is in contrast to SN 2002ic, for which an inner cavity in the circumstellar material was inferred. Within the context of the thin-shell approximation, the early lightcurve is well-described by a flat radial density profile for the circumstellar material. However, our decomposition of the spectra into Type Ia and shock emission components allows for little obscuration of the supernova, suggesting an aspherical or clumpy distribution for the circumstellar material. We suggest that the emission line velocity profiles arise from electron scattering rather than the kinematics of the shock. This is supported by the inferred high densities, and the lack of evidence for evolution in the line widths. Ground- and space-based photometry, and Keck spectroscopy, of the host galaxy are used to ascertain that the host galaxy has low metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.3; 95% confidence) and that this galaxy is undergoing a significant star formation event that began roughly 200 {+-} 70 Myr ago. We discuss the implications of these observations for progenitor models and cosmology using Type Ia supernovae.

  13. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). II. A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO THE YOUNG M DWARF GJ 3629 SEPARATED BY 0.''2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of a 0.''2 companion to the young M dwarf GJ 3629 as part of our high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets around low-mass stars with the Keck-II and Subaru telescopes. Two epochs of imaging confirm that the pair is comoving and reveal signs of orbital motion. The primary exhibits saturated X-ray emission which, together with its UV photometry from GALEX, points to an age younger than {approx}300 Myr. At these ages the companion lies below the hydrogen burning limit with a model-dependent mass of 46 {+-} 16 M{sub Jup} based on the system's photometric distance of 22 {+-} 3 pc. Resolved YJHK photometry of the pair indicates a spectral type of M7 {+-} 2 for GJ 3629 B. With a projected separation of 4.4 {+-} 0.6 AU and an estimated orbital period of 21 {+-} 5 yr, GJ 3629 AB is likely to yield a dynamical mass in the next several years, making it one of only a handful of brown dwarfs to have a measured mass and an age constrained from the stellar primary.

  14. A PLANETARY SYSTEM AROUND THE NEARBY M DWARF GJ 667C WITH AT LEAST ONE SUPER-EARTH IN ITS HABITABLE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Haghighipour, Nader; Carter, Brad D.; Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy A.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Jenkins, James S.

    2012-05-20

    We re-analyze 4 years of HARPS spectra of the nearby M1.5 dwarf GJ 667C available through the European Southern Observatory public archive. The new radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using a new data analysis technique that derives the Doppler measurement and other instrumental effects using a least-squares approach. Combining these new 143 measurements with 41 additional RVs from the Magellan/Planet Finder Spectrograph and Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer spectrometers reveals three additional signals beyond the previously reported 7.2 day candidate, with periods of 28 days, 75 days, and a secular trend consistent with the presence of a gas giant (period {approx}10 years). The 28 day signal implies a planet candidate with a minimum mass of 4.5 M{sub Circled-Plus} orbiting well within the canonical definition of the star's liquid water habitable zone (HZ), that is, the region around the star at which an Earth-like planet could sustain liquid water on its surface. Still, the ultimate water supporting capability of this candidate depends on properties that are unknown such as its albedo, atmospheric composition, and interior dynamics. The 75 day signal is less certain, being significantly affected by aliasing interactions among a potential 91 day signal, and the likely rotation period of the star at 105 days detected in two activity indices. GJ 667C is the common proper motion companion to the GJ 667AB binary, which is metal-poor compared to the Sun. The presence of a super-Earth in the HZ of a metal-poor M dwarf in a triple star system supports the evidence that such worlds should be ubiquitous in the Galaxy.

  15. Proposal of a gigawatt-class L/Ku dual-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, J.-C. Fan, Y.-W.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-10-15

    We present a gigawatt (GW)-class magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) which is capable of generating dual-band high power microwaves (HPMs). The proposed device, deriving from previously studied complex MILO and dual-frequency MILO, is designed to produce two HPMs in L-band and Ku-band, respectively. It is found in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation that when the diode voltage is 610?kV, HPMs with frequencies of 1.72 GHz and 14.6?GHz can be achieved with powers of 3.3?GW and 2.4?GW, respectively. The corresponding total power conversion efficiency is approximately 12.8%. Power difference of the two generated HPMs is approximately 1.4?dB, and frequency difference of them reaches a level as high as ?10?dB.

  16. Simulation of a gigawatt level Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov type oscillator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hua; Shu, Ting Ju, Jinchuan; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-03-15

    We present the simulation results of a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov type high power microwave oscillator. A guiding magnetic field as low as 0.6?T has been operated in the device. Overmoded slow wave structures with gradually tapered vanes are used in order to increase power capacity and the efficiency of beam-wave interaction. The drift cavity is adopted to enhance the beam-wave interaction of the device. After numerical optimization, the designed generator with an output microwave power of 1.2?GW, a frequency of 13.8 GHz, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 38% can be achieved, when the diode voltage and current are, respectively, 540?kV and 5.8?kA. The power compositions of TM{sub 0n} modes of the output microwave have been analyzed, the results of which show that TM{sub 01} mode takes over almost 95% of the power proportion.

  17. zhang-gj-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lagrangian Examination of the Cloud Physical and Radiative Properties in the ARM SGP Site from Satellite Observations G. J. Zhang and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction The conventional approach to studying clouds examines cloud properties, such as the fractional cloud cover, at a fixed location. One of the drawbacks of this approach is that the results depend upon resolution of the grid mesh on which the cloud

  18. Grenada-Caribbean Solar Finance Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    through: (1) a training program for lending officers, (2) a consumer awareness campaign, and (3) a pilot lending operation." References "OAS Project Database" Retrieved...

  19. DOE-LM/GJ1131-2006

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, Project Site September 2013 This is a draft, predecisional U.S. Department of Energy document and is not releasable to the public LMS/AMC/S01980-1.0 This page intentionally left blank LMS/AMC/S01980-1.0 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Amchitka Island, Alaska, Project Site September 2013 This is a draft, predecisional U.S. Department of Energy document and is not releasable to the public This is a draft, predecisional U.S. Department of Energy document and is not

  20. DOE_GJ_79491_943.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  1. DOE-LM/GJ1131-2006

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amchitka, Alaska, Site July 2014 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited LMS/AMC/S01980-1.0 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/scitech/ Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy

  2. The 18. annual P and GJ 500 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Share, J.; Tubb, R.

    1998-11-01

    The staff of Pipeline and Gas Journal presents its 18th annual 500 Report, providing the industry`s most comprehensive summary of the nation`s energy pipeline systems. As usual, categories are broken down to include the top liquids pipelines, gas transmission and distribution systems. The transmission companies are ranked by mileage while the liquids companies are determined by numbers of barrels. The gas distribution rankings are determined by number of customers. Other numbers include total throughput of natural gas and barrels of crude oil and refined products; operating revenue and net income; miles of mains and service lines; compression; and additions to plant. The figures for the most part represent calendar year 1997 statistics as compared to 1996. One interesting note: the mild winter of 1997--98 throughout most of the East Coast and Midwest led to a decrease in volume, especially for natural gas, and a resulting decline in revenues for a substantial number of companies.

  3. The 16th P and GJ 500 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Share, J.

    1996-09-01

    Pipeline and Gas Journal is pleased to present its 16th annual 500 Report--a comprehensive listing of the nation`s energy pipelines. The list comprises the leading 300 natural gas distribution utilities; top 100 gas transmission pipelines and top 100 liquids pipelines. The wealth of statistics includes pipeline mileage; total throughput of gas and barrels of crude oil and refined products; operating revenue; employees; and in the case of the gas distributors their number of customers. Just as important as the numbers are the trends they reveal of an energy industry continuing to undergo dramatic change. The gas industry in particular has faced a massive reorganization caused in large part by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Order 636.

  4. The 15th P and GJ 500 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congram, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    This is an annual compilation of data on the pipeline industry of the US. It provides information on the gas utilities and oil and gas transmission. Data is broken out by companies in terms of mileage, deliveries, operating revenues, operation additions, and numbers of customers. It is separated into both gas and liquids according to the top 10 and the top 300 distribution companies. It also provides a company break-out based on the top 100 gas and liquids pipelines.

  5. The 17th annual P and GJ 500 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Share, J.; Tubb, R.

    1997-11-01

    The staff of Pipeline and Gas Journal presents its 17th annual 500 Report, providing the industry`s most comprehensive statistical summary of the nation`s energy pipelines. The report was previously printed every September but has been moved to November to accommodate the new deadlines for pipeline companies to file their necessary paperwork with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The report contains listings of the 300 leading natural gas distribution utilities; the top 100 transmission and gathering pipelines and the top 100 liquids pipelines. The distribution companies are ranked according to number of customers while gas pipelines are ranked by mileage. The liquids companies are determined by barrels. Other numbers include total throughput of natural gas and barrels of crude oil and refined products; operating revenue and net income; miles of mains and service lines, compression; and additions to plant.

  6. DOE_GJ_79491-938_R_0.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. DOE_GJ_79491_927_R_0.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. User:GregZiebold/International Programs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strategy Inter-American Development Bank World Watch Institute (WWI) Grenada-Caribbean Solar Finance Program Organization of American States (OAS) Grenada-Pilot Program for...

  9. R:\DATA\AS\WROrpts\P&F@GJ\wrb0002.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PROPERTY AND FACILITIES AT GRAND JUNCTION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES DECEMBER 1999 WR-B-OO-02 December 10, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Lawrence R. Ackerly, Regional Manager (Signed) Western Regional Audit Office Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "Property and Facilities at Grand Junction" BACKGROUND At the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (DOE)

  10. OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  11. Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  12. OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  13. Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  14. Caribbean-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    internatio Country Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Saint...

  15. Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enpraxis95 Country Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Puerto...

  16. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 6: Appendices G--J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J.; Kaplan, M.

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

  17. Venture Capital Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venture Capital Finance DOE Biomass Conference July 2014 Priced Out of Oil ... Into What? Energy Source Commodity Price Sun: $0 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $10/bbl = $1.6 / GJ (late 1990s) Coal: $3 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (N America) $3 - 4 / GJ Biomass (15 GJ/dt) $60-100/dt = $4 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (ex N America) $10 - 15 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $100/bbl = $16 / GJ Corn $4-7/bu= $10 - 20 / GJ 2 * Higher oil prices create a disruptive opportunity for lower cost feedstocks * North American shale gas is a

  18. Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profiles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    featuredproductscsa-country-profiles Country: Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Grenada, Mexico, Peru Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Agriculture, country profiles,...

  19. NREL: Technology Deployment - More Than 70 Countries Turn to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy access and clean energy project finance programs in Chile Helping Grenada meet ... Kitts Establishing geothermal development and policy in the Caribbean Establishing ...

  20. Frequently Requested Documents | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    001 thru 085 to DOE Contract DEAC13-02GJ79491 DOE Contract DEAC13-02GJ79491 Freedom of Information & Privacy Act Group - Enron Documents Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and...

  1. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...V-1 D.P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, F.P. Abegglen, G.J. Derrig, R.S. Olsen and W.H. Peeler Progress on ECR2...

  2. Microsoft Word - S0175600CY_2004_ASER.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 July 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ879-2005 -L DOE M/GJ879-2005 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. S0175600 DOE-LM/GJ879-2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004 July 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the

  3. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan) WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)...

  4. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. Parker and P.E. Hodgson, Nucl. Phys. 21 (1960) 383 1960KO1C Kotin, Rev. Mex. Fisica 9 (1960) 73 1960KU1B Kunz, Ann. Phys. 11 (1960) 275 1960KU1C Kulchitskii and...

  5. A = 11B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E,...

  6. A=12C (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AF64, DU64A, PA64M, RE64B, KR65, MA65Z, DE66J, DU66B, PH66A, AU67A, KA67B, ZI67). Transition probabilities: (EL56, KU57A, KU62E, WA62, BO63R, KI63F, KU63B, MA63S, CL64C, GR65E,...

  7. The closest M-dwarf quadruple system to the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Cassy L.; White, R. J.; Jao, W.-C.; Henry, T. J.; Quinn, S. N.; Cantrell, J. R.; Winters, J. G.; Bailey, J. I. III; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J. P.; Crockett, C. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report new infrared radial velocity measurements obtained with CSHELL at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility that reveal the M3.5 dwarf GJ 867B to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 1.795 0.017 days. Its velocity semi-amplitude of 21.4 0.5 km s{sup 1} corresponds to a minimum mass of 61 7 M {sub JUP}; the new companion, which we call GJ 867D, could be a brown dwarf. Stable astrometric measurements of GJ 867BD obtained with CTIO's 0.9 m telescope over the last decade exclude the presence of any massive planetary companions (7-18 M {sub JUP}) with longer orbital periods (2-10 yr) for the majority of orientations. These complementary observations are also used to determine the trigonometric distance and proper motion of GJ 867BD; the measurements are consistent with the HIPPARCOS measured values of the M2 dwarf GJ 867AC, which is itself a 4.1 day double-lined spectroscopic binary at a projected separation of 24.''5 (216 AU) from GJ 867BD. These new measurements strengthen the case that GJ 867AC and GJ 867BD are physically associated, making the GJ 867 system one of only four quadruple systems within 10 pc of the Sun (d = 8.82 0.08 pc) and the only among these with all M-dwarf (or cooler) components.

  8. Microsoft Word - S0226100June 2006.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 July 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1213-2006 -L DOE M/GJ1213-2006 -L U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-LM/GJ1213-2006 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction Sites Grand Junction Sites gj_map Grand Junction Disposal Site Grand Junction Processing Site Grand Junction Site Contact Us

  10. Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Divsion | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Divsion Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Transportation Harbors Division Address: Hale Awa Ku Moku Building 79...

  11. SMC Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Namdong-ku Inchon, Incheon, Korea (Republic) Zip: 405-310 Product: Supplier of lithium ion battery packs for portable electronic devices to OEMs worldwide. References: SMC...

  12. Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (Tennessee) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 800-981-0600 Website: lge-ku.comcustomer-serviceou Outage...

  13. Berlin, Germany: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Berlin, Germany Ecologic Institute German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety Registered Energy Companies in Berlin, Germany 8KU...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR. Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter Feb. 2013 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM...

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and E.W. Titterton, Nucl. Phys. 44 (1963) 453 1963KE1B Kelson, Phys. Rev. 132 (1963) 2189 1963KU05 J.A. Kuehner, J.D. Prentice and E. Almqvist, Phys. Lett. 4 (1963) 332 1963KU19...

  16. A=13N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13N) GENERAL: See Table 13.21 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(LA55B, HU57D, BA59N, PH60A, TA60L, KU61A, KU61E,...

  17. A=11B (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1970CO1H, 1971BA2Y, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03, 1973SA30, 1974ME19). Cluster and collective models: (1969BA1J, 1970BA1Q, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03). Special...

  18. A=10Be (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (KO61L, FA68C, SA69K, BO70P, KA70H, KU73D, SA73S). Cluster and alpha-particle model: (KU73D). Special levels: (BO70P, FR70H, PE70F, SA73S)....

  19. Microsoft Word - S0171800August.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004 August 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ885-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ885-2005 U.S. Department of Energy

  20. Microsoft Word - S0180700.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sites June 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ896-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management S0180700 DOE-LM/GJ896-2005 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites June 2005 Work

  1. Microsoft Word - S01918-VMR 2005.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ969-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management This page intentionally left blank S0191800 DOE-LM/GJ969-2005

  2. Microsoft Word - S0195200.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ958-2005 This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/GJ958-2005 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site October 2005

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    and Maintenance Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site June 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ -2006 -L 1164 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/GJ1164-2006 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Grand Junction,

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    Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier-November 2005 Update January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Hydraulic Conductivity of

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    Update for 2005 April 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1127-2006 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/GJ1127-2006 Verification Monitoring Report for the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Update for

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    Third Five-Year Review September 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1158-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/GJ1158-2006 Weldon Spring Site Third Five-Year Review September 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE

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  10. Microsoft Word - s00400-sept2004.doc

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  14. 1

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    Resolution of Seep and Ground Water Monitoring at the Mexican Hat, Utah, UMTRCA Title I Disposal Site March 2006 DOE M/GJ1139 2006 - -L Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management This page intentionally left blank S02222 DOE-LM/GJ1139-2006 Office of

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    January Through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE LM/ 646 2004 - - GJ N0074600 DOE-LM/GJ646-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January

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    GJ - - 724 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Interim Remedial Action Report Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) National Priorities List Site EPA CERCLIS Identification UT 3890090035 OU III - Surface Water and Ground Water Monitored Natural Attenuation Remedy September 2004 Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ724-2004 Interim Remedial Action Report Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) National Priorities List Site EPA

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    Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona 2004 Status Report - December 2004 DOE LM/GJ768 2004 ESL RPT 2004 07 - - - - - S0155800 DOE-LM/GJ768-2004 ESL-RPT-2004-07 Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona 2004 Status Report December 2004 Prepared by Environmental Research Laboratory University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona and

  15. Microsoft Word - N0075600-sitewide April to June 2004.doc

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    2004 - - GJ 95 U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center April Through June 2004 July 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management

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    DOE-LM/GJ1241-2006 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Building 100 Area Corrective Measures Study Report Addendum July 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Corrective Measures Study Report Addendum July 2006 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations

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    44 2004 GJ - - U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center January Through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy

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  1. University of Kansas: Technical Design Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Report of a 400W Portable Wind Turbine For Submission to the First NREL National Collegiate Wind Competition Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Release Date: April 18, 2013 Jayhawk Windustries 2 Acknowledgments Jayhawk Windustries would like to acknowledge the significant guidance and consultation of Professors Dr. Kyle Wetzel from Wetzel Engineering, Dr. Rick Hale from the KU Aerospace Engineering Department, Dr. Chris Depcik from the KU Mechanical Engineering

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    GJ962-2005 Data Validation Package June 2005 Surface Water and Ground Water Sampling at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites September 2005 - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02Gj79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy DVPJune 2005 Durango, Colorado, Disposal and

  3. Microsoft Word - Final Chariot Comm & Records Plan Jan05.doc

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    788 U.S. Department of Energy Post-Cleanup Communication and Records Plan for Project Chariot, Alaska January 2005 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ788-2005 Post-Cleanup Communication and Records Plan for Project Chariot, Alaska January 2005 Post-Cleanup

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    Q0032900 DOE-LM/GJ684-2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan Draft Final August 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number Q0032900 Contents U.S. Department of Energy MMTS OU III Post-ROD Monitoring Plan August 2004 Draft Final Page iii Contents Page

  5. Microsoft Word - S0106300-December2004.DOC

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    704 U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor December 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management S0106300 DOE-LM/GJ704-2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Long-Term

  6. Microsoft Word - S0131700_NOV04.doc

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    S0131700 DOE-LM/GJ757-2004 Office of Legacy Management Monument Valley Ground Water Remediation: Pilot Study Work Plan November 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monument Valley GW Remediation Pilot Study Work Plan November 2004 Doc. No. S0131700 Page 3 Signature Page Authors: J. Waugh, S.

  7. Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc

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    GJ803-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-01 Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Doc. No. S0162200 Page v Contents Executive

  8. Microsoft Word - S0171500.doc

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    DOE-LM/GJ850-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-03 Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah April 2005 Prepared for U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8, Denver, Colorado Under Interagency Agreement DW89953767018 By U. S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

  9. Microsoft Word - S01902_As Built Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 DOE-LM/GJ930-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 DOE-LM/GJ930 2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 Prepared for U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No.

  10. Microsoft Word - S03274.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management - - Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1461-2007 Annual Performance Report April 2006 Through March 2007 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site June 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management,

  11. Microsoft Word - TR02-23.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site February 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1137-2006 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy 2005 Annual Inspection - Weldon Spring, Missouri February 2006 Page 1 2005 Annual

  12. Microsoft Word - TR12-30.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1065-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy 2005 Annual

  13. Microsoft Word - U0197800.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site April 2004 DOE-LM/GJ625-2004 ESL-RPT-2004-04 ESL-RPT-2004-04 U0197800 Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site April 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Signature Page Document Number U0197800 Analysis of

  14. Microsoft Word - U0199700_August 2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9700 DOE-EM/GJ708-2004 Tuba City, Arizona, Land Management Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation September 2003 through February 2004 August 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0199700 Contents U.S. Department of Energy Tuba City Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation August 2004 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction

  15. Microsoft Word - U0200600-Semi-Annual Report Sept 03 to March 04.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    200600 DOE-LM/GJ725-2004 Semiannual Performance Report September 2003 through March 2004 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site September 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Semi-Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico September 2004 Doc. No. U0200600 Page iii Contents 1.0

  16. Microsoft Word - Bldg 100 Pilot Test.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE-LM/GJ791-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Young - Rainey STAR Center Building 100 Area Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test Final Report January 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test Final Report January 2005 Page ii Contents 1.0

  17. Microsoft Word - N0064700-April 2004 version.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    64700 DOE-LM-GJ/628-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Young - Rainey STAR Center Reactive Transport Modeling of Enhanced Bioremediation in the Building 100 Area April 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank Document Number N0064700 Contents U.S. Department of Energy Reactive Transport Modeling of Enhanced

  18. Microsoft Word - s00583_January2005.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lowman, Idaho, (UMTRCA Title I) Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Lowman, Idaho, (UMTRCA Title I) Disposal Site January 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ 2005 - -L 771 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy

  19. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    n D n D 0 D D 0 0 0 [] D 0 D u u l'\- ... UMTRO. Ground Water Project GJ0-2002-356-TAC GJO-GWGRN 1.1:1 . . *.*Final Site Observational Work Plan . * . for the Green River, Utah, *.UMTRAProjecfSite * * * September 2002 . . Prepared by the U:S. Department of Energy * Grand Junction Office . Work Perfo,;,ed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC1J-{)2GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy .. . . Approved for p1Jb!ic release; diStribution is unlimited. . . . ij n Ci l__j 11. L.) ' I. u f I I I. '---1 I , \

  20. E~ S*D3 Weldon Spring Site Environmental Repon lor Calendar Year 2002

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    E~ S*D3 Weldon Spring Site Environmental Repon lor Calendar Year 2002 HEIIJIJ9491-931 CHinclll. IE-IC13-02CJJ9491 * * 2813 Ill. I I.S. De .. l'llllllllf 1111'11 Oak Rld1e Olllce/lnnll JuiCden omce We1H1 brill Site l*llllllletlan PriJect WIIIIH Sllrllll. MISSGirl DOE/GJ/79491-931 CONTRACT NO. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 WELDON SPRING SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2002 WELDON SPRING SITE REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT WELDON SPRING, MISSOURI MAY2003 U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office

  1. Microsoft Word - S0123800_050107.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1232-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U n c o n t r o l l e d C o p y CERCLA Sites QAPP Summary of Changes May 3, 2007 Page i Summary of

  2. Microsoft Word - S07566_Requirements

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites This document supersedes DOE-LM/GJ1242-2006, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Needs Assessment for the 25 DOE FUSRAP Sites (S01649), December 2006 March 2011 LMS/FUSRAP/S07566 This page intentionally left blank LMS/FUSRAP/S07566 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites This document supersedes DOE-LM/GJ1242-2006, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Needs Assessment for

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#341474-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April_-_June_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 2005 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report April Through June 2005 July 2005 DOE-LM/GJ927-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#344133-v1-Final_NAPL_Quarterly_July-Sept_2005.Dƒ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 2005 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report July Through September 2005 October 2005 DOE-LM/GJ1011-2005 Pinellas Environmental

  5. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345139-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 2006 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report October Through December 2005 January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1105-2006 Pinellas Environmental

  6. Microsoft Word - S00790AG.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/mo/weldon/weldon.htm DOE office in Grand Junction 24-hour toll free security telephone number: (877) 695-5322 DOE-WSS local telephone number: (636) 300-0012 S00790AG DOE-LM/GJ688-2004 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S Department of Energy Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand

  7. A=6He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 6.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1983GA12, 1983LE14, 1984FI14, 1984PA08, 1984VA06, 1985EM01, 1985FI1E, 1986EM02, 1986FI07, 1986KU08, 1986KU1F, 1986VA13, 1986VO09, 1987DA1H, 1988KA1J). Special states: (1984FI1A, 1984FI14, 1984VA06, 1985EM01, 1985FI1E, 1986EM02, 1986FI07, 1986KU08, 1986VA13, 1986VO09, 1986WI04, 1987BL18, 1987DA1G, 1987DA1H, 1987KO39, 1987KUZI, 1988DA1E).

  8. Section V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. May, G.J. Kim and F.P. Abegglen Radiation Effects Facility H.L. Clark, V. Horvat, B. Hyman and D. Utley Control System Upgrade F.P. Abegglen, R.H. Bruch and T. Cowden ECR2 Ion...

  9. Effect of wood chip size on update gasifier-combustor operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, F.A.; Dunlap, J.L.; Caussanel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three wood chip sizes were tested in a 0.3 GJ/h updraft gasifier-combustor. Thermal output did not vary significantly between wood chips. Pressure and temperature profiles were measured in the gasifier bed. Channeling occurred with the small wood chips. Efficiency of the combustor was determined by a mass and energy balance and an enthalpy technique.

  10. Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is the main electricity consuming process in the chemical industry, next to oxygen and nitrogen production. We estimate final electricity use at 173 PJ (48 TWh) and fuel use of 38 PJ. Total primary energy consumption is estimated at 526 PJ (including credits for hydrogen export). The energy intensity is estimated at an electricity consumption of 4380 kWh/tonne chlorine and fuel consumption of 3.45 GJ/tonne chlorine, where all energy use is allocated to chlorine production. Assuming an average power generation efficiency of 33% the primary energy consumption is estimated at 47.8 GJ/tonne chlorine (allocating all energy use to chlorine).

  11. Fall 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 1:30---2:30pm September 25 1100 Dow Matt Dejarld (Millunchick), Michael Kuo (Ku) October 16 MSE Conf. Simon Huang (Goldman), Brian Roberts (Ku) November 6 MSE Conf. Mike Abere (Yalisove), Jimmy Chen (Phillips) December 11 MSE Conf. Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis), Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected F ridays 1:30---2:30pm September 20 1100 Dow Vladimir Stoica (Clarke) October 18 1100 Dow Wei Liu (Uher) November 8

  12. Winter 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 :00---2:00pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) January 1 7 Jimmy Chen ( Phillips g roup) February 7 Michael K uo ( Ku g roup) February 2 8 Vladimir S toica (note: l...

  13. A=18O (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 18O) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1970FL1A, 1970SA1M, 1971KU1F, 1972BB07, 1972EN03, 1972GA02, 1972LE13,...

  14. A=13C (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 13.4 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1982KU1B, 1983JA09, 1983SH38,...

  15. A=07Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See (HU57D, BA59K, BA59N, BR59M, FE59E, MA59E, MA59H, KU60A, PE60E, PH60A, SH60C, TA60L, BA61H, BA61N, BL61C, CL61D, KH61,...

  16. A=19O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1982KI02)....

  17. A=10B (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See (BA59F, BR59M, TA60L, TR61, IN62, BU63D, KU63B, ME63A, MO63C, OL63B, VL63A, WA63C, AM64, BA64V, FR64D, GR64C, MA64HH,...

  18. A=6He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model Calculations: (1979SH1C, 1980FI1D, 1981KU13,...

  19. A=07Be (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See (FR57, PH60A, SH60C, TA60L, KU61E, TA61G, TO61B, GL62A, IN62, AR64D, BA64I, GR64C, HO64D, LI64G, MO64F, NE64D, PA64N, PH64,...

  20. A=12B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12B) GENERAL: See Table 12.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). See (KU56, FL59A, TA60L, RE63, RU63A, MA64B, NA64D, ST64, UB65B, MA66S,...

  1. A=13C (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See Table 13.4 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(BR59M, PH60A, TA60L, ZE60, BA61L, BA61N, KU61A,...

  2. A=7Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li) GENERAL: See also (66LA04) and Table 7.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KO61L, CO65I, KU65D, VO65A, BA66T, HA66F, WI66E, BO67R, BO67V, CO67M, FA67A,...

  3. A=7Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1983BU1B, 1983KU17, 1983SH1D, 1983VA31, 1984CH24, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06,...

  4. A=6Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SU70C, ZO70, CO71J, JA71D, LO71, NO71C, LE72, LO72M, VE72E, HA73M, JO73D, KU73D). Cluster and -particle model: (NE65E, HA66C, AL67C, BA67DD, HA67H, LO67B, SI67D, TH67E,...

  5. A=9Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (1975KU27, 1975SC1K, 1977CA08, 1977JA14, 1978BO31). and cluster models: (1974CH19, 1974GR42, 1974PA1B, 1975AB1E, 1975CH28, 1975KR1D, 1975RO1B,...

  6. A=17O (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1973KU04, 1973LA1D, 1973RE17, 1973SM1C, 1974LO04, 1974RI09, 1976PO01). Collective and cluster models: (1969FE1A, 1971AR1R, 1972LE1L, 1972NE1B). Special levels: (1968KA1C,...

  7. A=18F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978PI1E, 1978SA15,...

  8. A=18O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1979WU06, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982OL01). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978CH26, 1978PI1E,...

  9. A=19O (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EL68, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, MO68A, FE69C, HO69U, KU69G, MA69N, TA70H, AR71L, WI71B). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (CH63A, FE65B, FE69C). Astrophysical questions:...

  10. A=10B (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deformed models: (1978FU13, 1979FL06, 1979KU05, 1980NI1F, 1981BO1Y, 1981DE2G, 1982BA52). Cluster and -particle models: (1979AD1A, 1980FU1G, 1980NI1F, 1980OK1B, 1981KR1J,...

  11. A=8Be (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8Be*(16.63) is very low: 5% compared to 8Be*(16.91) as expected by predictions of the cluster model (MA66B: Ep 40.8 MeV). See also (KU67C) and reaction 21 in 9Be in (66LA04)....

  12. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  13. A=5Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n)4He is very close. See also (KU55B, BO57G, BR57E). Above Ed 3.71 MeV, deuteron breakup (reaction (b)) is observed (HE55D). 4. 3He(d, d)3He Eb 16.555 Differential cross...

  14. A=15O (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a similar experiment, excitations of 5.185 and 5.244 MeV are reported (K.W. Allen, R. Middleton and S. Hinds, private communication). See also (PO52B, KU53A). 22. 17O(p, t)15O Qm ...

  15. 2011-2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K yle R enshaw ( Forrest) February 6 2:30pm GG Brown 2315 Brian R oberts ( Ku) a nd S haohui Z heng ( Dunietz) February 2 0 2:30pm GG Brown 2315 Hossein H ashemi ( Kieffer) a nd X ...

  16. Co-production of decarbonized synfuels and electricity from coal + biomass with CO{sub 2} capture and storage: an Illinois case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Larson; Giulia Fiorese; Guangjian Liu; Robert H. Williams; Thomas G. Kreutz; Stefano Consonni

    2010-07-01

    Energy, carbon, and economic performances are estimated for facilities co-producing Fischer-Tropsch Liquid (FTL) fuels and electricity from a co-feed of biomass and coal in Illinois, with capture and storage of by-product CO{sub 2}. The estimates include detailed modeling of supply systems for corn stover or mixed prairie grasses (MPG) and of feedstock conversion facilities. Biomass feedstock costs in Illinois (delivered at a rate of one million tonnes per year, dry basis) are $ 3.8/GJ{sub HHV} for corn stover and $ 7.2/GJ{sub HHV} for MPG. Under a strong carbon mitigation policy, the economics of co-producing low-carbon fuels and electricity from a co-feed of biomass and coal in Illinois are promising. An extrapolation to the United States of the results for Illinois suggests that nationally significant amounts of low-carbon fuels and electricity could be produced this way.

  17. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBtu) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBtu) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 Btu/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollowcore floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  18. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test of an Improved Convection Scheme in the National Centers for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) G.J. Zhang Scripps Institution of Oceanography/Center for Atmospheric Sciences La Jolla, California Introduction One of the major scientific objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to use observations to improve convection and cloud parameterizations in global climate models for use in climate and climate change predictions. In our previous

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications of the Aerosonde at NSA Curry, J.A. and Holland, G.J., University of Colorado Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The first ARM Aerosonde flights at Barrow in April 1999 were not successful owing to the aircraft's inability to fly under severe icing conditions. However, we were sufficiently encouraged by these initial flights to pursue further developments to make feasible Aerosonde flights in the Arctic. NSF has funded a major project to establish

  1. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 168 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability

  2. Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Authors: Flynn, G.J. ; Borg, J. ; Bleuet, P. ; Brenker , F. ; Brennan, S. ; Daghlian, C. ; Djouadi, Z. [1] ; ESRF) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (SUNYP) ( Publication Date: 2016-01-15 OSTI Identifier: 1235455 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Lunar and Plnetary Science XXXVII;March

  3. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 160 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability

  4. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 115 Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

  5. shippip.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6-TAR MAC-GWSHP 7.1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ8733 Public Involvement Plan for the Shiprock UMTRA Site Page ii Contents Regulatory

  6. shprkEA.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EA-1388 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Site September 2001 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations

  7. Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Durango, Colorado,UMTRA Project Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site February 2008 This page intentionally left blank U0165200 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site February 2008 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left

  8. Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11900 DOE/EA-1399 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87355 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison Site July 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations

  9. Microsoft Word - U0163300.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EA-1458 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations

  10. Microsoft Word - U0179700.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    700 DOE/EA-1466 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita Site April 2003 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations

  11. Microsoft Word - U01866.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    186600 GJO-2003-489-TAC GJO-GWDUR 2.0 UMTRA Ground Water Project Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Document Number U0186600 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Verification Monitoring Report-Durango, Colorado September 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0

  12. U0174100.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4100 DOE/EA-1452 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final November 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junctio n, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango Site November 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations

  13. gjpip.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWGRJ 7.1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) July 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ8733 Public Involvement Plan July 1999 Page 1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction,

  14. u0052100_Beav.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    312 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive

  15. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook COunty, Illinois

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number S00218 DOE/Grand Junction Office Site A/Plot M LTSP September 1999 Page iii Contents 1.0

  16. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling and Analysis Plan for Radon and Direct Gamma Radiation at the Shiprock, NM Disposal Site Prepared by MACTEC-ERS Grand Junction, Colorado Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office 2597 B 314 Road Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Contents 1.0Introduction ............................................................... 1 1.1 Location ............................................................... 1

  17. Microsoft Word - Q00336-Sept- 2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    652 U.S. Department of Energy Remedial Action Report for the Interim Remedial Action Record of Decision Operable Unit III, Surface Water and Ground Water Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site, Monticello, Utah EPA CERCLIS Identification Number UT 3890090035 September 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy

  18. Microsoft Word - S03840_MNT ZVI Treat Cells_Feb08.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells January 2008 DOE LM/1560 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008-01 - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental

  19. Microsoft Word - TR12-14.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1399 2006 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2006 Annual

  20. Microsoft Word - e0399102.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED E0399101 GJO-2003-493-TAC MNT 015.20 REV. 06 Copy No. ______ Draft-Final Monticello Site Management Plan October 2003 UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED Contents October 2003 Site Management Plan Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations

  1. Microsoft Word - s0070700.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report Second Five-Year Review Report for Monticello Mill Tailings (U.S. Department of Energy) City of Monticello San Juan County, Utah June 2002 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved forpvbJic release; dislribution is unlimifed. DOE/Grand Junction Office Second Five-Year Report for MMTS June 2002 Page ii Five-Year Review Report Table of Contents List of Acronyms

  2. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  3. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy GJO-99-96-TAR Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance and Risk June 1999 DOE Grand Junction Office June 1999 Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell Page iii Contents Page Executive Summary

  4. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    458 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pinellas Plant General Electric Co -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FL 07 Pinellas Plant General Electric Co - FL 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pinellas Plant General Electric Co. (FL.07) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Pinellas, Florida, Site Documents Related to Pinellas Plant General Electric Co. Building 100 Area Corrective Measures Study Report Addendum; DOE-LM/GJ1241-2006;

  6. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-082\PIP2FCT.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWFCT 11.6.2 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Falls City, Texas November 1997 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, L.L.C. Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance

  7. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell Wellpinit, Washington February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 01-06 Document Number S00204 DOE/Grand Junction Office Sherwood LTSP February 2001 Page iii Contents 1.0

  8. Microsoft Word - N0071400-sitewide Oct to Dec.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center October Through December 2003 January 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management

  9. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    293-2006 Office of Legacy Management 2006 Avian Wetland Surveys Monticello Mill Tailings Site September 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Avian Wetland Surveys at MMTS-2006 September 2006 Doc. No. S0255600 Page iii Contents Summary

  10. DISCLAIMER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOEIEA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site Draft September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number UW69700 This Page Intentionally Blank Contents Page . . ................................... ................................................................ Acronyms

  11. DOE/EA-1261 Rev.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13 -96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE Grand Junction Office Page iii EA of Ground Water Compliance at Riverton Final September 1998 Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . .

  12. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-075\U0027603.WP6

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site December 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0027603 DOE Grand Junction Office Page iii EA of Ground Water Compliance at Tuba City December 1998 Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\mvsowp\MONPIP.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site July 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Monument Valley UMTRA Site Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA)

  14. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE- SUBJECT:' g 1, .,;,A 5 ti ~I' ow, Y. ; + SITE NAME: CITY: ---@h---f&- -________ STATE: -' -;L- 9kE%;f' 4N; -' . PlrrrGj current: ------------------------ ------------- Owner contacted 0' yes if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ---_----------_-- q Research & Development .o Production scale testing a Pilot scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Thearetical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis IJ Production Cl Disposal/Storage Q Prime 0 Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0

  15. Microsoft Word - N0071600-NAPL-Oct to Dec.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report October Through December 2003 January 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management N0071600

  16. Microsoft Word - S01382_September2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S0138200 Verification Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRCA Title I Processing Site September 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Verification Monitoring Report-Gunnison, Colorado September 2004 Doc. No. S0138200 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations

  17. Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    k-& +gj ~--%- Washington, DC 20545 Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Installations Pentagon Washington, D.C. 20301 Dear Mr. Schafer: As you know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing, a program to identify sites that may be radiologically contaminated as a result of.DOE predecessor operations and to correct any problems associated with this contamination if there is DOE authori,ty to do so. Reviews of

  18. Supplemental Modeling and Analysis Report, Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterly, CE

    2001-11-05

    The purpose of this report is to provide additional numerical modeling and data evaluation for the Atlas tailings pile near Moab, Utah. A previous report (Tailings Pile Seepage Model: The Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah, January 9, 1998) prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Grand Junction (ORNL/GJ) presented the results of steady-state modeling of water flow and subsequent discharge to the underlying groundwater system. At the request of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), this model was expanded to evaluate the impact of drainage from the tailings pile in addition to recharge from precipitation in a transient mode simulation. In addition, the FWS requested transient simulations of contaminant transport in the alluvial aquifer. Subsequently, NRC requested an evaluation of additional hydrologic issues related to the results presented in the Tailings Pile Seepage Model (ORNL/GJ 1998a) and the Limited Groundwater Investigation (ORNL/GJ 1998b). Funding for the report was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy. The following section lists the individual tasks with subsequent sections providing the results. A map for the Atlas Moab Mill site is presented in Fig. 1.1.

  19. A=10Be (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10Be) GENERAL: See (KU56, FR57, BA59F, KU60A, TA60L, BA61N, TR61, BU63D, VL63A, WA63C, FR64D, GR64C, VO64C, WA64H, WA64K). See also Table 10.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 10Be(β-)10B Qm = 0.555 The weighted mean end-point energy is 0.556 ± 0.003 MeV (LI51A). The mean half life is (2.7 ± 0.4) x 106 y (HU49A): log ft = 13.65 (FE51B). The spectrum is of the D2 type (WU50). 2. (a) 7Li(t, α)6He Qm = 9.834 Eb = 17.250 (b) 7Li(t, 2n)8Be Qm =

  20. A=11B (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 11B) GENERAL: See also Table 11.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (KU56, KU57A, FR58B). 1. 7Li(α, γ)11B Qm = 8.670 Three resonances are reported below Eα = 2.5 MeV (BE51, HE54B): see Table 11.2 (in PDF or PS). Study of α-γ and γ-γ angular correlations, taken together with the relative γ-intensities, leads to the following assignments: 9.28 MeV level, J = 5/2+; 9.19 MeV, J = 5/2-; 8.93 MeV, J = 3/2 or 5/2; 6.81 MeV, J = 3/2-;

  1. A=11C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 11C) GENERAL: See also Table 11.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (KU56, KU57A, FR58B). 1. 11C(β+)11B Qm = 1.981 The spectrum is simple; Eβ+(max) = 968 ± 8 keV (WO54A). The mean of half-lives reported in (55AJ61) is 20.36 ± 0.05 min. Recent values of the half-lives are 20.26 ± 0.1 min (BA55E), 20.8 ± 0.2 min (PR57B) and 20.11 ± 0.13 min (AR58); log ft = 3.62 (WO54A). The ratio of K-capture to positron emission is 0.19 ± 0.03

  2. A=15O (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See Table 15.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(TA60H, TA60L, CO63B, KU63I, AL64P, AM64, BR64Z, RI64B, CO65I, GI65D, GR65E, GU65A, HU65D, BO66J, EL66B, RI66G, SO66A, BO67B, EL67C, DE68K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WO68D, ZH68, ZU68, DE69M, EL69B, GU69, SA69). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, FA67A, NE67B, BI68C). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, PO66F, RO66C, WA66D, KU67J, PO67G, WA67I, BI68C,

  3. A=17F (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    71AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 17F) GENERAL: See also Table 17.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (WI57H, TA60L, BH62, TA62F, KU63I, LE65G, MA65J, DE66M, MA66BB, SO66A, EL67C, BI68A, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, EL69B, KU69G, MA69U, WA70A). Collective model: (FA59E, RA60B, AR62C, MA62J, MA62O, BA64AA, BI68A, MA68DD, MA69U). Electromagnetic transitions: (BA59M, FA59E, RA60B, BA64AA, GR65E, KA65F, MA66BB, KA67J, KH69, MA69U, EL70D, GO70D, SI70B). Special levels: (EV60A, WI61,

  4. A=20F (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See Table 20.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(BR59M, KU63F, MO64M, DE65B, DE65Q, CH66H, PI66A, BO67K, GU67, GU67A, AR68C, CO68L, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, HO69U, AN70G, BA70DD, AR71L, JO71, WI71B). Other theoretical calculations:(ST67G, CE68A, DW68, SC69F, LE71I, TE71B). General experimental work:(FA70, AR71). Ground state: μ = +2.0935 ± 0.009 nm (GU67D; see also (TS63, FU69E). See also (KU63F, LI64H, ST64, SH67N,

  5. A=8Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8Li (59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 8Li) GENERAL: See also Table 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (LA55A, KU56, FR57, KU57). 1. 8Li(β-)8Be Qm = 16.001 The weighted mean of half-lives reported in (55AJ61) is 0.848 ± 0.004 sec. A value of 0.873 ± 0.013 sec is given by (VE58A). See also (IM58). The decay is complex: see 8Be. 2. 6Li(t, p)8Li Qm = 0.803 Q0 = 0.790 ± 0.011 (AL54E). The ground state reaction has been observed by (MO52, PE52, AL54E, CU55B). (CU55B)

  6. Risk Analysis and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: A Strategy and its

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Applications | Department of Energy Analysis and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: A Strategy and its Applications Risk Analysis and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: A Strategy and its Applications Ming Ye (mye@fsu.edu) Florida State University Mary Hill (mchill@ku.edu) University of Kansas This research is supported by DOE Early Career Award: DE-SC0008272 Acknowledge the efforts of ISCMEM Working Group 2- Federal Scientists Working for Coordinated Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter

  7. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  8. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  9. Microsoft Word - MOU_UTokyo_LBNL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between The University of Tokyo, Information Technology Center and The University of California, as Management and Operating Contractor for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PREAMBLE This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by and between the University of Tokyo, Information Technology Center, hereafter "Todai", with a registered address at 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8658, Japan, and the University of California, as Management and

  10. Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Key understanding for modeling future fusion reactors such as ITER July 23, 2013 CHANG.JPG Flamelets or hot spots along the plasma edge (a) drive turbulence intensity (b), temperature intensity (c), and intrinsic torque (d) inward, converting heat into toroidal rotation. (S. Ku et al.) If humans could harness nuclear fusion, the process that powers stars like our sun, the

  11. Microsoft Word - orf2.doc

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    Structural Basis for the Promiscuous Biosynthetic Prenylation of Aromatic Natural Products Tomohisa Kuzuyama 1,2 , Joseph P. Noel 1 & Stéphane B. Richard 1 1 Jack Skirball Chemical Biology and Proteomics Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. 2 Laboratory of Cell Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan Prenylation is a general term for

  12. wkpd080.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Properties of High ~, Quasi-Axisymmetric NCSX Stellarator Contlgurations L. P. Ku, G. Y. Fu, D. Monticello, A. Reiman Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, NJ 08543 A. Boozer Columbia University New, York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT Quasi-axisy~etry, external kinks and ballooning stability are studied wi~hrespect to the plasma shaping and variation in the pressure and current profiles for NCSX. We show that while the kink stability may require a delicate boundary shaping, most quasi- axisymmetry

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6 Mary Hill & Ming Ye

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Analysis and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty: A Strategy and its Applications Ming Ye (mye@fsu.edu) Florida State University Mary Hill (mchill@ku.edu) University of Kansas 1 This research is supported by DOE Early Career Award: DE-SC0008272 Acknowledge the efforts of ISCMEM Working Group 2- Federal Scientists Working for Coordinated Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation Since 2002 Learning from the NAS workshop * Anna Willett, director of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory

  14. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Section 40

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Modeling the Surface Energy Balance and Soil Moisture at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed in the U.S. Southern Great Plains J.C. Liljegren, J.C. Doran, J.M. Hubbe, W.J. Shaw, S. Zhong Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 G.J. Collatz National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland D.R. Cook, R.L. Hart Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction We have applied the Simple

  16. 2010-2011 Section V: Superconducting Cyclotron, Instrumentation, and RIB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, and F.P. Abegglen Texas A&M cyclotron radiation effects facility April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012 H.L. Clark, J. Brinkley, G. Chubarian, V. Horvat, B. Hyman, B. Roeder and G. Tabacaru Cyclotron computing R. Burch and K. Hagel Cyclotron Institute upgrade project H.L. Clark, F. Abegglen, G. Chubarian, G. Derrig, G. Kim, D. May, and G. Tabacaru The charge breeding ECR ion source at the Cyclotron Institute G. Tabacaru and D.P. May Radiation monitor data

  17. Research Highlight

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    Improving Entrainment Rate Parameterization Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, GJ Zhang, X Wu, S Endo, L Cao, Y Li, and X Guo. 2016. "Improving parameterization of entrainment rate for shallow convection with aircraft measurements and large-eddy simulations." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 73(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-15-0050.1. Relationships

  18. JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research-

  19. United States Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    .. a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and

  20. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information 5 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry]; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] (1995) 134 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 114

  1. U0083900.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2002-304-TAR MAC-GWTUB 11.11.2 Plan for Injection of Treated Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site March 2002 Prepared by U. S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0023-17-000 Document Number U0083900 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0083900 DOE/Grand Junction Office Plan for Injection of Treated Ground Water at the Tuba City UMTRA Site March 2002 Page 1 Introduction This plan

  2. piptub.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWTUB 7.1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site May 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 DOE Grand Junction Office Page 1 Public Involvement Plan for Tuba City, Arizona May 1998 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City,

  3. Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project

  4. Microsoft Word - Appendix F - Erosion Control Plan for COU.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Erosion Control Plan for Rocky Flats Property Central Operable Unit This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1497-2007 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Erosion Control Plan for Rocky Flats Property Central Operable Unit July 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado End of current text Contents 1.0 Introduction

  5. Microsoft Word - New Rifle EA.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE/EA-1406 Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site July 2003 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U01341 DOE/EA-1406 Rev. 0 Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site July 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado

  6. Microsoft Word - RIN07050889_ DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    512 2007 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 May 2007 Ground Water and Surface Water Sampling at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites August 2007 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2007, Durango, Colorado, Disposal and

  7. Microsoft Word - S00416.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Management Plan for the Salt Lake City, Utah, (UMTRCA Title I) Processing Site September 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1541 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1541-2007 Office of

  8. Microsoft Word - S01394_PRB_ZVI.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJ719-2004 ESL-RPT-2004-06 Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site September 2004 Prepared by Environmental Sciences Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally blank Signature Page Document Number S0139400 PRB Using Granular ZVI-2004 Annual Report U.S. Department of Energy Page iv September 2004 End of current text Document Number S0139400 Contents U.S.

  9. Microsoft Word - S0191800 - Gunnison Verification Monitoring Report 0906.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1305-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy S0191800 DOE-LM/1305-2006 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2006 Work Performed by S.M.

  10. Microsoft Word - S0255900.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1301-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1301-2006 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site

  11. Microsoft Word - S0350400_2007VMR.doc

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    7 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1525 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1525-2007 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site October 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller

  12. Microsoft Word - S03651

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1524 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1524-2007 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2007 Work Performed by S.M.

  13. Microsoft Word - contents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January

  14. Microsoft Word - cover.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1999-90-TAR MAC-GWGRJ 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 2001 GJO-1999-90-TAR MAC-GWGRJ 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0008-09-000 Document Number U0050100 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0050100 Contents DOE/Grand

  15. Public Involvment Plan - Rifle, Colorado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4-TAR MAC-GWRIF 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New and Old Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Sites May 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Rifle UMTRA Sites Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action

  16. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001 (GJO-2002-341-FOS)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2-341-FOS Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-96GJ87460 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. July 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001 GJO-2002-341-FOS U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001 July 2002 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Idaho Operations Office Prepared by WASTREN, Inc.

  17. U01024.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-214-TAR MAC-GWGUN 1.1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site March 2001 GJO-2001-214-TAR MAC-GWGUN 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site March 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0010-02-000 Document Number U01024 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U01024

  18. u42501.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    88-TAR Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Old Rifle Site August 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-06-000 Document Number U0042501 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0042501 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado August 1999 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and

  19. G JO-2001-283-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JO-2001-283-TAR MAGLREP 6.3.1-4 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2001 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites January 2002 Work Performed Under DOE Conlracf No. DE-AC1+96GJ87335 for Ule U.S. Approwd for public release; dislrihution is unlimited. ~ ..~... ~.~ . ..., . . . This file contains inspection data for the Shiprock Site only. MAC-LREP 6 . 3 . 1 4 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2001

  20. GJO-2000-163-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    63-TAR MAC-MSG 2.2.5 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I l l Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999 - July 2000 September 2000 Work Performed Under DOE Conlracl No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Departmenf of Energy Approved lorpublic release; dislribullon is unlimiled. MAC-MSG 2.2.5 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operabig Unit 1 1 1 Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000 September 2000 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office

  1. GJO-2000-183-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    83-TAR LREP 6.1.13 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2000 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites January 200 1 Work Performed Under DOE Conlnccf Na DE-AC13-96GJ87335 lor Uw U.S. Deparlmenf of Energ) Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. , . This file contains inspection data for the Shiprock Site only. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2000 Annual Site Inspection and

  2. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Burrell Vicinity Property, Blairsville, Pennsylvania, GJO-2002-331-TAR, MAC-LBUR 1.1, Revised April 2000

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Burrell Vicinity Property Blairsville, Pennsylvania April 2000 Revised This document supersedes document number UMTRA-DOE/AL/62350-3F Ver.2, Rev.2 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 00-06 Document Number S00350 DOE/Grand Junction Office LTSP for Burrell April

  3. MAC-GWHAT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWHAT 1.1 Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0014-03-000 Document Number U0026800 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0026800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for

  4. MAC-GWMON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWMON 1.1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Monument Valley, Arizona April 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0015-07-000 Document Number U0018101 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on which the section appears when viewing them in Adobe Acrobat. Document Number U0018101

  5. Microsoft Word - EA March 05.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 2005 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0069700 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Office of Legacy Management EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Site March 2005 Final Page iii

  6. Microsoft Word - RIN 06080459 DVP_112806.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    383 2006 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 September 2006 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2006 U.S. Department of Energy DVP-Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2006 RIN 06080459 Page ii Contents Sampling Event Summary

  7. Microsoft Word - RIN 06110582_DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    448 2007 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 December 2006, Monument Valley, Arizona This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP⎯December 2006, Monument Valley, Arizona March 2007 RIN 06110582 Page iii Contents Sampling Event Summary

  8. Microsoft Word - RIN 07081119 DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    85 2008 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 September 2007 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site January 2008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2007, Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

  9. Microsoft Word - S01065_Mod_Env_Mon_Program.doc

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    8-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Environmental Monitoring Program at Site A and Plot M, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois February 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management GJO-2004-558-TAC S01065 Office of Legacy

  10. Microsoft Word - S0221000_072606.doc

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    Soil and Ground Water Phytoremediation Pilot Studies at Monument Valley, Arizona 2005 Status Report July 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1254-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE LM/1254-2006 Soil

  11. Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc

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    312-2006 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Ground Water Report October 2005 through April 2006 September 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site OU III Annual Ground Water Report October 2005-April 2006 September 2006 Doc. No. S0245900 Page iii Contents 1.0

  12. Microsoft Word - S02808.doc

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    Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah November 2006 DOE-LM/1379-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-03 Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page

  13. Microsoft Word - S02996.doc

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    Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Update for 2006 March 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1442 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1442-2007 Verification Monitoring Report for the Riverton,

  14. Microsoft Word - S02997_mmts 2007.doc

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    Third Five-Year Review Report for Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site City of Monticello San Juan County, Utah June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1472 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy MMTS Third

  15. Microsoft Word - S0333300_2007Report_June07.doc

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    7 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1491 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1497-2007 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property June 2007 Work Performed

  16. Microsoft Word - S03347_final.doc

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    7 July 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1495 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1495-2007 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities

  17. Microsoft Word - S03368_PostClosure Unit 417

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    Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006 June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1488 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank

  18. Microsoft Word - S03535_Oct2007

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    Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1530 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1530-2007 Revision 3

  19. Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc

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    Site Operable Unit III Annual Ground Water Report October 2006 through April 2007 September 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1523 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1523-2007 Monticello Mill

  20. Microsoft Word - S03722_MonRpt_Jan08.doc

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    Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447 January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/1553-2008 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1553-2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area,

  1. Microsoft Word - S03729_Dec2007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1554 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1554-2007 2007 Annual Inspection of the

  2. Microsoft Word - TR01-18.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site January 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1425 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2006 Annual Inspection - Weldon Spring, Missouri January 2007 Page 1 2006 Annual

  3. Microsoft Word - TR12-17.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site December 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1561 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2007 Annual Inspection - Weldon Spring, Missouri December 2007 Page 1 2007 Annual

  4. Microsoft Word - U01804.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0400 GJO-2003-422-TAC GJO-GWTUB 30.13.2-2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation through August 2002 May 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0180400 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation May 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0

  5. Microsoft Word - U0184800-September 2003.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4800 GJO-2003-483-TAC GJO-GWTUB 30.13.2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation September 2002 through February 2003 September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0184800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation

  6. Microsoft Word - U01860_Feb to Aug 03.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 GJO-2003-490-TAC GJO-GWSHP 13.2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Semiannual Performance Report February 2003 through August 2003 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0186000 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Semi-Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico September 2003 Page

  7. Microsoft Word - U0186500.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    500 GJO-2003-487-TAC GJO-GWSHP 11.7 UMTRA Ground Water Project Wildlife Management Plan for the Evaporation Pond at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC-13-02GJ79491 Document Number U0186500 DOE/Grand Junction Office Wildlife Management PlanShiprock Evaporation Pond September 2003 Page 1 1.0 Introduction The Proposed Action in the Environmental

  8. Microsoft Word - U0192600_January 2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    92600 GJO-2004-550-TAC Tuba City, Arizona, Land Management Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation March 2003 through August 2003 January 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0192600 Contents DOE/Office of Legacy Management Tuba City Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation January 2004 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction

  9. Microsoft Word - U0194500July2005.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4500 GJO-2004-579-TAC Office of Legacy Management Refinement of Conceptual Model and Recommendations for Improving Remediation Efficiency at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site July 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Conceptual Model Refinement and Efficiency Recommendations July 2005 Doc. No.

  10. Microsoft Word - U0195900.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site February 2004 GJO-2004-589-TAC ESL-RPT-2004-02 ESL-RPT-2004-02 U0195900 Office of Legacy Management Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site February 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number U0195900 Contents DOE/Office of Legacy

  11. Microsoft Word - U0197300.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site March 2004 GJO-2004-591-TAC ESL-RPT-2004-03 ESL-RPT-2004-03 U0197300 Office of Legacy Management Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site March 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Signature Page Document Number U0197300 Analysis of MSE Cores DOE/Office of Legacy Management Page iv March 2004 End of current text

  12. Microsoft Word - toc.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    y Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Monticello NPL Sites Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1465 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Copy No. _______ Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

  13. Microsoft Word - u01493_July2002.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    97-TAR MAC-GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 U0149300 GJO-2001-297-TAR GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0149300 Contents DOE/Grand Junction

  14. Mon Valley work plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWSHP 1.8 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Work Plan for Characterization Activities at the Shiprock UMTRA Project Site June 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number UGW-511-0020-01-000 Document Number U0013400 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on which the section appears when viewing them in

  15. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1 Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC1342GJ79491 DOE Task Order No. ST03-205 Document N u m b e r Q0029500 S i g t ~ a t u r e Page Signature Page Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendud Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Submitted By: Arthur W. Kleinrath, Project

  16. Monument Valley Phytoremediation Pilot Study:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1.8 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Monument Valley Ground Water Remediation Work Plan: Native Plant Farming and Phytoremediation Pilot Study August 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0015-10-000 Document Number U0029501 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page

  17. Mound, Ohio, Second Five-Year Review

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report Second Five-Year Review for the Mound, Ohio, Site Miamisburg, Ohio September 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1308-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Mound, Ohio, Second Five-Year Review September 2006

  18. PNWD

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - - - - - -- - - - -- -- -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- - - -- - --, PNWD -3802 Battelle 71u! Business a/Innovation Monticello Mill Ta:i.lings Site Macroinvertebrate Sampling for 2006 A.L. Bunn R.P. Mueller CA. Duberstein J.M. Brandenberger February 2007 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Ene rgy under Con tract DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DI SCLAIM ER This report was prepared as an account of wo rk spo nso red by an agency of th e United States Go vernment. N either th e United States G

  19. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated by Battelle for the U .S. D ep artm ent of Energy PNWD-3914 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Macroinvertebrate Sampling for 2007 A.L. Bunn R.P. Mueller J.M. Brandenberger D .M. Wellman February 2008 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DISCLAIMER This repon was prepared as an accoun t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereo f, no r

  20. Project Plan: Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, Piqua, Ohio, April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999).

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility Piqua, Ohio April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999) Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number LTS-111-0027-00-000 Document Number S0007600 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-06 This page

  1. Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New Mexico - February 2002. GJO-2001-276-TAR. MAC-GWSHP 13.3-1.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-276-TAR MAC-GWSHP13.3-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Results of A Piezocone Investigation Shiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0020-28-003 Document Number U0145400 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0145400 DOE/Grand Junction Office Results of A Piezocone InvestigationShiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Page 2 Executive Summary A piezocone

  2. . UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    YVE r 1Lcla (8.8gJ EFG (07.90) (3f1 , q q - z . UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO A?TN OF: SUBJECT: TO: =.--. AUG12 1991 EM-421 (J. Wagoner, 3-8147) Elimination of the Processes Research, Inc. Site The File I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the Processes Research, Inc. Site in Cincinnati, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Processes Research,

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7' )J i b' ' -* . * 1 **-p-d ra . - .., -. -. -. ,- ? i. (, . . . . . ..* . s ,' ;. .-, jd .: ,... ',_ .<'t ':<';. ::-,' -. i y,- , . ,,- ., I ..d . c ~~; ZC ANT %C -~j~~~i-: ~~~~~s~~ !~~~,KS b ~' ,cc,!~~,L' ~~~ N,~,' , ?:;c,:g iz c:~~-&y~ 30 .-.;;.z-' ::; ggf~g.piJ\ ,I..? , .7* -26 g z -_ I . f ;' ., :dy~gj-";:, ;:.:1; : -;; ;-+,,: -. 1; .- . . c J " y&=;@ F / tEfW?& FUS ' *Lx5 ms .xm I? ,ziic%*~g~J&a~ yF.n?-m- - - me rsaa.jxig q 1, c P 32 h qpg?~Io2 m

  4. Working Together to Reduce Our Environmental Footprint

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MONDAY April 13 - TUESDAY April 21 All Day * Earth Day Displays * Forrestal First Floor, Ground Floor, & DOE Cafeteria MONDAY APRIL 20 11:00 A.M. - 2:30 P.M. * Environmental Film Series * Forrestal Small Auditorium GJ-015 See two excellent films related to reducing our carbon footprint and evaluating the environmental consequences of some of the products we use on a regular basis. 11:00-12:30 Tapped 1:00-2:30 Bag It TUESDAY April 21 12:00 P.M. - 1:00 P.M. * Green Tips for the Home Workshop *

  5. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGUtiTORY COMMISSION REGION I C31 PARK AVENUE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REGUtiTORY COMMISSION REGION I C31 PARK AVENUE KlNt OF PRUSSIC. PENNSYLVANIA 1P4D6 z,: P -. : _ &J L . . : ; .; 3 Do:ket No. 40-2286 Westinqhouse Electric Company Lamp D1vis-i ons KTm : Mr. 8. Rourke Operations Manager 1 &stinghouse Plaza Bioomfield, New Jersey 07003 Gentlemen: Subject: Inspection 8E01 . ' 2 7 -7 CE r:.. gj a h = 3 Y -;3 -a. D- r0 kc - . I g. r-- I- ; 3.. rr z -. --V, --..I . .e. ! ,: ." 1; .,' < -- 'I c This refers February il to the inspection conducted by Mr.

  6. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EFS (07-W United States Government memorandukn Department of Energy j ; I.-- ' -i;: /J DATE: j.gjG 2 9 1994 REPLY TO En-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) AlTN OF: h p)\;--/ ;,;' J ( SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Ur. Doug Tonkay and Us. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites,

  7. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-083\U00321.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    27 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground-Water Compliance at the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on

  8. Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1457 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank

  9. Microsoft Word - 4_5 acrejune-nov07.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2007 Through November 2007 December 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1563 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1563-2007 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center's

  10. Microsoft Word - dec-may07.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    December 2006 through May 2007 June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1493 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1493-2007 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report 4.5 Acre Site December 2006 through

  11. Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department

  12. Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center's 4.5 Acre Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    600 GJO-2003-410-TAC GJO-PIN 25.5.1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center's 4.5 Acre Site October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057600 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office 4.5 Acre Site Quarterly Progress Report January 2003 Page iii Contents

  13. Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center, October through December 2002

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7500 GJO-2003-409-TAC GJO-PIN 11.6.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057500 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January

  14. doe-lm-1419-2007.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Young Rainey STAR Center Wastewater Neutralization Area No Further Action With Controls Proposal March 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1419 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1419-2007

  15. n0053200-sitewide.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3200 GJO-PIN 11.6.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center April through June 2002 July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST02-107 Document Number N0053200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project July 2002 Page iii Contents Page

  16. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water at Monument Valley, Arizona, and Shiprock, New Mexico 2006 Status Report April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1428 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1428-2007 Natural and

  17. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300 GJO-2003-431-TAC GJO-GWSHP 13.2-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Baseline Performance Report for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0179300 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Baseline Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico September 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction

  18. Alternate Water Supply System, Riverton, WY, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water

  19. Community Relations Plan Update

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8-TAR MAC-MRAP 1.9.1 Monticello Mill Tailings Superfund Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties Superfund Site Monticello, Utah Community Relations Plan Update FY 2001 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy For more information or to request additional copies of this

  20. DOE-lM/G/1007-2005 Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lM/G/1007-2005 Office of I@~ Final Report 2005 Avian Wetland Surveys at the Mo nticello Mill Tailings Site Octobe r 2005 ~ ~~ Of ... Q . ~ \ ~ ~~ ~~~ Oit-* u.s. Departm ent of Energ y ~ (JjJ ~ flVj,.; 1.";~ :oJ I I [:oJ I n Work Performed Under DOE Contract No . DE-A C0 1- 02GJ7949 1 for the U.S. Depe rtmen t of Energy Office of Legacy Ma nagement. ApproVRd for public release; distribution Is unlimilp. d. DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products.

  1. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-055\U0027401.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9-TAR Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Site June 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0023-05-000 Document Number U0027401 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0027401 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Tuba City, Arizona June 1999 Page iii Contents Page 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-084\U0013801

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Riverton, Wyoming February 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0018-02-000 Document Number U0013801 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on which the section

  3. FIVE YEAR REVIEW - MONTICELLO RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED PROPERTIES - 06/11/2007

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Third Five-Year Review Report for Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Monticello, Utah San Juan County, Utah June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1473 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1473-2007 Five-Year Review

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#350832-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April-June_2006.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2006 July 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1253-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1253-2006 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project

  5. Microsoft Word - N0049800.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    49800 GJO-2002-306-TAR MAC-PIN 14.5.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project at the Young-Rainey STAR Center Building 100 Area Plume Control Technology Selection Report February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC02-10 This page intentionally left blank Document Number N0049800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Building 100 Area Plume Control Technology

  6. Microsoft Word - N00647-Enhanced Bioremediation-October 2003.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    N0064700 GJO-2003-495-TAC PIN 700.20.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Young - Rainey STAR Center Simulation of Enhanced Bioremediation at the Building 100 Area October 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Document Number N0064700 Contents U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction Simulation of Enhanced Bioremediation at the Building 100 Area October 2003 Page ii Contents 1.0 Introduction

  7. Microsoft Word - S0079000.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    85-2005 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site July 2005 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site July 2005 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy

  8. Microsoft Word - S03307_2007 report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water Report April 2006 through March 2007 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site August 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/ 2007 - -L 1519 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1519-2006 Annual Ground

  9. Microsoft Word - n0045000.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pinellas STAR Center Building 100 Area Remediation Technology Screening Report August 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number PIN-041-0004-04-000 Document Number N0045000 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC01-10 This page intentionally left blank Document Number N0045000 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Building 100 Area Remediation Technology Screening Report August 2001 Page iii

  10. N0057000.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    000 GJO- 2002-380- TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report July through September 2002 October 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057000 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report October 2002 Page

  11. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April Through June 2003 July 2003 N0063400 GJO- 2003- 467- TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures

  12. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057700 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report January 2003 Page

  13. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report-January through March 2003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January through March 2003 Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April 2003 Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N0060900 GJO-2003-434-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids

  14. DOE/EA-1535; Uranium Leasing Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment July 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE/EA 1535 - Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1535 Uranium Leasing Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment July 2007 U.S. Department of

  15. A Close in Place Option for Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site - 8210 G.J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell National Security Technologies, LLC P.O. Box 98521, Las Vegas, NV 89193 Sponsored by: G. Pyles, J. Carilli U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193 ABSTRACT In 1986, 21 m 3 of transuranic (TRU) waste was

  16. Ligncellulosic feedstock supply systems with intermodal and overseas transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ric Hoefnagels; Kara Cafferty; Erin Searcy; Jacob J. Jacobson; Martin Junginger; Thijs Cornelissen; Andre Faaij

    2014-12-01

    With growing demand for biomass from industrial uses and international trade, the logistic operations required to economically move the biomass from the field or forest to the end users have become increasingly complex. In addition to economics, understanding energy and GHG emissions is required to design cost effective, sustainable logistic process operations; in order to improve international supply chains it is also important to understate their interdependencies and related uncertainties. This article presents an approach to assess lignocellulosic feedstock supply systems at the operational level. For this purpose, the Biomass Logistic Model (BLM) has been linked with the Geographic Information Systems based Biomass Intermodal Transportation model (BIT-UU) and extended with inter-continental transport routes. Case studies of herbaceous and woody biomass, produced in the U.S. Midwest and U.S. Southeast, respectively, and shipped to Europe for conversion to Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel are included to demonstrate how intermodal transportation and, in particular, overseas shipping integrates with the bioenergy supply chains. For the cases demonstrated, biomass can be supplied at 99 Mg-1 to 117 Mg-1 (dry) and converted to FT-diesel at 19 GJ-1 to 24 GJ-1 depending on the feedstock type and location, intermediate (chips or pellets) and size of the FT-diesel production plant. With the flexibility to change the design of supply chains as well as input variables, many alternative supply chain cases can be assessed.

  17. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  18. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed.

  19. A=18Ne (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1959AJ76) (Not illustrated) Theory: See (RA57). 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.227 The maximum energy of the positrons is 3.2 ± 0.2 MeV, the half-life is 1.6 ± 0.2 sec: log ft = 2.9 ± 0.2 (GO54D). See also (DZ56). 2. 16O(3He, n)18Ne Qm = -2.966 See (KU53A). 3. 19F(p, 2n)18Ne Qm = -15.424 See (GO54D). 4. 20Ne(p, t)18Ne Qm = -19.812 Not reported

  20. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9 PPPL- 4589 Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators January, 2011 G.H. Neilson, L. Bromberg, T.G. Brown, D.A. Gates, L.P. Ku, M.C. Zarnstorff, A.H. Boozer, J.H. Harris, O. Meneghini, H.E. Mynick, N. Pomphrey, A.H. Reiman and P. Xanthopoulos Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

  1. Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as seen via

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    inelastic neutron scattering (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as seen via inelastic neutron scattering « Prev Next » Title: Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as seen via inelastic neutron scattering Authors: Xu, Zhijun ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Guangyong ; Chi, Songxue ; Ku, Wei ; Gu, Genda ; Tranquada, J. M. Publication Date: 2011-08-11 OSTI Identifier: 1100533 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  2. Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 « Prev Next » Title: Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 Authors: Luo, Qinlong ; Nicholson, Andrew ; Rincón, Julián ; Liang, Shuhua ; Riera, José ; Alvarez, Gonzalo ; Wang, Limin ; Ku, Wei ; Samolyuk, German D. ; Moreo, Adriana ; Dagotto, Elbio Publication Date: 2013-01-08 OSTI Identifier: 1101865 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  3. All-dielectric three-dimensional broadband Eaton lens with large refractive index range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Ming; Yong Tian, Xiao, E-mail: leoxyt@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ling Wu, Ling; Chen Li, Di [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-03-03

    We proposed a method to realize three-dimensional (3D) gradient index (GRIN) devices requiring large refractive index (RI) range with broadband performance. By combining non-resonant GRIN woodpile photonic crystals structure in the metamaterial regime with a compound liquid medium, a wide RI range (16.32) was fulfilled flexibly. As a proof-of-principle for the low-loss and non-dispersive method, a 3D Eaton lens was designed and fabricated based on 3D printing process. Full-wave simulation and experiment validated its omnidirectional wave bending effects in a broad bandwidth covering Ku band (12?GHz18?GHz)

  4. Winter 2014 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 10:30---11:30am February 12 POD room Sung Joo Kim (Pan) March 19 POD room Matt DeJarld (Millunchick) Alan Teran (Phillips) April 16 POD room Mike Abere (Yalisove) Brian Roberts (Ku) May 21 POD room Simon Huang (Goldman) Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis) Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected M ondays 10:00---11:00am February 3 267B West Hall Gunho Kim (Pipe) March 10 267B West Hall Wonho Jeong (Reddy) Youngsang Kim

  5. paper_r.dvi

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PPPL-3538 PPPL-3538 UC-70 Recent Advances in the Design of Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarator Plasma configurations by A. Reiman, L. Ku, D. Monticello, S. Hirschman, S. Hudson, C. Kessel, E. Lazarus, D. Mikkelsen, M. Zarnstorff, L.A. Berry, A. Boozer, A. Brooks, W.A. Cooper, M. Drevlak, E. Fredrickson, G. Fu, R. Goldston, R. Hatcher, M. Isaev, C. Jun, S. Knowlton, J. Lewandowski, Z. Lin,

  6. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    "U ,-r-r-r ..- - ku 117 Booker case Pilu Jtav. prot. Duror.0 -1.Y.S. Dupartaant of Lau lkw York, Icu rork I A. Pmduetlom klnion: 591 drmr of K-65 have been dumped into the lower aectlon otthe 0 toimr sina* the iwuption or operst1ona. making a tatal or 199e tom 6f slud@ mow stored therein. Irfteentona ot SSP 505Test Bonctor roda shippad rzy IPOC to Bridy"" Panas Corpsn~ to be cold dryprior to m.%hWng" e Mlaoellaneou~ rod shlplsnt.reremad.toBstbLaba-Stab Co-,

  7. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-10-28

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same direct relativistic mapping between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  8. EV-13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?a/71 2.z=' 1. lg EV-13 Notification of Xced for So!?e Form of Reoedial Action, in Ikyo Ca~;~op., Los Alanos, New Mexico s. lkycrs, HEI-90 4 EV/IXT has dctcrnincd that portions of Szyo Ca~yor? aztr contapAnat& vith radioactive residue as a result of activities conducteiI for the ku!hsttzi F r- sider this -n...lnecr I?istrict and ntornic Lncrg Cocaissio2. vc con- site to be low priority as potential e!xp,osw'c rates to the general putilic are relatively low under the p&en: Enclosed in

  9. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  10. A=12C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 12C) GENERAL: See also Table 12.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (FE55A, HE55F, CA56E, EL56, GL56A, HA56G, HA56H, KU56, MO56, NA56B, PE56A, RE56B, WI56K, BA57, BI57F, HE57B, KU57A, PA57A, RE57, SA57C, CA58C, FR58B). 1. 7Li(6Li, n)12C Qm = 20.931 See (NO57A). 2. (a) 9Be(3He, n)11C Qm = 7.565 Eb = 26.286 (b) 9Be(3He, p)11B Qm = 10.329 (c) 9Be(3He, α)8Be Qm = 18.911 (d) 9Be(3He, d)10B Qm = 1.093 The yields and angular distributions of

  11. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A 3.1 M{sub +} PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF THE NEARBY M3V STAR GLIESE 581

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, E. J.; Haghighipour, N.; Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael H.

    2010-11-01

    We present 11 years of HIRES precision radial velocities (RVs) of the nearby M3V star Gliese 581, combining our data set of 122 precision RVs with an existing published 4.3-year set of 119 HARPS precision RVs. The velocity set now indicates six companions in Keplerian motion around this star. Differential photometry indicates a likely stellar rotation period of {approx}94 days and reveals no significant periodic variability at any of the Keplerian periods, supporting planetary orbital motion as the cause of all the RV variations. The combined data set strongly confirms the 5.37-day, 12.9-day, 3.15-day, and 67-day planets previously announced by Bonfils et al., Udry et al., and Mayor et al.. The observations also indicate a fifth planet in the system, GJ 581f, a minimum-mass 7.0 M{sub +} planet orbiting in a 0.758 AU orbit of period 433 days, and a sixth planet, GJ 581g, a minimum-mass 3.1 M{sub +} planet orbiting at 0.146 AU with a period of 36.6 days. The estimated equilibrium temperature of GJ 581g is 228 K, placing it squarely in the middle of the habitable zone of the star and offering a very compelling case for a potentially habitable planet around a very nearby star. That a system harboring a potentially habitable planet has been found this nearby, and this soon in the relatively early history of precision RV surveys, indicates that {eta}{sub +}, the fraction of stars with potentially habitable planets, is likely to be substantial. This detection, coupled with statistics of the incompleteness of present-day precision RV surveys for volume-limited samples of stars in the immediate solar neighborhood, suggests that {eta}{sub +} could well be on the order of a few tens of percent. If the local stellar neighborhood is a representative sample of the galaxy as a whole, our Milky Way could be teeming with potentially habitable planets.

  12. The Magnetically Driven Direct Drive Approach to Ignition: Responses to Questions by Panel 1 of the FY15 ICF Program Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinars, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The long-term goal of the pulsed-power based, magnetically driven target approach is to achieve high singleshot yields (0.5-1 GJ per shot). This goal may take decades to achieve, but if successful we believe it would be a key capability for the Stockpile Stewardship program, as noted as far back as 1988 in the Laboratory Microfusion Capability Phase 1 (U) study. If this approach is successful, it may be possible to achieve these yields from targets absorbing up to 10 MJ in a laboratory pulsed power facility with a stored energy of roughly 130 MJ. Such a facility would be substantially cheaper, and not as complex, than the corresponding pulsed power facility required for producing comparable yields from x-ray driven capsule targets.

  13. First-cut design of an all-superconducting 100-T direct current magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu Hahn, Seungyong

    2013-12-16

    A 100-T magnetic field has heretofore been available only in pulse mode. This first-cut design demonstrates that a 100-T DC magnet (100?T) is possible. We base our design on: Gadolinium-based coated superconductor; a nested-coil formation, each a stack of double-pancake coils with the no-insulation technique; a band of high-strength steel over each coil; and a 12-T radial-field limit. The 100?T, a 20?mm cold bore, 6-m diameter, 17-m height, with a total of 12?500-km long superconductor, stores an energy of 122 GJ at its 4.2-K operating current of 2400?A. It requires a 4.2-K cooling power of 300?W.

  14. L-7 J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t *G.E; ?$UCLEONICS PROJECT r\ _- P s .- f t-h -_ r* 4 -_ :. i > \ ,' *< I 2 ;.:. - ' - - . i .;, L-7 J ti * _._ -4. _ - s. e_ ,.. -a,: -+ G ,' -x ' * .- I" g ;"_ Clrssification Cancaltd GJ5N l#AJAw.&* 1 \ : #XC J d.?;*c / fi,2,3,4 - F.C. S-chl-er, 1 Richla' nd, Washington ?ecember 15, 1948 By Authod&f u.....-... e -..I. :.,,..e u. 5. aomic J3.m~ coJnraission HanfomNper&ionOXfice ; Rich'frurd, u- A+tiion* ar, P; Ci S&m&, Panag;er - :, I, '/ ." .I: ., .; ~

  15. Surface-PlasmonoDielectric-polaritonic devices and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John; Soljacic, Marin

    2013-06-25

    There is provided a structure for supporting propagation of surface plasmon polaritons. The structure includes a plasmonic material region and a dielectric material region, disposed adjacent to a selected surface of the plasmonic material region. At least one of the plasmonic material region and the dielectric material region have a dielectric permittivity distribution that is specified as a function of depth through the corresponding material region. This dielectric permittivity distribution is selected to impose prespecified group velocities, v.sub.gj, on a dispersion relation for a surface polaritonic mode of the structure for at least one of a corresponding set of prespecified frequencies, .omega..sub.j, and corresponding set of prespecified wavevectors, where j=1 to N.

  16. FROM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :s. B. ' Brown S"BJJ=T:WIDEKLY IUSWiT ,BDR WBMlC BHDIBG WlLBcB 28, 1951 L:' -F k-2.M0 _ firlt, )fa~rQf ti' + " ' ; /=jo A?T?i id' ! CP~) ~c~cd.: &JL& c"/ . ,Q.~~,~~~.- GJ I; ' " ;?%lT Scrap RecoverJT Kellex wae requested to expand their inveatigation.of poaeible 7-7 ;. I i * meam for recoverfng uran' itlm from low-grade wastes and reeiduee to . include all reeiduee containing above about 0.1% U. S-lee were .- collected from the IOOU and Hairt eitsr for this research

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    (gj' z,r' I 3 CEISTRAL F;LES O+ 2g I y * ,;r" x(-J,, r;:, i, :*.s- > _ !, ;I'"( 1' . 5; y 0 $ 3 1 10 tiC0 P .' y lT<c -T;\$ ;,' f J j$ 9 c.j?)> <-.$--,r.:+s ; a 0 :.9fS .Yw (' t i 1 7, T :., r*> ;< ' , J;! P' ,.;,. y--T;' ; j;.z,,:;, I, -5 ' ir' Ab ,I,: ,;.,.&.. .*. -wrv . i -rs-ab"=-- . ' J.' & :,' JZFi> :;<; of% 1 .+ ,, .,i:.s this ~~3s tc ;rovi.tie IieGth ,mZ safety cover age &iX i?Jg 8 .I; 3 5 ,j of -'-?- ic ;: F?qi:>::J.iy; - .,.C +

  18. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up to 2.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF THERMAL EVOLUTION IN THE MAGNETIC PROTECTION OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Bustamante, Sebastian; Cuartas, Pablo A.; Hoyos, Jaime H. E-mail: sbustama@pegasus.udea.edu.co E-mail: jhhoyos@udem.edu.co

    2013-06-10

    Magnetic protection of potentially habitable planets plays a central role in determining their actual habitability and/or the chances of detecting atmospheric biosignatures. Here we develop a thermal evolution model of potentially habitable Earth-like planets and super-Earths (SEs). Using up-to-date dynamo-scaling laws, we predict the properties of core dynamo magnetic fields and study the influence of thermal evolution on their properties. The level of magnetic protection of tidally locked and unlocked planets is estimated by combining simplified models of the planetary magnetosphere and a phenomenological description of the stellar wind. Thermal evolution introduces a strong dependence of magnetic protection on planetary mass and rotation rate. Tidally locked terrestrial planets with an Earth-like composition would have early dayside magnetopause distances between 1.5 and 4.0 R{sub p} , larger than previously estimated. Unlocked planets with periods of rotation {approx}1 day are protected by magnetospheres extending between 3 and 8 R{sub p} . Our results are robust in comparison with variations in planetary bulk composition and uncertainties in other critical model parameters. For illustration purposes, the thermal evolution and magnetic protection of the potentially habitable SEs GL 581d, GJ 667Cc, and HD 40307g were also studied. Assuming an Earth-like composition, we found that the dynamos of these planets are already extinct or close to being shut down. While GL 581d is the best protected, the protection of HD 40307g cannot be reliably estimated. GJ 667Cc, even under optimistic conditions, seems to be severely exposed to the stellar wind, and, under the conditions of our model, has probably suffered massive atmospheric losses.

  20. A statistical analysis of seeds and other high-contrast exoplanet surveys: massive planets or low-mass brown dwarfs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Spiegel, David S.; McElwain, Michael W.; Grady, C. A.; Turner, Edwin L.; Mede, Kyle; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Brandner, W.; Feldt, M.; Wisniewski, John P.; Abe, L.; Biller, B.; Carson, J.; Currie, T.; Egner, S.; Golota, T.; Guyon, O.; Goto, M.; Hashimoto, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We conduct a statistical analysis of a combined sample of direct imaging data, totalling nearly 250 stars. The stars cover a wide range of ages and spectral types, and include five detections (? And b, two ?60 M {sub J} brown dwarf companions in the Pleiades, PZ Tel B, and CD35 2722B). For some analyses we add a currently unpublished set of SEEDS observations, including the detections GJ 504b and GJ 758B. We conduct a uniform, Bayesian analysis of all stellar ages using both membership in a kinematic moving group and activity/rotation age indicators. We then present a new statistical method for computing the likelihood of a substellar distribution function. By performing most of the integrals analytically, we achieve an enormous speedup over brute-force Monte Carlo. We use this method to place upper limits on the maximum semimajor axis of the distribution function derived from radial-velocity planets, finding model-dependent values of ?30-100 AU. Finally, we model the entire substellar sample, from massive brown dwarfs to a theoretically motivated cutoff at ?5 M {sub J}, with a single power-law distribution. We find that p(M, a)?M {sup 0.65} {sup } {sup 0.60} a {sup 0.85} {sup } {sup 0.39} (1? errors) provides an adequate fit to our data, with 1.0%-3.1% (68% confidence) of stars hosting 5-70 M {sub J} companions between 10 and 100 AU. This suggests that many of the directly imaged exoplanets known, including most (if not all) of the low-mass companions in our sample, formed by fragmentation in a cloud or disk, and represent the low-mass tail of the brown dwarfs.

  1. 11C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1940MO09, 1954WO23: 11C. 1941SM11: 11C; measured T1/2. 1941SO01: 11C; measured T1/2. 1944SI30: 11C; measured T1/2. 1951DI12: 11C; measured T1/2. 1953KU08: 11C; measured T1/2. 1955BA63: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957PR53: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957SC29, 1967CA09: 11C; measured K/β+. 1958AR15: 11C; measured T1/2. 1964KA31: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965PA10: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1969AW02: 11C;

  2. 11C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  3. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1994WR01 9Be(α, n): σ, thick target yield, deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.16 - 1.87 S(E) X4 01/24/2012 2011GI05 9Be(α, nγ): σ for n1 0.3 - 7.9 linear scale, log scale 06/18/2012 1968DA05 9Be(α, n): excitation function at θ = 0° 0.34 - 0.68 n0, n1 X4 07/19/2011 1994HA32 9Be(α, n): excitation function 480- 740 keV 1 01/24/2012 1994LE18 9Be(α, α): σ at θ = 170.5° 0.5- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1996KU07

  4. A=12B (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 12B) GENERAL: See also Table 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (KU56, FR58B). 1. 12B(β-)12C Qm = 13.376 The spectrum is complex: see 12C. The transition to 12Cg.s. is allowed; hence J(12B) = 1+. 2. 6Li(7Li, p)12B Qm = 8.338 Three groups of protons are reported, corresponding to the ground state and to the excited states at 0.95 and 1.67 MeV. At E(7Li) = 2.0 MeV, θ = 90° (lab), the relative intensities are 1 : 1.1 : 0.8 (NO57).

  5. A=12C (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 12.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1984CA1N, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1985AR07, 1985CA23, 1985KO2B, 1985MI23, 1986YO1F, 1987DZ1A, 1987GU1C, 1987KI1C, 1987PR01, 1987SC1J, 1988GU13, 1988JA13, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04, 1989KW1A). Deformed Models: (1984LO05, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G, 1986KU1P, 1986LE16, 1987HO1C, 1987PR03, 1988KH07). Cluster Model: (1983DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1984KR10, 1985DE05, 1985KO2B,

  6. A=17O (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 17O) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 17.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1982BA53, 1982KU1B, 1982WA1Q, 1982YA1D, 1982ZH01, 1984ZI04). Collective and cluster models: (1983JA09, 1983ME18, 1984ZI04, 1985ME06). Special states: (1978WI1B, 1981WI1K, 1982BA53, 1982HA43, 1982ZA1D, 1983AU1B, 1983LI10, 1983ME18, 1983SH15, 1984ANZV, 1984ST1E, 1984WI17, 1985AR1H, 1985ME06, 1985SH24). Electromagnetic transitions and giant

  7. A=19F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1959AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 19F) GENERAL: See also Table 19.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (EL55, EL55A, RE55, RE55B, BA56E, PA56A, PA57, RA57, AB58, KU58A, RE58). 1. 9Be(14N, α)19F Qm = 13.263 See (GO58E). 2. 15N(α, γ)19F Qm = 3.993 Three resonances are observed (PR57A): see Table 19.4 [Resonances in 15N(α, γ)19F] (in PDF or PS). The γ-transition strengths indicate that all three yield dipole or E2 radiation. The indicated assignments are derived from

  8. A=7Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1967FA1A, 1968GO01, 1969TA1H, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1971NO02, 1972HI16, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L). Rotational and deformed models: (1965VO1A, 1966EL08). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967FA1A, 1969HA1G, 1969HA1F, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972BB26, 1973AS02, 1973FE1J).

  9. A=7Be (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978RE1A, 1979WI1B, 1980HA1M, 1981KU13, 1982FI13, 1983WA1M). Astrophysical questions: (1978BU1B, 1979MO04, 1979RA20, 1979RA1C, 1980CA1C, 1980LA1G, 1980WI1M, 1983LI01). Applied work: (1979LA1E, 1982HA1D, 1983HA1W). Complex reactions involving 7Be: (1978DI1A, 1978DU1B, 1978HA40, 1978HE1C, 1979BO22, 1979KA07, 1979LO11, 1979PO10, 1979RA20, 1979SC1D,

  10. A=7Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 7Li) GENERAL: See also Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (AU55, DA55, LA55A, AB56, FE56, KU56, ME56, FE57C, FR57, LE57F, MA57E, MA57J, SO57, HA58D, SK58). 1. 3H(α, γ)7Li Qm = 2.465 For Eα = 0.5 to 1.9 MeV, capture radiation is observed to 7Li(0) and 7Li*(0.48), with intensity ratio 5 : 2. The smooth rise of the cross section suggests a direct capture process. The angular distribution is not isotropic, indicating l > 0

  11. A=8Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8Be (59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 8Be) GENERAL: See also Table 8.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (HE55F, KU56, PE56A, BI57F, FR57, WI58G). 1. 8Be --> 4He + 4He Qm = 0.094 Recent Q-values are 93.7 ± 0.9 keV (CO57D: 9Be(p, d)8Be), 90 ± 5 keV (TR55: 11B(p, α)8Be): the weighted mean of all measurements is 94.1 ± 0.7 keV (VA57). The width of the ground state is 4.5 ± 3 eV (RU56A: 15% of Wigner limit), < / = 3.5 eV (HE56B). The second value leads to τm

  12. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, J.-C. Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields.

  13. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected Thursdays; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) October 1 1 Dylan B ayerl ( Kioupakis g roup) 3:00---4:00pm November 1 Andy M artin ( Millunchick g roup) 2:00---3:00pm December 1 3 Brian R oberts ( Ku g roup) 2:00---3:00pm Thrust II --- s elected T hursdays, 3 :30---4:30pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) September 2 7 Hang C hi ( Uher g roup) October 1 8 Reddy g roup November 2 9 Gunho Kim (Pipe group) Thrust III --- s elected

  14. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic AcidDependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (?H2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive ?-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (?H2AX) staining and prominent ?-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  15. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lewis, Nikole K.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Sada, Pedro V.; Charbonneau, David; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-20

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf star, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 {mu}m). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% 4.5 {mu}m). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with the hot Neptune GJ 436b and the hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3{sigma} upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: <0.042% (3.6 {mu}m) and <0.085% (4.5 {mu}m). We discuss these results in the context of the Spitzer secondary eclipse measurements of GJ 436b and WASP-29b. It is possible that we do not detect the eclipses of HAT-P-12b due to high eccentricity, but find that weak planetary emission in these wavelengths is a more likely explanation. We place 3{sigma} upper limits on the |e cos {omega}| quantity (where e is eccentricity and {omega} is the argument of periapsis) for HAT-P-3b (<0.0081) and HAT-P-4b (<0.0042), based on the secondary eclipse timings.

  16. Photochemistry in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. III. Photochemistry and thermochemistry in thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Renyu; Seager, Sara

    2014-03-20

    Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H{sub 2}-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres and non-H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO{sub 2} rather than CH{sub 4} or CO in a H{sub 2}-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to the formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1214 b, we find that (1) C{sub 2}H{sub 2} features at 1.0 and 1.5 ?m in transmission and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} features at 9-14 ?m in thermal emission are diagnostic for hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres; (2) a detection of water-vapor features and a confirmation of the nonexistence of methane features would provide sufficient evidence for a water-dominated atmosphere. In general, our simulations show that chemical stability has to be taken into account when interpreting the spectrum of a super Earth/mini Neptune. Water-dominated atmospheres only exist for carbon to oxygen ratios much lower than the solar ratio, suggesting that this kind of atmospheres could be rare.

  17. Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaks, Alex; Reardon, John

    2013-09-30

    A proof-of-concept biocatalyst enhanced solvent process was developed and demonstrated in an integrated bench-scale system using coal post combustion flue gas. The biocatalyst was deployed as a coating on M500X structured packing. Rate enhancement was evaluated using a non-volatile and non- toxic 20 wt% potassium carbonate solution. Greater than 500-fold volumetric scale-up from laboratory to bench scale was demonstrated in this project. Key technical achievements included: 10-fold mass transfer enhancement demonstrated in laboratory testing relative to blank potassium carbonate at 45C; ~ 7-fold enhancement over blank in bench-scale field testing at National Carbon Capture Center; aerosol emissions were below detection limits (< 0.8 ppm); 90% capture was demonstrated at ~19.5 Nm{sup 3}/hr (dry basis); and ~ 80% CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at ~ 30 Nm{sup 3}/hr (dry basis) for more than 2800-hrs on flue gas with minimal detectible decline in activity. The regeneration energy requirement was 3.5 GJ/t CO{sub 2} for this solvent, which was below the target of <2.1 GJ/t CO{sub 2}. Bench unit testing revealed kinetic limitations in the un-catalyzed stripper at around 85C, but process modeling based on bench unit data showed that equivalent work of less than 300 kWh/t CO{sub 2} including all CO{sub 2} compression can be achieved at lower temperature stripping conditions. Cost analysis showed that 20% potassium carbonate in a basic solvent flow sheet with biocatalyst coated packing has economic performance comparable to the reference NETL Case-12, 30% MEA. A detailed techno-economic analysis indicated that addition of catalyst in the stripper could reduce the cost of capture by ~6% and cost of avoided CO{sub 2} by ~10% below reference NETL Case-12. Based on these results, a directional plan was identified to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture in future work.

  18. Context dependent reversion of tumor phenotype by connexin-43 expression in MDA-MB231 cells and MCF-7 cells: Role of ?-catenin/connexin43 association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talhouk, Rabih S.; Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Rahme, Gilbert J.; Hariri, Hanaa H.; Rayess, Tina; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Bazzoun, Dana; Al-Labban, Dania; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2013-12-10

    Connexins (Cx), gap junction (GJ) proteins, are regarded as tumor suppressors, and Cx43 expression is often down regulated in breast tumors. We assessed the effect of Cx43 over-expression in 2D and 3D cultures of two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. While Cx43 over-expression decreased proliferation of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 by 56% and 80% respectively, MDA-MB-231 growth was not altered in 2D cultures, but exhibited 35% reduction in 3D cultures. C-terminus truncated Cx43 did not alter proliferation. Untransfected MCF-7 cells formed spherical aggregates in 3D cultures, and MDA-MB-231 cells formed stellar aggregates. However, MCF-7 cells over-expressing Cx43 formed smaller sized clusters and Cx43 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells lost their stellar morphology. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced by 60% and 30% respectively. On the other hand, silencing Cx43 in MCF10A cells, nonneoplastic human mammary cell line, increased proliferation in both 2D and 3D cultures, and disrupted acinar morphology. Although Cx43 over-expression did not affect total levels of ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2, it decreased nuclear levels of ?-catenin in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and in 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cx43 associated at the membrane with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and only in 3D conditions in MDA-MB-231 cells. This study suggests that Cx43 exerts tumor suppressive effects in a context-dependent manner where GJ assembly with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 may be implicated in reducing growth rate, invasiveness, and, malignant phenotype of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells, by sequestering ?-catenin away from nucleus. - Highlights: Cx43 over-expressing MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were grown in 2D and 3D cultures. Proliferation and growth morphology were affected in a context dependent manner. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced. Cx43-mediated gap junction complex assembly correlated with observed changes. We propose that membranous Cx43 sequesters ?-catenin away from the nucleus.

  19. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to the figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJ0-100 published and distributed by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy.

  20. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  1. New trends in industrial energy efficiency in the Mexico iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozawa, Leticia; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Sheinbaum, Claudia

    1999-07-31

    Energy use in the Mexican industrial sector experienced important changes in the last decade related to changes in the Mexican economy. In previous studies, we have shown that a real change in energy-intensity was the most important factor in the overall decline of energy use and CO2 emissions in the Mexican industrial sector. Real changes in energy intensity were explained by different factors, depending on the industrial sub-sector. In this paper, we analyze the factors that influenced energy use in the Mexican iron and steel industry, the largest energy consuming and energy-intensive industry in the country. To understand the trends in this industry we used a decomposition analysis based on physical indicators to decompose the changes in intra-sectoral structural changes and efficiency improvements. Also, we use a structure-efficiency analysis for international comparisons, considering industrial structure and the best available technology. In 1995, Mexican iron and steel industry consumed 17.7 percent of the industrial energy consumption. Between 1970 and 1995, the steel production has increased with an annual growth rate of 4.7 percent, while the specific energy consumption (SEC) has decreased from 28.4 to 23.8 GJ/tonne of crude steel. This reduction was due to energy efficiency improvements (disappearance of the open hearth production, increase of the share of the continuous casting) and to structural changes as well (increase of the share of scrap input in the steelmaking).

  2. Low-emission vortex combustion of biomass and fossil fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finker, F.Z.; Kubischkin, I.B.; Akhmedov, D.B.

    1995-11-01

    The article introduces the results of development and industrial experience of low-emission vortex combustion technology (LEVC) of biomass and fossil fuel in industrial and utility boilers in Russian timber and paper industries and Polish power plants. The LEVC technology is based on aerodynamics method of multiple circulation of gases and fuel in the furnaces. LEVC technology accumulates the advantages of conventional and fluidized bed combustion technology. Existing boilers could be easily retrofitted for the application of LEVC technology without requiring major investment. The repowering of boiler with LEVC was the result the reduction NOx emission to the level 170g/GJ without installation additional flue gas cleaning equipment and it gave the opportunity for an injection of sulfur sorbent in the furnace. The authors discussed Russian-Polish experiment on utility boiler retrofitted with the application of LEVC. As the result the efficiency of the boiler increased in 2%. The reduction of the emission is: NOx-40%, SO2-17%.

  3. Direct Carbon Conversion: Application to the Efficient Conversion of Fossil Fuels to Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Berry, G; Pasternak, A; Surles, T; Steinberg, M

    2001-03-07

    We introduce a concept for efficient conversion of fossil fuels to electricity that entails the decomposition of fossil-derived hydrocarbons into carbon and hydrogen, and electrochemical conversion of these fuels in separate fuel cells. Carbon/air fuel cells have the advantages of near zero entropy change and associated heat production (allowing 100% theoretical conversion efficiency). The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product are invariant, allowing constant EMF and full utilization of fuel in single pass mode of operation. System efficiency estimates were conducted for several routes involving sequential extraction of a hydrocarbon from the fossil resource by (hydro) pyrolysis followed by thermal decomposition. The total energy conversion efficiencies of the processes were estimated to be (1) 80% for direct conversion of petroleum coke; (2) 67% HHV for CH{sub 4}; (3) 72% HHV for heavy oil (modeled using properties of decane); (4) 75.5% HHV (83% LHV) for natural gas conversion with a Rankine bottoming cycle for the H{sub 2} portion; and (5) 69% HHV for conversion of low rank coals and lignite through hydrogenation and pyrolysis of the CH{sub 4} intermediate. The cost of carbon fuel is roughly $7/GJ, based on the cost of the pyrolysis step in the industrial furnace black process. Cell hardware costs are estimated to be less than $500/kW.

  4. POSSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN AD LEO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Petrucci, Romina; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Jofr, Emiliano

    2014-01-20

    AD Leo (GJ388) is an active dM3 flare star that has been extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully convective boundary, studying its long-term chromospheric activity in detail could be an appreciable contribution to dynamo theory. Here, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we analyze the Ca IIK line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both of these totally independent time series, we obtain a possible activity cycle with a period of approximately seven years and a less significant shorter cycle of approximately two years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe different spectral features simultaneously, we also analyze the relation between simultaneous measurements of the Na I index (R{sub D}{sup ?}), H?, and Ca IIK fluxes at different activity levels of AD Leo, including flares.

  5. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump to avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.

  6. AN H-BAND SPECTROSCOPIC METALLICITY CALIBRATION FOR M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Bochanski, John J., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We present an empirical near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic method for estimating M dwarf metallicities, based on features in the H band, as well as an implementation of a similar published method in the K band. We obtained R {approx} 2000 NIR spectra of a sample of M dwarfs using the NASA IRTF-SpeX spectrograph, including 22 M dwarf metallicity calibration targets that have FGK companions with known metallicities. The H-band and K-band calibrations provide equivalent fits to the metallicities of these binaries, with an accuracy of {+-}0.12 dex. We derive the first empirically calibrated spectroscopic metallicity estimate for the giant planet-hosting M dwarf GJ 317, confirming its supersolar metallicity. Combining this result with observations of eight other M dwarf planet hosts, we find that M dwarfs with giant planets are preferentially metal-rich compared to those that host less massive planets. Our H-band calibration relies on strongly metallicity-dependent features in the H band, which will be useful in compositional studies using mid- to high-resolution NIR M dwarf spectra, such as those produced by multiplexed surveys like SDSS-III APOGEE. These results will also be immediately useful for ongoing spectroscopic surveys of M dwarfs.

  7. THERMAL STUDY OF THE DIII-D MACHINE HEAT REMOVAL CAPACITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YIP,H; ADERSON,P.M; HOLTROP,K.L; HARRISON,S

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 With each plasma shot, the DIII-D tokamak dissipates 0.5 to 1.0 GJ of energy. Plasma shots may occur as frequently as every ten minutes, and the energy is removed in the form of heat by a cooling water system. to remove heat from the machine, cooling water circulates through each major heat source. These sources include the power supplies, motor/generator, rf current drives, neutral beam power supplies, magnetic field coils, and vacuum vessel. The cooling water system consists of isolated primary and secondary cooling loops separated by intermediate heat exchangers. As future DIII-D plans include operation during summer months and longer pulse duration, the cooling system's overall heat removal capability and performance efficiency must be assessed. Temperature and flow data from around the DIII-D facility are collected by a programmable logic controller (PLC); the data are used to analyze the heat generating sources, the heat transfer rate to intermediate heat exchangers, and the ultimate heat rejection to the environment via the cooling towers. A comparison of the original DIII-D machine design versus the actual performance determines the margin of heat removal capacity. projections of the heat removal rate for various longer plasma shots are made. Improvements in design and/or operational procedure will be necessary to attain the desired pulse duration.

  8. Gasoline from Wood via Integrated Gasification, Synthesis, and Methanol-to-Gasoline Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S. D.; Tarud, J. K.; Biddy, M. J.; Dutta, A.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) assessment of the feasibility of making gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline route using syngas from a 2,000 dry metric tonne/day (2,205 U.S. ton/day) biomass-fed facility. A new technoeconomic model was developed in Aspen Plus for this study, based on the model developed for NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007). The necessary process changes were incorporated into a biomass-to-gasoline model using a methanol synthesis operation followed by conversion, upgrading, and finishing to gasoline. Using a methodology similar to that used in previous NREL design reports and a feedstock cost of $50.70/dry ton ($55.89/dry metric tonne), the estimated plant gate price is $16.60/MMBtu ($15.73/GJ) (U.S. $2007) for gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) produced from biomass via gasification of wood, methanol synthesis, and the methanol-to-gasoline process. The corresponding unit prices for gasoline and LPG are $1.95/gallon ($0.52/liter) and $1.53/gallon ($0.40/liter) with yields of 55.1 and 9.3 gallons per U.S. ton of dry biomass (229.9 and 38.8 liters per metric tonne of dry biomass), respectively.

  9. Design scoping study of the 12T Yin-Yang magnet system for the Tandem Mirror Next Step (TMNS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The overall objective of this engineering study was to determine the feasibility of designing a Yin-Yang magnet capable of producing a peak field in the windings of 12T for the Tandem Mirror Next Step (TMNS) program. As part of this technical study, a rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost estimate of the winding for this magnet was undertaken. The preferred approach to the winding design of the TMNS plug coil utilizes innovative design concepts to meet the structural, electrical and thermodynamic requirements of the magnet system. Structurally, the coil is radially partitioned into four sections, preventing the accumulation of the radial loads and reacting them into the structural case. To safely dissipate the 13.34 GJ of energy stored in each Yin-Yang magnet, the winding has been electrically subdivided into parallel or nested coils, each having its own power supply and protection circuitry. This arrangement effectively divides the total stored energy of the coils into manageable subsystems. The windings are cooled with superfluid helium II, operated at 1.8K and 1.2 atmospheres. The superior cooling capabilities of helium II have enabled the overall winding envelope to be minimized, providing a current density of 2367 A/CM/sup 2/, excluding substructure.

  10. Design, Manufacture and Testing of A Bend-Twist D-Spar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Cheng-Huat; Tsai, Stephen W.

    1999-06-01

    Studies have indicated that an adaptive wind turbine blade design can significantly enhance the performance of the wind turbine blade on energy capture and load mitigation. In order to realize the potential benefits of aeroelastic tailoring, a bend-twist D-spar, which is the backbone of a blade, was designed and fabricated to achieve the objectives of having maximum bend-twist coupling and fulfilling desirable structural properties (031 & GJ). Two bend-twist D-spars, a hybrid of glass and carbon fibers and an all-carbon D-spar, were fabricated using a bladder process. One of the D-spars, the hybrid D-spar, was subjected to a cantilever static test and modal testing. Various parameters such as materials, laminate schedule, thickness and internal rib were examined in designing a bend-twist D-spar. The fabrication tooling, the lay-up process and the joint design for two symmetric clamshells are described in this report. Finally, comparisons between the experimental test results and numerical results are presented. The comparisons indicate that the numerical analysis (static and modal analysis) agrees well with test results.

  11. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump tomore » avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.« less

  12. THE CALIFORNIA PLANET SURVEY IV: A PLANET ORBITING THE GIANT STAR HD145934 AND UPDATES TO SEVEN SYSTEMS WITH LONG-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherina Feng, Y.; Wright, Jason T.; Nelson, Benjamin; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.

    2015-02-10

    We present an update to seven stars with long-period planets or planetary candidates using new and archival radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and literature velocities from other telescopes. Our updated analysis better constrains orbital parameters for these planets, four of which are known multi-planet systems. HD24040 b and HD183263 c are super-Jupiters with circular orbits and periods longer than 8yr. We present a previously unseen linear trend in the residuals of HD66428 indicative of an additional planetary companion. We confirm that GJ 849 is a multi-planet system and find a good orbital solution for the c component: it is a 1 M {sub Jup} planet in a 15yr orbit (the longest known for a planet orbiting an M dwarf). We update the HD74156 double-planet system. We also announce the detection of HD145934 b, a 2 M {sub Jup} planet in a 7.5yr orbit around a giant star. Two of our stars, HD187123 and HD217107, at present host the only known examples of systems comprising a hot Jupiter and a planet with a well constrained period greater than 5yr, and with no evidence of giant planets in between. Our enlargement and improvement of long-period planet parameters will aid future analysis of origins, diversity, and evolution of planetary systems.

  13. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen A.

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  14. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province ; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ? Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ? Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ? Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 0.013 vs. 0.622 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 0.045 vs. 0.475 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 0.021 vs. 0.380 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT increases breast cancer cell radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. These findings have salient implications for designing clinical trials using fulvestrant and radiation therapy.

  15. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS ; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogerio; Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  16. Formation mechanisms of precursors of radiation-induced color centers during fabrication of silica optical fiber preform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomashuk, A. L.; Zabezhailov, M. O.

    2011-04-15

    Samples in the form of transverse slices of rods and optical fiber preforms made from the high-hydroxyl KU-1 and low-hydroxyl KS-4V silica by the plasma outside deposition (POD) method are {gamma}-irradiated to a dose of {approx}1 MGy (SiO{sub 2}). Next, the radial dependences of the radiation-induced nonbridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) and E'-center (three-coordinated silicon) in the samples are constructed by measuring the amplitudes of their 4.8 and 5.8 eV absorption bands, respectively. Based on the analysis of these radial dependences and considering the temperature and duration of the preirradiation heat treatment of the rods and preforms at the POD-installation, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths of the above bands and the microscopic thermoinduced processes occurring during preform fabrication and producing precursors of the radiation-induced NBOHC and E'-center. These processes are found to be associated with the escape of either H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O from neighboring hydroxyl groups, and, therefore, can occur in high-hydroxyl silica only. It is concluded that enhancement of the radiation resistance of high-hydroxyl silica optical fibers requires decreasing the temperature and duration of the preform fabrication process, in particular, changing from the POD-technology to the low-temperature plasmachemical vapor deposition (PCVD) or surface PCVD (SPCVD)-technology.

  17. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  18. 14C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  19. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  20. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  1. A=20O (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calulations:(BR59M, TA60L, TA62, PA63C, CO64B, MO64M, PA64C, TR64A, DE65B, FE65B, AR66H, BR66C, TR66, FE67A, FL67D, LA67N, PI67B, AR68C, BE68DD, CO68K, FL68B, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, MO68A, PA68K, FE69C, KU69G, SO69A, AR71L). Other theoretical calculations:(JA61L, KE66C, ST67G, SU68D, SC69F, LA71C, LE71I). General experimental work:(AR69E, AR71, AR71M). 1. 20O(β-)20F Qm = 3.815 20O

  2. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside 45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  3. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  4. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Howard, A. W.; Laughlin, G. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Deming, D.; Todorov, K. O.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.

    2014-02-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 ?m flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.

  5. A SEARCH FOR HIGH PROPER MOTION T DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 + 2MASS + WISE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Michael C.; Deacon, Niall R.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Redstone, Joshua; Goldman, Bertrand; Price, P. A.

    2011-10-20

    We have searched {approx}8200 deg{sup 2} for high proper motion ({approx}0.''5-2.''7 year{sup -1}) T dwarfs by combining first-epoch data from the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3{pi} Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) All-Sky Point Source Catalog, and the WISE Preliminary Data Release. We identified two high proper motion objects with the very red (W1 - W2) colors characteristic of T dwarfs, one being the known T7.5 dwarf GJ 570D. Near-IR spectroscopy of the other object (PSO J043.5395+02.3995 {identical_to} WISEP J025409.45+022359.1) reveals a spectral type of T8, leading to a photometric distance of 7.2 {+-} 0.7 pc. The 2.''56 year{sup -1} proper motion of PSO J043.5+02 is the second highest among field T dwarfs, corresponding to a tangential velocity of 87 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. According to the Besancon galaxy model, this velocity indicates that its galactic membership is probably in the thin disk, with the thick disk an unlikely possibility. Such membership is in accord with the near-IR spectrum, which points to a surface gravity (age) and metallicity typical of the field population. We combine 2MASS, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, WISE, and PS1 astrometry to derive a preliminary parallax of 171 {+-} 45 mas (5.8{sup +2.0} {sub -1.2} pc), the first such measurement using PS1 data. The proximity and brightness of PSO J043.5+02 will facilitate future characterization of its atmosphere, variability, multiplicity, distance, and kinematics. The modest number of candidates from our search suggests that the immediate ({approx}10 pc) solar neighborhood does not contain a large reservoir of undiscovered T dwarfs earlier than about T8.

  6. Energy production potential of a 100 m/sup 3/ biogas generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, H.D.; Persson, S.P.; Regan, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Penn State 100-cow capacity digester system - 100 m/sup 3/ (Upright Silo), heated (35/sup 0/C), continuous feed (1 to 2 times daily), gas agitation (continuously) - operated dependably on a continuous basis for periods as long as 9 months. Alternative systems for handling high solids-content input (up to 15% TS) were tested. Daily feedings of dairy manure slurries (8 to 15% TS) at rates of 345 to 1030 kg VS resulted in total biogas production rates of 70 to 200 m/sup 3//day, respectively. Increased loading rates, and related reduction in retention time to as low as 11 days, increased the energy recovery ratio (m/sup 3/ biogas/m/sup 3/ digester volume) to 2.02. Daily energy production was as high as 35,000 kJ/cow. Part of the biogas produced was used satisfactorily as fuel or a hot water boiler to heat incoming slurry and offset the digester heat losses. Tests of biogas as fuel for a water heater and for internal combustion engines showed combustion efficiencies comparable to other fuels on the basis of its energy content. Experience in operating the digester over a 4-year period showed that uncoated, galvanized, or enamel-painted steel are unsatisfactory for digester components that are in contact with both biogas and slurry. Carefully applied epoxy paints seemed to adequately protect continuously submerged steel components. Concrete, plastic, stainless steel, and treated wood appear to be suitable construction materials. Estimated costs versus returns for the Penn State digester system (75 to 76 prices) were $20,000 initial costs, and an annual return equal to the value of 900 GJ of energy.

  7. A smooth transition to hydrogen transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Schock, R.N.

    1995-04-14

    The goal of this work is to examine viable near-term infrastructure options for a transition to hydrogen fueled vehicles and to suggest profitable directions for technology development. The authors have focused in particular on the contrasting options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Delivered costs have been estimated using best available industry cost and deliberately conservative economic assumptions. The sensitivities of these costs have then been examined for three small-scale scenarios: (1) electrolysis at the home for one car, and production at the small station scale (300 cars/day), (2) conventional alkaline electrolysis and (3) steam reforming of natural gas. All scenarios assume fueling a 300 mile range vehicle with 3.75 kg. They conclude that a transition appears plausible, using existing energy distribution systems, with home electrolysis providing fuel costing 7.5 to 10.5{cents}/mile, station electrolysis 4.7 to 7.1{cents}/mile, and steam reforming 3.7 to 4.7{cents}/mile. The average car today costs about 6{cents}/mile to fuel. Furthermore, analysis of liquid hydrogen delivered locally by truck from central processing plants can also be competitive at costs as low as 4{cents}/mile. These delivered costs are equal to $30 to $70 per GJ, LHV. Preliminary analysis indicates that electricity transmission costs favor this method of distributing energy, until very large (10 GW) hydrogen pipelines are installed. This indicates that significant hydrogen pipeline distribution will be established only when significant markets have developed.

  8. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  9. BONA FIDE, STRONG-VARIABLE GALACTIC LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STARS ARE FAST ROTATORS: DETECTION OF A HIGH ROTATIONAL VELOCITY IN HR CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groh, J. H.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Teodoro, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Barba, R.; Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G.

    2009-11-01

    We report optical observations of the luminous blue variable (LBV) HR Carinae which show that the star has reached a visual minimum phase in 2009. More importantly, we detected absorptions due to Si IV lambdalambda4088-4116. To match their observed line profiles from 2009 May, a high rotational velocity of v{sub rot} approx = 150 +- 20 km s{sup -1} is needed (assuming an inclination angle of 30 deg.), implying that HR Car rotates at approx =0.88 +- 0.2 of its critical velocity for breakup (v{sub crit}). Our results suggest that fast rotation is typical in all strong-variable, bona fide galactic LBVs, which present S-Dor-type variability. Strong-variable LBVs are located in a well-defined region of the HR diagram during visual minimum (the 'LBV minimum instability strip'). We suggest this region corresponds to where v{sub crit} is reached. To the left of this strip, a forbidden zone with v{sub rot}/v{sub crit}>1 is present, explaining why no LBVs are detected in this zone. Since dormant/ex LBVs like P Cygni and HD 168625 have low v{sub rot}, we propose that LBVs can be separated into two groups: fast-rotating, strong-variable stars showing S-Dor cycles (such as AG Car and HR Car) and slow-rotating stars with much less variability (such as P Cygni and HD 168625). We speculate that supernova (SN) progenitors which had S-Dor cycles before exploding (such as in SN 2001ig, SN 2003bg, and SN 2005gj) could have been fast rotators. We suggest that the potential difficulty of fast-rotating Galactic LBVs to lose angular momentum is additional evidence that such stars could explode during the LBV phase.

  10. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  11. Principles and applications of measurement and uncertainty analysis in research and calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.V.

    1992-11-01

    Interest in Measurement Uncertainty Analysis has grown in the past several years as it has spread to new fields of application, and research and development of uncertainty methodologies have continued. This paper discusses the subject from the perspectives of both research and calibration environments. It presents a history of the development and an overview of the principles of uncertainty analysis embodied in the United States National Standard, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1-1985, Measurement Uncertainty. Examples are presented in which uncertainty analysis was utilized or is needed to gain further knowledge of a particular measurement process and to characterize final results. Measurement uncertainty analysis provides a quantitative estimate of the interval about a measured value or an experiment result within which the true value of that quantity is expected to lie. Years ago, Harry Ku of the United States National Bureau of Standards stated that The informational content of the statement of uncertainty determines, to a large extent, the worth of the calibrated value.'' Today, that statement is just as true about calibration or research results as it was in 1968. Why is that true What kind of information should we include in a statement of uncertainty accompanying a calibrated value How and where do we get the information to include in an uncertainty statement How should we interpret and use measurement uncertainty information This discussion will provide answers to these and other questions about uncertainty in research and in calibration. The methodology to be described has been developed by national and international groups over the past nearly thirty years, and individuals were publishing information even earlier. Yet the work is largely unknown in many science and engineering arenas. I will illustrate various aspects of uncertainty analysis with some examples drawn from the radiometry measurement and calibration discipline from research activities.

  12. Principles and applications of measurement and uncertainty analysis in research and calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.V.

    1992-11-01

    Interest in Measurement Uncertainty Analysis has grown in the past several years as it has spread to new fields of application, and research and development of uncertainty methodologies have continued. This paper discusses the subject from the perspectives of both research and calibration environments. It presents a history of the development and an overview of the principles of uncertainty analysis embodied in the United States National Standard, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1-1985, Measurement Uncertainty. Examples are presented in which uncertainty analysis was utilized or is needed to gain further knowledge of a particular measurement process and to characterize final results. Measurement uncertainty analysis provides a quantitative estimate of the interval about a measured value or an experiment result within which the true value of that quantity is expected to lie. Years ago, Harry Ku of the United States National Bureau of Standards stated that ``The informational content of the statement of uncertainty determines, to a large extent, the worth of the calibrated value.`` Today, that statement is just as true about calibration or research results as it was in 1968. Why is that true? What kind of information should we include in a statement of uncertainty accompanying a calibrated value? How and where do we get the information to include in an uncertainty statement? How should we interpret and use measurement uncertainty information? This discussion will provide answers to these and other questions about uncertainty in research and in calibration. The methodology to be described has been developed by national and international groups over the past nearly thirty years, and individuals were publishing information even earlier. Yet the work is largely unknown in many science and engineering arenas. I will illustrate various aspects of uncertainty analysis with some examples drawn from the radiometry measurement and calibration discipline from research activities.

  13. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockli, Daniel F.

    2015-11-30

    The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

  14. TAILORING X-RAY BEAM ENERGY SPECTRUM TO ENHANCE IMAGE QUALITY OF NEW RADIOGRAPHY CONTRAST AGENTS BASED ON GD OR OTHER LANTHANIDES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DILMANIAN,F.A.; WEINMANN,H.J.; ZHONG,Z.; BACARIAN,T.; RIGON,L.; BUTTON,T.M.; REN,B.; WU,X.Y.; ZHONG,N.; ATKINS,H.L.

    2001-02-17

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin Germany, in use in clinical MPI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-my beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a ''truly'' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's Ku line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with {approximately} twice higher output become available.

  15. Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

    2009-03-31

    Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

  16. The importance of retaining a phylogenetic perspective in traits-based community analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poteat, Monica D; Buchwalter, David; Jacobus, Luke

    2015-01-01

    1) Many environmental stressors manifest their effects via physiological processes (traits) that can differ significantly among species and species groups. We compiled available data for three traits related to the bioconcentration of the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) from 42 aquatic insect species representing orders Ephemeroptera (mayfly), Plecoptera (stonefly), and Trichoptera (caddisfly). These traits included the propensity to take up Cd from water (uptake rate constant, ku), the ability to excrete Cd (efflux rate constant, ke), and the net result of these two processes (bioconcentration factor, BCF). 2) Ranges in these Cd bioaccumulation traits varied in magnitude across lineages (some lineages had a greater tendency to bioaccumulate Cd than others). Overlap in the ranges of trait values among different lineages was common and highlights situations where species from different lineages can share a similar trait state, but represent the high end of possible physiological values for one lineage and the low end for another. 3) Variance around the mean trait state differed widely across clades, suggesting that some groups (e.g., Ephemerellidae) are inherently more variable than others (e.g., Perlidae). Thus, trait variability/lability is at least partially a function of lineage. 4) Akaike information criterion (AIC) comparisons of statistical models were more often driven by clade than by other potential biological or ecological explanation tested. Clade-driven models generally improved with increasing taxonomic resolution. 5) Together, these findings suggest that lineage provides context for the analysis of species traits, and that failure to consider lineage in community-based analysis of traits may obscure important patterns of species responses to environmental change.

  17. Energy-consumption and carbon-emission analysis of vehicle and component manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-12

    A model is presented for calculating the environmental burdens of the part manufacturing and vehicle assembly (VMA) stage of the vehicle life cycle. The approach is bottom-up, with a special focus on energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. The model is applied to both conventional and advanced vehicles, the latter of which include aluminum-intensive, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles. An important component of the model, a weight-based distribution function of materials and associated transformation processes (casting, stamping, etc.), is developed from the United States Council for Automotive Research Generic Vehicle Life Cycle Inventory Study. As the approach is bottom-up, numerous transformation process data and plant operational data were extracted from the literature for use in representing the many operations included in the model. When the model was applied to conventional vehicles, reliable estimates of cumulative energy consumption (34 GJ/vehicle) and CO{sub 2} emission (2 tonnes/vehicle) were computed for the VMA life-cycle stage. The numerous data sets taken from the literature permitted the development of some statistics on model results. Because the model explicitly includes a greater coverage of relevant manufacturing processes than many earlier studies, our energy estimates are on the higher end of previously published values. Limitations of the model are also discussed. Because the material compositions of conventional vehicles within specific classes (cars, light duty trucks, etc.) are sensibly constant on a percent-by-weight basis, the model can be reduced to a simple linear form for each class dependent only on vehicle weight. For advanced vehicles, the material/transformation process distribution developed above needs to be adjusted for different materials and components. This is particularly so for aluminum-intensive and electric-drive vehicles. In fact, because of their comparatively high manufacturing energy, batteries required for an electric vehicle can significantly add to the energy burden of the VMA stage. Overall, for conventional vehicles, energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from the VMA stage are about 4% of their total life-cycle values. They are expected to be somewhat higher for advanced vehicles.

  18. Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benemann, J.R.

    1998-03-31

    This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

  19. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

  20. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A.; Cour Jansen, J. la

    2012-05-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  1. Willow firing in retrofitted Irish peat plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broek, R. van den; Faaij, A.; Kent, T.

    1995-11-01

    Interest in biomass electricity in Ireland is being re-awakened by environmental concerns about CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation and the potential of biomass production to provide an alternative agricultural enterprise. The technical and economical feasibility of wood-fuelled power production using willow from energy farming in existing peat-fired plants in Ireland is being studied within the framework of the EU JOULE II+ programme. These options are compared with new combustion plants and a biomass integrated gasifier with combined cycle (BIG/CC). Background studies supplied data for yields of willow farming, establishment of willow plantations, harvesting methods, logistics and costs and efficiencies for different retrofit options at Irish peat plants. All technologies considered are currently available or are expected to be available in the near future. Neither agricultural subsidies nor possible CO{sub 2} taxes have been included. In the least cost supply scenario storage and chipping of wood is done at the power station. In this case wood is only stored in the form of sticks and wood harvested by a chips harvester is supplied to the plant directly during the harvesting season. Fuel costs at the plant gate were estimated between 3.3 and 11 EGU/GJ{sub LHV}. This wide range resulted in a wide range of kWh costs. For the lowest cost option they ranged between 5.4 and 15 ECUcents/kWh. The cheapest proven retrofit option is the conversion of the existing milled peat Lanesborough unit 3 into a bubbling fluidized bed with kWh costs ranging from 5.6 up to 16 ECUcents/kWh. For this plant, costs per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} emissions varied between 1 and 70 ECU. It is noteworthy that the kWh costs for all options considered were very close. Especially in the high costs scenario a BIG/CC appeared to have lower kWh cost than all biomass combustion plants. Mainly for the retrofitted plants the fuel costs were by far the largest kWh cost component.

  2. A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment - Eliminating CO2 Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2013-11-05

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the potential of a new process technology to reduce the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission from the production of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) pigment. TiO{sub 2} is one of the most commonly used minerals in the chemical manufacturing industry. It has been commercially processed as a pigment since the early 1900's, and has a wide variety of domestic and industrial applications. TiO{sub 2} pigment is currently produced primarily by the use of the so called ?chloride process?. A key step of the chloride process relies on high temperature carbo-chlorination of TiO{sub 2} bearing raw materials, hence producing large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The new method uses a chemical/metallurgical sequential extraction methodology to produce pigment grade TiO{sub 2} from high-TiO{sub 2} slag. The specific project objectives were to 1) study and prove the scientific validity of the concept, 2) understand the primary chemical reactions and the efficiency of sequential extraction schemes, 3) determine the properties of TiO{sub 2} produced using the technology, and 4) model the energy consumptions and environmental benefits of the technology. These objectives were successfully met and a new process for producing commercial quality TiO{sub 2} pigment was developed and experimentally validated. The process features a unique combination of established metallurgical processes, including alkaline roasting of titania slag followed by leaching, solvent extraction, hydrolysis, and calcination. The caustic, acidic, and organic streams in the process will also be regenerated and reused in the process, greatly reducing environmental waste. The purpose and effect of each of these steps in producing purified TiO{sub 2} is detailed in the report. The levels of impurities in our pigment meet the requirements for commercial pigment, and are nearly equivalent to those of two commercial pigments. Solvent extraction with an amine extractant proved to be extremely effective in achieving these targets. A model plant producing 100,000 tons TiO{sub 2} per year was designed that would employ the new method of pigment manufacture. A flow sheet was developed and a mass and energy balance was performed. A comparison of the new process and the chloride process indicate that implementation of the new process in the US would result in a 21% decrease in energy consumption, an annual energy savings of 42.7 million GJ. The new process would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 21% in comparison to the chloride process, an annual reduction of 2.70 million tons of CO{sub 2}. Since the process equipment employed in the new process is well established in other industrial processes and the raw materials for the two processes are identical we believe the capital, labor and materials cost of production of pigment grade TiO{sub 2} using the new method would be at least equivalent to that of the chloride process. Additionally, it is likely that the operating costs will be lower by using the new process because of the reduced energy consumption. Although the new process technology is logical and feasible based on its chemistry, thermodynamic principles, and experimental results, its development and refinement through more rigorous and comprehensive research at the kilogram scale is needed to establish it as a competitive industrial process. The effect of the recycling of process streams on the final product quality should also be investigated. Further development would also help determine if the energy efficiency and the environmental benefits of the new process are indeed significantly better than current commercial methods of pigment manufacture.

  3. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). IV. THE OUTER ARCHITECTURE OF M DWARF PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (≳1 M {sub Jup}) around 122 newly identified nearby (≲40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). After removing 44 close stellar binaries (implying a stellar companion fraction of >35.4% ± 4.3% within 100 AU), 27 of which are new or spatially resolved for the first time, our remaining sample of 78 single M dwarfs makes this the largest imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars (0.1-0.6 M {sub ☉}) to date. Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1'', respectively, which correspond to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 M {sub Jup} at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 ± 6 M {sub Jup}; L0{sub −1}{sup +2}; 120 ± 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64{sub −23}{sup +30} M {sub Jup}; M7.5 ± 0.5; 6.5 ± 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 ± 8 M {sub Jup}; L0 ± 1; 19.8 ± 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 ± 9 M {sub Jup}; M8.0 ± 0.5; 190 ± 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 M {sub Jup} planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 M {sub Jup} range like those orbiting HR 8799 and β Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. The frequency of brown dwarf (13-75 M {sub Jup}) companions to single M dwarfs between 10-100 AU is 2.8{sub −1.5}{sup +2.4}%. Altogether we find that giant planets, especially massive ones, are rare in the outskirts of M dwarf planetary systems. Although the first directly imaged planets were found around massive stars, there is currently no statistical evidence for a trend of giant planet frequency with stellar host mass at large separations as predicted by the disk instability model of giant planet formation.

  4. Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

    2009-01-07

    This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

  5. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends to produce a higher precipitation rate over some topical regions, it actually well captures the variations in the zonal and meridional means. Among the three reanalyses, ERA-Interim seems to have values close to those of the satellite retrievals especially for GPCP. It is interesting to note that the MMF obtained the best results in the rain forest of Africa even better than those of CFSR and ERA-Interim, when compared to CMORPH. MERRA fails to capture the precipitation in this region. We are now collaborating with Steve Rutledge (CSU) to validate the model results for AMMA 6. MC3E and the diurnal variation of precipitation processes The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a joint field campaign between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. It took place in central Oklahoma during the period April 22 _ June 6, 2011. Some of its major objectives involve the use of CRMs in precipitation science such as: (1) testing the fidelity of CRM simulations via intensive statistical comparisons between simulated and observed cloud properties and latent heating fields for a variety of case types, (2) establishing the limits of CRM space-time integration capabilities for quantitative precipitation estimates, and (3) supporting the development and refinement of physically-based GMI, DPR, and DPR-GMI combined retrieval algorithms using ground-based GPM GV Ku-Ka band radar and CRM simulations. The NASA unified WRF model (nu-WRF) was used for real time forecasts during the field campaign, and ten precipitation events were selected for post mission simulations. These events include well-organized squall lines, scattered storms and quasi-linear storms. A paper focused on the diurnal variation of precipitation will be submitted in September 2012. The major highlights are as follows: a. The results indicate that NU-WRF model could capture observed diurnal variation of rainfall (composite not individual); b. NU-WRF model could simulate two different types (propagating and local type) of the diurnal variation of rainfall; c. NU-WRF model simulation show very good agreement with observation in terms of precipitation pattern (linear MCS), radar reflectivity (a second low peak – shallow convection); d. NU-WRF model simulation indicates that the cool-pool dynamic is the main physical process for MCS propagation speed; e. Surface heat fluxes (including land surface model and initial surface condition) do not play a major role in phase of diurnal variation (change rainfall amount slightly); f. Terrain effect is important for initial stage of MCS (rainfall is increased and close to observation by increasing the terrain height that is also close to observed); g. Diurnal variation of radiation is not important for the simulated variation of rainfall. Publications: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 487-503. Powell, S. W., R. A. Houze, Jr., A. Kumar, and S. A. McFarlane, 2012: Comparison of simulated and observed continental tropical anvil clouds and their radiative heating profiles. J. Atmos. Sci., 69, 2662-2681. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, T. Matsui, S. Xie, S. Lang, M. Zhang, D. Starr, and X. Li, 2011: Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics. J. Atmos. Sci., 68, 1424-1434. Conferences: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: Comparison of water budget between AMMA and TWP-ICE clouds. The 3rd Annual ASR Science Team Meeting. Arlington, Virginia, Mar. 12-16, 2012. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. A. Houze Jr., and P. Ciesielski, 2011: Comparing the water budgets between AMMA and TWP-ICE clouds. Fall 2011 ASR Working Group Meeting. Annapolis, September 12-16, 2011. Zeng, X. et al., 2011: Introducing ice nuclei into turbulence parameterizations in CRMs. Fall 2011 ASR Working Group Meeting. Annapolis, September 12-16, 2011.