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  1. Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface ...

  2. Atoms.inp Archive: Crystallographic Data from GSECARS

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newville, Matthew

    The Atoms.inp Archive is a collection of crystallographic data for use in XAFS analysis. The crystallographic data is stored as atoms.inp files, which contain all the information necessary to describe the crystal, and can be used by the program ATOMS to generate feff.inp files. These files can then be used by the FEFF program [See http://leonardo.phys.washington.edu/feff/] to calculate a theoretical XAFS spectrum for the crystal. This archive exists because it can take a considerable amount of time to locate a suitable reference for a model structure to use for making theoretical XAFS standards. Even then, references sometimes give non-standard or incomplete crystallographic notation that ATOMS has difficulty interpreting. All of this means that getting a reliable atoms.inp file can take quite a bit of effort. It is hoped that this collection of well-documented and well-tested atoms.inp files will eliminate much of the work in creating theoretical XAFS standards from FEFF. [Taken from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/]. The collection currently has more than 200 crystal structures, 2748 data files, and it continues to expand. The collection is related to the UWXAFS Project [http://depts.washington.edu/uwxafs/] and to the work of the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). After searching the Archive, a user may also choose to run the web version of ATOMS software.

  3. GIS data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  4. GIS | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS keyword and include US and global energy data. Search solar, wind, biomass and wave energy resources. Do you have GIS data you would like to share? Please add it to OpenEI's...

  5. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Burk, Thomas E; Lime, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  6. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition Citation Details ... Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ...

  7. Excited-state spectroscopy of InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, D.; Micic, O.I.; Nozik, A.J.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured low-temperature size-selective photoluminescence excitation spectra of high-quality InP quantum dots prepared by collodial chemistry. A set of samples with mean emission energies in the range from 1.9 to 2.2 eV was investigated. All samples have a size distribution of about 10{percent}, resulting in an inhomogeneously broadened photoluminescence lineshape. Due to the finite size distribution, spectra were collected at different detection wavelengths to reveal the energies of the excited excitonic states. The size dependence of the quantization energies of InP nanoparticles was determined by measuring photoluminescence excitation at different detection energies within one sample. Up to eight excited-state transitions in a set of seven samples were observed, as the estimated quantum dot size was scanned from 1.8 to 4.0 nm. A comparison of the observed peaks with a six-band {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} calculation is given. In contrast to the successful interpretation in the case of CdSe, no agreement between the calculated and the observed excited-state energies is achieved. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. OpenEI Community - GIS

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    keyword and include US and global energy data. Search solar, wind, biomass and wave energy resources.

    Do you have GIS data you would like to share? Please add it...

  9. Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the Interface with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting Behavior of GaP(001) and InP(001) at the Interface with Water Authors: Wood, B C ; ...

  10. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition Fields as diverse as biological imaging and telecommunications utilize the unique photophysical and electronic properties of nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs). The development of new NQD compositions promises material properties optimized for specific applications, while addressing

  11. Defect reaction network in Si-doped InP : numerical predictions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-10-01

    This Report characterizes the defects in the defect reaction network in silicon-doped, n-type InP deduced from first principles density functional theory. The reaction network is deduced by following exothermic defect reactions starting with the initially mobile interstitial defects reacting with common displacement damage defects in Si-doped InP until culminating in immobile reaction products. The defect reactions and reaction energies are tabulated, along with the properties of all the silicon-related defects in the reaction network. This Report serves to extend the results for intrinsic defects in SAND 2012-3313: %E2%80%9CSimple intrinsic defects in InP: Numerical predictions%E2%80%9D to include Si-containing simple defects likely to be present in a radiation-induced defect reaction sequence.

  12. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M.

    2008-10-06

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  13. Ordered InP nanostructures fabricated by Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanta, S.K.; Soni, R.K.; Tripathy, S.; Chua, S.J.

    2006-01-23

    In this letter, we report fabrication of ordered InP nanostructures using 50 keV Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation at normal incidence. The structural and optical properties of these nanodots as a function of ion dose have been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy investigations reveal that the average sizes of the InP nanodots vary from 50 nm to 90 nm as the ion dose increases from 1x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Furthermore, an increase in ion dose results in a wider dot size distribution. Apart from the bulk InP band-edge photoluminescence (PL), the surface nanostructuring leads to the observation of an additional PL band at 1.98 eV. Such a blueshifted PL peak could arise due to a combined effect of carrier confinement in the surface nanodots and radiative recombination associated with surface states. The room-temperature micro-Raman investigation of InP nanodots reveals optical phonon softening due to phonon confinement in the surface nanodots.

  14. InP quantum dots: Electronic structure, surface effects, and the redshifted emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Zunger, A.

    1997-07-01

    We present pseudopotential plane-wave electronic-structure calculations on InP quantum dots in an effort to understand quantum confinement and surface effects and to identify the origin of the long-lived and redshifted luminescence. We find that (i) unlike the case in small GaAs dots, the lowest unoccupied state of InP dots is the {Gamma}{sub 1c}-derived direct state rather than the X{sub 1c}-derived indirect state and (ii) unlike the prediction of {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} models, the highest occupied state in InP dots has a 1sd-type envelope function rather than a (dipole-forbidden) 1pf envelope function. Thus explanations (i) and (ii) to the long-lived redshifted emission in terms of an orbitally forbidden character can be excluded. Furthermore, (iii) fully passivated InP dots have no surface states in the gap. However, (iv) removal of the anion-site passivation leads to a P dangling bond (DB) state just above the valence band, which will act as a trap for photogenerated holes. Similarly, (v) removal of the cation-site passivation leads to an In dangling-bond state below the conduction band. While the energy of the In DB state depends only weakly on quantum size, its radiative lifetime increases with quantum size. The calculated {approximately}300-meV redshift and the {approximately}18 times longer radiative lifetime relative to the dot-interior transition for the 26-{Angstrom} dot with an In DB are in good agreement with the observations of full-luminescence experiments for unetched InP dots. Yet, (vi) this type of redshift due to surface defect is inconsistent with that measured in {ital selective} excitation for HF-etched InP dots. (vii) The latter type of ({open_quotes}resonant{close_quotes}) redshift is compatible with the calculated {ital screened} singlet-triplet splitting in InP dots, suggesting that the slow emitting state seen in selective excitation could be a triplet state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - About GIS at NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About GIS at NREL NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team analyzes renewable energy resources and many other data sources to determine which energy technologies are viable solutions across the globe and inputs the data into a geographic information system. GIS is a computer-based system used to manipulate, manage, and analyze multidisciplinary geographic and related attribute data. The GIS system is composed of hardware, software, data, and expertise. Using a GIS system allows the user to perform

  16. InP single-junction concentrator cell. Semi-annual report, October 1, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a glass-sealed back-contacted InP or InGaAsP solar cell for use in concentrator systems. Work to be performed in developing this cell includes growing the InP epitaxial layers needed for cells and test structures, developing a model to be used in optimizing the cell structure, measurement of InP parameters necessary for use in the model, and developing the glass-bonding and back-contacting scheme. Accomplishments in these areas are discussed.

  17. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geographic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information System Data Background NREL's GIS Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and...

  18. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last ... GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial ...

  19. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Nicaragua from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nicaragua from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  20. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Cuba from NREL -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuba from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  1. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formationmore » of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.« less

  2. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formation of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution P{H} and H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.

  3. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  4. Mechanism of lateral ordering of InP dots grown on InGaP layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, J.R.R.; Gutierrez, H.R.; Cotta, M.A.; Bettini, J.

    2005-07-04

    The mechanisms leading to the spontaneous formation of a two-dimensional array of InP/InGaP dots grown by chemical-beam epitaxy are discussed. Samples where the InGaP buffer layer was grown at different conditions were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Our results indicate that a periodic strain field related to lateral two-dimensional compositional modulation in the InGaP buffer layer determines the dot nucleation positions during InP growth. Although the periodic strain field in the InGaP is large enough to align the InP dots, both their shape and optical properties are effectively unaltered. This result shows that compositional modulation can be used as a tool for in situ dot positioning.

  5. Seeding of InP islands on InAs quantum dot templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Maltez, R. L.; Bernussi, A. A.; Ugarte, D.; de Carvalho, W.

    2001-06-01

    The ability of stacking layers of islands and their corresponding alignment have prompted a number of studies. The main focus so far has been on stacking self-assembled quantum dot (QD) layers of the same material and composition. Our goal is to create systems of coupled QDs of different electronic properties, aiming at hybridization of their different electronic levels. In this work, we investigate the early stages of the coupling of alternate InAs{endash}InP QD layers through a GaAs spacer layer. We have found that by using an InAs layer containing QDs as seeds, we can control the size, shape and density of InP islands by varying the spacer thickness. We have observed a significant improvement of the InP island size uniformity, as well as an induced size reduction, thus providing an extra degree of tunability previously available only through growth kinetics. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Structure of InP (001) surfaces prepared by decapping and by ion bombardment and annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahlke, D.; Kinsky, J.; Schultz, C.; Pristovsek, M.; Zorn, M.; Esser, N.; Richter, W.

    1997-07-01

    The structure of InP surfaces prepared by ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) and by decapping of InP (001) samples grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy is studied. The structural changes of the surfaces during preparation are monitored by low-energy electron diffraction and related to the surface electronic modifications as revealed by reflectance-anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). For both preparation methods we find (2{times}4) reconstructions and almost identical RAS spectra. This finding contrasts with previous reports usually claiming a (4{times}2) surface after IBA Auger-electron spectroscopy as well as hydrogen-adsorbate vibrations recorded with high-resolution electron-energy spectroscopy indicate an In-rich surface stoichiometry. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. The Facility for 500 MeV Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration Experiments at Budker INP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, A. V.; Lotov, K. V.; Logatchov, P. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2010-11-04

    The experimental PWFA facility currently under construction at the Budker INP is described. The objective is to use electron and positron beams extracted from the VEPP-5 damping ring in PWFA experiments. Due to longitudinal beam compression many PWFA schemes including the efficient blowout regime as well as multibunch regime can be studied. The simulations of beam dynamics in the facility are presented. Also we propose a simple technique for longitudinal beam slicing using dipole kickers and collimator in the damping ring.

  8. Structural characterization of amorphized InP: Evidence for chemical disorder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, C.J.; Ridgway, M.C.; Yu, K.M.; Foran, G.J.; Lee, T.W.; Moon, Y.; Yoon, E.

    1999-03-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements at the In {ital K} edge of amorphous InP are presented. The presence of chemical disorder in the form of like-atom bonding has been unambiguously demonstrated in stoichiometric InP amorphized by ion implantation. In{endash}In bonding comprised 14{percent}{plus_minus}4{percent} of the In{endash}atom constituent bonds. Also, relative to the crystalline value of four P atoms, an increase in the total In coordination number to 4.16{plus_minus}0.32 atoms was observed for the amorphous phase, as composed of 3.56{plus_minus}0.19; P and 0.60{plus_minus}0.13; In atoms. Experimental results were consistent with recent {ital ab initio} structural calculations and, furthermore, demonstrated that amorphous InP is best described by a Polk-like continuous random network, containing both even- and odd-membered rings. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface: Band offsets and oxygen dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KC, Santosh; Dong, Hong; Longo, Roberto C.; Xiong, Ka; Wang, Weichao; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2014-01-14

    Using ab-initio methods, atomic structures and electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are studied within the framework of density functional theory. We examine the InP/HfO{sub 2} model interface electronic structures under varying oxidation conditions. The effects of indium and phosphorous concentrations on interfacial bonding, defect states, band offsets, and the thermodynamic stability at the interface are also investigated. The origin of interfacial gap states in InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are proposed, mainly from the P-rich oxides, which is validated by our experimental work. This highlights the importance of surface passivation prior to high-κ deposition based on the in situ spectroscopic results of atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP.

  10. The Dependence of the Oxidation Enhancement of InP(100) Surface on the Coverage of the Adsorbed Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yun

    2010-06-07

    We report the oxidation of the InP(100) surface promoted by adsorbed Cs by synchrotron radiation photoemission. Oxygen exposure causes reduction of the charge transferred to the InP substrate from Cs and the growth of indium oxide and phosphorous oxide. The oxide growth displays a clear dependence on the Cs coverage. The oxidation of phosphorous is negligible up to 1000 L of O{sub 2} exposure when the Cs coverage is less than half a monolayer (ML), but the formation of the second half monolayer of Cs greatly accelerates the oxidation. This different enhancement of the InP oxidation by the first and the second half monolayer of Cs is due to the double layer structure of the adsorbed Cs atoms, and consequently the higher 6s electron density in the Cs atoms when Cs coverage is larger than 0.5 ML.

  11. Optical, electronic, and structural properties of uncoupled and close-packed arrays of InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micic, O.I.; Jones, K.M.; Cahill, A.; Nozik, A.J.

    1998-12-03

    Solid films consisting of close-packed arrays of InP quantum dots have been prepared by slowly evaporating colloidal solutions of InP quantum dots. The diameters of the quantum dots were controlled to be between about 30 to 60 {angstrom}; size-selective precipitation yielded a size distribution of about 10% about the mean diameter. The arrays show regions of hexagonal order, as well as disordered regions. Oxide layers can form irreversibly on the quantum dot surface and limit the effectiveness of the size-selective precipitation. Photoluminescence spectra obtained from close-packed films of InP quantum dots formed from quantum dots with a single mean diameter and from a mixture of two quantum dot sizes show that energy transfer occurs from the photoexcited smaller quantum dots to the larger quantum dots. The efficiency of this energy transfer process is high.

  12. Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water Authors: Wood, B C ; Schwegler, E ; Choi, W ; Ogitsu, T Publication Date: 2013-09-20 OSTI Identifier: 1130018 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-644315 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 118, no. 2,

  13. Controllable growth and optical properties of InP and InP/InAs nanostructures on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia Li, Junshuai; Cui, Jiangong; Ren, Xiaomin

    2014-12-07

    The growth and optical properties of InP and InP/InAs nanostructures on GaAs nanowires are investigated. InP quantum well and quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires successively with increasing the deposition time of InP. The GaAs/InP nanowire heterostructure exhibits a type-II band alignment. The wavelength of the InP quantum well is in the range of 857892?nm at 77?K, which means that the quantum well is nearly fully strained. The InP quantum dot, which has a bow-shaped cross section, exhibits dislocation-free pure zinc blende structure. Stranski-Krastanow InAs quantum dots are subsequently formed on the GaAs/InP nanowire core-shell structure. The InAs quantum dots are distributed over the middle part of the nanowire, indicating that the In atoms contributing to the quantum dots mainly come from the vapor rather than the substrate. The longest emission wavelength obtained from the InAs QDs is 1039?nm at 77?K. The linewidth is as narrow as 46.3?meV, which is much narrower than those on planar InP substrates and wurtzite InP nanowires, suggesting high-crystal-quality, phase-purity, and size-uniformity of quantum dots.

  14. CyberGIS software: a synthetic review and integration roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaowen; Anselin, Luc; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Cosby, Christopher; Goodchild, Michael; Liu, Yan; Nygers, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    CyberGIS defined as cyberinfrastructure-based geographic information systems (GIS) has emerged as a new generation of GIS representing an important research direction for both cyberinfrastructure and geographic information science. This study introduces a 5-year effort funded by the US National Science Foundation to advance the science and applications of CyberGIS, particularly for enabling the analysis of big spatial data, computationally intensive spatial analysis and modeling (SAM), and collaborative geospatial problem-solving and decision-making, simultaneously conducted by a large number of users. Several fundamental research questions are raised and addressed while a set of CyberGIS challenges and opportunities are identified from scientific perspectives. The study reviews several key CyberGIS software tools that are used to elucidate a vision and roadmap for CyberGIS software research. The roadmap focuses on software integration and synthesis of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and SAM by defining several key integration dimensions and strategies. CyberGIS, based on this holistic integration roadmap, exhibits the following key characteristics: high-performance and scalable, open and distributed, collaborative, service-oriented, user-centric, and community-driven. As a major result of the roadmap, two key CyberGIS modalities gateway and toolkit combined with a community-driven and participatory approach have laid a solid foundation to achieve scientific breakthroughs across many geospatial communities that would be otherwise impossible.

  15. Insight into the photoelectron angular dependent energy distribution of negative-electron-affinity InP photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhanghui; Jiang, Xiangwei; Dong, Shan; Li, Jingbo Li, Shushen; Wang, Linwang

    2014-01-13

    Energy distribution and angular distribution of the photoelectrons from InP photocathodes are investigated using a precise Monte Carlo model. It is found that ?-valley electrons contribute to the first peak of the energy distribution curve, but the second peak is contributed by both ?-valley and L-valley electrons rather than only L-valley electrons. L valley electrons are shown to have a smaller angular spread than ?-valley electrons, which is attributed to the much higher potential energy of L-valley minimum. The further simulation indicates that the performance of InP photocathodes can be improved by increasing the hole concentration or decreasing the temperature, but the activation layer thickness variation only has very slight influence on either energy or angular distribution.

  16. Pseudopotential calculations of electron and hole addition spectra of InAs, InP, and Si quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    2000-07-15

    The electron and hole addition energies, the quasiparticle gap, and the optical gap of InAs, InP, and Si quantum dots are calculated using microscopic pseudopotential wave functions. The effects of the dielectric mismatch between the quantum dot and the surrounding material are included using a realistic profile for the dielectric constant {epsilon}(r). We find that the addition energies and the quasiparticle gap depend strongly on the dielectric constant of the environment {epsilon}{sub out}, while the optical gap is rather insensitive to {epsilon}{sub out}. We compare our results with recent tunneling spectroscopy measurements for InAs nanocrystals, finding excellent agreement. Our calculations for the addition energies and the quasiparticle gap of InP and Si nanocrystals serve as predictions for future experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF SWERA UNEP atmospheric water v... solar Additional Info Field Value Source www.nrel.gov Author National Renewable...

  18. Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy AgencyCompany Organization:...

  19. NREL GIS Data: Bhutan High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL GIS Data: Bhutan High Resolution Wind Resource This shapefile containing 50 meter height data has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However,...

  20. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of InP Solar Cells Using Organic Window Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, N; Lee, K.; Renshaw, C. K.; Xiao, X.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    We employ the organic semiconductor 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) as a nanometer thick window layer for p-InP/indium tin oxide (ITO) Schottky barrierdiodesolar cells. The power conversion efficiency is enhanced compared to ITO/InP cells lacking the PTCDA window layer, primarily due to neutralizing InP surface state charges via hole injection from the PTCDA. This leads to an increased ITO/p-InP Schottky barrier height, and hence to an increased open circuit voltage. The power conversion efficiency of the cells increases from 13.2±0.5% for the ITO/InP cell to 15.4±0.4% for the ITO/4 nm PTCDA/p-InP cell under 1 sun, AM1.5G simulated solar illumination. The PTCDA window layer is also shown to contribute to the photocurrent by light absorption followed by exciton dissociation at the organic/inorganic semiconductor interface.

  1. Photophysics of size-selected InP nanocrystals: Exciton recombination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Wolters, R.H.; Heath, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    We report here on the size-dependent kinetics of exciton recombination in a III{endash}V quantum dot system, InP. The measurements reported include various frequency dependent quantum yields as a function of temperature, frequency dependent luminescence decay curves, and time-gated emission spectra. This data is fit to a three-state quantum model which has been previously utilized to explain photophysical phenomena in II{endash}VI quantum dots. The initial photoexcitation is assumed to place an electron in a (delocalized) bulk conduction band state. Activation barriers for trapping and detrapping of the electron to surface states, as well as activation barriers for surface-state radiationless relaxation processes are measured as a function of particle size. The energy barrier to detrapping is found to be the major factor limiting room temperature band-edge luminescence. This barrier increases with decreasing particle size. For 30 A particles, this barrier is found to be greater than 6 kJ/mol{emdash}a barrier which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that previously found for 32 A CdS nanocrystals. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Structural modifications in InP nanostructures prepared by Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Soni, R. K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Vajpeyi, A. P.; Tripathy, S.

    2007-10-01

    The evolution of nanopatterned InP surfaces by low-energy Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation and their dependence on incidence angle were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman scattering. Ordered surface nanodots of high aspect ratio were created. At large ion incidence angle the dot density decreases and the size varies in the range of 65-130 nm with height of around 25-30 nm. Rapid thermal annealing of the patterned surface shows cluster formation at annealing temperatures of 400 deg. C and above, with some micro-cracks at ion incidence angle of 45 deg. C . With increasing ion incidence angle, the optical phonon Raman modes display systematic downward shift and large asymmetric broadening associated with increased contribution of disorder activated LO and TO modes from the patterned surface. The lowering of phonon frequencies, induced by the phonon wave function confinement, signifies the presence of embedded nanocrystallites in the large sized nanodot patterned surface. The surface damage recovery is achieved by rapid thermal annealing of the samples as reflected in the increased optical phonon frequencies and reduced line shape broadening with annealing temperature. For large ion incident angle, the strain relaxation in the irradiated surface region leads to micro-crack formation in the patterned surface and further hardening of the phonon frequencies.

  3. eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration PDF icon eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant

  4. GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2296 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid in the Evaluation of Flow-Ecology ...

  5. Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are generated by interpolating the model results from computational grids onto an ArcGIS raster grid with 0.003 resolution and are useful for a quick visual examination.1...

  6. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Dynamic Maps, Geographic Information System (GIS) Data and Analysis Tools website provides maps, data and tools for renewable energy resources that determine which energy technologies are viable solutions in domestic and international regions. MapSearch - While this site contains detailed information and quality data, if you want to search for the latest and most up-to-date maps created by NREL, please visit our MapSearch: http://www.nrel.gov/gis/mapsearch/ Renewable Energy Technical

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Data Resources NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, as well as targeted analysis tools that can help determine availability of renewable energy resources. Geographic Information System Data NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and renewable hydrogen. The team has made some of our datasets available for

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geospatial Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Data Science Team The following are members of NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team: Jon Duckworth Michael Gleason Nick Grue Pamela Gray-Hann Donna Heimiller Dylan Hettinger Jim Leyshon Anthony Lopez Galen Maclaurin Meghan Mooney Billy J. Roberts If you have questions about our programs or would like to contact our staff, please email Webmaster. Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster To contact the Webmaster, please provide your name, e-mail address, and message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Data Science Team

  10. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0006554 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial infrastructure, which contains the basin baseline datasets for surface and groundwater, customized analytical toolsets, and user interfaces (UIs). The water resource geospatial infrastructure will provide water management solutions that will facilitate

  11. GSG-GIS development program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.C.

    1992-10-15

    For the past 40 years, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been subjected to numerous geological and geotechnical investigations in support of facility construction and waste site development and remediation. Over this period,.a variety of different subcontractors have collected large quantities of geoscience data. In addition, current programs involve numerous investigators from different departments, and consequently, earth science data and interpretations are scattered among the departments, investigators, and subcontractors at SRS. As a result, scientific and management decisions cannot take advantage of the significant body of information that exists at SRS. Recent DOE Orders (Systematic Evaluation Program, 1991) have put specific requirements on their contractors to compile geological databases to coordinate DOE site data gathering and interpretations, and to assist in compiling safety analysis reports. The Earth Science Advisory Committee and the Environmental Advisory Committee have also made specific recommendations on the management of SRS geoscience data. This plan describes a management system to identify, communicate, and compile SRS geological (including geohydrologic), seismological, and geotechnical (656) data and interpretations on a Geographic Information System (GIS).

  12. Evaluating the Potential of Commercial GIS for Accelerator Configuration Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.L. Larrieu; Y.R. Roblin; K. White; R. Slominski

    2005-10-10

    The Geographic Information System (GIS) is a tool used by industries needing to track information about spatially distributed assets. A water utility, for example, must know not only the precise location of each pipe and pump, but also the respective pressure rating and flow rate of each. In many ways, an accelerator such as CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) can be viewed as an ''electron utility''. Whereas the water utility uses pipes and pumps, the ''electron utility'' uses magnets and RF cavities. At Jefferson lab we are exploring the possibility of implementing ESRI's ArcGIS as the framework for building an all-encompassing accelerator configuration database that integrates location, configuration, maintenance, and connectivity details of all hardware and software. The possibilities of doing so are intriguing. From the GIS, software such as the model server could always extract the most-up-to-date layout information maintained by the Survey & Alignment for lattice modeling. The Mechanical Engineering department could use ArcGIS tools to generate CAD drawings of machine segments from the same database. Ultimately, the greatest benefit of the GIS implementation could be to liberate operators and engineers from the limitations of the current system-by-system view of machine configuration and allow a more integrated regional approach. The commercial GIS package provides a rich set of tools for database-connectivity, versioning, distributed editing, importing and exporting, and graphical analysis and querying, and therefore obviates the need for much custom development. However, formidable challenges to implementation exist and these challenges are not only technical and manpower issues, but also organizational ones. The GIS approach would crosscut organizational boundaries and require departments, which heretofore have had free reign to manage their own data, to cede some control and agree to a centralized framework.

  13. In situ study of HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition on InP(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-04-29

    The interfacial chemistry of the native oxide and chemically treated InP samples during atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfO{sub 2} growth at 250 Degree-Sign C has been studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The In-oxide concentration is seen to gradually decrease on the native oxide and acid etched samples. No significant changes of the P-oxide concentrations are detected, while the P-oxides chemical states are seen to change gradually during the initial cycles of ALD on the native oxide and the chemically treated samples. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment strongly decreases In-oxide and P-oxide concentrations prior to ALD and maintains low concentrations during the ALD process.

  14. In situ study of e-beam Al and Hf metal deposition on native oxide InP (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; KC, Santosh; Azcatl, A.; Cabrera, W.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-11-28

    The interfacial chemistry of thin Al (∼3 nm) and Hf (∼2 nm) metal films deposited by electron beam (e-beam) evaporation on native oxide InP (100) samples at room temperature and after annealing has been studied by in situ angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The In-oxides are completely scavenged forming In-In/In-(Al/Hf) bonding after Al and Hf metal deposition. The P-oxide concentration is significantly decreased, and the P-oxide chemical states have been changed to more P-rich oxides upon metal deposition. Indium diffusion through these metals before and after annealing at 250 °C has also been characterized. First principles calculation shows that In has lower surface formation energy compared with Al and Hf metals, which is consistent with the observed indium diffusion behavior.

  15. Growth mode and strain relaxation of InAs on InP (111)A grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H.; Daniels-Race, T.; Wang, Z.

    1999-03-01

    Growth mode and strain relaxation of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown InAs/InAlAs/InP (111)A system have been investigated using reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. In direct contrast to the well-studied InAs/GaAs system, our experimental results show that the InAs grown on InAlAs/InP (111)A follows the Stranski{endash}Krastanov mode. Both self-organized InAs quantum dots and relaxed InAs islands are formed depending on the InAs coverage. Intense luminescence signals from both the InAs quantum dots and wetting layer are observed. The luminescence efficiency of (111)A samples is comparable to that of (001) samples, suggesting the feasibility of fabricating quantum dot optoelectronic devices on InP (111)A surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  17. Ab initio calculations of polarization, piezoelectric constants, and elastic constants of InAs and InP in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajlaoui, C. Pedesseau, L.; Raouafi, F.; Ben Cheikh Larbi, F.; Even, J.; Jancu, J.-M.

    2015-08-15

    We report first-principle density functional calculations of the spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric stress constants, and elastic constants for the III–V wurtzite structure semiconductors InAs and InP. Using the density functional theory implemented in the VASP code, we obtain polarization values–0.011 and–0.013 C/m{sup 2}, and piezoelectric constants e{sub 33} (e{sub 31}) equal to 0.091 (–0.026) and 0.012 (–0.081) C/m{sup 2} for structurally relaxed InP and InAs respectively. These values are consistently smaller than those of nitrides. Therefore, we predict a smaller built-in electric field in such structures.

  18. Application of GIS in siting of linear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, G.A. III; Heatwole, D.W.; Schmidt, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are powerful tools in the analysis and selection of environmentally acceptable corridors for linear facilities, such as roads and utility lines. GIS can serve several functions in corridor siting, including managing and manipulating extensive environmental databases, weighting and compositing data layers to enable spatial analysis for a path of least resistance,'' summarizing statistics for a comparison of alternative corridors, preparing color graphics for presentations and reports, and providing a record of alternative analysis for permitting reviews and legal challenges. In this paper, the authors examine the benefits and limitations of using GIS to site linear facilities, based mainly on their experience in siting a 600-mile natural gas pipeline in Florida. They implemented a phased analytical approach to define acceptable corridors several miles in width and then selected viable routes within the corridors using a magnified scale. This approach resulted in a dynamic siting process which required numerous iterations of analysis. Consequently, their experience has instilled the benefits derived by expending preliminary effort to create macros of the GIS analytical process so that subsequent effort is minimized during numerous iterations of corridor and route refinement.

  19. Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation at the May 26, 2010, TAP Webinar presented by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials by National Renewable Energy Laboratory GIS Applications Developers Ted Quinby and Dan Getman.

  20. Detection of lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub n} short period superlattice on InP by magnetoexciton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.D.; Mirecki-Millunchick, J.; Follstaedt, D.; Hafich, M.; Lee, S.; Reno, J.; Twesten, R.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental signature for detecting spontaneous lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub n} short period superlattice on a InP substrate based on magnetoexciton spectroscopy is presented. The authors find by aligning the magnetic field in three crystallographic directions, one parallel to and the other two perpendicular to the composition modulation direction, that the magnetoexciton shifts are anisotropic and are a good indicator for the presence of composition modulation.

  1. Investigation of InP etching mechanisms in a Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gatilova, L.; Bouchoule, S.; Guilet, S.; Chabert, P.

    2009-03-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used in order to investigate the InP etching mechanisms in a Cl{sub 2}-H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma. The authors have previously shown that anisotropic etching of InP could be achieved for a H{sub 2} percentage in the 35%-45% range where the InP etch rate also presents a local maximum [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 24, 2381 (2006)], and that anisotropic etching was due to an enhanced passivation of the etched sidewalls by a silicon oxide layer [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 666 (2008)]. In this work, it is shown that this etching behavior is related to a maximum in the H atom concentration in the plasma. The possible enhancement of the sidewall passivation process in the presence of H is investigated by comparing OES measurements and etching results obtained for Cl{sub 2}-H{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2}-Ar gas mixtures.

  2. Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

  3. Effect of matrix on InAs self-organized quantum dots on InP substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustinov, V.M.; Weber, E.R.; Ruvimov, S.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Zhukov, A.E.; Egorov, A.Y.; Kovsh, A.R.; Tsatsulnikov, A.F.; Kopev, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    InAs self-organized quantum dots in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As matrices have been grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The dot size in InGaAs has been found to be 3{endash}4 times larger, but the areal density about an order of magnitude smaller than that in InAlAs. Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) of the InAs/InGaAs quantum dots is characterized by a narrow (35 meV) PL line as compared to that of InAs/InAlAs quantum dots (170 meV). Quantum dot formation increases the carrier localization energy as compared to quantum well structures with the same InAs thickness in a similar manner for both InAs/InGaAs and InAs/InAlAs structures. The effect of the barrier band gap on the optical transition energy is qualitatively the same for quantum well and quantum dot structures. The results demonstrate a possibility of controlling the quantum dot emission wavelength by varying the matrix composition. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. GIS applications to evaluate public health effects of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; Hodges, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modeling projections of future climatic conditions suggest changes in temperature and precipitation patterns that might induce direct adverse effects on human health by altering the extent and severity of infectious and vector-borne diseases. The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases, for example, could increase substantially in areas where temperature and relative humidity rise. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offers new methodologies to evaluate the impact of global warming on changes in the incidence of infectious and vector-borne diseases. This research illustrates the potential analytical and communication uses of GIS for monitoring historical patterns of climate and human health variables and for projecting changes in these health variables with global warming.

  5. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Maps These maps illustrate the biomass resources generated in the United States by county. Biomass feedstock data are analyzed both statistically and graphically using a geographic information system (GIS). The following feedstock categories are evaluated: crop residues, forest residues, primary and secondary mill residues, urban wood waste, and methane emissions from animal manure, landfills, wastewater treatment, and industrial, institutional, and commercial organic waste (e.g. food

  6. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in hydrogen infrastructure, demand, market and resource analyses. The JPG images are samples of the maps available in the following PDFs. Refer to the report for further information. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Map of U.S. Hydrogen Infrastructure Demand - Consumer Strategy U.S. Hydrogen Infrastructure Demand - Consumer Strategy (JPG 129

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Potential Technical Potential Figure 1: Defining 'Potential' Image of a triangle divided into sections called Market, Economic, Technical, and Resource that include the key assumptions for each section on a bullet list beside it. Enlarge image Renewable energy technical potential as defined in this report: U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis (PDF 2.7 MB) represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance,

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Wind Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team offers both a national wind resource assessment of the United States and high-resolution wind data. The national wind resource assessment was created for the U.S. Department of Energy in 1986 by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and is documented in the Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  10. JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework JeoViewer is an intelligent, object-oriented geographical information system (GIS) framework written in Java. It can provide links to any object's data and behaviors, and is optimized for spatial geometry representation. Unlike traditional "static" GIS systems, JeoViewer is dynamic and can be dynamically linked to objects, models and other live data streams. JeoViewer's object-oriented approach provides a

  11. The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PDF icon The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems More Documents & Publications CX-002853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geospatial Technology Summit The Bioenergy ...

  12. MgSe/ZnSe/CdSe coupled quantum wells grown on InP substrate with intersubband absorption covering 1.55??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Guopeng; Shen, Aidong; De Jesus, Joel; Tamargo, Maria C.

    2014-12-08

    The authors report the observation of intersubband (ISB) transitions in the optical communication wavelength region in MgSe/ZnSe/CdSe coupled quantum wells (QWs). The coupled QWs were grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. By inserting ZnSe layers to compensate the strain, samples with high structural quality were obtained, as indicated by well resolved satellite peaks in high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The observed ISB transition energies agree well with the calculated values.

  13. A GIS approach to cultural resources management and NEPA compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, K.

    1996-06-01

    Cultural resources management and historic preservation compliance are best approached within the broader framework of natural resources planning and land management. Argonne National Laboratory is currently assisting federal agencies with the development of computer- based resource management systems for large facilities, and cultural resources management and preservation are components of these systems. In the area of cultural resources, Argonne is using the GIS tool to demonstrate how federal facilities can manage large, complex databases, integrate cultural resource data with other environmental variables, model distributions of resources to aid in inventory and evaluation, link the data to quantitative and impact modes, and effectively manage and monitor resource planning activities and environmental compliance.

  14. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - International Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in international resource analyses. The JPG images are samples of the maps available. Refer to the Geospatial Toolkits for further information. Map of the Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Power Density at 80m Map of Flat Plate Tilted at Latitude Resource of China Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m JPG 6,336 KB Map of

  15. In situ study of the role of substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Santosh, K.C.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; McDonnell, S.; Kim, J.; Zhernokletov, D.; Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080

    2013-10-21

    The dependence of the “self cleaning” effect of the substrate oxides on substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} on various chemically treated and native oxide InP (100) substrates is investigated using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The removal of In-oxide is found to be more efficient at higher ALD temperatures. The P oxidation states on native oxide and acid etched samples are seen to change, with the total P-oxide concentration remaining constant, after 10 cycles of ALD HfO{sub 2} at different temperatures. An (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} S treatment is seen to effectively remove native oxides and passivate the InP surfaces independent of substrate temperature studied (200 °C, 250 °C and 300 °C) before and after the ALD process. Density functional theory modeling provides insight into the mechanism of the changes in the P-oxide chemical states.

  16. GIS-BASED PREDICTION OF HURRICANE FLOOD INUNDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    A simulation environment is being developed for the prediction and analysis of the inundation consequences for infrastructure systems from extreme flood events. This decision support architecture includes a GIS-based environment for model input development, simulation integration tools for meteorological, hydrologic, and infrastructure system models and damage assessment tools for infrastructure systems. The GIS-based environment processes digital elevation models (30-m from the USGS), land use/cover (30-m NLCD), stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and soils data from the NRCS (STATSGO) to create stream network, subbasins, and cross-section shapefiles for drainage basins selected for analysis. Rainfall predictions are made by a numerical weather model and ingested in gridded format into the simulation environment. Runoff hydrographs are estimated using Green-Ampt infiltration excess runoff prediction and a 1D diffusive wave overland flow routing approach. The hydrographs are fed into the stream network and integrated in a dynamic wave routing module using the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to predict flood depth. The flood depths are then transformed into inundation maps and exported for damage assessment. Hydrologic/hydraulic results are presented for Tropical Storm Allison.

  17. Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M.

    2008-07-08

    A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

  18. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  19. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area undermore » investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.« less

  20. Low density of self-assembled InAs quantum dots grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy on InP(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, E.; Regreny, P.; Robach, Y.; Gendry, M.; Chauvin, N.; Tranvouez, E.; Bremond, G.; Bru-Chevallier, C.; Patriarche, G.

    2006-09-18

    The authors report on a postgrowth method to obtain low density InAs/InP(001) quantum dots by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. They used an approach based on the ripening of the InAs sticks, which is triggered by the sample cooling under arsenic overpressure, before InP capping. Atomic force microscopy images show the evolution of InAs islands from sticks oriented along the [1-10] direction to dot-shaped islands with a density that can be reduced to about 2x10{sup 9} dots/cm{sup 2}. Macro- and microphotoluminescence reveal that these diluted InAs dots exhibit a strong spatial confinement and emit in the 1.55 {mu}m range.

  1. VolmerWeber InAs quantum dot formation on InP (113)B substrates under the surfactant effect of Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yu Bertru, Nicolas; Folliot, Herv; Rohel, Tony; Mauger, Samuel J. C.; Koenraad, Paul M.

    2014-07-21

    We report on Sb surfactant growth of InAs nanostructures on GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} layers deposited on InP (001) and on (113)B oriented substrates. On the (001) orientation, the presence of Sb significantly favors the two-dimensional growth regime. Even after the deposition of 5 mono-layers of InAs, the epitaxial film remains flat and InAs/GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} type-II quantum wells are achieved. On (113)B substrates, same growth runs resulted in formation of high density InAs islands. Microscopic studies show that wetting layer is missing on (113)B substrates, and thus, a Volmer-Weber growth mode is concluded. These different behaviors are attributed to the surface energy changes induced by Sb atoms on surface.

  2. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  3. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A...

  4. Integrating GIS with Distributed Applications Using Dynamic Data-Sharing Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, Robert A. ); Tzemos, Spyridon ); Stoops, LaMar R. )

    2002-08-21

    Effective integration of a stand-alone GIS (e.g., ArcView 3.x) into a complex distributed software application requires an efficient, reliable mechanism for passing data and function requests to and from the GIS component. This paper describes the use of dynamic data-sharing and inter-process communication mechanisms to integrate GIS capability into a multi-jurisdictional distributed emergency management information system. These mechanisms include dynamic layer updates from spatial and attribute information shared via a distributed relational database across multiple sites; storage of private and shared ViewMarks to facilitate consistent GIS views; and asynchronous inter-process communication using function queuing and a data sharing library.

  5. Effect of Cl{sub 2}- and HBr-based inductively coupled plasma etching on InP surface composition analyzed using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchoule, S.; Vallier, L.; Patriarche, G.; Chevolleau, T.; Cardinaud, C.

    2012-05-15

    A Cl{sub 2}-HBr-O{sub 2}/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process has been adapted for the processing of InP-based heterostructures in a 300-mm diameter CMOS etching tool. Smooth and anisotropic InP etching is obtained at moderate etch rate ({approx}600 nm/min). Ex situ x-ray energy dispersive analysis of the etched sidewalls shows that the etching anisotropy is obtained through a SiO{sub x} passivation mechanism. The stoichiometry of the etched surface is analyzed in situ using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching results in a significantly P-rich surface. The phosphorous layer identified on the top surface is estimated to be {approx}1-1.3-nm thick. On the other hand InP etching in HBr/Ar plasma results in a more stoichiometric surface. In contrast to the etched sidewalls, the etched surface is free from oxides with negligible traces of silicon. Exposure to ambient air of the samples submitted to Cl{sub 2}-based chemistry results in the complete oxidation of the P-rich top layer. It is concluded that a post-etch treatment or a pure HBr plasma step may be necessary after Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching for the recovery of the InP material.

  6. Effect of band alignment on photoluminescence and carrier escape from InP surface quantum dots grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, Nripendra N.; Biswas, Pranab; Banerji, P.; Dhabal Das, Tushar; Das, Sanat Kr.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Biswas, D.

    2014-01-28

    A detailed analysis of photoluminescence (PL) from InP quantum dots (QDs) grown on Si has been carried out to understand the effect of substrate/host material in the luminescence and carrier escape process from the surface quantum dots. Such studies are required for the development of monolithically integrated next generation III-V QD based optoelectronics with fully developed Si microelectronics. The samples were grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technique, and the PL measurements were made in the temperature range 1080?K. The distribution of the dot diameter as well as the dot height has been investigated from atomic force microscopy. The origin of the photoluminescence has been explained theoretically. The band alignment of InP/Si heterostructure has been determined, and it is found be type II in nature. The positions of the conduction band minimum of Si and the 1st excited state in the conduction band of InP QDs have been estimated to understand the carrier escape phenomenon. A blue shift with a temperature co-efficient of 0.19?meV/K of the PL emission peak has been found as a result of competitive effect of different physical processes like quantum confinement, strain, and surface states. The corresponding effect of blue shift by quantum confinement and strain as well as the red shift by the surface states in the PL peaks has been studied. The origin of the luminescence in this heterojunction is found to be due to the recombination of free excitons, bound excitons, and a transition from the 1st electron excited state in the conduction band (e{sub 1}) to the heavy hole band (hh{sub 1}). Monotonic decrease in the PL intensity due to increase of thermally escaped carriers with temperature has been observed. The change in barrier height by the photogenerated electric-field enhanced the capture of the carriers by the surface states rather than their accumulation in the QD excited state. From an analysis of the dependence of the PL intensity, peak position, and line width with temperature and excitation source, the existence of free and bound excitonic recombination together with e{sub 1} ? hh{sub 1} transitions in the QDs is established.

  7. Geographic Information System (GIS) Emergency Support for the May 2000 Cerro Grande Wildfire, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R.Mynard; G.N.Keating; P.M.Rich; D.R. Bleakly

    2003-05-01

    In May 2000 the Cerro Grande wildfire swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, burning approximately 17,400 ha (43,000 acres) and causing evacuation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the communities of Los Alamos and White Rock. An integral part of emergency response during the fire was the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology, which continues to be used in support of post-fire restoration and environmental monitoring. During the fire Laboratory GIS staff and volunteers from other organizations worked to produce maps and provide support for emergency managers, including at an emergency GIS facility in Santa Fe. Subsequent to the fire, Laboratory GIS teams supported the multiagency Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) team to provide GIS data and maps for planning mitigation efforts. The GIS teams continue to help researchers, operations personnel, and managers deal with the tremendous changes caused by the fire. Much of the work is under the auspices of the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project (CGRP) to promote recovery from fire damage, improve information exchange, enhance emergency management, and conduct mitigation activities. GIS efforts during the fire provided important lessons about institutional matters, working relationships, and emergency preparedness. These lessons include the importance of (1) an integrated framework for assessing natural and human hazards in a landscape context; (2) a strong GIS capability for emergency response; (3) coordinated emergency plans for GIS operations; (4) a method for employees to report their whereabouts and receive authoritative information during an evacuation; (5) GIS data that are complete, backed-up, and available during an emergency; (6) adaptation of GIS to the circumstances of the emergency; (7) better coordination in the GIS community; (8) better integration of GIS into LANL operations; and (9) a central data warehouse for data and metadata. These lessons are important for planning future directions of GIS at LANL. Growing maturity of GIS is expected to lead to standardization and a better-integrated, more-coordinated approach to data sharing and emergency management at LANL, and within DOE, in accord with the federal government's increasing focus on electronic communication for its organizational and public interactions.

  8. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  9. Use of ArcGIS in Environmental Monitoring at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    oertel; giles

    2007-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy site located in southeastern Idaho. The INL is required to perform environmental monitoring of anthropogenically introduced contaminants. One primary contaminant of interest is radioactive Cs-137 which is resident in INL soils due to past operational activities and atmospheric weapons testing. Collection of field data is performed using vehicle mounted and portable radiation detector units. All data is combined in ArcGIS and displayed over georeferenced satellite images and digital elevation models. The use of the ArcGIS geostatistical analysis package enhances the ability to look for areas of higher Cs-137 concentration. Combining current monitoring results with meteorological wind pattern maps allows for siting of new and improved monitoring locations. Use of the ArcGIS package provides an integrated analysis and mapping protocol for use in radioactive contaminant monitoring.

  10. GIS solutions for ecosystem management in developing countries: A case study of Sao Tome and Principe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, L.; Barrasso, T.; Pinto da Costa, H.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote awareness of the application of the Geographic information system (GIS) technology to the management of ecosystems in developing countries. The adoptation of systematic environmental research and management techniques by national and local conservation programs helps ensure the sustainability of important biological resources.

  11. RE Atlas: The U.S. Atlas of Renewable Resources (Interactive Map, GIS Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This interactive data map allows a user to explore the locations across the U.S. of many different basic, renewable energy resources. The many layers can be activated one at a time or in multiple combinations and the GIS display draws from a rich combination of data collections.

  12. Coastal water quality from remote sensing and GIS. A case study on South West Sardinia (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poli, U.; Ippoliti, M.; Venturini, C.; Falcone, P.; Marino, A.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the application of remote sensing image processing and GIS techniques in monitoring and managing coastal areas is proposed. The methodology has been applied to South-West Sardinia Coast where the environment is endangered by industrial plants and other human activities. The area is characterized by the presence of many submarine springs aligned along coastal cliffs. Water quality parameters (chlorophyll, suspended sediments and temperature) spatial and temporal variations, have been studied using Landsat TM images. Particularly, in this paper are reported the results referred to sea surface thermal gradients, considered as one of the main water quality index. Thermal gradients have been mapped in order to outline water circulation, thermal pollution and presence and distribution of submarine springs. Furthermore, a GIS approach of relating mono and multitemporal TM data with ground referenced information on industrial plants characteristics and distribution has been applied.

  13. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  14. GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L.

    2008-05-15

    The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

  15. Monitoring landscape response to climate change using remote sensing and GIS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhas, R.H.; Dolan, P.H.; Goetz, A.F.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Increasing concern over the threat of global warming has precipitated the need for study sites which can be scientifically monitored to detect and follow the effects of environmental landscape change. Extensive eolian dune deposits in northeastern Colorado provide an ideal study site. These dune complexes, found along the South Platte River, are currently stabilized by a thin cover of shortgrass prairie vegetation. However, stratigraphic evidence demonstrates that during at least four times in the past 10,000 years, the dunes were actively migrating across the landscape. In addition, climate models indicate that the High Plains could be one of the first areas to react to climate changes when they occur. The scaling relationships that contribute to the evolution of the landscape are nearly impossible to understand without the regional perspective that remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) techniques provide. Imagery acquired with the NASA/JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is processed to detect the amount of sand exposed, as well as the percent vegetation cover that is currently stabilizing the dunes. Excellent discrimination is found between areas of low and no vegetation, something not possible with traditional analysis methods. Seasonal changes are also emphasized. This information is incorporated into the GIS database the authors created, which also has information on parameters that influence the landscape: elevation, soil type, surface/subsurface hydrology, etc. With these data areas that are susceptible to climate change are highlighted, but more importantly, the reasons for the susceptibility are determined using the GIS's analytical capabilities.

  16. An open source GIS tool to quantify the visual impact of wind turbines and photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minelli, Annalisa; Marchesini, Ivan; Taylor, Faith E.; De Rosa, Pierluigi; Casagrande, Luca; Cenci, Michele

    2014-11-15

    Although there are clear economic and environmental incentives for producing energy from solar and wind power, there can be local opposition to their installation due to their impact upon the landscape. To date, no international guidelines exist to guide quantitative visual impact assessment of these facilities, making the planning process somewhat subjective. In this paper we demonstrate the development of a method and an Open Source GIS tool to quantitatively assess the visual impact of these facilities using line-of-site techniques. The methods here build upon previous studies by (i) more accurately representing the shape of energy producing facilities, (ii) taking into account the distortion of the perceived shape and size of facilities caused by the location of the observer, (iii) calculating the possible obscuring of facilities caused by terrain morphology and (iv) allowing the combination of various facilities to more accurately represent the landscape. The tool has been applied to real and synthetic case studies and compared to recently published results from other models, and demonstrates an improvement in accuracy of the calculated visual impact of facilities. The tool is named r.wind.sun and is freely available from GRASS GIS AddOns. - Highlights: • We develop a tool to quantify wind turbine and photovoltaic panel visual impact. • The tool is freely available to download and edit as a module of GRASS GIS. • The tool takes into account visual distortion of the shape and size of objects. • The accuracy of calculation of visual impact is improved over previous methods.

  17. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  18. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - MapSearch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share MapSearch MapSearch Logo is a computer monitor with a magnifying glass suspended in the air before it. Use our MapSearch to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geospatial Data Science Team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit results. June 2013 - The NREL GIS team released a new version of the Mapsearch tool. This new version should eliminate some of the browser issues experienced with the previous tool. This latest

  19. Development of analytic intermodal freight networks for use within a GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, F.; Xiong, D.; Middendorf, D.

    1997-05-01

    The paper discusses the practical issues involved in constructing intermodal freight networks that can be used within GIS platforms to support inter-regional freight routing and subsequent (for example, commodity flow) analysis. The procedures described can be used to create freight-routable and traffic flowable interstate and intermodal networks using some combination of highway, rail, water and air freight transportation. Keys to realistic freight routing are the identification of intermodal transfer locations and associated terminal functions, a proper handling of carrier-owned and operated sub-networks within each of the primary modes of transport, and the ability to model the types of carrier services being offered.

  20. The application of GIS and remote sensing technologies for site characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, R.C.; McCord, R.A.; Dobson, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Environmental cleanup and restoration of hazardous waste sites are major activities at federal facilities around the US. Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies are very useful computer tools to aid in site characterization, monitoring, assessment, and remediation efforts. Results from applying three technologies are presented to demonstrate examples of site characterization and environmental assessment for a federal facility. The first technology involves the development and use of GIS within the comprehensive Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) to integrate facility data, terrain models, aerial and satellite imagery, demographics, waste area information, and geographic data bases. The second technology presents 3-D subsurface analyses and displays of groundwater and contaminant measurements within waste areas. In the third application, aerial survey information is being used to characterize land cover and vegetative patterns, detect change, and study areas of previous waste activities and possible transport pathways. These computer technologies are required to manage, analyze, and display the large amounts of environmental and geographic data that must be handled in carrying out effective environmental restoration.

  1. The application of GIS and remote sensing technologies for site characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, R.C.; McCord, R.A.; Dobson, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental cleanup and restoration of hazardous waste sites are major activities at federal facilities around the US. Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies are very useful computer tools to aid in site characterization, monitoring, assessment, and remediation efforts. Results from applying three technologies are presented to demonstrate examples of site characterization and environmental assessment for a federal facility. The first technology involves the development and use of GIS within the comprehensive Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) to integrate facility data, terrain models, aerial and satellite imagery, demographics, waste area information, and geographic data bases. The second technology presents 3-D subsurface analyses and displays of groundwater and contaminant measurements within waste areas. In the third application, aerial survey information is being used to characterize land cover and vegetative patterns, detect change, and study areas of previous waste activities and possible transport pathways. These computer technologies are required to manage, analyze, and display the large amounts of environmental and geographic data that must be handled in carrying out effective environmental restoration.

  2. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  3. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  4. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

  5. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E.; David, N.A.; Irvine, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  6. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  7. Evaluation of Open Geospatial Consortium Standards fur Use In LLNL Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R; Chubb, K; Schek, J

    2005-09-28

    The objective of this project is to evaluate existing and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for use in LLNL programs that rely heavily on geographic data. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to avoid duplication of effort, lower development costs, and encourage competition based on improved capability and performance rather than vendor lock-in. Some of these standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, DOE and DHS. A serious evaluation of this technology is appropriate at this time due to increasing interest and mandated compliance in the Federal government in some situations. A subset of OGC standards is identified and reviewed with a focus on applications to LLNL programs. Each standard or recommendation reviewed was evaluated in general terms. In addition, for specific programs such as Gen&SIS and NARAC, a specific evaluation was made of several of the standards and how they could be used most effectively. It is also important to evaluate the acceptance of these standards in the commercial arena. The implementation of OGC standards by the largest GIS vendor (ESRI) was reviewed. At present, OGC standards are primary useful in specific situations. More generally, many of the standards are immature and their impact on the government and commercial sectors is unclear. Consequently, OGC and related developments need to be observed. As specific standards or groups of standards mature and establish their relevance, these can also be incorporated in LLNL programs as requirements dictate, especially if open implementations and commercial products are available.

  8. Web-GIS oriented systems viability for municipal solid waste selective collection optimization in developed and transient economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rada, E.C.; Ragazzi, M.; Fedrizzi, P.

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? As an appropriate solution for MSW management in developed and transient countries. ? As an option to increase the efficiency of MSW selective collection. ? As an opportunity to integrate MSW management needs and services inventories. ? As a tool to develop Urban Mining actions. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste management is a multidisciplinary activity that includes generation, source separation, storage, collection, transfer and transport, processing and recovery, and, last but not least, disposal. The optimization of waste collection, through source separation, is compulsory where a landfill based management must be overcome. In this paper, a few aspects related to the implementation of a Web-GIS based system are analyzed. This approach is critically analyzed referring to the experience of two Italian case studies and two additional extra-European case studies. The first case is one of the best examples of selective collection optimization in Italy. The obtained efficiency is very high: 80% of waste is source separated for recycling purposes. In the second reference case, the local administration is going to be faced with the optimization of waste collection through Web-GIS oriented technologies for the first time. The starting scenario is far from an optimized management of municipal solid waste. The last two case studies concern pilot experiences in China and Malaysia. Each step of the Web-GIS oriented strategy is comparatively discussed referring to typical scenarios of developed and transient economies. The main result is that transient economies are ready to move toward Web oriented tools for MSW management, but this opportunity is not yet well exploited in the sector.

  9. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  10. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharifi, Mozafar Hadidi, Mosslem Vessali, Elahe Mosstafakhani, Parasto Taheri, Kamal Shahoie, Saber Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-15

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  11. Radiological Survey Tool Set for ArcGIS 8.3 and ArcPad 6.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGER, COTTRELL

    2004-11-30

    The Radiological Control Operations (RCO) group at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is tasked with conducting routine surveys for the detection of radiological contaminants in the environment. The Radiological Survey Tool Set (RSTS) was developed by the Environmental & Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) group of SRS to assist RCO personnel in this survey process. The tool set consists of two major components. The first component is a custom extension for ArcGIS 8.3 that allows the user to interactively create a sampling plan prior to entering the field. Additionally, the extension allows the user to upload field-collected data to the GIS with post-processing functionality. The second component is a custom ArcPad 6.0 applet. This applet provides the user with navigational capabilities to a selected origin point with the help of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology, and the recording of the sample data results into a hand-held field computer via ArcPad 6.0 software.

  12. Macroalgae Analysis A National GIS-based Analysis of Macroalgae Production Potential Summary Report and Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roesijadi, Guritno; Coleman, Andre M.; Judd, Chaeli; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Buenau, Kate E.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-12-01

    The overall project objective is to conduct a strategic analysis to assess the state of macroalgae as a feedstock for biofuels production. The objective in FY11 is to develop a multi-year systematic national assessment to evaluate the U.S. potential for macroalgae production using a GIS-based assessment tool and biophysical growth model developed as part of these activities. The initial model development for both resource assessment and constraints was completed and applied to the demonstration areas. The model for macroalgal growth was extended to the EEZ off the East and West Coasts of the United States, and a plan to merge the findings for an initial composite assessment was developed. In parallel, an assessment of land-based, port, and offshore infrastructure needs based on published and grey literature was conducted. Major information gaps and challenges encountered during this analysis were identified. Also conducted was an analysis of the type of local, state, and federal requirements that pertain to permitting land-based facilities and nearshore/offshore culture operations

  13. Structural Analysis for Gold Mineralization Using Remote Sensing and Geochemical Techniques in a GIS Environment: Island of Lesvos, Hellas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokos, D. Argialas, D. Mavrantza, R. St Seymour, K.; Vamvoukakis, C.; Kouli, M.; Lamera, S.; Paraskevas, H.; Karfakis, I.; Denes, G

    2000-12-15

    Exploration for epithermal Au has been active lately in the Aegean Sea of the eastern Mediterranean Basin, both in the islands of the Quaternary arc and in those of the back-arc region. The purpose of this study was the structural mapping and analysis for a preliminary investigation of possible epithermal gold mineralization, using remotely sensed data and techniques, structural and field data, and geochemical information, for a specific area on the Island of Lesvos. Therefore, Landsat-TM and SPOT-Pan satellite images and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area were processed digitally using spatial filtering techniques for the enhancement and recognition of the geologically significant lineaments, as well as algebraic operations with band ratios and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), for the identification of alteration zones. Statistical rose diagrams and a SCHMIDT projection Stereo Net were generated from the lineament maps and the collected field data (dip and strike measurements of faults, joints, and veins), respectively. The derived lineament map and the band ratio images were manipulated in a GIS environment, in order to study the relation of the tectonic pattern to both the alteration zoning and the geomorphology of the volcanic field of the study area. Target areas of high interest for possible mineralization also were specified using geochemical techniques, such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, trace-element, and fluid-inclusion analysis. Finally, preliminary conclusions were derived about possible mineralization, the type (high or low sulfidation), and the extent of mineralization, by combining the structural information with geochemical information.

  14. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor encountered many technical challenging and hasn't been done in the past for any oil shale basin. The database built during this study remains valuable for any other future studies involving oil shale and water resource management in the Piceance Basin. The methodology applied in the development of the GIS based Geospatial Infrastructure can be readily adapted for other professionals to develop database structure for other similar basins.

  15. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  16. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng )

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  17. A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2013-03-15

    A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

  18. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M.; Krysa, A. B.

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5?nm at 300?K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11?nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  19. Photoluminescence Imaging Characterization of Thin-Film InP ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2015 IEEE 42nd Photovoltaic Specialist Conference (PVSC), 14-19 June 2015, New Orleans, Louisiana; Related Information: Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE 42nd Photovoltaic Specialist ...

  20. GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Keith Parks at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C.

  1. eGIS_Portal-PIA_WEB.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    cover_booked.indd cover_booked.indd PDF icon cover_booked.indd More Documents & Publications Three Year Rolling Timeline Order Module--DOE O 430.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT The Department of Energy Asset Management Plan (2015)

    Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Ultrasonic Acoustic Deterrent for Reducing Bat Fatalities at Wind Turbines Edward B. Arnett 1 * ¤ , Cris D. Hein 1 , Michael R. Schirmacher 1 , Manuela M. P. Huso 2 , Joseph M. Szewczak 3 1 Bat Conservation International,

  2. GIS keyword | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Open government map data initiatives in the USA or Canada? IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential more Group members (8) Managers: NickL Recent members:...

  3. GIS Method for Developing Wind Supply Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.; Heimiller, D.; Cowlin, S.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes work conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the Wind Technology Partnership (WTP) sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This project has developed methods that the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) intends to use in the planning and development of China's 30 GW of planned capacity. Because of China's influence within the community of developing countries, the methods and the approaches here may help foster wind development in other countries.

  4. Surface Chemistry of GaP(001) and InP(001) in Contact with Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 118, no. 2, December 20, 2013, pp. 1062 ...

  5. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; COATINGS; INDIUM PHOSPHIDES; MICROSCOPY; OXIDATION; ...

  6. Rapid, Reversible, SolidGas and Solution-Phase Insertion of CO 2 into InP Bonds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dickie, Diane A.; Barker, Madeline T.; Land, Michael A.; Hughes, Kira E.; Clyburne, Jason A. C.; Kemp, Richard A.

    2015-11-17

    The P,P-chelated heteroleptic complex bis[bis(diisopropylphosphino)amido]indium chloride [(i-Pr2P)2N]2InCl was prepared in high yield by treating InCl3 with 2 equiv of (i-Pr2P)2NLi in Et2O/tetrahydrofuran solution. Samples of [(i-Pr2P)2N]2InCl in a pentane slurry, a CH2Cl2 solution, or in the solid state were exposed to CO2, resulting in the insertion of CO2 into two of the four MP bonds to produce [O2CP(i-Pr2)NP(i-Pr2)]2InCl in each case. These compounds were characterized by multinuclear NMR and IR spectroscopy, as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction. ReactIR solution studies show that the reaction is complete in less than 1 min at room temperature in solution and in less thanmore2 h in the solidgas reaction. The CO2 complex is stable up to at least 60 C under vacuum, but the starting material is regenerated with concomitant loss of carbon dioxide upon heating above 75 C. Furthermore, the compound [(i-Pr2P)2N]2InCl also reacts with CS2 to give a complicated mixture of products, one of which was identified as the CS2 cleavage product [S=P(i-Pr2)NP(i-Pr2)]2InCl]2(?-Cl)[?-(i-Pr2P)2N)].less

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal Prospector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting data layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Prospector The Geothermal Prospector mapping tool provides an excellent data resource for visual exploration of geothermal resources using the tools and datasets required to produce and disseminate both exploration gap analysis and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) planning and analysis. In 2010, NREL developed Geothermal

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Geospatial Toolkits Geothermal Hydrogen International Marine & Hydrokinetic Solar Wind Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Team Publications Contact Us...

  9. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  10. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy...

  11. Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORSSAB recommends that DOE include future actions planned in fact sheets that are on the DOE Geographical Information System.

  12. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting dataset layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Data...

  13. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Biomass Data These datasets represent the biomass resources available in the United States by...

  14. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Federal Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Program (FEMP) Maps Federal Energy Management Program The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) teamed with Geospatial Analysis staff at NREL to update the analysis for this project and created an interactive FEMP Screening Map application. The previous maps have been archived. If you have a need for one of the archived maps, please contact the Webmaster. This new application examines the viability of three solar technologies in the United States with a high-level annualized

  15. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting dataset layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Maps These maps show existing and developing geothermal power plants, geothermal resource potential estimates, and other information related to geothermal power. They are updated as information becomes available, but may not represent all available geothermal data. Resource Potential The geothermal resource potential map (JPG

  16. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops maps for various renewable resources and for specific projects. As a benefit to the public, a majority of static maps are offered and Google Map (KML/KMZ) files on a tool called MapSearch. Biomass Maps Maps showing the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Feedstock categories include crop residues; forest residues; primary and secondary mill residues; urban wood waste; and methane emissions from manure

  17. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Click anywhere on the document title to see a summary or click on the PDF icon to see full text. PDF 3.5 MB Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S. (2011). Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities. 54 pp.; NREL Report No. TP-6A20-48986. PDF 5.6 MB Dahle, D.; Elliott, D.; Heimiller, D.; Mehos, M.; Robichaud, R.; Schwartz, M.; Stafford,

  18. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Potential Economic Potential Types of Renewable Generation Potential An image of a overlapping circles labelled Resource, Technical, Economic, and Market Potential that include the key assumptions for each segment on a bullet list inside it. Enlarge image The report Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for

  19. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MapSearch Searching for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Solar Maps Solar maps provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells. The insolation values represent the resource available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal to equal to the latitude of the collector location. This is typical practice for PV system installation, although other orientations are

  20. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bhutan.htm Central America Wind 50m Resolution (includes Belize, Cayman Islands, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua (Zip 2.4 MB) 02192009 Central America.htm Chile...

  1. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Data 10-Kilometer This data provides monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of 0.1 degrees in both latitude and longitude,...

  2. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Oaxaca from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  3. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for India from NREL ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  4. Placing power linres : GIS helps site energy corridors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J. A.; Cantwell, B.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Moore, H. R.

    2011-08-01

    Turn the lights on when you enter a room, then turn the lights off when you leave. Most of us repeat this sequence many times each day, and never give it another thought. But that seemingly simple light switch on the wall connects us to one of the most complex systems in the world: the electrical grid. Most of the United States is served by a highly reliable and adequate supply of electrical power, which is distributed through a grid of thousands of miles of electricity-transmission lines. However, as the electricity-supply infrastructure ages and consumer demand for electricity grows, the capacity to deliver electrical power hasn't kept pace with demand, and upgrading the electrical-transmission grid has become a more pressing need. From 1988-1998, demand for transmission grew by 30 percent while transmission grew by only 15 percent. From 1999-2009, demand grew by 20 percent and transmission by only 3 percent Despite a short-term decline related to the economic downturn and improved efficiency, U.S. energy consumption is expected to increase by 14 percent between 2008 and 2035. This growth will drive the need to develop viable routes for new transmission lines. Because transmission lines extend over large distances, they typically cross many federal, tribal, state, local and private land jurisdictions, each with a complex and varying set of siting issues and land-management practices. And as the existing grid needs improvement to meet growing demand, the U.S. is rapidly developing renewable energy sources, particularly solar and wind energy, often in areas far removed from existing electricity-transmission infrastructure and energy-consumption areas.

  5. Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages environmental records from Cold War legacy sites spanning nearly 40 years. These records are a key LM asset and must be...

  6. Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wildlife connectivity areas in Montana. The aim of the mapping system is to consider fish, wildlife, and recreational resources earlier on when planning for future development....

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resource data at various hub heights and spatial resolutions for both land-based and offshore data including the data used in the maps located at the WINDExchange and U.S. DOE...

  8. eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Adminstration Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...

  9. The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond October 20, 2009 The RERF program is not a typical research program since it aims at fostering the health and welfare of the atomic-bomb survivors. A unique nurse's perspective on the RERF and the health of the A-bomb survivors is presented by Dr. Amy Knowles. PDF icon The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond More Documents & Publications Report of the Senior Review Panel on the Review of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  10. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  11. Evaluation of OGC Standards for Use in LLNL GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R M; Chubb, K K; Schek, J L

    2006-06-23

    Over the summer of 2005, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Computer Applications and Research Department conducted a small project that examined whether Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards might be useful in meeting program mission requirements more effectively. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to lower development costs and to avoid duplication of effort and vendor lock-in. Some OGC standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and so an evaluation was deemed appropriate.

  12. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, Nick

    2013-09-30

    Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross‐section.

  13. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-10-31

    Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

  14. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary ... Additional offline INP analyses are underway to extend the characterization of INP to ...

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a distinctly different INP population in comparison to long range transported desert or urban and regional land-sourced INP, and that the layering of marine within other...

  17. Electronic structure, morphology and emission polarization of enhanced symmetry InAs quantum-dot-like structures grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary?ski, A.; S?k, G.; Musia?, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Gilfert, C.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Capua, A.; Karni, O.; Gready, D.; Eisenstein, G.; Atiya, G.; Kaplan, W. D.; Klling, S.

    2013-09-07

    The optical and structural properties of a new kind of InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dot (QD)-like objects grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. These nanostructures were found to have significantly more symmetrical shapes compared to the commonly obtained dash-like geometries typical of this material system. The enhanced symmetry has been achieved due to the use of an As{sub 2} source and the consequent shorter migration length of the indium atoms. Structural studies based on a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) provided detailed information on both the structure and composition distribution within an individual nanostructure. However, it was not possible to determine the lateral aspect ratio from STEM or APT. To verify the in-plane geometry, electronic structure calculations, including the energy levels and transition oscillator strength for the QDs have been performed using an eight-band kp model and realistic system parameters. The results of calculations were compared to measured polarization-resolved photoluminescence data. On the basis of measured degree of linear polarization of the surface emission, the in-plane shape of the QDs has been assessed proving a substantial increase in lateral symmetry. This results in quantum-dot rather than quantum-dash like properties, consistent with expectations based on the growth conditions and the structural data.

  18. Quantum-Size Effects on the Pressure-Induced Direct-to-Indirect Band-Gap Transition in InP Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Zunger, A.

    1998-06-01

    We predict that the difference in quantum confinement energies of {Gamma} -like and X -like conduction states in a covalent quantum dot will cause the direct-to-indirect transition to occur at substantially lower pressure than in the bulk material. Furthermore, the first-order transition in the bulk is predicted to become, for certain dot sizes, a second-order transition. Measurements of the {open_quotes}anticrossing gap{close_quotes} could thus be used to obtain unique information on the {Gamma}-X- L intervalley coupling, predicted here to be surprisingly large (50{endash}100thinspthinspmeV). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Maps Development - How the Maps Were Made 10km The State University of New York/Albany satellite radiation model was developed by Richard Perez and collaborators at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and other universities for the U.S. Department of Energy. Specific information about this model can be found in Perez, et al. (2002). This model uses hourly radiance images from geostationary weather satellites, daily snow cover data, and monthly averages of atmospheric water vapor,

  20. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials. A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Anthony; Roberts, Billy; Heimiller, Donna; Blair, Nate; Porro, Gian

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  1. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Roberts, B.; Heimiller, D.; Blair, N.; Porro, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  2. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting...

  3. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  4. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Visualization &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Tools MapSearch Searching for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Bookmark and Share Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team has developed tools that allow users to apply these data. These tools help determine things such as how much electricity can be produced from solar systems on a house or what renewable resources are available in a specific areas. Please visit http://maps.nrel.gov/ for the most

  5. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. There is significant opportunity for water power to provide large amounts of clean and renewable power. The Water Power Program is invested significantly in comprehensive analysis of ocean energy potential for future

  6. http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/metadata/usgswrd/XML/nv_dtw750nv_l...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Susan G. Buto Originator: Sienna Smith-Sager PublicationDate: 2006 Title: ... Reference Cited Lopes, T.J., Buto, S.G., Smith, J.L., and Welborn, T.L., 2006, Water-table ...

  7. Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.T. McLean

    2005-06-01

    This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Tables were then created for each analyte that listed the PRSs average value by storm water station allowing a tabular view of the mapped data. The final table that was created listed the number of high erosion PRSs and regular PRSs over background values that were contained in each watershed. An overall relationship between the high erosion PRSs or the regular PRSs and the storm water stations was not identified through the methods used in this research. However, the Arc Hydro data models created for this analysis were used to track possible sources of contamination found through sampling at the storm water gaging stations. This geometric network tracing was used to identify possible relationships between the storm water stations and the PRSs. The methods outlined for the geometric network tracing could be used to find other relationships between the sites. A cursory statistical analysis was performed which could be expanded and applied to the data sets generated during this research to establish a broader relationship between the PRSs and storm water stations.

  8. Renewable Energy Deployment in Colorado and the West: A Modeling Sensitivity and GIS Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ‹ See All Petrolem Reports Renewable Energy Annual With Data for 2009 | Release Date: January 30, 2012 | Next Release Date: Discontinued | full report Previous Renewable Energy Annual Reports Year (PDF): 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Data Tables Renewable Energy Trends Consumption 1.1 U.S. energy consumption by energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.2 Renewable energy consumption by energy-use sector and energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.3 Renewable energy

  9. Integrating multisource imagery and GIS analysis for mapping Bermuda`s benthic habitats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierros, M.K.

    1997-06-01

    Bermuda is a group of isolated oceanic situated in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and surrounded by the Sargasso Sea. Bermuda possesses the northernmost coral reefs and mangroves in the Atlantic Ocean, and because of its high population density, both the terrestrial and marine environments are under intense human pressure. Although a long record of scientific research exists, this study is the first attempt to comprehensively map the area`s benthic habitats, despite the need for such a map for resource assessment and management purposes. Multi-source and multi-date imagery were used for producing the habitat map due to lack of a complete up-to-date image. Classifications were performed with SPOT data, and the results verified from recent aerial photography and current aerial video, along with extensive ground truthing. Stratification of the image into regions prior to classification reduced the confusing effects of varying water depth. Classification accuracy in shallow areas was increased by derivation of a texture pseudo-channel, while bathymetry was used as a classification tool in deeper areas, where local patterns of zonation were well known. Because of seasonal variation in extent of seagrasses, a classification scheme based on density could not be used. Instead, a set of classes based on the seagrass area`s exposure to the open ocean were developed. The resulting habitat map is currently being assessed for accuracy with promising preliminary results, indicating its usefulness as a basis for future resource assessment studies.

  10. Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Paul Breckenridge

    2007-05-01

    Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

  11. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) routinely estimates the technical potential of specific renewable electricity generation technologies. These are technology-specific estimates of energy generation potential based on renewable resource availability and quality, technical system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints only. The estimates do not consider (in most cases) economic or market constraints, and therefore do not represent a level of renewable generation that might actually be deployed. Technical potential estimates for six different renewable energy technologies were calculated by NREL, and methods and results for several other renewable technologies from previously published reports are also presented.

  12. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    Shapefiles and spreadsheets of structural data, including attitudes of faults and strata and slip orientations of faults. - Detailed geologic mapping of ~30 km2 was completed in the vicinity of the Columbus Marsh geothermal field to obtain critical structural data that would elucidate the structural controls of this field. - Documenting E‐ to ENE‐striking left lateral faults and N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults. - Some faults cut Quaternary basalts. - This field appears to occupy a displacement transfer zone near the eastern end of a system of left‐lateral faults. ENE‐striking sinistral faults diffuse into a system of N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults within the displacement transfer zone. - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  13. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross‐sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill‐hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics.

  14. Geologic Map of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-03-31

    Neal Hot Springs—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Three cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and exploration wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples. - Location of XRF geochemical samples. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  15. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Offshore Wind Port Readiness U.S. Offshore Wind Port Readiness Report that reviews the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and assesses the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support as much as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030. PDF icon Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States.pdf More Documents & Publications Wind Offshore Port Readiness Assessment of Vessel Requirements for

  16. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  17. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  18. How can I open .ASC files contained in the following linkhttp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .ASC file format is also compatible with most common GIS software, such as ESRI ArcGIS or Quantum GIS (QGIS). The data will be added to the GIS interface as a raster layer....

  19. Health Care (Inpatient) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS Building Types U.S. Energy Information Administration (Oct 2008) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHealthCare(Inp...

  20. DOE Announces Selection of National Laboratory Center for Solid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to negotiation): Recipient: Sandia National Laboratories Title: Development of White LEDs using Nanophosphor InP Blends Summary: This project proposes to develop blends of ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel ... Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition Dennis, Allison M. ...

  2. Neutronic, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Kazakhstan VVR-K reactor with LEU fuel: ANL independent verification results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanan, Nelson A.; Garner, Patrick L.

    2015-08-01

    Calculations have been performed for steady state and postulated transients in the VVR-K reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP), Kazakhstan. (The reactor designation in Cyrillic is BBP-K; transliterating characters to English gives VVR-K but translating words gives WWR-K.) These calculations have been performed at the request of staff of the INP who are performing similar calculations. The selection of the transients considered started during working meetings and email correspondence between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and INP staff. In the end the transient were defined by the INP staff. Calculations were performed for the fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) core and for four subsequent cores as beryllium is added to maintain critically during the first 15 cycles. These calculations have been performed independently from those being performed by INP and serve as one step in the verification process.

  3. geospatial data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  4. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spillmore » Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.« less

  5. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.

  6. Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2011-09-30

    In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

  7. Using remotely sensed imagery and GIS to monitor and research salmon spawning: A case study of the Hanford Reach fall chinook (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RH Visser

    2000-03-16

    The alteration of ecological systems has greatly reduced salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest. The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, for example, is a component of the last ecosystem in eastern Washington State that supports a relatively healthy population of fall chinook salmon ([Oncorhynchus tshawytscha], Huntington et al. 1996). This population of fall chinook may function as a metapopulation for the Mid-Columbia region (ISG 1996). Metapopulations can seed or re-colonize unused habitat through the mechanism of straying (spawning in non-natal areas) and may be critical to the salmon recovery process if lost or degraded habitat is restored (i.e., the Snake, Upper Columbia, and Yakima rivers). For these reasons, the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is extremely important for preservation of the species in the Columbia River Basin. Because this population is important to the region, non-intrusive techniques of analysis are essential for researching and monitoring population trends and spawning activities.

  8. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  9. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  10. Red light-emitting diodes based on InP/GaP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatami, F.; Lordi, V.; Harris, J.S.; Kostial, H.; Masselink, W.T.

    2005-05-01

    The growth, fabrication, and device characterization of InP quantum-dot light-emitting diodes based on GaP are described and discussed. The diode structures are grown on gallium phosphide substrates using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy and the active region of the diode consists of self-assembled InP quantum dots embedded in a GaP matrix. Red electroluminescence originating from direct band-gap emission from the InP quantum dots is observed at low temperatures.With increasing temperature, however, the emission line shifts to the longer wavelength. The emission light is measured to above room temperature.

  11. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  12. NREL: Energy Analysis - Pamela Gray-Hann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet map server applications GIS web page PVWatts Outreach Meeting planning Project support Education and background training University of Minnesota-Duluth GIS Technical ...

  13. Using HyTrans to Study H2 Transition Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    early transition analysis? 4. How will we interface with NREL's detailed GIS analyses? ... S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 4. How will we interface with NREL's detailed GIS analyses? * ...

  14. Comparison of steady-state and transient characteristics of lattice-matched and strained InGaAs-AlGaAs (on GaAs) and InGaAs-AlInAs (on InP) quantum-well lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Y.; Singh, J. ); Loehr, J.P. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports on numerical techniques to study the output spectra and to solve the multimode coupled rate equations including TE and TM propagations for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As-Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As and In{sub 0.53+x}Ga{sub 0.47{minus}x}As-Al{sub 0.48}In{sub 0.52}As quantum well lasers. Optical properties are calculated from a 4 {times} 4 k {center dot} p bandstructure and strain effects are included with the deformation potential theory. The authors find that an introduction of 1.4% compressive strain to the quantum well results in roughly 3-4 times improvement in the intrinsic static characteristics in terms of lower threshold current, greater mode suppression, and lower nonlashing photon population in the laser cavity. The authors also identify the role of strain on the large signal temporal response. If the laser is switched from the off state to a given photon density in the lasing mode, then the strained system exhibits a faster intrinsic time response. However, if the lasers are switched to equal total photon density, then the strained system has a slower time response. The authors also include calculated CHSH Auger rates in our model and find that the main effect of Auger recombination is to greatly increase the threshold current and to shorten the response time to large signal switching.

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Sanchez, Daniel S. ; Neupane, Madhab ; Chang, Guoqing ; Yaji, Koichiro ; Yuan, Zhujun ; ... quantum well lasers on InP substrate Chang, Chia-Hao ; Li, Zong-Lin ; Pan, Chien-Hung ...

  16. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections … MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... low Chlorophyll-a (with the exception of near-shore) ocean regions, which exist along the MAGIC transect. Current analyses suggest that INP numbers in the marine boundary ...

  17. removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was transported via two air shipments to a...

  18. ACAPEX - Ship-Based Ice Nuclei Collections Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: ACAPEX - Ship-Based Ice Nuclei Collections Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ACAPEX - Ship-Based Ice Nuclei Collections Field Campaign Report Measurements were sought to evaluate a hypotheses that sea-spray-sourced ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are of biological origin and represent a distinctly different INP population in comparison to long-range-transported desert or urban

  19. Low Cost High Efficiency InP-Based Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-344

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells on 2-inch InP substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 4-inch InP substrates. NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells, including a metamorphic layer, on 2-inch GaAs substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 6-inch GaAs substrates. NREL will perform characterization measurements of the solar cells, including I-V and quantum efficiency measurements at AM1.5 1-sun.

  20. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Sacit M; Howard, Rob L; Liu, Cheng; Mueller, Don; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Peterson, Steven K; Scaglione, John M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  1. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-03-22

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  2. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  3. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

  4. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1995-02-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber. 5 figs.

  5. Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lasers on InP substrate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Room-temperature mid-infrared "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate We have demonstrated experimentally the InP-based "M"-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum-well (QW) laser lasing at 2.41 μm at room temperature by optical pumping. The threshold power density

  6. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-05

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  7. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-08

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  8. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geospatial > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds ask queries (1) compound queries (1) data (1) developer (1) geospatial data (1) GIS (1) GIS data (1) Global...

  9. http://www.esri.com/data/data-maps/index.html

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Overview Data & Maps content is preconfigured to work with ArcGIS products and provided at no additional cost for ArcGIS users. Data & Maps-DVD containing ready-to-use basemaps and...

  10. geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "/INFN, Legnaro/INFN, Legnaro/INFN, Legnaro/INFN, Trieste/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/Insubria U., Como/INFN, Milan Bicocca/INFN, Rome/INFN, Rome/INFN, Rome/INFN, Rome/INFN, Rome/Frascati/Serpukhov, IHEP/Serpukhov, IHEP/Serpukhov, IHEP/Serpukhov, IHEP/Dubna, JINR/Dubna, JINR/St. Petersburg, INP/St. Petersburg, INP/St. Petersburg,

  12. Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Masatoshi Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency , Honcho Kawaguchi, 3320012 Saitama

    2013-12-09

    Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436?V, short-circuit current of 24.8?mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5?G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

  13. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  14. InP:Fe Photoconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Robert B.; Paulter, Nicholas G.; Wagner, Ronald S.

    1984-01-01

    A photoconducting device fabricated from Fe-doped, semi-insulating InP crystals exhibits an exponential decay transient with decay time inversely related to Fe concentration. Photoconductive gain as high as 5 is demonstrated in photoconducting devices with AuGe and AuSn contacts. Response times from 150 to 1000 picoseconds can be achieved.

  15. InP:Fe photoconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, R.B.; Paulter, N.G.; Wagner, R.S.

    A photoconducting device fabricated from Fe-doped, semi-insulating InP crystals exhibits an exponential decay transient with decay time inversely related to Fe concentration. Photoconductive gain as high as 5 is demonstrated in photoconducting devices with AuGe and AuSn contacts. Response times from 150 to 1000 picoseconds can be achieved.

  16. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  17. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. In conclusion, Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  18. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sullivan, S. C.; Morales Betancourt, R.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2015-08-11

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the Barahona and Nenes cirrus formation parameterization to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically-derived spectrum,morea lab-based empirical spectrum, and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon aerosol and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never unraveled as done here.less

  19. Geographic Perspective on the Current Biomass Resource Availability in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the biomass resources available in the United States and map the results using geographic information systems (GIS).

  20. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2014 Welcome to the 78th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue examines some recent developments and practices in the use of GIS for NEPA and related environmental reviews. NEPAnode_carosel_500.jpeg NEPAnode Pilot Site Articles in this issue include: DOE NEPA Practitioners To Test NEPAnode Using GIS Tools for NEPA Analysis Select Past LLQR Articles on GIS and NEPA Using GIS To See the Big Picture and "Zoom In"

  1. Property:Contact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydropower Federal Preservation Officer (Federal Energy Regulatory Agency) + Alabama Oil and Gas BoardWebsiteGISDatabaseDeveloper + Alabama Oil and Gas Board: WebsiteGIS...

  2. Four County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.facebook.compagesFour-County-Electric-Membership-Corporation188316197857616?reftntnmn Outage Hotline: (888)368-7289 Outage Map: gis.fourcty.orgpubmap.html...

  3. spatial analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    spatial analysis Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis Syndicate content...

  4. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  5. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  6. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  7. Inside Idaho: Interactive Numeric and Spatial Information Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GraphicMapChart Abstract Idaho GIS Clearinghouse Organization Idaho Geospatial Office Published Idaho Geospatial Office, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  8. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... a geographic information system (GIS)-based database ... -1 ) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (, ... rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in ...

  9. Oak Ridge ARI Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications ARI Quarterly Newsletter Oak Ridge ARI Overview ARI: Creating a 2020 DOE Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets...

  10. CenterPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .centerpointenergy.comhome Twitter: @CNPalerts Outage Hotline: 800-332-7143 Outage Map: gis.centerpointenergy.comouta Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page:...

  11. Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ethiopia on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  12. Recommendation 211 : Recommendation on Availability of DOE Environment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    211 More Documents & Publications Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets Recommendation 217: Stewardship Point of Contact for the Oak Ridge...

  13. Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Bangladesh on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  14. File:SWERA-247.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  15. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

  16. CenterPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Place: Houston, Texas Service Territory: Texas Website: www.centerpointenergy.comhome Twitter: @CNPalerts Outage Hotline: 800-332-7143 Outage Map: gis.centerpointenergy.co...

  17. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    integration for applications which: 1) support agencys geospatial information systems (GIS); 2) support Computer Aided Design systems (CAD) and knowledge workers; and 3) support...

  18. Rhode Island High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detailed license and usage information for this dataset Preview Download 50m GIS NREL Rhode Island energy high resoltuion renewable shapefile wind wind data wind...

  19. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Compiled existing He data for Cascades and Snake River Plain regions * Created GIS maps depicting results of existing data and locations of wells and thermal features to...

  20. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory (NREL). It integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) - for integrated resource assessment. The Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based...

  1. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable energy credit trades and purchases are tracked through the NEPOOL Generation Information System (NEPOOL-GIS). Renewables within the jurisdiction of New York,...

  2. PV Mapper Live Webinar_ R09_0083_edit_L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    applications, and management of web based GIS application development projects. He holds a bachelor's degree in geography and environmental science from the University of Colorado. ...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The ...

  4. LEDSGP/sector/AFOLU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of its technical Reference Level training series. The videos demonstrate the use of ArcGIS and IDRISI software to link historical activity data to deforestation drivers (video...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - NTSF 2014 180(c) WG session_final [Compatibilit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More economical More user-oriented Easier to maintain and update ESRI ArcGIS recommended as tool development platform 26 National Transportation Stakeholders...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - NTPAHWG_Jones [Compatibility Mode

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More economical More user-oriented Easier to maintain and update ESRI ArcGIS recommended as tool development platform Analyze alternative routing criteria ...

  7. Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Lightning Dock KGRA, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with the interpretation of information obtained from digitized map layers created in ArcGIS. The evaluation indicates that the Lightning Dock area has high geothermal potential...

  8. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. ... (EERE) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 9 - BIOMASS FUELS

  9. untitled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA Environmental Assessment EFH essential fish habitat EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ESA Endangered Species Act FAD Fish aggregation device GIS Geographic Information ...

  10. Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    partnered with Afghanistan to develop high-resolution wind and solar resource maps and data products for Afghanistan. The data were output in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)...

  11. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expedite Milestones C. Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets (C. Staley) D. Election of FY 2015 Board Officers (B. Price) VII. Responses to Recommendations & Comments (D. ...

  12. Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database Abstract This database provides GIS data...

  13. Transmission/Resource Library/NEPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Planning Public Involvement GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General...

  14. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix A

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Area Power Administration Substation) Prepared for: U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management Las ... GIS geographic information system kV kilovolt MW megawatt ...

  15. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    critical elements. - Construction of Critical Element Charts that assess probability of success vs. data confidence for each play type. - Use of Arc GIS to compile data for each...

  16. Near-infrared photodetector with reduced dark current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F; Kim, Jin K

    2012-10-30

    A photodetector is disclosed for the detection of near-infrared light with a wavelength in the range of about 0.9-1.7 microns. The photodetector, which can be formed as either an nBp device or a pBn device on an InP substrate, includes an InGaAs light-absorbing layer, an InAlGaAs graded layer, an InAlAs or InP barrier layer, and an InGaAs contact layer. The photodetector can detect near-infrared light with or without the use of an applied reverse-bias voltage and is useful as an individual photodetector, or to form a focal plane array.

  17. Halftoning band gap of InAs/InP quantum dots using inductively coupled argon plasma-enhanced intermixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, D.; Mei, T.; Xu, C. D.; Dong, J. R.

    2006-09-25

    Inductively coupled argon plasma-enhanced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots grown on InP substrate is investigated. Intermixing is promoted by the near-surface defects generated by plasma exposure in annealing at a temperature of 600 deg. C for 30 s. The annealing results in a maximum differential band-gap blueshift of 106 nm but a thermal shift of only 10 nm. Band-gap halftones are obtained by controlling the amount of near-surface defects via wet chemical etching on the plasma-exposed InP cap layer. No degradation of quantum-dot crystal quality due to the process has been observed as evidenced by photoluminescence intensity.

  18. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  19. Radiation Control on Uzbekistan Borders - Results and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, Vitaliy; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Ismailov, Ulughbek; Shipilov, Nikolay; Chipizubov, Sergey; Avezov, Anvar

    2009-12-02

    The measures and actions on prevention, detection and response to criminal or unauthorized acts involving radioactive materials in Uzbekistan are presented. In frames of program of radiation monitoring to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials main customs border checkpoints were equipped with commercial radiation portal monitors. Special radiation monitors elaborated and manufactured in INP AS RU are installed in INP(main gates, research reactor and laboratory building) to provide nuclear security of Institute facilities. The experience of Uzbekistan in establishing radiation monitoring systems on its borders, their operation and maintenance would be useful for realization of proposed plan of strengthening measures to prevent illicit trafficking in Republics of Central Asia region.

  20. Proceedings of the 12th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference (SPRAT 12)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-05-01

    The Twelfth Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology conference was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 20 to 22 Oct. 1992. The papers and workshops presented in this volume report substantial progress in a variety of areas in space photovoltaics. Topics covered include: high efficiency GaAs and InP solar cells, GaAs/Ge cells as commercial items, flexible amorphous and thin film solar cells (in the early stages of pilot production), high efficiency multiple bandgap cells, laser power converters, solar cell and array technology, heteroepitaxial cells, betavoltaic energy conversion, and space radiation effects in InP cells. Space flight data on a variety of cells were also presented. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  1. Ulrich Wiesner > Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium January 07, 2015 WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was transported via two air shipments to a secure facility in Russia for permanent disposition. This

  2. Detection of lateral composition modulation by magnetoexciton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Follstaedt, D.; Lee, S.; Reno, J.; Twesten, R.D.; Zhang, Y.; Mascerenhas, A.

    1997-07-10

    An experimental signature for detecting spontaneous lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} short period superlattice on an InP substrate based on magnetoexciton spectroscopy described. The authors find by aligning the magnetic field in three crystallographic directions, one parallel to and the other two perpendicular to the composition modulation direction, that the magnetoexciton shifts are anisotropic and are a good indicator for the presence of composition modulation.

  3. Indium diffusion through high-k dielectrics in high-k/InP stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Cabrera, W.; Santosh KC,; Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; McDonnell, S.; Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Chabal, Y. J.; Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D.; Wallace, R. M.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080

    2013-08-05

    Evidence of indium diffusion through high-k dielectric (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) films grown on InP (100) by atomic layer deposition is observed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The analysis establishes that In-out diffusion occurs and results in the formation of a PO{sub x} rich interface.

  4. request.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    removal US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was

    render safe Nuclear Forensics The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

  5. Prediction of a strain-induced conduction-band minimum in embedded quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, A.J.; Zunger, A.; Canning, A.

    1998-02-01

    Free-standing InP quantum dots have previously been theoretically and experimentally shown to have a direct band gap across a large range of experimentally accessible sizes. We demonstrated that when these dots are embedded coherently within a GaP barrier material, the effects of quantum confinement in conjunction with coherent strain suggest there will be a critical diameter of dot ({approx}60 {Angstrom}), above which the dot is direct, type I, and below which it is indirect, type II. However, the strain in the system acts to produce another conduction state with an even lower energy, in which electrons are localized in small pockets at the interface between the InP dot and the GaP barrier. Since this conduction state is GaP X{sub 1c} derived and the highest occupied valence state is InP, {Gamma} derived, the fundamental transition is predicted to be indirect in both real and reciprocal space ({open_quotes}type II{close_quotes}) for all dot sizes. This effect is peculiar to the strained dot, and is absent in the freestanding dot. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Improving Water Management: Applying ModelBuilder to site water impoundments using AEM survey data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Harbert, W.P.; Ackman, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    ArcGIS ModelBuilder was used to create a GIS-based decision support model that incorporated digital elevation data and electromagnetic geophysical results gathered by helicopter to screen potential sites for water disposal impoundments produced from coal bed natural gas.

  7. Workshop on user experience with gas-insulated substations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graybill, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    There is widespread interest among American and Canadian utilities in the interchange of operating and maintenance experience with gas-insulated substations (GIS). Those utilities who do not yet have GIS on their systems are likewise interested in the operating experience of those who do. A two-day workshop on GIS was held in Portland, Oregon, on July 30 and 31, 1981. The first day of the workshop was open to users only, and the agenda for the day consisted of user presentations on the following subjects: GIS station design and layout; specification and acquisition of GIS equipment; installation and commissioning; and operation and maintenance. On the second day, manufacturers were invited to present their experience, status, and progress in recent developments and improvements. The session was concluded with a general discussion of experience, problems, etc. No formal written papers were presented. The highlights of each verbal presentation and of ensuing discussion are presented in this report.

  8. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.

  9. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore » supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  10. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  11. File:SWERA-212.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar: monthly global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Central America from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  12. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS ... but with "smu" suffix added to name. The first layer must contain the well points ...

  13. File:SWERA-202.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Sri Lanka from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  14. NREL: MapSearch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geographic Information System (GIS) team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit...

  15. Kenya-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Kenya on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  16. Ghana-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ghana on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  17. File:SWERA-253.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Nepal from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels....

  18. File:SWERA-213.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File usage Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Cuba from SUNY Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  19. File:SWERA-214.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    usage Solar: annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Cuba from SUNY Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  20. Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek March 29, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she...

  1. Help:Citations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Cite template. For example, to cite U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis in this page, just add the following code: Cite|Billy's paper|U.S....

  2. Map Data: Alternative Fuel Stations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The geospatial vector data has been compressed into one file.  You will need to uncompress it before using a geographic information systems (GIS) program to view the data.

  3. FEI Nova 200 Dual-Beam SEM/FIB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    milling * GIS for Pt deposition * Kleindiek nanomanipulator for specimen lift-out * Oxford Inca EDS system * AutoTEM, AutoFIB, and slice and view automation software Fabricating...

  4. Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Gary Edmondo (MiniGIS, Inc., Reno, NV)24 modified by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy to include symbols for geothermal surface features was used to actively...

  5. File:SWERA-203.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km for Sri Lanka from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full...

  6. File:SWERA-254.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual latitude tilt horizontal GIS data at 40km resolution for Nepal from NREL Size of this preview: 776 ...

  7. File:SWERA-248.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  8. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and model data on high performance computers with pre-loaded software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, EarthVision, GoldSim, MATLAB, and other advanced analytical, statistical and...

  10. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample to develop call list 94 The resulting list of 167 trade allies was entered into ArcGIS, a geographic information system platform, and mapped using the zip code of each trade...

  11. Diapositiva 1

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    se utilizaron los siguientes parmetros en el mdulo de anlisis geoestadstico de ArcGis: Tamao del lag igual a 9000 metros. Para ello se utiliz la regla emprica de que...

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their datasets using top-of-the-line research computers with key software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, GoldSim, and Earthvision, among other advanced geostatistical and analytical...

  13. How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    display and how it is stored. I agree that it is not an ideal format for using with ArcGIS, but this can be easily modified using your favorite spreadsheet editor. Since Excel...

  14. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  15. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit for Honduras from NREL - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and easy to use geographic toolkit that allows non-GIS users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected...

  16. Question about Map of Wind Farms | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    farms using GIS software. Submitted by Wzeng on 13 July, 2012 - 13:59 1 answer Points: 1 Hi, there is a button labeled "Download CSV" below the map. A recent change was made to...

  17. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    local utility grid lagi green apps blog department of energy wind vision logo software solar land use REEEP REEGLE Texas contest Database gateway pv land use Colorado GIS tcdb...

  18. Renewable Energy Atlas of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Hlava, K.; Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2013-12-13

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software. The report also includes: A description of each of the components of the Atlas; Lists of the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and A brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies. The Atlas includes the following: A GIS database organized as a set of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Personal GeoDatabases, and ESRI ArcReader and ArcGIS project files providing an interactive map visualization and analysis interface.

  19. Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    License Info DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory... ZIP Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km...

  20. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    on research by the U.S. Department of Energy and was only incorporated into the GIS analysis below; it is not in any other elements of this report. See Methodology for greater...

  1. enhanced_oil_current_proj | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology DE-NT0006554 GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Colorado School of Mines DE-FE0006015 ...

  2. Chad Rowan | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    His specialized background in GIS and geospatial analysis-fields that gave him a thorough grounding in data management, storing, and analysis-has been a strong asset for EDX. As ...

  3. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  4. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to Prichard to improve its decision-making process through Geographic Information System (GIS) as a decision-making tool. The agency has...

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated and Improved Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Geographic Information System Data and Maps A. Cialella and R. Wagener Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Overview A geographic information system (GIS) allows for multiple datasets with spatial information to be overlaid and layers combined and analyzed. Although the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program surface characterization data have been incorporated into a GIS since the early

  6. Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zvolanek Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek March 29, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she has worked since 2010. Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she has worked since 2010. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Editor's Note: View this video about Emily's work,

  7. NREL: Solar Research - News Release Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 November 30, 2006 More Than Pretty Maps-NREL Uses GIS to Find Workable Energy Solutions NREL's geographic information systems (GIS) team produces maps of renewable energy resources that demonstrate which technologies, whether solar, wind, hydrogen or biomass, are the best, most workable energy solutions. But that's not all. October 12, 2006 Energy Secretary Announces $13 Million to Expand Solar Energy Technologies U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced more

  8. Register to

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Siting Guidelines | Department of Energy Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting guidelines, both in the US and other countries. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign

  9. Isoelectronic co-doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2004-11-09

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with deep acceptors and deep donors is used to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, N and Bi, to customize solar cells, thermal voltaic cells, light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and lasers on GaP, InP, GaAs, Ge, and Si substrates. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  10. Effect of surface steps on the microstructure of lateral composition modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; NORMAN,A.G.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; TWESTEN,R.D.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; MOUTINHO,H.; MASCARENHAS,A.

    2000-03-23

    Growth of InAs/AlAs short-period superlattices on appropriately miscut (001) InP substrates is shown to alter the microstructure of composition modulation from a 2D organization of short compositionally enriched wires to a single dominant modulation direction and wire lengths up to {approximately}1 {micro}m. The effects of miscut are interpreted in terms of surface step orientation and character. The material is strongly modulated and exhibits intense optical emission. The 1D modulations appear potentially useful for new devices that take advantage of the preferred direction formed in the growth plane.

  11. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgstrm, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  12. Piezoelectric effect in InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires grown on silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anufriev, Roman; Chauvin, Nicolas Bru-Chevallier, Catherine; Khmissi, Hammadi; Naji, Khalid; Gendry, Michel; Patriarche, Gilles

    2014-05-05

    We report on the evidence of a strain-induced piezoelectric field in wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires. This electric field, caused by the lattice mismatch between InAs and InP, results in the quantum confined Stark effect and, as a consequence, affects the optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure. It is shown that the piezoelectric field can be screened by photogenerated carriers or removed by increasing temperature. Moreover, a dependence of the piezoelectric field on the quantum rod diameter is observed in agreement with simulations of wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowire heterostructures.

  13. Light-splitting photovoltaic system utilizing two dual-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Dong, Jianrong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-12-15

    There are many difficulties limiting the further development of monolithic multi-junction solar cells, such as the growth of lattice-mismatched material and the current matching constraint. As an alternative approach, the light-splitting photovoltaic system is investigated intensively in different aspects, including the energy loss mechanism and the choice of energy bandgaps of solar cells. Based on the investigation, a two-dual junction system has been implemented employing lattice-matched GaInP/GaAs and InGaAsP/InGaAs cells grown epitaxially on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. (author)

  14. Intersubband absorption in CdSe/Zn{sub x}Cd{sub y}Mg{sub 1-x-y}Se self-assembled quantum dot multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, A.; Lu, H.; Charles, W.; Yokomizo, I.; Tamargo, M. C.; Franz, K. J.; Gmachl, C.; Zhang, S. K.; Zhou, X.; Alfano, R. R.; Liu, H. C.

    2007-02-12

    The authors report the observation of intersubband absorption in multilayers of CdSe/Zn{sub x}Cd{sub y}Mg{sub 1-x-y}Se self-assembled quantum dots. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates. For samples with the CdSe dot layers doped with Cl and with the deposited CdSe equivalent layer thickness between 5.2 and 6.9 ML, peak absorption between 2.5 and 3.5 {mu}m was observed. These materials are promising for intersubband devices operating in the mid- and near-infrared ranges.

  15. Investigation of temperature dependence of neutron yield and electron screening potential for the d(d, n){sup 3}He reaction proceeding in deuterides ZrD{sub 2} and TiD{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Bystritskii, Vit. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Filipowicz, M.; Gazi, S.; Huran, J.; Kobzev, A. P.; Mesyats, G. A.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Parzhitskii, S. S.; Pen'kov, F. M.; Philippov, A. V.; Kaminskii, V. L.; Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Wozniak, J.

    2012-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the enhancement factor for the dd reaction proceeding in TiD{sub 2} and ZrD{sub 2} is investigated. The experiments were carried out at the Hall pulsed ion accelerator (INP, Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia) in the deuteron energy interval 7.0-12.0 keV and at temperatures ranging from 20 to 200 Degree-Sign C. The values obtained for the electron screening potentials indicate that the dd reaction enhancement factor does not depend on the target temperature in the range 20-200 Degree-Sign C. This result contradicts the conclusions drawn by the LUNA Collaboration from their work.

  16. Carbon doping of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moll, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Focus of the study is C acceptor doping of GaAs, since C diffusion coefficient is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of other common p-type dopants in GaAs. C ion implantation results in a concentration of free holes in the valence band < 10% of that of the implanted C atoms for doses > 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Rutherford backscattering, electrical measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were amonth the techniques used. Ga co-implantation increased the C activation in two steps: first, the additional radiation damage creates vacant As sites that the implanted C can occupy, and second, it maintains the stoichiometry of the implanted layer, reducing the number of compensating native defects. In InP, the behavior of C was different from that in GaAs. C acts as n-type dopant in the In site; however, its incorporation by implantation was difficult to control; experiments using P co-implants were inconsistent. The lattice position of inactive C in GaAs in implanted and epitaxial layers is discussed; evidence for formation of C precipitates in GaAs and InP was found. Correlation of the results with literature on C doping in III-V semiconductors led to a phenomenological description of C in III-V compounds (particularly GaAs): The behavior of C is controlled by the chemical nature of C and the instrinsic Fermi level stabilization energy of the material.

  17. The nature and origin of lateral composition modulations in short-period strained-layer superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NORMAN,A.G.; AHRENKIEL,S.P.; MOUTINHO,H.R.; BALLIF,C.; ALJASSIM,M.M.; MASCARENHAS,A.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; MIRECKI-MILLUNCHICK,J.; TWESTEN,R.D.

    2000-01-27

    The nature and origin of lateral composition modulations in (AlAs){sub m}(InAs){sub n} SPSs grown by MBE on InP substrates have been investigated by XRD, AFM, and TEM. Strong modulations were observed for growth temperatures between {approx} 540 and 560 C. The maximum strength of modulations was found for SPS samples with InAs mole fraction x (=n/(n+m)) close to {approx} 0.50 and when n {approx} m {approx} 2. The modulations were suppressed at both high and low values of x. For x >0.52 (global compression) the modulations were along the <100> directions in the (001) growth plane. For x < 0.52 (global tension) the modulations were along the two <310> directions rotated {approx} {+-} 27{degree} from [110] in the growth plane. The remarkably constant wavelength of the modulations, between {approx} 20--30 nm, and the different modulation directions observed, suggest that the origin of the modulations is due to surface roughening associated with the high misfit between the individual SPS layers and the InP substrate. Highly uniform unidirectional modulations have been grown, by control of the InAs mole fraction and growth on suitably offcut substrates, which show great promise for application in device structures.

  18. Photopumped red-emitting InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P self-assembled quantum dot heterostructure lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryou, J. H.; Dupuis, R. D.; Walter, G.; Kellogg, D. A.; Holonyak, N.; Mathes, D. T.; Hull, R.; Reddy, C. V.; Narayanamurti, V.

    2001-06-25

    We report the 300 K operation of optically pumped red-emitting lasers fabricated from InP self-assembled quantum dots embedded in In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers on GaAs (100) substrates grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Quantum dots grown at 650{degree}C on In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers have a high density on the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} and the dominant size of individual quantum dots ranges from {similar_to}5 to {similar_to}10 nm for 7.5 monolayer {open_quotes}equivalent growth.{close_quotes} These InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P quantum dot heterostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. Laser structures are prepared from wafers having two vertically stacked InP quantum dot active layers within a 100-nm-thick In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P waveguide and upper and lower 600 nm InAlP cladding layers. We observe lasing at {lambda}{similar_to}680 nm at room temperature in optically pumped samples. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Defect production during ion implantation of various A/sub III/B/sub V/ semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Goetz, G.; Kekelidse, N.P.

    1989-01-15

    The present paper gives a survey about the defect generation caused by ion implantation of GaAs, InAs, GaP, and InP. By combining Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopic methods, further information concerning the kinetics of the defect production as well as the type of defects created is obtained. Generally, the defect concentration in the region of implantation parameters investigated can be described by the energy density deposited into nuclear processes. Below critical values of the nuclear deposited energy density in GaAs weakly damaged layers containing point defects and point defect clusters are produced. With increasing nuclear deposited energy density an increasing number of amorphous zones is created due to manifold overlap of the initial defect clusters. The results indicate that in GaAs and InAs already at relatively low implantation temperatures, the amorphization occurs via homogeneous defect nucleation. The results obtained for GaP and InP, on the other hand, point at a remarkable contribution of heterogeneous defect nucleation already at room temperature, leading to amorphization at markedly lower nuclear deposited energy densities in spite of nearly identical values of the nuclear deposited energy. It is therefore concluded that defect recombination and annealing at room temperature is much less pronounced in the phosphides than in the arsenides.

  20. Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Quantum Dot Arrays and Applications of Multiple Exciton Generation to Third-Generation Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozik, Arthur J.; Beard, Matthew C.; Luther, Joseph M.; Law, Matt; Ellingson, Randy J.; Johnson, Justin C.

    2010-10-14

    Here, we will first briefly summarize the general principles of QD synthesis using our previous work on InP as an example. Then we will focus on QDs of the IV-VI Pb chalcogenides (PbSe, PbS, and PbTe) and Si QDs because these were among the first QDs that were reported to produce multiple excitons upon absorbing single photons of appropriate energy (a process we call multiple exciton generation (MEG)). We note that in addition to Si and the Pb-VI QDs, two other semiconductor systems (III-V InP QDs(56) and II-VI core-shell CdTe/CdSe QDs(57)) were very recently reported to also produce MEG. Then we will discuss photogenerated carrier dynamics in QDs, including the issues and controversies related to the cooling of hot carriers and the magnitude and significance of MEG in QDs. Finally, we will discuss applications of QDs and QD arrays in novel quantum dot PV cells, where multiple exciton generation from single photons could yield significantly higher PV conversion efficiencies.

  1. High-performance, lattice-mismatched InGaAs/InP monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Stan, Mark S.; Weizer, Victor G.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Khan, Osman S.; Murray, Christopher S.; Scheiman, David; Brinker, David

    1998-10-01

    High performance, lattice-mismatched p/n InGaAs/lnP monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structures were developed for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. A MIM device consists of several individual InGaAs photovoltaic (PV) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating (S.I.) InP substrate. Both interdigitated and conventional (i.e., non-interdigitated) MIMs were fabricated. The energy bandgap (Eg) for these devices was 0.60 eV. A compositionally step-graded InPAs buffer was used to accommodate a lattice mismatch of 1.1% between the active InGaAs cell structure and the InP substrate. 1x1-cm, 15-cell, 0.60-eV MIMs demonstrated an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 5.2 V (347 mV per cell) and a fill factor of 68.6% at a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.0 A/cm{sup 2}, under flashlamp testing. The reverse saturation current density (Jo) was 1.6x10{sup {minus}6} A/cm{sup 2}. Jo values as low as 4.1x10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 2} were also observed with a conventional planar cell geometry.

  2. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nick Grue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Grue Nick Grue is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist II - GIS On staff since June 2014 Phone number: 303-384-7278 E-mail: nick.grue@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis Web GIS Primary research interests Open source energy data Web visualization of energy data Renewable energy policy Education and background training B.A. in Geography and Environmental Science, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO, 2012

  4. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  5. Design of the improved plutonium canister assay system (IPCAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Polk, P. J.; Vo, Duc T.

    2001-01-01

    The improved Plutonium Canister Assay System (iPCAS) is designed to detect gross and partial defects in the declared plutonium content of plutonium and MOX storage canisters during transfer to storage and process areas of the MOX fuel fabrication facility in Kokkasho, Japan. In addition, an associated Gamma Isotopics System (GIS) will be used to confirm facility-declared plutonium isotopics with accuracy sufficient to reduce the amount of destructive isotopic analysis needed. The design of the iPCAS instrument and its associated GIS is described and the expected performance of the instrument is discussed.

  6. Geospatial Products and Techniques at the Center for Transportation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, Bruce E

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights geospatial science-related innovations and developments conducted by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. CTA researchers have been developing integrated inter-modal transportation solutions through innovative and cost-effective research and development for many years. Specifically, this paper profiles CTA-developed Geographic Information System (GIS) products that are publicly available. Examples of these GIS-related products include: the CTA Transportation Networks; GeoFreight system; and the web-based Multi-Modal Routing Analysis System. In addition, an application on assessment of railroad Hazmat routing alternatives is also discussed.

  7. Electrical Properties of Er-doped In0.53Ga0.47As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Peter G.; Lu, Hong; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Stemmer, Susanne; Gossard, Arthur C.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-03-03

    The electrical properties of In0.53Ga0.47As As thin films Er-doped to concentrations of 1.51017 7.21020 cm-3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 490 C on (001) InP substrates were studied. Electrical conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility as a function of Er doping were measured by Hall effect at temperatures of 20750 K. Additionally, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of epitaxially embedded ErAs nanoparticles at Er concentrations ?81019 cm-3. The observed electrical properties are discussed in terms of the dependence of ErAs nanoparticle formation with Er doping.

  8. Wavelength controlled multilayer-stacked linear InAs quantum dot arrays on InGaAsP/InP (100) by self-organized anisotropic strain engineering: A self-ordered quantum dot crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sritirawisarn, N.; Otten, F. W. M. van; Eijkemans, T. J.; Noetzel, R.

    2008-09-29

    Multilayer-stacked linear InAs quantum dot (QD) arrays are created on InAs/InGaAsP superlattice templates formed by self-organized anisotropic strain engineering on InP (100) substrates in chemical beam epitaxy. Stacking of the QD arrays with identical emission wavelength in the 1.55 {mu}m region at room temperature is achieved through the insertion of ultrathin GaAs interlayers beneath the QDs with increasing interlayer thickness in successive layers. The increment in the GaAs interlayer thickness compensates the QD size/wavelength increase during strain correlated stacking. This is the demonstration of a three-dimensionally self-ordered QD crystal with fully controlled structural and optical properties.

  9. Low-density InP-based quantum dots emitting around the 1.5??m telecom wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yacob, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Benyoucef, M.

    2014-01-13

    The authors report on low-density InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on AlGaInAs surfaces lattice matched to InP using post-growth annealing by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. Clearly spatially separated QDs with a dot density of about 5??10{sup 8} cm{sup ?2} are obtained by using a special capping technique after the dot formation process. High-resolution micro-photoluminescence performed on optimized QD structures grown on distributed Bragg reflector exhibits single QD emissions around 1.5??m with narrow excitonic linewidth below 50??eV, which can be used as single photon source in the telecom wavelength range.

  10. Birefringence in the transparency region of GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko, A.A.; Etchegoin, P.; Fainstein, A.; Eberl, K.; Cardona, M.

    1999-09-01

    Birefringence measurements for in-plane propagation of light below the absorption edge in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells (MQW{close_quote}s) are reported for different well/barrier widths. A remarkable drop in the low-frequency limit of the birefringence has been observed for MQW structures with small periods and ascribed to the presence of local fields. The temperature dependence of the birefringence is also studied and complementary results in InP quantum dot structures are also presented. The latter exhibit a strong resonant birefringence, which can be explained by the reduced dimensionality in the joint density of states for optical transitions in the dots. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Optical set-reset latch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  12. Method of making organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John; Janora, Kevin Henry; Parthasarathy, Gautam; Cella, James Anthony; Chichak, Kelly Scott

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides a method for the preparation of organic light-emitting devices comprising a bilayer structure made by forming a first film layer comprising an electroactive material and an INP precursor material, and exposing the first film layer to a radiation source under an inert atmosphere to generate an interpenetrating network polymer composition comprising the electroactive material. At least one additional layer is disposed on the reacted first film layer to complete the bilayer structure. The bilayer structure is comprised within an organic light-emitting device comprising standard features such as electrodes and optionally one or more additional layers serving as a bipolar emission layer, a hole injection layer, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a hole transport layer, exciton-hole transporting layer, exciton-electron transporting layer, a hole transporting emission layer, or an electron transporting emission layer.

  13. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-07

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  14. 100 mm Engineered InP-on-Si Laminate Substrates for InP-based Multijunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-06-25

    The project focused on fabrication of InP/Si laminate substrates as templates for growth of InGaAsP/InGaAs and InAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs multijunction solar cells. InP/Si template substrates were developed and used as templates for InGaAs solar growth. A novel feature of the program was development of the virtual substrate template, which enables a substrate to be formed with a lattice constant intermediate between those of GaAs and InP. Large-area virtual substrate templates were formed by transfer and bonding of dislocation free InGaAs films wafer onto silicon substrates.

  15. CdSe self-assembled quantum dots with ZnCdMgSe barriers emitting throughout the visible spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Paz, M. Noemi; Zhou Xuecong; Munoz, Martin; Lu Hong; Sohel, Mohammad; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jean-Mary, Fleumingue; Akins, Daniel L.

    2004-12-27

    Self-assembled quantum dots of CdSe with ZnCdMgSe barriers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates. The optical and microstructural properties were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Control and reproducibility of the quantum dot (QD) size leading to light emission throughout the entire visible spectrum range has been obtained by varying the CdSe deposition time. Longer CdSe deposition times result in a redshift of the PL peaks as a consequence of an increase of QD size. AFM studies demonstrate the presence of QDs in uncapped structures. A comparison of this QD system with CdSe/ZnSe shows that not only the strain but also the chemical properties of the system play an important role in QD formation.

  16. Substrate structures for InP-based devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Sheldon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    A substrate structure for an InP-based semiconductor device having an InP based film is disclosed. The substrate structure includes a substrate region having a lightweight bulk substrate and an upper GaAs layer. An interconnecting region is disposed between the substrate region and the InP-based device. The interconnecting region includes a compositionally graded intermediate layer substantially lattice-matched at one end to the GaAs layer and substantially lattice-matched at the opposite end to the InP-based film. The interconnecting region further includes a dislocation mechanism disposed between the GaAs layer and the InP-based film in cooperation with the graded intermediate layer, the buffer mechanism blocking and inhibiting propagation of threading dislocations between the substrate region, and the InP-based device.

  17. Microstructure of compositionally modulated InAlAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twesten, R.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Lee, S.R.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have observed spontaneous, lateral composition modulation in tensile InAlAs alloy films grown as short-period superlattices on InP (001). They have analyzed these films using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray reciprocal space mapping, and polarized photoluminescence spectroscopy. They find the growth front is nonplanar, exhibiting {approximately} 2 nm deep cusps aligned with the In-rich regions of the compositionally modulated films. In addition to the measured 15 nm wavelength modulation in the [110] direction, a modulation of 30 nm wavelength is seen in the orthogonal [1{bar 1}0] direction. The photoluminescence from the modulated layer is strongly polarized and red shifted by 0.22 eV.

  18. Optical data latch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  19. After Action Report - Kazakhstan NSDD July 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Caterina; Eppich, Gary; Kips, Ruth; Knight, Kim; Belian, Anthony; Gray, Paul; Canazaro, B.

    2015-07-25

    On Monday 20 July, Caterina Fox, Ruth Kips and Kim Knight were invited to participate in Kazakhstan's nuclear material inventory management working group meeting coordinated by Alexander Vasilliev as nuclear forensics subject matter experts. The meeting included participants from Kazakhstan's nuclear regulatory agency (CAESC, the Committee on Atomic and Energetic Supervision and Control) and 3 institutes 1. Institute of Nuclear Physics, INP (Almaty), 2. National Nuclear Center, NNC (Kurchatov), and 3. Ulba Metallurgical Plant, UMP (Oskemen). CAESC requested attendance of an MC&A expert, an IT Specialist, and a Physical Security Specialist from each site. The general meeting concerned considerations for creating unified or compatible systems for nuclear material inventory management. NSDD representatives provided an overview of nuclear forensics and presented considerations for developments of inventory management that might be synergistic with future consideration of development of a National Nuclear Forensics Library to support nuclear forensics investigations.

  20. Spectral utilization in thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clevenger, M.B.; Murray, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    Multilayer assemblies of epitaxially-grown, III-V semiconductor materials are being investigated for use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion applications. It has been observed that thick, highly-doped semiconductor layers within cell architectures dominate the parasitic free-carrier absorption (FCA) of devices at wavelengths above the bandgap of the semiconductor material. In this work, the wavelength-dependent, free-carrier absorption of p- and n-type InGaAs layers grown epitaxially onto semi-insulating (SI) InP substrates has been measured and related to the total absorption of long-wavelength photons in thermophotovoltaic devices. The optical responses of the TPV cells are then used in the calculation of spectral utilization factors and device efficiencies.

  1. Strain-driven growth of GaAs(111) quantum dots with low fine structure splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yerino, Christopher D.; Jung, Daehwan; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Simmonds, Paul J.; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.; Schneider, Christian; Unsleber, Sebastian; Vo, Minh; Kamp, Martin; Hfling, Sven

    2014-12-22

    Symmetric quantum dots (QDs) on (111)-oriented surfaces are promising candidates for generating polarization-entangled photons due to their low excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS). However, (111) QDs are difficult to grow. The conventional use of compressive strain to drive QD self-assembly fails to form 3D nanostructures on (111) surfaces. Instead, we demonstrate that (111) QDs self-assemble under tensile strain by growing GaAs QDs on an InP(111)A substrate. Tensile GaAs self-assembly produces a low density of QDs with a symmetric triangular morphology. Coherent, tensile QDs are observed without dislocations, and the QDs luminescence at room temperature. Single QD measurements reveal low FSS with a median value of 7.6??eV, due to the high symmetry of the (111) QDs. Tensile self-assembly thus offers a simple route to symmetric (111) QDs for entangled photon emitters.

  2. Pseudopotential study of electron-hole excitations in colloidal free-standing InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, A. J.; Zunger, Alex

    2000-01-15

    Excitonic spectra are calculated for free-standing, surface passivated, InAs quantum dots using atomic pseudopotentials for the single-particle states and screened Coulomb interactions for the two-body terms. We present an analysis of the single particle states involved in each excitation in terms of their angular momenta and Bloch-wave parentage. We find that (i) in agreement with other pseudopotential studies of CdSe and InP quantum dots, but in contrast to k{center_dot}p calculations, the dot wave functions exhibit strong odd-even angular momentum envelope function mixing (e.g., s with p) and large valence-conduction coupling. (ii) While the pseudopotential approach produced very good agreement with experiment for free-standing, colloidal CdSe and InP dots, and for self-assembled (GaAs-embedded) InAs dots, here the predicted spectrum does not agree well with the measured (ensemble average over dot sizes) spectra. (1) Our calculated excitonic gap is larger than the photoluminescence measured one, and (2) while the spacing between the lowest excitons is reproduced, the spacings between higher excitons is not fit well. Discrepancy (1) could result from surface state emission. As for (2), agreement is improved when account is taken of the finite-size distribution in the experimental data. (iii) We find that the single-particle gap scales as R{sup -1.01} (not R{sup -2}), that the screened (unscreened) electron-hole Coulomb interaction scales as R{sup -1.79} (R{sup -0.7}), and that the excitonic gap scales as R{sup -0.9}. These scaling laws are different from those expected from simple models. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Carrier Multiplication in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Theoretical Screening of Candidate Materials Based on Band-Structure Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. W.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    Direct carrier multiplication (DCM) occurs when a highly excited electron-hole pair decays by transferring its excess energy to the electrons rather than to the lattice, possibly exciting additional electron-hole pairs. Atomistic electronic structure calculations have shown that DCM can be induced by electron-hole Coulomb interactions, in an impact-ionization-like process whose rate is proportional to the density of biexciton states {rho}{sub XX}. Here we introduce a DCM 'figure of merit' R{sub 2}(E) which is proportional to the ratio between the biexciton density of states {rho}{sub XX} and the single-exciton density of states {rho}{sub x}, restricted to single-exciton and biexciton states that are coupled by Coulomb interactions. Using R{sub 2}(E), we consider GaAs, InAs, InP, GaSb, InSb, CdSe, Ge, Si, and PbSe nanocrystals of different sizes. Although DCM can be affected by both quantum-confinement effects (reflecting the underly electronic structure of the confined dot-interior states) and surface effects, here we are interested to isolate the former. To this end the nanocrystal energy levels are obtained from the corresponding bulk band structure via the truncated crystal approximation. We find that PbSe, Si, GaAs, CdSe, and InP nanocrystals have larger DCM figure of merit than the other nanocrystals. Our calculations suggest that high DCM efficiency requires high degeneracy of the corresponding bulk band-edge states. Interestingly, by considering band structure effects we find that as the dot size increases the DCM critical energy E{sub 0} (the energy at which R{sub 2}(E) becomes {ge}1) is reduced, suggesting improved DCM. However, whether the normalized E{sub 0}/{var_epsilon}{sub g} increases or decreases as the dot size increases depends on dot material.

  4. Surface Induced Magnetism in Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meulenberg, R W; Lee, J I

    2009-08-20

    The study of nanometer sized semiconductor crystallites, also known as quantum dots (QDs), has seen rapid advancements in recent years in scientific disciplines ranging from chemistry, physics, biology, materials science, and engineering. QD materials of CdSe, ZnSe, InP, as well as many others, can be prepared in the size range of 1-10 nm producing uniform, nearly monodisperse materials that are typically coated with organic molecules [1-3]. The strength of charge carrier confinement, which dictates the size-dependent properties, in these QDs depends on the nature of the material and can be correlated to the Bohr radius for the system of interest. For instance, the Bohr radius for CdSe is {approx} 5 nm, while in the more covalent structure of InP, the Bohr radius approaches {approx} 10 nm. The study of CdSe QDs has been particularly extensive during the last decade because they exhibit unique and tunable optical properties and are readily synthesized with high-crystallinity and narrow size dispersions. Although the core electronic properties of CdSe are explained in terms of the quantum confinement model, experimental efforts to elucidate the surface structure of these materials have been limited. Typically, colloidal CdSe QDs are coated with an organic surfactant, which typically consists of an organo-phosphine, -thiol, or -amine, that has the function of energetically relaxing defect states via coordination to partially coordinated surface atoms. The organic surfactant also acts to enhance carrier confinement and prevent agglomeration of the particles. Chemically, it has been shown that the bonding of the surfactant to the CdSe QD occurs through Cd atoms resulting cleavage of the Se atoms and formation of a Cd-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) particle [5].

  5. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  6. Solar Energy — Capturing and Using Power and Heat from the Sun

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials TAP Webinar presentation by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Geographic Information System (GIS) Developer Christopher Helm on the In My Backyard estimator for PV output at a given location in the United States.

  7. Omega Bridge To Los Alamos "Town Site" W E S T J E M E Z R O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ct ur e Research Park University House F ir e S ta ti o n 1 1 4 0 0 2 7 1 IP, SPPI GIS, September 2012 S T 2 0 5 4 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY E A S T J E M E Z R O A D (...

  8. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1: A Tool for Informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative Geologic Media and Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Frank Vinton; Kelley, Richard E.; Birdsell, Suzanne M.; Lugo, Alexander Bryan; Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2014-11-12

    Reported is progress in the following areas: Phase 1 and 2 websites for the regional geology GIS database; terrane maps of crystalline basement rocks; inventory of shale formations in the US; and rock properties and in-situ conditions for shale estimated from sonic velocity measurements.

  9. #WomenInSTEM: Making a Cleaner Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Mallory

    2014-11-24

    Mallory Lindgren uses geographic information systems or GIS - a mapping software that she compares to "a real-life videogame" - to assess how various constraints, such as wetlands or an airport, may interact with potential renewable energy projects. Her aim is to site and design projects that can effectively co-exist with the surrounding environment.

  10. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Lane

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  11. Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H.

    1994-02-01

    This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

  12. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  13. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System: Validation Integration - Results of Future Architecture Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects. This report is second in a series of reports detailing this effort.

  14. How Do I Use Renewable Energy in My Region?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-11-01

    NREL can asses renewable energy resource information and integrate it with data using geographic information systems (GIS) and interface the data with key analytical models. Planners and energy developers use these integrated resource assessments to make decisions about the feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and risks of developing projects in specific locations and for regional planning.

  15. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Lane

    2010-01-01

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  16. United States Atlas of Renewable Resources

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atlas is an interactive application of the renewable energy resources in the contiguous United States, Alaska and Hawaii. It illustrates the geographic distribution of wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass resources, as well as other pertinent information such as transportation network and administrative boundaries.[Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html

  17. #WomenInSTEM: Making a Cleaner Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Mallory

    2014-09-09

    Mallory Lindgren uses geographic information systems or GIS - a mapping software that she compares to "a real-life videogame" - to assess how various constraints, such as wetlands or an airport, may interact with potential renewable energy projects. Her aim is to site and design projects that can effectively co-exist with the surrounding environment.

  18. The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

    1995-09-01

    One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

  19. Geographic information system applications in coal transportation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Geographic information systems (GIS) offer great potential to the coal transportation industry for capitalizing on the growing availability of spatially-referenced data. As computer-based systems for the collection, storage, retrieval and analysis of spatial data, generating information products in a variety of formats, GIS have a great capability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of coal transportation operations, planning, engineering, and facilities management. Currently GIS are used in the transportation industry at large to analyze, and display information about network infrastructure, fleet operations, property ownership, routing and scheduling, and utilities. Current coal transportation applications include consumer service inquiries, train and locomotive scheduling, and evaluation of network usage. The paper describes the significant potential uses of GIS in the coal transportation sector when integrated with optimization and decision support systems, scientific visualization, data forecasting, and strategic system planning approaches. Ultimately consumer demand and the drive for economic efficiency are likely to stimulate the integration and management of spatial information across the entire coal chain.

  20. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  1. Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  2. The ORNL Basemapping and Imagery Project: Data collection, processing and dissemination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuttle, M.; Pace, P.

    1996-04-01

    Over the past three years, the GIS and Computer Modeling (GCM) Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been engaged in creating a very comprehensive geospatial data base for Department of Energy (DOE) installations managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). This effort encompasses topographic, planimetric, land use/land cover, flood plain, digital elevation, and digital imagery data for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. The ORR covers approximately 34,800 acres and includes ORNL, the K-25 Site and the Y-12 Plant. The geographic extent of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project covers the ORR and surrounding area and two other DOE plants (Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky) for a total of 166,000 acres. The resulting data represent a major improvement in the spatial accuracy and currency of data which are used as a foundation for environmental restoration, facility studies, and other GIS data applications. A GIS data server was also created in order to store and disseminate the new basemapping data. This paper describes the history of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project with emphasis on the logistical aspects of data quality assessment. data tracking, and data product work flow for a large comprehensive spatial data base. The paper then describes the evolution of the GIS data server including its design from an FTP server to a NetScape-based World Wide Web interface. This combination of data and data access provides the ORR environmental community with a carefully configured and managed GIS dataset.

  3. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost data was linked to the GIS model so that this data could be rapidly displayed and analyzed in its geographic context. Once the GIS representing SRS infrastructure and associated descriptive attribute information was developed, detailed maps depicting the future status of all site facilities were created. These maps display the relationship between known waste units and buildings that will be decommissioned and demolished. Cost and hazard information was also depicted illustrating areas and facilities that could present a particular demolition challenge. Although the GIS was quite helpful as an engineering and planning tool, its real power was evident in communicating the impact of the facilities disposition plan to senior management and other stakeholders.

  4. Geospatial Analysis and Technical Assistance for Power Plant Siting Interagency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neher, L A

    2002-03-07

    The focus of this contract (in the summer and fall of 2001) was originally to help the California Energy Commission (CEC) locate and evaluate potential sites for electric power generation facilities and to assist the CEC in addressing areas of congestion on transmission lines and natural gas supply line corridors. Subsequent events have reduced the immediate urgency, although not the ultimate need for such analyses. Software technology for deploying interactive geographic information systems (GIS) accessible over the Internet have developed to the point that it is now practical to develop and publish GIS web sites that have substantial viewing, movement, query, and even map-making capabilities. As part of a separate project not funded by the CEC, the GIS Center at LLNL, on an experimental basis, has developed a web site to explore the technical difficulties as well as the interest in such a web site by agencies and others concerned with energy research. This exploratory effort offers the potential or developing an interactive GIS web site for use by the CEC for energy research, policy analysis, site evaluation, and permit and regulatory matters. To help ground the geospatial capabilities in the realistic requirements and needs of the CEC staff, the CEC requested that the GIS Center conduct interviews of several CEC staff persons to establish their current and envisioned use of spatial data and requirements for geospatial analyses. This survey will help define a web-accessible central GIS database for the CEC, which will augment the well-received work of the CEC Cartography Unit. Individuals within each siting discipline have been contacted and their responses to three question areas have been summarized. The web-based geospatial data and analytical tools developed within this project will be available to CEC staff for initial area studies, queries, and informal, small-format maps. It is not designed for fine cartography or for large-format posters such as the Cartographic Unit is excellent at producing for public meetings. Nor is it designed for the specialized geospatial analyses that the Cartographic Unit maintains a deservedly excellent reputation for producing. The web-based system could be used by the Cartographic Unit staff in support of CEC technical and policy staff to respond during meetings to questions posed by senior management or the public.

  5. Using DRASTIC'' to improve the accuracy of a geographical information system used for solid waste disposal facility siting: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, D.A. . Dept. of Geography)

    1993-01-01

    Beginning in 1989, the citizens and commissioners of Alachua County, Florida began to develop a siting plan for a new solid waste disposal facility (SWDF). Through a cooperative effort with a private consulting firm, several evaluative criteria were selected and then translated into parameters for a geographical information system (GIS). Despite efforts to avoid vulnerable hydrogeology, the preferred site selected was in close proximity to the well field supplying Gainesville, Florida, home to approximately 75 percent of the county's population. The results brought forth a wave of protests from local residents claiming that leachate from the proposed SWDF would contaminate their drinking water. In this study, DRASTIC'' was applied in order to improve the accuracy and defensibility of the aquifer protection-based GIS parameters. DRASTIC'', a method for evaluating ground water contamination potential, is an acronym which stands for Depth to Water, Net Recharge, Aquifer Media, Soil Media, Topography, Impact of Vadose Zone Media, and Conductivity (Hydraulic)''.

  6. Building Height-Characteristics in Three U.S. Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burian, S. J.; Brown, M. J.; Velugubantla, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    Urban canopy parameterizations have been used to represent urban effects in numerical models of mesoscale meteorology, the surface energy budget, and pollutant dispersion. The urban canopy parameterization accounts for the drag exerted by urban roughness elements, the enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy, and the alteration of the surface energy budget (Brown 2000). Accurate representation of urban effects in numerical simulations requires the determination of urban morphological parameters, including building height statistics. Computer analysis of 3-D building digital datasets can provide details of the urban environment in an efficient manner. Ratti ut al. (2001) describe a method for obtaining urban canopy parameters from digital imagery using image processing techniques, Burian et al. (2002) present an alternative analysis approach using a geographic information system (GIS). In this paper, building height statistics computed for three U.S. cities following the GIS approach are presented.

  7. RAPID MAPPING TOOL: AN ARCMAP EXTENSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEVE P. LINGER; PAUL M. RICH; DOUG WALTHER; MARC S. WITKOWSKI; MARCIA A. JONES; HARI S. KHALSA

    2002-06-18

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  8. Rapid mapping tool : an ArcMap extension /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linger, S. P.; Rich, P. M.; Walther, D.; Witkowski, M. S.; Jones, M. A.; Khalsa, H. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  9. An integrated computer modeling environment for regional land use, air quality, and transportation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, C.J.; Marshall, N.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menu-driven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and area-wide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future projections. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W. ); Daniels, R.C. )

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude [times] 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  11. Assessing deforestation in the coastal zone of the Campeche State, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mas, J.F.; Vega, A.P.; Aponte, G.P.; Lomeli, D.Z.

    1997-06-01

    In order to determine rates of deforestation in the State of Campeche, Mexico, forest maps of 1978/80 and 1992 were compared within a geographic information system (GIS). Results indicate that more than 25 per cent of the tropical forest and mangroves were deforested and other 29 per cent were fragmented during this period. The rate of deforestation in the whole state is about 4.4 per cent per year, but the analysis showed that rates of deforestation are much higher in the coastal zone. For this reason an attempt was made to study deforestation patterns in the coastal zone. Data such as distance from roads and from settlements images were incorporated in the GIS data base and a model which represents influence of population on its environment was developed in order to establish the influence of socioeconomic factors on forest clearing. Results indicate that deforestation presents a higher correlation with levels of poverty and social abandonment than with demographic aspects.

  12. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude {times} 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  13. Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    BNL is developing and implementing the project ``Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island`` to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ``Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.`` It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP).

  14. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.

  15. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  16. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 The need for timely preparation of quality EISs has not lessened since DOE initiated the NEPA Lessons Learned program in 1994. This issue provides advice on developing and maintaining EIS schedules from some of the Department's most experienced NEPA practitioners and highlights guidance and GIS tools that can help DOE prepare NEPA documents more efficiently. Articles in this issue include: How to Manage an EIS Schedule Successfully EPA Electronic

  17. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS

  18. Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment Jeremy Freimund, Water Resources Manager Victor Johnson, GIS/Water Resources Tech. III Lummi Natural Resources Department U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review November 15, 2011 Purpose Statement l The purpose of this presentation is to: l Provide summary information about the Lummi Nation; l Describe the Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment Project; and l Provide an update

  19. & Immobilization Plant Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PDF icon eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

    eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power

  20. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010 Title: Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010 Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines. Authors: Michael Lane Publication Date: 2010-01-01

  1. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States | Department of Energy Tidal Streams in the United States Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology. PDF icon Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States More Documents & Publications Project

  2. The ARRA EAP Energy Assurance Planning Bulletin

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1, 2010 THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT VOLUME 1, NUMBER 2 Need to Know LEAP Grant Award Recipients Action Items Recovery Act Report Quarterly Report Plan Updates Contact Updates Upcoming Events April 2010 Energy Conference April 2010 Summer Energy Outlook and Energy Data Workshop Training GIS Webinar NASEO Conf. Calls Other Useful Links and Information FEMA's Lessons Learned Website NIST's Cyber Standards News from the States S.D. Ethanol Bill Energy Conference Locality Notes CARRI

  3. NREL: International Activities - Geospatial Toolkits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is an NREL-developed map-based software application that integrates resource data and other geographic information systems (GIS) data for integrated resource assessment. The non-resource, country-specific data for each toolkit comes from a variety of agencies within each country as well as from global datasets. Funding for the toolkit was provided by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), United States Trade and Development

  4. NREL: International Activities - Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A map depicting wind resources at 100 meters of the republic of the Philippines. Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Philippines Wind Viewer Tutorial Learn how to navigate, display, query and download Philippines data in the Wind Prospector. Philippines Geospatial Toolkit EXE 926.5 MB Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data In 2014, under the Enhancing Capacity for Low

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anthony Lopez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Lopez Photo of Anthony Lopez Anthony Lopez is the section supervisor of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Scientist IV - Section Supervisor On staff since April 2009 Phone number: 303-275-3654 E-mail: anthony.lopez@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Spatial database design and utilization High performance computing Parallel processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets Visualization of complex spatial-temporal datasets Renewable

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Donna Heimiller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donna Heimiller Photo of Donna Heimiller. Donna Heimiller is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Sr. GIS Analyst On staff since June 1998 Phone number: 303-275-4667 E-mail: donna.heimiller@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling supporting multiple resource assessment technologies, regional-scale site evaluation, and energy system modeling Electricity infrastructure analysis Data visualization Primary research

  7. NREL: Energy Analysis - Dylan Hettinger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dylan Hettinger Photo of Dylan Hettinger. Dylan Hettinger is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Programmer Analyst On staff since 2010 Phone number: 303-275-3750 E-mail: dylan.hettinger@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Information design Spatial analysis and cartography Prior work experience AMEC Earth & Environmental, Denver, CO Greenhorne & O'Mara, Raleigh, NC Personal interests/hobbies All kinds of climbing and cycling

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - Michael Gleason

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gleason Michael Gleason is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist III - GIS On staff since April 2014 Phone number: 303-275-4109 E-mail: Michael.Gleason@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling Scientific programming Multivariate data visualization Technical writing and editing Primary research interests Modeling technical resource potential for renewable technologies Modeling market diffusion of distributed

  9. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  10. Probabilistic seismic risk of the territory of Bishkek city, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamchybekov, Murataly Pakirovich

    2008-07-08

    For seismic risk analysis were gathered information about district's seismicity, tectonics, topography, and engineering--geotechnical conditions, which present in apartments, infrastructures and demographies. All of these informations are joined within the limits of GIS for father probabilistic evaluations from different losses levels from earthquake, and also definitions of effective arrangements by reaction. There were given analysis of obtained results with the purpose to take into the consideration and falling of seismic risk's levels.

  11. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  12. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Calendar Year 2015

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 include annual weed distribution data (for selected species), annual weed control locations, biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's mouse and wetland mitigation areas, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS-compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial

  13. Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's meadow jumping mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's meadow jumping mouse and wetland mitigation work, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS ® compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different time frames, including pre- and post-closure. 3.4 Validation

  14. Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Spatial ecology data for the Site are available for several data types and are stored in the GIS on the servers in Grand Junction, Colorado. The types of ecological spatial data that are available include annual weed distribution data (for selected species), annual weed control locations, biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations,

  15. Microsoft Word - S09641_2012Annual.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's mouse and wetland mitigation areas, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS-compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different

  16. Applicability of the {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} method to the electronic structure of quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Wang, L.; Zunger, A.

    1998-04-01

    The {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} method has become the {open_quotes}standard model{close_quotes} for describing the electronic structure of nanometer-size quantum dots. In this paper we perform parallel {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} (6{times}6 and 8{times}8) and direct-diagonalization pseudopotential studies on spherical quantum dots of an ionic material{emdash}CdSe, and a covalent material{emdash}InP. By using an equivalent input in both approaches, i.e., starting from a given atomic pseudopotential and deriving from it the Luttinger parameters in {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} calculation, we investigate the effect of the different underlying wave-function representations used in {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} and in the more exact pseudopotential direct diagonalization. We find that (i) the 6{times}6{bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} envelope function has a distinct (odd or even) parity, while atomistic wave function is parity-mixed. The 6{times}6{bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} approach produces an incorrect order of the highest valence states for both InP and CdSe dots: the p-like level is above the s-like level. (ii) It fails to reveal that the second conduction state in small InP dots is folded from the L point in the Brillouin zone. Instead, all states in {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} are described as {Gamma}-like. (iii) The {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} overestimates the confinement energies of both valence states and conduction states. A wave-function projection analysis shows that the principal reasons for these {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} errors in dots are (a) use of restricted basis set, and (b) incorrect {ital bulk} dispersion relation. Error (a) can be reduced only by increasing the number of basis functions. Error (b) can be reduced by altering the {bold k}{center_dot}{bold p} implementation so as to bend upwards the second lowest bulk band, and to couple the conduction band into the s-like dot valence state. Our direct diagonalization approach provides an accurate and practical replacement to the standard model in that it is rather general, and can be performed simply on a standard workstation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Microstructural evaluation of Sb-adjusted Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer layer systems for IR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.; Paine, D.C.; Uppal, P.; Ahearn, J.S.; Nichols, K.; Charache, G.W.

    1998-06-01

    The authors report on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of Sb-adjusted quaternary Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBE at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBe at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} is successively increased in a series of 125 nm thick layers. Post growth analysis using conventional bright field and weak beam dark field imaging of these buffer layers in cross-section reveals that the interface misfit dislocations are primarily of the 60{degree} type and are distributed through out the interfaces of the buffer layer. When optimized, the authors have shown, using plan view and cross-sectional TEM, that this approach can reduce the threading defect density to below the detectability limit of TEM (< 10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}) and preserve growth surface planarity. The Sb-graded approach was used to fabricate two 2.2 {micro}m power converter structures fabricated using InGaAs grown on Sb-based buffer layers on GaAs substrates. A microstructural and electrical characterization was performed on these device structures and the results are contrasted with a sample in which InP was selected as the substrate. Microstructure, defect density and device performance in these not-yet-optimized Sb-based buffer layers compares favorably to equivalent devices fabricated using InP substrates.

  18. Characterizing Composition Modulations in InAs/AIAs Short-Period Superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Lee, S.R.; Mascarenhas, A.; Millunchick, J. Mirecki; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1999-04-26

    The formation of quantum wires has much interest due to their novel electronic properties which may lead to enhanced optoelectronic device performance and greater photovoltaic efficiencies. One method of forming these structures is through spontaneous lateral modulation found during the epitaxial growth of III/V alloys. In this paper, we report and summarize our investigations on the formation of lateral moduation in the MBE grown InAlAs/InP(001) system. This system was grown as a short-period superlattice where n-monolayers of InAs are deposited followed by m-Monolayers of AlAs (with n and m~2) and this sequence is repeated to grown a low strain InAlAs ternary alloy on InP(001) that exhibits lateral modulation. Films were grown under a variety of condition (growth temperature, effective alloy composition, superlattice period, and growth rate). These films have been extensively analyzed using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microcharacterization, in addition to photon-based spectroscopes. Here we present results of several microstructural characterizations using a wide range of TEM-based techniques, and compare them to results from the other methods to obtain a unified understanding of composition modulation. Two strong points consistently emerge: 1) The lateral modulation wavelength is insensitive to growth temperature and effective alloy composition, but the strength of the lateral modulation is greatest near an effective alloy composition of In(0.46)Al(0.54)As, which corresponds to a slightly tensile global strain with respect to InP. 2) The composition variation for the strongly modulated films is as much as 0.38 InAs mole fraction. In addition, for these strongly modulated films, the modulation wave is asymmetric showing strongly peaked, narrower InAs-rich regions separated by flat AlAs-rich regions. We discuss these results and their possible implications in addition to detailing the techniques used to obtain them.

  19. Analysis of isothermal and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2016-02-24

    Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature, T, and relative humidity, RH, at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature) and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nucleating particles (INPs) all have the same INP surface area (ISA); however, the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimentalmore » data is rarely questioned. Descriptions of ice active sites and variability of contact angles have been successfully formulated to describe ice nucleation experimental data in previous research; however, we consider the ability of a stochastic freezing model founded on classical nucleation theory to reproduce previous results and to explain experimental uncertainties and data scatter. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses parameters including the total number of droplets, Ntot, and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T). This model is applied to address if (i) a time and ISA-dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii) the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and acoustically levitated droplets, droplets in a continuous-flow diffusion chamber (CFDC), the Leipzig aerosol cloud interaction simulator (LACIS), and the aerosol interaction and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber. Observed time-dependent isothermal frozen fractions exhibiting non-exponential behavior can be readily explained by this model considering varying ISA. An apparent cooling-rate dependence of Jhet is explained by assuming identical ISA in each droplet. When accounting for ISA variability, the cooling-rate dependence of ice nucleation kinetics vanishes as expected from classical nucleation theory. Finally, the model simulations allow for a quantitative experimental uncertainty analysis for parameters Ntot, T, RH, and the ISA variability. We discuss the implications of our results for experimental analysis and interpretation of the immersion freezing process.« less

  20. Mapping Suitability Areas for Concentrated Solar Power Plants Using Remote Sensing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2015-01-01

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. We present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  1. Using geographic information systems in the delineation of wellhead protection areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Horton, C.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act established the nationwide wellhead protection program to be administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although individual states have the responsibility to implement wellhead protection, the US EPA provides technical guidance, and approves each wellhead protection plan prepared by the states. A major aspect of wellhead protection strategies is the delineation of wellhead protection areas. These are zones around municipal water supply wells that receive special land use considerations intended to minimize the threat of contamination of the wells. The US EPA has recommended several technical approaches to delineating wellhead protection areas, ranging in sophistication from simple concentric circles around wells to irregular areas determined from groundwater flow and transport analyses. Regardless of the wellhead protection area delineation technique, the resulting area surrounding the municipal well must be accurately mapped. A geographic information system (GIS) approach to mapping the results of wellhead protection area delineation is demonstrated. Using hypothetical groundwater flow regimes, each EPA recommended approach to wellhead protection area delineation is presented in a GIS format. A visual comparison of delineation techniques in terms of area and configuration of the resulting wellhead protection areas is made. Finally, the advantages of using a GIS for representing wellhead protection areas is provided.

  2. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  3. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    1999-11-09

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  4. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  5. Mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants using remote sensing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-05-14

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. Furthermore, we present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  6. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  7. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Michael D.

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55?m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  8. Reciprocal-Space Analysis of Compositional Modulation in Short-Period Superlattices Using Position-Sensitive X-Ray Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, S.R.; Millunchick, J.M.; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1998-11-10

    Epitaxial growth of AlAs-InAs short-period superlattices on (001) InP can lead to heterostructures exhibiting strong, quasi-periodic, lateral modulation of the alloy composition; transverse satellites arise in reciprocal space as a signature of the compositional modulation. Using an x-ray diffractometer equipped with a position-sensitive x-ray detector, we demonstrate reciprocal-space mapping of these satellites as an efficient, nondestructive means for detecting and characterizing the occurrence of compositional modulation. Systematic variations in the compositional modulation due to the structural design and the growth conditions of the short-period superlattice are characterized by routine mapping of the lateral satellites. Spontaneous compositional modulation occurs along the growth front during molecular-beam epitaxy of (AlAs) (InAs)n short-period superlattices. The modulation is quasi-periodic and forms a lateral superlattice superimposed on the intended SPS structure. Corresponding transverse satellites arise about each reciprocal lattice point, and x-ray diffraction can be routinely used to map their local reciprocal-space structure. The integrated intensity, spacing, orientation, and shape of these satellites provide a reliable means for nondestructively detecting and characterizing the compositional modulation in short-period superlattices. The analytical efficiency afforded by the use of a PSD has enabled detailed study of systematic vacations in compositional modulation as a function of the average composition, the period, and the growth rate of the short- period superlattice

  9. Reciprocal-space and real-space analyses of compositional modulation in InAs/AlAs short-period superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; TWESTEN,R.D.; NORMAN,A.G.; AHRENKIEL,S.P.; MOUTINHO,H.R.; MASCARENHAS,A.; MILLUNCHICK,J. MIRECKI

    2000-01-25

    The microstructure of lateral composition modulation in InAs/AlAs superlattices grown by MBE on InP is examined. The use of x-ray diffraction, TEM, AFM, and STEM to characterize the modulations is discussed. Combining the information from these techniques gives increased insight into the phenomenon and how to manipulate it. Diffraction measures the intensity of modulation and its wavelength, and is used to identify growth conditions giving strong modulation. The TEM and STEM analyses indicate that local compositions are modulated by as much as 0.38 InAs mole fraction. Plan-view images show that modulated structures consists of short ({approx_lt}0.2 {micro}m) In-rich wires with a 2D organization in a (001) growth plane. However, growth on miscut substrates can produce a single modulation along the miscut direction with much longer wires ({approx_gt}0.4 {micro}m), as desired for potential applications. Photoluminescence studies demonstrate that the modulation has large effects on the bandgap energy of the superlattice.

  10. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup ?}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1?y} lattice matched to InP, as example of IIIV compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  11. Excitonic exchange splitting in bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Wang, L.; Zunger, A.

    1999-02-01

    We present an approach to calculate the excitonic fine-structure splittings due to electron-hole short-range exchange interactions using the local-density approximation pseudopotential method, and apply it to bulk semiconductors CdSe, InP, GaAs, and InAs. Comparing with previous theoretical results, the current calculated splittings agree well with experiments. Furthermore, we provide an approximate relationship between the short-range exchange splitting and the exciton Bohr radius, which can be used to estimate the exchange splitting for other materials. The current calculation indicates that a commonly used formula for exchange splitting in quantum dot is not valid. Finally, we find a very large pressure dependence of the exchange splitting: a factor of 4.5 increase as the lattice constant changes by 3.5{percent}. This increase is mainly due to the decrease of the Bohr radius via the change of electron effective mass. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Growth and Characterization of MBE Parametric Variations Upon Polarization Independent Strained Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theda Daniels-Race

    2003-04-30

    This project was designed to comprehensively investigate the effects of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth variations upon tensile-strained films. Using two dimensional (2-D) structures, such as quantum wells of variable configurations, we worked to observe the electro-optical response of polarization independence. The latter had been studied for compressively strained systems. However, the proof of principle for the feasibility of tensile-strained single and double quantum wells, particularly in the GaAs as opposed to the InP material system, had been much less investigated by comparison. The significance of this project, from a Basic Energy Sciences perspective, has been in its contribution to the understanding of how MBE parameters and sample design effect the physics of strained materials which themselves have been tailored to react with polarization insensitivity. Fundamental issues of materials structure control, growth parameter modifications, and characterization methods were investigated. Both single and double quantum well systems were used with both symmetric and asymmetric well widths for the latter. In this work, we essentially investigated both the growth of and potential applications for quantum based structures that use tensile strain to induce polarization independence.

  13. Performance status of 0.55 eV InGaAs thermophotovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtczuk, S.; Colter, P.; Charache, G.; DePoy, D.

    1998-10-01

    Data on {approximately} 0.55 eV In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As cells with an average open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 298 mV (standard deviation 7 mV) at an average short-circuit current density of 1.16 A/cm{sup 2} (sdev. 0.1 A/cm{sup 2}) and an average fill-factor of 61.6% (sdev. 2.8%) is reported. The absorption coefficient of In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As was measured by a differential transmission technique. The authors use a numerical integration of the absorption data to determine the radiative recombination coefficient for In{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}As. Using this absorption data and simple one-dimensional analytical formula the above cells are modeled. The models show that the cells may be limited more by Auger recombination rather than Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination at dislocation centers caused by the 1.3% lattice mismatch of the cell to the host InP wafer.

  14. Synthesis, optical properties, and microstructure of semiconductor nanocrystals formed by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budai, J.D.; White, C.W.; Withrow, S.P.; Zuhr, R.A.; Zhu, J.G.

    1996-12-01

    High-dose ion implantation, followed by annealing, has been shown to provide a versatile technique for creating semiconductor nanocrystals encapsulated in the surface region of a substrate material. The authors have successfully formed nanocrystalline precipitates from groups IV (Si, Ge, SiGe), III-V (GaAs, InAs, GaP, InP, GaN), and II-VI (CdS, CdSe, CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1{minus}x}, CdTe, ZnS, ZnSe) in fused silica, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si substrates. Representative examples will be presented in order to illustrate the synthesis, microstructure, and optical properties of the nanostructured composite systems. The optical spectra reveal blue-shifts in good agreement with theoretical estimates of size-dependent quantum-confinement energies of electrons and holes. When formed in crystalline substrates, the nanocrystal lattice structure and orientation can be reproducibly controlled by adjusting the implantation conditions.

  15. CMOS-compatible InP/InGaAs digital photoreceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, M.L.; Rose, B.H.; Craft, D.C.; Enquist, P.M.; Slater, D.B. Jr.

    1997-11-04

    A digital photoreceiver is formed monolithically on an InP semiconductor substrate and comprises a p-i-n photodetector formed from a plurality of InP/InGaAs layers deposited by an epitaxial growth process and an adjacent heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifier formed from the same InP/InGaAs layers. The photoreceiver amplifier operates in a large-signal mode to convert a detected photocurrent signal into an amplified output capable of directly driving integrated circuits such as CMOS. In combination with an optical transmitter, the photoreceiver may be used to establish a short-range channel of digital optical communications between integrated circuits with applications to multi-chip modules (MCMs). The photoreceiver may also be used with fiber optic coupling for establishing longer-range digital communications (i.e. optical interconnects) between distributed computers or the like. Arrays of digital photoreceivers may be formed on a common substrate for establishing a plurality of channels of digital optical communication, with each photoreceiver being spaced by less than about 1 mm and consuming less than about 20 mW of power, and preferably less than about 10 mW. Such photoreceiver arrays are useful for transferring huge amounts of digital data between integrated circuits at bit rates of up to about 1,000 Mb/s or more. 4 figs.

  16. CMOS-compatible InP/InGaAs digital photoreceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Michael L.; Rose, Benny H.; Craft, David C.; Enquist, Paul M.; Slater, Jr., David B.

    1997-01-01

    A digital photoreceiver is formed monolithically on an InP semiconductor substrate and comprises a p-i-n photodetector formed from a plurality of InP/InGaAs layers deposited by an epitaxial growth process and an adjacent heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifier formed from the same InP/InGaAs layers. The photoreceiver amplifier operates in a large-signal mode to convert a detected photocurrent signal into an amplified output capable of directly driving integrated circuits such as CMOS. In combination with an optical transmitter, the photoreceiver may be used to establish a short-range channel of digital optical communications between integrated circuits with applications to multi-chip modules (MCMs). The photoreceiver may also be used with fiber optic coupling for establishing longer-range digital communications (i.e. optical interconnects) between distributed computers or the like. Arrays of digital photoreceivers may be formed on a common substrate for establishing a plurality of channels of digital optical communication, with each photoreceiver being spaced by less than about 1 mm and consuming less than about 20 mW of power, and preferably less than about 10 mW. Such photoreceiver arrays are useful for transferring huge amounts of digital data between integrated circuits at bit rates of up to about 1000 Mb/s or more.

  17. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; Young, Michelle; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector. The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.

  18. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; et al

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector.more » The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.« less

  19. Update on developments at SNIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacks, J. Turner, I.; Day, I.; Flinders, K.; McAdams, R.; Crowley, B.

    2015-04-08

    The Small Negative Ion Facility (SNIF) at CCFE has been undergoing continuous development and enhancement to both improve operational reliability and increase diagnostic capability. SNIF uses a CW 13.56MHz, 5kW RF driven volume source with a 30kV triode accelerator. Improvement and characterisation work includes: Installation of a new L type RF matching unit, used to calculate the load on the RF generator. Use of the electron suppressing biased insert as a Langmuir probe under different beam extraction conditions. Measurement of the hydrogen Fulcher molecular spectrum, used to calculate gas temperature in the source. Beam optimisation through parameter scans, using copper target plate and visible cameras, with results compared with AXCEL-INP to provide beam current estimate. Modelling of the beam power density profile on the target plate using ANSYS to estimate beam power and provide another estimate of beam current. This work is described, and has allowed an estimation of the extracted beam current of approximately 6mA (4mA/cm2) at 3.5kW RF power and a source pressure of 0.6Pa.

  20. Design Study of the Extraction System of the 3rd Generation ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, M.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Wutte, D.; Xie, Z.Q.

    1998-10-06

    A design study for the extraction system of the 3rd Generation super conducting ECR ion source at LBNL is presented. The magnetic design of the ion source has a mirror field of 4 T at the injection and 3 T at the extraction side and a radial field of 2.4 T at the plasma chamber wall. Therefore, the ion beam formation takes place in a strong axial magnetic field. Furthermore the axial field drops from 3 T to 0.4 T within the first 30 cm. The influence of the high magnetic field on the ion beam extraction and matching to the beam line is investigated. The extraction system is first simulated with the 2D ion trajectory code IGUN with an estimated mean charge state of the extracted ion beam. These results are then compared with the 2D code AXCEL-INP, which can simulate the extraction of ions with different charge states. Finally, the influence of the strong magnetic hexapole field is studied with the three dimensional ion optics code KOBRA. The introduced tool set can be used to optimize the extraction system of the super conducting ECR ion source.

  1. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  2. GaSb molecular beam epitaxial growth on p-InP(001) and passivation with in situ deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merckling, C.; Brammertz, G.; Hoffmann, T. Y.; Caymax, M.; Dekoster, J.; Sun, X.; Alian, A.; Heyns, M.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2011-04-01

    The integration of high carrier mobility materials into future CMOS generations is presently being studied in order to increase drive current capability and to decrease power consumption in future generation CMOS devices. If III-V materials are the candidates of choice for n-type channel devices, antimonide-based semiconductors present high hole mobility and could be used for p-type channel devices. In this work we first demonstrate the heteroepitaxy of fully relaxed GaSb epilayers on InP(001) substrates. In a second part, the properties of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface have been studied by in situ deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} gate dielectric. The interface is abrupt without any substantial interfacial layer, and is characterized by high conduction and valence band offsets. Finally, MOS capacitors show well-behaved C-V with relatively low D{sub it} along the bandgap, these results point out an efficient electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface.

  3. Radiation response analysis of wide-gap p-AlInGaP for superhigh-efficiency space photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Marupaduga, S.; Anandakrishnan, S.S.; Alam, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N.J.; Lee, H.S.; Sasaki, T.; Yamaguchi, M.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imazumi, M.

    2004-11-29

    We present here the direct observation of the majority and minority carrier defects generation from wide-band-gap (2.04 eV) and thick (2 {mu}m) p-AlInGaP diodes and solar cells structures before and after 1 MeV electron irradiation by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). One dominant hole-emitting trap H1 (E{sub V}+0.37{+-}0.05 eV) and two electron-emitting traps, E1 (E{sub C}-0.22{+-}0.04 eV) and E3 (E{sub C}-0.78{+-}0.05 eV) have been observed in the temperature range, which we could scan by DLTS. Detailed analysis of the minority carrier injection annealing experiment reveals that the H1 center has shown the same annealing characteristics, which has been previously observed in all phosphide-based materials such as InP, InGaP, and InGaAsP. The annealing property of the radiation-induced defects in p-AlInGaP reveals that multijunction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes based on this material could be considerably better to Si and GaAs in a radiation environment.

  4. Can p-channel tunnel field-effect transistors perform as good as n-channel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhulst, A. S. Pourghaderi, M. A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A. V.-Y.; Verreck, D.; Van de Put, M.; Groeseneken, G.; Sore, B.

    2014-07-28

    We show that bulk semiconductor materials do not allow perfectly complementary p- and n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), due to the presence of a heavy-hole band. When tunneling in p-TFETs is oriented towards the gate-dielectric, field-induced quantum confinement results in a highest-energy subband which is heavy-hole like. In direct-bandgap IIIV materials, the most promising TFET materials, phonon-assisted tunneling to this subband degrades the subthreshold swing and leads to at least 10 smaller on-current than the desired ballistic on-current. This is demonstrated with quantum-mechanical predictions for p-TFETs with tunneling orthogonal to the gate, made out of InP, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, InAs, and a modified version of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As with an artificially increased conduction-band density-of-states. We further show that even if the phonon-assisted current would be negligible, the build-up of a heavy-hole-based inversion layer prevents efficient ballistic tunneling, especially at low supply voltages. For p-TFET, a strongly confined n-i-p or n-p-i-p configuration is therefore recommended, as well as a tensily strained line-tunneling configuration.

  5. Direct wafer bonding technology for large-scale InGaAs-on-insulator transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Li, Jian; Kao, Yung-Chung

    2014-07-28

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V devices on Si wafers have been explored for realizing high device performance as well as merging electrical and photonic applications on the Si platform. Existing methodologies have unavoidable drawbacks such as inferior device quality or high cost in comparison with the current Si-based technology. In this paper, we present InGaAs-on-insulator (-OI) fabrication from an InGaAs layer grown on a Si donor wafer with a III-V buffer layer instead of growth on a InP donor wafer. This technology allows us to yield large wafer size scalability of III-V-OI layers up to the Si wafer size of 300?mm with a high film quality and low cost. The high film quality has been confirmed by Raman and photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the fabricated InGaAs-OI transistors exhibit the high electron mobility of 1700?cm{sup 2}/V s and uniform distribution of the leakage current, indicating high layer quality with low defect density.

  6. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  7. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  8. Geographic Information System Tools for Management of US DOE Sites - 13489

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Cliff; Pilz, Elaine; Pawel, Steve

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) uses a variety of GIS tools to support long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at DOE closure sites. These geo-spatial applications provide access to data both for external public viewing and for internal analysis and decision making. LM uses a custom geo-spatial application called geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) that draws validated information from a database of 4.6 million analytical results and 232,000 water level measurements for 58 LTS and M sites. These data were collected from transferred sites over a period of 40 years. The database is used to capture and store historical environmental information such as analytical chemistry data, groundwater depths and elevations, well logs, well construction data, geo-referenced boundaries, site physical features, and sampling locations from LTS and M sites. Stakeholders, regulators, and project personnel can use this Web-based application and data to display information in several forms, such as a tabular report, a graph, and a geo-spatial display, or the data can be labeled or highlighted in a map view. Institutional controls, with their LTS and M requirements and documentation, have recently been incorporated into a prototype GEMS Web page for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. LM uses multiple internal GIS viewers to help ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. For example, at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site, LM uses a GIS application to display real property interests on authoritative maps. Another project is used to facilitate discussions at stakeholder meetings for the Rocky Flats site's Original Landfill. The Uranium Leasing Program uses multiple interactive maps that assist in ongoing monitoring and the oversight of lease-holders' activities. (authors)

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SimTable helps firefighters model and predict fire direction April 3, 2012 SimTable projects maps onto sand as part of an interactive 3-D model In the past, firefighters modeled their response to a wildfire by moving matchbox cars and pieces of yarn on a tabletop filled with sand, using the sand to represent the landscape. Today, SimTable, an innovative company and technology housed at the Santa Fe Complex, is revolutionizing firefighter training. With SimTable, Google Earth and GIS data are

  10. MAp GENeralization COntroller

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-02-24

    MAGENCO is a geographic information systems (GIS) tool for managing geospatial data. It assists in choosing an appropriate level of cartographic simplification (removal of vertices while preserving line character). While an effective algorithm for this task exists (Douglas-Peucker, published in 1973), the tolerance parameter depends on the fractal dimension or the natural or manmade feature, the scale of mapping, and the uses to which the data will be put. It is thus necessary to iterativelymore » test different parameters until an acceptable one is found.« less

  11. A test of an expert-based bird-habitat relationship model in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Gartner, David, L.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Dunning, John, B., Jr.; Franzreb, Kathleen, E.; Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Miller, Karl, V.; Pearson, Scott, F.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships models are used widely by land managers to provide information on which species are likely to occur in an area of interest and may be impacted by a proposed management activity. Few such models have been tested. Recent Avian census data from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina was used to validate BIRDHAB, a geographic information system (GIS) model developed by United States Forest Service resource managers to predict relative habitat quality for birds at the stand level on national forests in the southeastern United States. BIRDHAB is based on the species-habitat matrices presented by Hamel (1992).

  12. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  13. Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B.

    2012-04-01

    New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

  14. An Analysis Of The Impact Of Selected Carbon Capture And Storage Policy Scenarios On The US Fossil-Based Electric Power Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2003-09-13

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is rapidly emerging as a potential key climate change mitigation option. However, as policymakers and industrial stakeholders begin the process of formulating new policy for implementing CCS technologies, participants require a tool to assess large-scale CCS deployment over a number of different possible future scenarios. This paper will analyze several scenarios using two state-of-the-art Battelle developed models, the MiniCAM and the CO2-GIS for examining CCS deployment. Outputs include the total amount of CO2 captured, total annual emissions, and fossil-based generating capacity.

  15. PRRC 03-08

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PRRC 03-08 NM WAIDS: A Produced Water Quality and Infrastructure GIS Database for New Mexico Oil Producers (First Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report) Report Start Date: October 1, 2002 Report End Date: March 1, 2003 Martha Cather, PI Robert Lee, Project Manager Ibrahim Gundiler, Co-PI Andrew Sung, Co-PI Contributors: Naomi Davidson Ajeet Kumar Reddy Mingzhen Wei April 1, 2003 DE-FC26-02NT15134 New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro,

  16. Some aspects of computer aided decision making for the crisis management of unstable slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faure, R.M.; Pairault, T.; Pham, M.; Bernardeau-Moreau, A.; Fayolle, G.; Robinson, J.C.; Foucheyrand, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present here the developments in their risk management research; software tools based on object oriented techniques, an image and graphics based man-machine interface, a new algorithm which allows the quick construction of a GIS, strong links with analysis software with the possibility of using fuzzy logic reasoning. The case of the threatening landslide at Sechilienne (Isere, France), studied using these tools, is briefly presented. The authors will show that is management is facilitated through the use of networks as in the WASSS project approach.

  17. User's Guide Virtual Hydropower Prospector Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall; Sera E. White; Julie A. Brizzee; Randy D. Lee

    2005-11-01

    The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a web-based geographic information system (GIS) application for displaying U.S. water energy resource sites on hydrologic region maps. The application assists the user in locating sites of interest and performing preliminary, development feasibility assessments. These assessments are facilitated by displaying contextual features in addition to the water energy resource sites such as hydrograpy, roads, power infrastructure, populated places, and land use and control. This guide provides instructions for operating the application to select what features are displayed and the extent of the map view. It also provides tools for selecting features of particular interest and displaying their attribute information.

  18. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn A. Baskin

    2004-03-31

    Work during the first six months of the project mainly concentrated on contracts execution and collection of data to characterize the region and input of that data into the geographical information system (GIS) system. Data was collected for source characterization, transportation options and terrestrial options. In addition, discussions were held to determine the extent of the geologic information that would be needed for the project. In addition, activities associated with the regulatory, permitting and safety issues were completed. Outreach activities are in the formative stages.

  19. Water Energy Resource Data from Idaho National Laboratory's Virtual Hydropower Prospector

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydropower Program is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will improve the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity, adding diversity to the nation's energy supply. The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a GIS application to locate and evaluate natural stream water energy resources. In the interactive data map the U.S. is divided into 20 hydrologic regions. The Prospector tool applies an analytical process to determine the gross power potential of these regions and helps users to site potential hydropower projects.

  20. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore » time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.« less

  1. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  2. Developing shape analysis tools to assist complex spatial decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E.; Ehler, G.B.; Cowen, D.

    1996-05-31

    The objective of this research was to develop and implement a shape identification measure within a geographic information system, specifically one that incorporates analytical modeling for site location planning. The application that was developed incorporated a location model within a raster-based GIS, which helped address critical performance issues for the decision support system. Binary matrices, which approximate the object`s geometrical form, are passed over the grided data structure and allow identification of irregular and regularly shaped objects. Lastly, the issue of shape rotation is addressed and is resolved by constructing unique matrices corresponding to the object`s orientation

  3. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  4. Modified Version of High Efficiency Dehumidification System (HEDS) ESTCP Presentation EW-201344

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Models & Tools for Evaluation of Project Options Tribal Energy Program Review 2015 Lars Lisell 5/7/2015 2 Energy Audits/Energy Evaluation * Envelope/Weatherization * Lighting * HVAC * Plug loads 3 * http://www.nrel.gov/gis/ RE Resource Maps 4 * Biopower Atlas * https://mapsbeta.nrel.gov/biopower-atlas/ RE Resource Maps 5 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 6 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 7 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 8 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 9 PV Watts

  5. A Geographic Information System approach to modeling nutrient and sediment transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Timmins, S.P.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water quality model to quantify nonpoint-source (NPS) pollution that uses a geographic information system (GIS) to link statistical modeling of nutrient and sediment delivery with the spatial arrangement of the parameters that drive the model. The model predicts annual nutrient and sediment loading and was developed, calibrated, and tested on 12 watersheds within the Lake Ray Roberts drainage basin in north Texas. Three physiographic regions are represented by these watersheds, and model success, as measured by the accuracy of load estimates, was compared within and across these regions.

  6. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Potential For Renewable Energy On Public Lands February 2003 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Download CD ZIP File (248 MB) Download CD-Lite ZIP File with no GIS Data or Acrobat Reader Installers (43 MB) CD-Lite Version Assessing The Potential For Renewable Energy On Public Lands U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  7. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-11-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}){sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm{sup -1}, which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (E{sub {nu}}+0.90{+-}0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations ({delta}p) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm{sup -1}, of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm{sup -1}, in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm{sup 2}), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is {delta}E=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (V{sub p}-P{sub i}). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center.

  8. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluskey, M D

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  9. InGaAs monolithic interconnected modules (MIM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Weizer, V.G.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Wilt, D.M.; Scheiman, D.; Brinker, D.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.

    1997-12-31

    A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. The MIM device consists of many individual InGaAs cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating (S.I.) InP substrate. An infrared (IR) back surface reflector (BSR), placed on the rear surface of the substrate, returns the unused portion of the TPV radiator output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Also, the use of a BSR obviates the need to use a separate filtering element. As a result, MIMs are exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. MIMs with an active area of 1 x 1-cm were comprised of 15 cells monolithically connected in series. Both lattice-matched and lattice-mismatched InGaAs/InP devices were produced, with bandgaps of 0.74 and 0.55 eV, respectively. The 0.74-eV modules demonstrated an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 6.158 V and a fill factor of 74.2% at a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 842 mA/cm{sup 2}, under flashlamp testing. The 0.55-eV modules demonstrated a Voc of 4.849 V and a fill factor of 57.8% at a Jsc of 3.87 A/cm{sup 2}. IR reflectance measurements (i.e., {lambda} > 2 {micro}m) of these devices indicated a reflectivity of {ge} 83%. Latest electrical and optical performance results for the MIMs will be presented.

  10. Electrical and optical performance characteristics of 0.74eV p/n InGaAs monolithic interconnected modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, D.M.; Weizer, V.G.; Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Jain, R.K.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.R.

    1997-06-01

    There has been a traditional trade-off in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion development between system efficiency and power density. This trade-off originates from the use of front surface spectral controls such as selective emitters and various types of filters. A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed which allows for both high power densities and high system efficiencies. The MIM device consists of many individual indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating indium phosphide (InP) substrate. The MIM is exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. An infrared (IR) reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns the unused portion of the emitter output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Initial MIM development has focused on a 1 cm{sup 2} device consisting of eight series interconnected cells. MIM devices, produced from 0.74 eV InGaAs, have demonstrated V{sub oc} = 3.2 volts, J{sub sc} = 70 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 66% under flashlamp testing. Infrared (IR) reflectance measurements (> 2 {micro}m) of these devices indicate a reflectivity of > 82%. MIM devices produced from 0.55 eV InGaAs have also been demonstrated. In addition, conventional p/n InGaAs devices with record efficiencies (11.7% AM0) have been demonstrated.

  11. Applications of Geographic Information Systems technology for environmental planning and management in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Z.; Wiele-Evans, C. Van Der )

    1993-01-01

    The State of North Carolina is developing a multipurpose geographic information systems (GIS) database for widespread use. The database currently consists of more than fifty categories of information state wide. In addition to basic planimetric information, the data include many categories of environmental significance. Much of the database has proven useful to planners, managers, and consultants involved with environmental policy-making and protection. The database is being used to augment activities in regulatory programs, research programs and in a variety of siting applications. The North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCCGIA) has operated the State's GIS since 1977 and is the lead coordinating agency for geographic information in the state. NCCGIA is able to develop and maintain the corporate database through partnerships with other state, federal, regional, and local government agencies and private organizations. Users access the database at NCCGIA for the production of maps and statistics, to spontaneously generate displays of a project area, to acquire data, and to conduct special studies. This paper describes some of the activities associated with environmental planning and management applications at the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Specifically, it illustrates the following: the conceptual framework for development and maintenance of the corporate database; the contents of the database; several environmental planning documents and applications developed at NCCGIA; and methods of data access.

  12. Application of geographic information systems to waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Burns, M.; Weinrach, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is often difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the generators themselves in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This Process Waste Assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the Process Modeling System and currently being integrated with the InFoCAD Geographic Information System (GIS) . The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation framework written using the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) . Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Development activities include integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS) and provisions for a Best Available Technologies (BAT) database. The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results.

  13. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  14. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 1, User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is a consolidated set of automated resources that effectively manage the data gathered during environmental monitoring and restoration of the Hanford Site. HEIS includes an integrated database that provides consistent and current data to all users and promotes sharing of data by the entire user community. HEIS is an information system with an inclusive database. Although the database is the nucleus of the system, HEIS also provides user access software: query-by-form data entry, extraction, and browsing facilities; menu-driven reporting facilities; an ad hoc query facility; and a geographic information system (GIS). These features, with the exception of the GIS, are described in this manual set. Because HEIS contains data from the entire Hanford Site, many varieties of data are included and have.been divided into subject areas. Related subject areas comprise several volumes of the manual set. The manual set includes a data dictionary that lists all of the fields in the HEIS database, with their definitions and a cross reference of their locations in the database; definitions of data qualifiers for analytical results; and a mapping between the HEIS software functions and the keyboard keys for each of the supported terminals or terminal emulators.

  15. Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

  16. The global coastal hazards data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); White, T.W. )

    1989-01-01

    A rise of sea level between 0.5 and 1.5 m, caused by predicted climate warming in the next century, could jeopardize low-lying radioactive waste disposal sites near the coast, due to permanent and episodic inundation, increased shoreline retreat, and changes in the water table. The effects of global sea level rise on the shoreline will not be spatially uniform. Therefore, site selection will depend on assessment of these differential vulnerabilities, in order to avoid high-risk coasts. The coastal hazards data base described here could provide an appropriate framework. The coastal hazards data base integrates relevant topographic, geologic, geomorphologic, erosional and subsidence information in a Geographic Information System (GIS), to identify high-risk shorelines characterized by low coastal relief, an erodible substrate, present and past evidence of subsidence, extensive shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Data for seven variables relating to inundation and erosion hazards are incorporated into the ORNL ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS). Data compilation has been completed for the US and is being extended to North America, and ultimately the world. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) has been designed to flag high risk coastal segments. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A coastal hazards data base for the U.S. West Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M. |; Beaty, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US West Coast that are at risk to sea-level rise. This data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US West Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data bases. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data variables from the following seven data sets: elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. One variable from each data set was classified according to its susceptibility to sea-level rise and/or erosion to form 7 relative risk variables. These risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI). Algorithms used to calculate several CVIs are listed within this text.

  18. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  19. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  20. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change. Final report, July 15, 1990--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  1. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  2. Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

    2007-05-31

    Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

  3. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  4. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  5. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  6. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability tomore » be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.« less

  7. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five sub-basins. Results highlight the effectiveness of the L-THIA approach in assessing the long-term hydrologic impact of urban sprawl. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios to enhance NPS pollution management. Access to the model via the INTERNET enhances the usability and effectiveness of the technique significantly. Recommendations can be made to community decision makers, based on this analysis, concerning how development can be controlled within the watershed to minimize the long-term impacts of increased stormwater runoff and NPS pollution for better management of water resources.

  8. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B.

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability to be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.

  9. Topographic and Air-Photo Lineaments in Various Locations Related to Geothermal Exploration in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Title: Topographic and Air-Photo Lineaments in Various Locations Related to Geothermal Exploration in Colorado Tags: Colorado, lineaments, air-photo, geothermal Summary: These line shapefiles trace apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in various counties in Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids, as part of a DOE reconnaissance geothermal exploration program. Description: Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. This line shapefile is an attempt to use desktop GIS to delineate possible faults and fracture orientations and locations in highly prospective areas prior to an initial site visit. Geochemical sampling and geologic mapping could then be centered around these possible faults and fractures. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and utility right-of-ways. Still, it is unknown what actual features these lineaments, if they exist, represent. Although the shapefiles are arranged by county, not all areas within any county have been examined for lineaments. Work was focused on either satellite thermal infrared anomalies, known hot springs or wells, or other evidence of geothermal systems. Finally, lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Projection Information: UTM Zone 13 NAD 27 projection Credits: These lineament shapefile was created by Geothermal Development Associates, as part of a geothermal geologic reconnaissance performed by Flint Geothermal, LLC, of Denver Colorado. Funding was provided in part by DOE Grant DE-EEE0002828. Use Limitation These shapefiles was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and/or nature.

  10. A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Reeves, Kelly S.

    2006-06-01

    Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

  11. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S

    2001-05-22

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  12. Bolivia renewable energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.

    1997-12-01

    The author summarizes changes which have occurred in Bolivia in the past year which have had an impact on renewable energy source development. Political changes have included the privatization of power generation and power distribution, and resulted in a new role for state level government and participation by the individual. A National Rural Electrification Plan was adopted in 1996, which stresses the use of GIS analysis and emphasizes factors such as off grid, economic index, population density, maintenance risk, and local organizational structure. The USAID program has chosen to stress economic development, environmental programs, and health over village power programs. The national renewables program has adopted a new development direction, with state projects, geothermal projects, and private sector involvement stressed.

  13. Concentrating Solar Deployment System (CSDS) -- A New Model for Estimating U.S. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Market Potential: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Short, W.; Heimiller, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the Concentrating Solar Deployment System Model (CSDS). CSDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. CSDS is designed to address the principal market and policy issues related to the penetration of concentrating solar power (CSP) electric-sector technologies. This paper discusses the current structure, capabilities, and assumptions of the model. Additionally, results are presented for the impact of continued research and development (R&D) spending, an extension to the investment tax credit (ITC), and use of a production tax credit (PTC). CSDS is an extension of the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). While WinDS examines issues related to wind, CSDS is an extension to analyze similar issues for CSP applications. Specifically, a detailed representation of parabolic trough systems with thermal storage has been developed within the existing structure.

  14. Decadal growth of black carbon emissions in India - article no. L02807

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, S.K.; Beig, G.; Sharma, C.

    2008-01-15

    A Geographical Information System (GIS) based methodology has been used to construct the black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Indian geographical region. The distribution of emissions from a broader level to a spatial resolution of 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid has been carried out by considering micro level details and activity data of fossil fuels and bio-fuels. Our calculated total BC emissions were 1343.78 Gg and 835.50 Gg for the base years 2001 and 1991 respectively with a decadal growth of around 61%, which is highly significant. The district level analysis shows a diverse spatial distribution with the top 10% emitting districts contributing nearly 50% of total BC emission. Coal contributes more than 50% of total BC emission. All the metropolitan cities show high BC emissions due to high population density giving rise to high vehicular emissions and more demand of energy.

  15. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D.; Shevenell, L., Garside, L.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  16. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  17. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-02-07

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  18. VIRTUAL HYDROPOWER PROSPECTING: A FOUNDATION FOR WATER ENERGY RESOURCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Lee; Sera White; Julie Brizzee; Shane Cherry; Douglas Hall

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the gross power potential of the natural stream water energy resources of the United States was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models (DEMs) and geographic information system (GIS) tools. Water energy resource sites (stream segments) assessed in the basic resource assessment were further evaluated to identify which can be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of each site was refined to determine its developable hydropower potential using a set of development criteria corresponding to a damless low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) project. The methodologies for performing the basic resource assessment and subsequent feasibility assessment are described and the summary results for the nation are presented.

  19. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides formore » dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.« less

  20. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  1. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  2. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  3. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  4. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  5. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  6. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future oil shale and tar sands resource development.

  7. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. I. THE CONSTANT COOLING TIME CASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, Scott; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Boley, Aaron C., E-mail: scamicha@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: tomsc@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protostellar disk, subject to a constant global cooling time and susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs), at a time when heating and cooling are roughly balanced. Our goal is to determine the gravitational torques produced by GIs, the level to which transport can be represented by a simple {alpha}-disk formulation, and to examine fragmentation criteria. Four simulations are conducted, identical except for the number of azimuthal computational grid points used. A Fourier decomposition of non-axisymmetric density structures in cos (m{phi}), sin (m{phi}) is performed to evaluate the amplitudes A{sub m} of these structures. The A{sub m} , gravitational torques, and the effective Shakura and Sunyaev {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses are determined for each resolution. We find nonzero A{sub m} for all m-values and that A{sub m} summed over all m is essentially independent of resolution. Because the number of measurable m-values is limited to half the number of azimuthal grid points, higher-resolution simulations have a larger fraction of their total amplitude in higher-order structures. These structures act more locally than lower-order structures. Therefore, as the resolution increases the total gravitational stress decreases as well, leading higher-resolution simulations to experience weaker average gravitational torques than lower-resolution simulations. The effective {alpha} also depends upon the magnitude of the stresses, thus {alpha}{sub eff} also decreases with increasing resolution. Our converged {alpha}{sub eff} is consistent with predictions from an analytic local theory for thin disks by Gammie, but only over many dynamic times when averaged over a substantial volume of the disk.

  8. Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2002-06-01

    This annual report describes progress of the project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is working to provide advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The MIDCARB project is developing improved online tools to provide real-time display and analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The system links together data from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  9. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  10. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  11. Decision Support for Water Planning: the ZeroNet Water-Energy Initiative.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, P. M.; Weintraub, Laura H. Z.; Ewers, Mary E.; Riggs, T. L.; Wilson, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid population growth and severe drought are impacting water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry...), particularly in arid regions. New generation decision support tools, incorporating recent advances in informatics and geographic information systems (GIS), are essential for responsible water planning at the basin scale. The ZeroNet water-energy initiative is developing a decision support system (DSS) for the San Juan River Basin, with a focus on drought planning and economic analysis. The ZeroNet DSS provides a computing environment (cyberinfrastructure) with three major components: Watershed Tools, a Quick Scenario Tool, and a Knowledge Base. The Watershed Tools, based in the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF), provides capabilities (1) to model surface flows, both the natural and controlled, as well as water withdrawals, via an engineering module, and (2) to analyze and visualize results via a stakeholder module. A new ZeroNet module for WARMF enables iterative modeling and production of 'what if' scenario libraries to examine consequences of changes in climate, landuse, and water allocation. The Quick Scenario Tool uses system dynamics modeling for rapid analysis and visualization for a variety of uses, including drought planning, economic analysis, evaluation of management alternatives, and risk assessment. The Knowledge Base serves simultaneously as the 'faithful scribe' to organize and archive data in easily accessible digital libraries, and as the 'universal translator' to share data from diverse sources and for diverse uses. All of the decision tools depend upon GIS capabilities for data/model integration, map-based analysis, and advanced visualization. The ZeroNet DSS offers stakeholders an effective means to address complex water problems.

  12. Assessing the perception and reality of arguments against thermal waste treatment plants in terms of property prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, K.J.O.; Longhurst, P.J.; Wagland, S.T.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Previous research studies have shown that EfW facilities negatively impact the local house prices. • In this study property prices surrounding 3 operational EfW plants were analysed. • No significant negative effect on property prices due to an incinerator was found. - Abstract: The thermal processing of waste materials, although considered to be an essential part of waste management, is often sharply contested in the UK. Arguments such as health, depletion of resources, cost, noise, odours, traffic movement and house prices are often cited as reasons against the development of such facilities. This study aims to review the arguments and identify any effect on property prices due to the public perception of the plant. A selection of existing energy from waste (EfW) facilities in the UK, operational for at least 7 years, was selected and property sales data, within 5 km of the sites, was acquired and analysed in detail. The locations of the properties were calculated in relation to the plant using GIS software (ArcGIS) and the distances split into 5 zones ranging from 0 to 5 km from the site. The local property sale prices, normalised against the local house price index, were compared in two time periods, before and after the facility became operational, across each of the 5 zones. In all cases analysed no significant negative effect was observed on property prices at any distance within 5 km from a modern operational incinerator. This indicated that the perceived negative effect of the thermal processing of waste on local property values is negligible.

  13. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  14. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-04-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

  15. Excited-State Relaxation in PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, J. M.; Califano, M.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    In solids the phonon-assisted, nonradiative decay from high-energy electronic excited states to low-energy electronic excited states is picosecond fast. It was hoped that electron and hole relaxation could be slowed down in quantum dots, due to the unavailability of phonons energy matched to the large energy-level spacings ('phonon-bottleneck'). However, excited-state relaxation was observed to be rather fast ({le}1 ps) in InP, CdSe, and ZnO dots, and explained by an efficient Auger mechanism, whereby the excess energy of electrons is nonradiatively transferred to holes, which can then rapidly decay by phonon emission, by virtue of the densely spaced valence-band levels. The recent emergence of PbSe as a novel quantum-dot material has rekindled the hope for a slow down of excited-state relaxation because hole relaxation was deemed to be ineffective on account of the widely spaced hole levels. The assumption of sparse hole energy levels in PbSe was based on an effective-mass argument based on the light effective mass of the hole. Surprisingly, fast intraband relaxation times of 1-7 ps were observed in PbSe quantum dots and have been considered contradictory with the Auger cooling mechanism because of the assumed sparsity of the hole energy levels. Our pseudopotential calculations, however, do not support the scenario of sparse hole levels in PbSe: Because of the existence of three valence-band maxima in the bulk PbSe band structure, hole energy levels are densely spaced, in contradiction with simple effective-mass models. The remaining question is whether the Auger decay channel is sufficiently fast to account for the fast intraband relaxation. Using the atomistic pseudopotential wave functions of Pb{sub 2046}Se{sub 2117} and Pb{sub 260}Se{sub 249} quantum dots, we explicitly calculated the electron-hole Coulomb integrals and the P {yields} S electron Auger relaxation rate. We find that the Auger mechanism can explain the experimentally observed P {yields} S intraband decay time scale without the need to invoke any exotic relaxation mechanisms.

  16. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Schultz, Peter A.; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen M.; Tucker, Garritt J.

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled %22Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations.%22 During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel computers and advanced processor ar- chitectures. Finally, we briefly describe the MSM method for efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions on massively parallel computers.

  17. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SA-miRNAs are involved in the regulation of IR-induced senescence, so targeting these miRNAs may be a novel approach for modulating cellular response to radiation exposure.

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  19. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is ending, NatCarb will continue as an internal US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) project with the continued cooperation of personnel at both West Virginia University and the Kansas Geological Survey. The successor project will continue to organize and enhance the information about CO{sub 2} sources and developing the technology needed to access, query, analyze, display, and distribute natural resource data critical to carbon management. Data are generated, maintained and enhanced locally at the RCSP level, or at the national level in specialized data warehouses, and assembled, accessed, and analyzed in real-time through a single geoportal. To address the broader needs of a spectrum of users form high-end technical queries to the general public, NatCarb will be moving to an improved and simplified display for the general public using readily available web tools such as Google Earth{trademark} and Google Maps{trademark}. The goal is for NatCarb to expand in terms of technology and areal coverage and remain the premier functional demonstration of distributed data-management systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas, and forms the foundation of a functioning carbon cyber-infrastructure. NatCarb provides access to first-order information to evaluate the costs, economic potential and societal issues of CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including public perception and regulatory aspects.

  20. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.