National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for giant prudhoe bay

  1. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area BOE Reserve Class No 2004 Reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE

  2. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF

  3. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area Liquids Reserve Class No 2004 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl > 10,000 Mbbl

  4. Recent applications of coiled tubing in remedial wellwork at Prudhoe Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, K.R.; Bond, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The vast number of wells and unique operating conditions in Alaska`s Prudhoe Bay field have presented many opportunities for those involved in remedial wellwork. Among the technologies that have either been pioneered, tested, or applied there, coiled tubing (CT) ranks as one of the most long lasting and widely used. This paper highlights the more recent applications of CT in the field. The paper begins with a brief overview of the Prudhoe Bay Unit`s (PBU) CT wellwork program and then follows with discussions on eight CT applications that have been developed or expanded in the last two years. Some are new technology and others are old techniques with a new design. Descriptions and procedures are given for each in addition to performance results thus far.

  5. Improved coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques at Prudhoe Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornbrook, P.R.; Mason, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents major changes in coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques used in the Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBUWOA). Changes include introduction of a polymer diluent to replace borax contamination, increased differential pressures placed on squeeze and coil, reduced cement volumes, and incorporation of an inflow test and resqueeze procedure. These changes resulted in increased squeeze effectiveness by reducing equipment and engineering time requirements and by shortening well shut-in time after the workover.

  6. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  7. New coiled-tubing cementing techniques at Prudhoe developed to withstand higher differential pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, R.E.; Reem, D.C. )

    1993-11-01

    The successful hydraulic fracturing program at Prudhoe Bay would not have been possible without an effective coiled-tubing-unit (CTU) cement-squeeze program. Many fracture stimulation candidates were wells that have been squeezed previously. Therefore, squeezed perforations were exposed to higher differential pressures during fracturing operations than normally were seen at Prudhoe. At the outset of the fracture stimulation program in 1990, squeeze perforations failed when subjected to fracture job pressures. It quickly became clear that more aggressive CTU squeeze techniques resulting in stronger squeezed perforations would be necessary if the Prudhoe fracture program were to achieve its goals. Arco Alaska Inc. implemented a more aggressive CTU squeeze program in the Eastern Operating Area (EOA) in mid-1990. This paper documents the results of the new squeeze program, in which increased surface coiled-tubing squeeze pressures from 1,500 to 3,500 psi for 1 hour were used. More resilient, acid-resistant latex cement also became the standard in late 1990 for squeeze cementing. Implementation of this program has resulted in a squeeze success rate approaching 90%.

  8. Alaska Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil Shut-in Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Background and facts on Alaska's crude oil reserves, production, and transportation with the Energy Information Administration's analysis of potential shut-in impacts on U.S. oil markets.

  9. Daya Bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bay Daya Bay Basics The basics of Daya Bay computing at PDSF. Read More » Data Management All Daya Bay raw data is transferred to PDSF. Read More » File Systems Daya Bay has space on 2 elizas: 6TB on /eliza7 and 35TB on /eliza16. Read More » Running on Carver The Daya Bay software is installed on PDSF on /common so is therefore unavailable on Carver. At this point there has been no effort to port the code to /project for use on... Read More » Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:11

  10. Sandia Energy - 'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC 'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum Dots 'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum DotsTara...

  11. Bay Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  12. Chesapeake Bay Test Site | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chesapeake Bay Test Site Jump to: navigation, search Name Chesapeake Bay Test Site Facility Chesapeake Bay Test Site Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status...

  13. 'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Giant' Nanocrystal Quantum Dots - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. Growing Giant Crystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing Giant Crystals A new process similar to making rock candy was developed at NIF to rapidly grow very large crystals that are about 2 cubic feet in size and weigh up to 800 pounds-about the weight of a large grizzly bear! The crystals are made of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (or KDP), a naturally occurring chemical. In crystal form, KDP has good optical properties. Crystal plates have special optical properties, like prisms, that transmit, bend, and break light up into the spectrum of

  15. Hooper Bay Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I L L I A M N A N E N G , G E N E R A L M A N A G E R VILLAGE CORPORATION OF HOOPER BAY, ALASKA SEA LION CORPORATION TO PROTECT OUR LANDS AND ENHANCE THE CULTURE AND LIVES OF NAPARYARMIUT (OUR PEOPLE) Hooper Bay Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study "Askinuk" or "Askinaghamiut" are the early Eskimo names for Hooper Bay. The village was first reported in 1878 by E.W. Nelson of the U.S. Signal Service. The 1890 Census found 138 persons living in 14 homes. The name Hooper Bay came

  16. Bay Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bay Biodiesel LLC Place: Martinez, California Zip: 94553 Product: Biodiesel producers in Martinez, California. References: Bay...

  17. Bay Solar Power Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power Design Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bay Solar Power Design Place: California Product: US-based PV system installer. References: Bay Solar Power Design1 This...

  18. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  19. Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project Montana Area Office Great Plains Region October 2015 Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project Table of Contents (Page 1 of 3) CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 PROPOSED ACTION

  20. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The protein "skeleton" of this giant protease is depicted in magenta ribbon. The grey enclosure represents a lower-resolution surface and is included to aid visualization of...

  1. Tuscola Bay Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Tuscola Bay Wind Facility Tuscola Bay Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy...

  2. Felton Bay Logistics, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logistics, LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Felton Bay Logistics, LLC is a company based in San Diego, California. Felton Bay offers training,...

  3. BayWa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BayWa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: BayWa Group Place: Munich, Germany Zip: 81925 Sector: Services, Solar Product: Germany-based company with international operations...

  4. Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys ...

  5. Next-Generation "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for Lighting Next-Generation "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for Lighting Lead Performer: Los Alamos National Laboratory - ...

  6. Final Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project Montana Area Office Great Plains Region November 2015 Adopted 1/11/2016 by Western Area Power Administration as DOE/EA-2022 Final Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project Table of Contents (Page 1 of 3) CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 PROPOSED ACTION

  7. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of

  8. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Keweenaw Bay Indian Community PRESENTATION Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands DOE Tribal Energy Program Review October 25 29, 2010 Gregg Nominelli, J.D. Economic Developer BACKGROUND INFORMATION  U.S. Department of Justice - Community Capacity Development Office  Alternative & Renewable Energy Committee Established by Tribal Council  Council for Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) - Developed Strategic Energy Plan

  9. Bay Front Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEEDS 2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBayFrontBiomassFacility&oldid397174" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  10. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authority Name: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Address: 10 Park Plaza, Suite 3910 Boston, MA 02116 Zip: 02116 Website: www.mbta.com Coordinates:...

  11. Hooper Bay Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Developer Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Energy Purchaser Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Location Hooper Bay AK Coordinates...

  12. Glacier Bay Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Glacier Bay Inc Place: Oakland, California Zip: 94601 Product: US-based, advanced thermal control, sound reduction, and DC power management technologies...

  13. Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  14. San Luis Bay Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name San Luis Bay Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Luis Bay...

  15. Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  16. Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place: Tampa, Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Consortium researching ethanol from...

  17. San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation and Development Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission Name: San Francisco Bay Conservation and...

  18. Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pedro Bay Village Council Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907) 850-2225 Website: www.swamc.orghtml...

  19. Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  20. Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Facility Bay Resource Management Center Sector Biomass...

  1. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3...

  2. New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

  3. The stable K0 giant star ? Gem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, David F.

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of ? Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ?2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ?40 m s{sup 1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 0.20 km s{sup 1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 0.10 km s{sup 1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 70 m s{sup 1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I ?6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup 1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with ? Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  4. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands.

  5. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands.

  6. Keeping comets and asteroids at bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keeping Comets And Asteroids At Bay Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Keeping comets and asteroids at bay Every two years, experts from around the globe convene at the Planetary Defense Conference. August 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Every two years, experts from around the globe convene at

  7. Really Off the Grid: Hooper Bay, AK

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Really Off the Grid - Hooper Bay, AK Old Housing - Energy Efficiency Vintage Hooper Bay Renewable Energy - Before & After DOE Tribal Energy Grant * $200,000 - Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study * Hire & train 2-5 local energy assessors * Energy audits of 24 homes with blower doors, etc. - Reduce energy consumption from air leakage - Moisture/mold issues - Reduce drafts * $7/gallon heating fuel * ~ $0.55/kWh - electricity (over half of households behind on utility payments) Is your house

  8. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  9. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  10. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  11. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  12. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  13. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  14. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  15. Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    activity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical activity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical activity We demonstrated giant optical activity using a chiral metamaterial composed of an array of conjugated bilayer metal structures. The chiral metamaterials were further integrated with photoactive inclusions to accomplish a wide

  16. Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical activity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with ...

  17. Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB Jump to: navigation, search Name: Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP (GBB) Place: Houston, Texas Product: Developer of a 75.8m litre per year biodiesel...

  18. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada...

  19. Bay County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Bay County, Michigan Dow Chemical Co Dow Kokam Places in Bay County,...

  20. Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Chris Kushman Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study *DOE Tribal Energy Program *Tribal Energy Program Review presenters *Bay Mills Indian Community Thank You * Great relationship between ITCMI and Bay Mills * Proactive in exploring renewable energy alternatives - Bay Mills Community College Alternative Energy Curriculum - Biofuels and the crops to support biofuels - Wind resource data collection * Upper

  1. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y. J.; Tan, K. F.; Wang, L.; Zhao, G.; Li, H. N.; Sato, Bun'ei; Takeda, Y. E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-20

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s{sup 1}. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s{sup 1}). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M {sub ?}) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  2. Bristol Bay Native Corporation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC), through its subsidiary, Bristol Environmental and Engineering Services Corporation, will assess renewable energy opportunities within the BBNC region of southwest Alaska. The goals of this initiative are to encourage tribal self-sufficiency, create jobs, improve environmental quality, and help make our nation more secure through the development of clean, affordable, and reliable renewable energy technologies. The study will identify technologies or systems that could potentially reduce the cost or improve the sustainability of electricity within the Bristol Bay region.

  3. MERGING CRITERIA FOR GIANT IMPACTS OF PROTOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genda, H.; Kokubo, E.; Ida, S.

    2012-01-10

    At the final stage of terrestrial planet formation, known as the giant impact stage, a few tens of Mars-sized protoplanets collide with one another to form terrestrial planets. Almost all previous studies on the orbital and accretional evolution of protoplanets in this stage have been based on the assumption of perfect accretion, where two colliding protoplanets always merge. However, recent impact simulations have shown that collisions among protoplanets are not always merging events, that is, two colliding protoplanets sometimes move apart after the collision (hit-and-run collision). As a first step toward studying the effects of such imperfect accretion of protoplanets on terrestrial planet formation, we investigated the merging criteria for collisions of rocky protoplanets. Using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic method, we performed more than 1000 simulations of giant impacts with various parameter sets, such as the mass ratio of protoplanets, {gamma}, the total mass of two protoplanets, M{sub T}, the impact angle, {theta}, and the impact velocity, v{sub imp}. We investigated the critical impact velocity, v{sub cr}, at the transition between merging and hit-and-run collisions. We found that the normalized critical impact velocity, v{sub cr}/v{sub esc}, depends on {gamma} and {theta}, but does not depend on M{sub T}, where v{sub esc} is the two-body escape velocity. We derived a simple formula for v{sub cr}/v{sub esc} as a function of {gamma} and {theta} (Equation (16)), and applied it to the giant impact events obtained by N-body calculations in the previous studies. We found that 40% of these events should not be merging events.

  4. Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry Hybrid semiconductor-metal nanoscale constructs are of both fundamental and practical interest.

  5. Reconnaissance survey of eight bays in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, J.A.; Crecelius, E.A.; Pearson, W.H.; Fellingham, G.W.; Elston, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1983 to 1985, Battelle/Marine Research Laboratory conducted reconnaissance-level field and laboratory studies to better characterize toxic contamination problems occurring in selected urban-industrialized bays (Bellingham Bay, Port Gardner - Everett Harbor, Fourmile Rock - Elliot Bay dump site vicinity, Sinclair Inlet) of Puget Sound. It was envisioned that this goal was best achieved by simultaneously determining levels of contamination in selected baseline or 'reference bays' (Samish Bay, Case Inlet, Dabob Bay, Sequim Bay). Two major tasks composed this effort. The first was conducted in 1983 and consisted of preliminary or screening surveys to collect and analyze sediment samples from 101 stations distributed in the four urban-industrialized bays (Figure 1), and at 80 stations distributed in the four baseline bays (Figure 2). The second task was undertaken in 1984 and involved detailed surveys and analyses of the same bays, but at a limited number of stations (32 in urban embayments, 16 in baseline bays). The stations to be resampled in 1984 were the ''cleanest'' of the clean and the ''dirtiest'' of the dirty as determined by the 1983 sediment chemical analyses, and within restrictions imposed by sediment type.

  6. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron’s relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO₃ and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O₃, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, inducesmore » a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO₃/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O₃ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.« less

  7. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electrons relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO? and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O?, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, induces a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO?/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O? heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.

  8. Thorne Bay School - A Model in Sustainability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thorne Bay School - A Model in Sustainability 1 2 Community Supported Wood Supply Innovative Operations Plan 3 Embracing the Benefits 4 Beyond an Energy Vision 5 Alaska's Process  Regional Planning  Outreach  Statements of Interest  Pre-feasibility Studies  Sustainable Fuel Supply  Technology Options  Economics  Community Education  Community Decision 6 7 Devany Plentovich dplentovich@aidea.oprg AKEnergyAuthority.org 8

  9. Bay Area | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home / Bay

  10. Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton pump Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Volker Zickermann, Goethe...

  11. THE FREQUENCY OF RAPID ROTATION AMONG K GIANT STARS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalog are much fainter and typically more metal-poor than those of other catalogs of red giant star rotational velocities, but the spectra generally only have signal-to-noise...

  12. Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We show here that photostable 'giant' quantum dots when placed at the center of an ultrathin gold shell retain their key optical property of bright and blinking-free ...

  13. Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical ... OSTI Identifier: 1053248 Report Number(s): IS-J 7788 Journal ID: 1098-0121 DOE Contract ...

  14. Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. PDF icon November 2009 status report PDF icon October 2010 status

  15. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Industrial

  16. EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy 5: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon SUMMARY The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared, with DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve estuary habitat in Trestle Bay. BPA's proposed action is to partially fund the proposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None

  17. Production of Giant magnetocaloric Substances Using Commercially Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raw Materials - Energy Innovation Portal Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Production of Giant magnetocaloric Substances Using Commercially Available Raw Materials Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe giant magnetocaloric material Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature

  18. Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This

  19. Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys Authors: Rao, Wei-Feng ; Wuttig, Manfred ; Khachaturyan, Armen G. Publication Date: 2011-03-10 OSTI Identifier: 1100025 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007

  20. Cost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materials - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Cost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materials Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The giant magnetocaloric material Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control, has just become more cost effective with the development of this new method for utilizing commercially available Gd to produce it.

  1. Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    activity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical activity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Terahertz chiral metamaterials with giant and dynamically tunable optical activity Authors: Zhou, Jiangfeng ; Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy ; Zhao, Rongkuo ; Azad, Abul K. ; Chen, Hou-Tong ; Soukoulis, Costas M. ; Taylor, Antoinette J. ; O'Hara, John F. Publication Date: 2012-07-27 OSTI Identifier: 1103017 Type:

  2. EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 2: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana Summary The Bureau of Reclamation (Montana Area Office), with DOE's Western Area Power Administration (Upper Great Plains Region) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri

  3. Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IT fields, the Laney College Computer Information Systems Department offered its Upgrade: Computer Science Program. Thirty-eight students from 10 East Bay high schools registered...

  4. Kawela Bay, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kawela Bay, Hawaii: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 21.7033333, -158.01 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  5. Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as an ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7. Places in Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska King Salmon, Alaska Naknek, Alaska South Naknek, Alaska Retrieved from "http:...

  6. Promising Technology: High Bay Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High bay LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires including longer lifetimes, reduced maintenance costs, and lower energy consumption.

  7. San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  8. Bay Harbor Islands, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bay Harbor Islands is a town in Miami-Dade County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  9. MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  10. U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet describes the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) success story on environmental stewardship and cost savings at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

  11. McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Facility McKay Bay Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597, -82.3017728...

  12. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy, LLC

  13. On the One-Year Anniversary of EPAct and Release of National Transmission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Congestion Study and On the Situation in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska | Department of Energy On the One-Year Anniversary of EPAct and Release of National Transmission Congestion Study and On the Situation in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska On the One-Year Anniversary of EPAct and Release of National Transmission Congestion Study and On the Situation in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska August 8, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you for joining us today for the one-year

  14. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  15. Giant landslide deposits in northwest Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauque, L.; Strecker, M.R.; Bloom, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Giant Quaternary landslide deposits occur along mountain fronts in the structural transition zone between the high-angle reverse-fault-bounded Sierras Pampeanas and the low-angle thrust belt of the Sierras Subandinas. There are two modes of occurrence: (1) chaotic masses without distinct geometry, and (2) masses with distinct lobate geometry similar to glacial moraines. Type (1) deposits occur where the moving rock mass followed a narrow valley and blocked the drainage. Many of these caused subsequent formation of lakes and changed the sedimentation processes on pediments at the mountain fronts. In type (2) deposits, lateral and frontal ridges are up to 10 m higher than the interior parts; in some places pressure ridges within the lobes are well preserved. Type (2) deposits show reverse grading and were deposited on relatively smooth pediments or alluvial fans. The lobate geometry strongly suggests that type (2) deposits are a product of flowage and are debris stream or sturzstrom deposits (sense of Heim, 1932 and Hsu, 1975). All investigated deposits occur in areas of demonstrated Quaternary faulting and are interpreted as the result of tectonic movements, although structural inhomogeneities in the source area may have been a significant factor for some of the landslides. No datable materials have yet been found associated with the deposits.

  16. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  17. Low-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback,more » net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  18. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound ...

  19. Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: Fine Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: Fine Structure of Spin Plasmons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: ...

  20. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    response in BiFeO3 thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films In this article, terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric thin-film BiFeO3 while monitoring the time-dependent ferroelectric

  1. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389-A Great Bay Energy Rescission (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  2. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  3. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  4. Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Barrels of 42 U.S. Gallons) 200 9 2009 Est. Non 2009 Proved Production Producing Discov er 2008 Rank Field Name Location Reserves Volume Reserves Y ear Rank 1 PRUDHOE BAY AK 95.9 ...

  5. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  6. Coulomb excitation of multiphonon levels of the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayman, B. F.; Zardi, F.

    2010-03-15

    A closed expression is obtained for the cross-section for Coulomb excitation of levels of the giant dipole resonance of given angular momentum and phonon number. Applications are made to the Goldhaber-Teller and Steinwedel-Jensen descriptions of the resonance at relativistic bombarding energies.

  7. Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to build the staff capacity to enable the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) to establish a tribal weatherization program that promotes energy sufficiency throughout the tribal community.

  8. Morro Bay, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Morro Bay is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California. It falls under California's 23rd congressional...

  9. The ecology of Tampa Bay, Florida: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.R. III; Estevez, E.D.

    1988-09-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida's largest open-water estuary and one of the most highly urbanized. This report summarizes and synthesizes many years of scientific investigation into Tampa Bay's geology, hydrology and hydrography, water chemistry, and biotic components. The estuary is a phytoplankton-based system, with mangroves being the second most important primary producer. Benthic organisms are abundant and diverse, although in parts of the bay the benthos consists of a relatively few opportunistic and pollution indicator species. The estuary provides habitat for the juveniles and adults of a number of commercial and recreational fishery species. Significant changes occurring as a result of urbanization and industrialization include significant declines in intertidal wetlands and seagrass meadows, changes in circulation and flushing, and degradation of water quality. Important management issues include dredge and fill operations, restoration of fisheries, increasing freshwater flow to the bay, and eutrophication. 257 refs., 85 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. City of Larsen Bay, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Larsen Bay Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907)847-2211 Website: www.swamc.orghtmlsouthwest-a Outage Hotline: (907)847-2211 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File...

  11. Nassau Bay, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Nassau Bay is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 22nd congressional district.12 References...

  12. BayWa Sunways JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV that specialises in developing, planning and realizing medium-sized to large photovoltaic systems and solar plants. References: BayWa & Sunways JV1 This article is a stub....

  13. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to build the staff capacity to enable the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) to establish a tribal weatherization program that promotes energy sufficiency throughout the tribal community.

  14. North Bay Village, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. North Bay Village is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  15. Cross-media approach to saving the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    A project EPA began in August will investigate the possibility of cross-media emissions trading as a new approach to reducing nitrogen loadings to the Chesapeake Bay. Working with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the Agency hopes to device a NO{sub x} trading framework along the lines of existing sulfur dioxide trading plans to control acid rain. The Chesapeake Air Project will examine the feasibility of using emissions trading between and water sources, including trading credits between power plants and mobile sources, to reduce the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to the bay. The progress of the Bay Program nutrient reduction goals is up for reevaluation in 1997, and Knopes and EDF economist Brian Morton have high hopes that the trading plan, which would place a cap on the mass of emissions and rate of deposition allowed by all sources, will become the atmospheric deposition portion of the Chesapeake Bay Program`s Nutrient Reduction Strategy. 6 refs.

  16. West Bay Shore, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Bay Shore is a census-designated place in Suffolk County, New York.1 References ...

  17. Tampa Bay Designated as the Newest Clean Cities Coalition | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This week, Clean Cities welcomed another major partner in the effort to reduce our nation's dependence on petroleum - the brand-new Tampa Bay Clean Cities Coalition. Through its ...

  18. Huntington Bay, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Huntington Bay is a village in Suffolk County, New York. It falls under New York's 2nd...

  19. ARE GIANT TORNADOES THE LEGS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-09-10

    Observations in the 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional H{alpha} observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale.

  20. NREL: Wind Research - Building 251 and High Bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building 251 and High Bay Photo of an aerial shot of a large blue and grey building with parking lot and cars in the foreground. Building 251 at the NWTC houses administrative and research support offices and well as a high bay for testing wind turbine components. Building 251 is the hub of the National Wind Technology Center. In addition to housing administrative and research support offices, the facility's conference rooms enable NREL to host international wind power specialists, conferences,

  1. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Jackson Counties, Texas | Department of Energy EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal

  2. Microsoft Word - Green Bay Notes - FINAL.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (DOE) TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION (TEC) WORKING GROUP MEETING September 13-14, 2006 Green Bay, WI Welcome and Meeting Overview The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 26 th meeting on September 13-14, 2006, in Green Bay, WI. One- hundred thirty-two participants, representing national, State, Tribal, and local government; industry; professional organizations; and other interested parties, met to address a variety of issues

  3. Cathodic Protection of the Yaquina Bay Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Laylor, H.M.; Cryer, C.B.

    2001-02-01

    The Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Oregon, was designed by Conde B. McCullough and built in 1936. The 3,223-foot (982 m) structure is a combination of concrete arch approach spans and a steel through arch over the shipping channel. Cathodic protection is used to prevent corrosion damage to the concrete arches. The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) installed a carbon anode coating (DAC-85) on two of the north approach spans in 1985. This anode was operated at a current density of 6.6 mA/m2(0.6 mA/ft2). No failure of the conductive anode was observed in 1990, five years after application, or in 2000, 15 years after application. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 20 mils (0.5 mm) thick were applied to half the south approach spans beginning in 1990. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 15 mils (0.4 mm) thick were applied to the remaining spans in 1996. These anodes were operated at a current density of 2.2 mA/m2(0.2 mA/ft2). In 1999, four zones on the approach spans were included in a two-year field trial of humectants to improve zinc anode performance. The humectants LiNO3 and LiBr were applied to two zones; the two adjacent zones were left untreated as controls. The humectants substantially reduced circuit resistance compared to the controls.

  4. Researchers correlate incidences of rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arteritis with solar cycles | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers correlate incidences of rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis with solar cycles By John Greenwald June 15, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A coronal mass ejection hurling plasma from the sun (Photo by NASA) A coronal mass ejection hurling plasma from the sun What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery. The results, published in May in BMJ

  5. Researchers correlate incidences of rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arteritis with solar cycles | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Researchers correlate incidences of rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis with solar cycles By John Greenwald June 15, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A coronal mass ejection hurling plasma from the sun (Photo by NASA) A coronal mass ejection hurling plasma from the sun What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery. The results, published in May in BMJ

  6. Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tokamaks | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks By Raphael Rosen June 2, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Left: Plasmoid formation in simulation of NSTX plasma during CHI / Right: Fast-camera image of NSTX plasma shows two discrete plasmoid-like bubble structures. (Photo by Left: Fatima Ebrahimi, PPPL / Right: Nishino-san, Hiroshima University) Left: Plasmoid formation in simulation of NSTX plasma

  7. Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tokamaks | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks By Raphael Rosen June 2, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Left: Plasmoid formation in simulation of NSTX plasma during CHI / Right: Fast-camera image of NSTX plasma shows two discrete plasmoid-like bubble structures. (Photo by Left: Credit Fatima Ebrahimi, PPPL / Right: Credit Nishino-san, Hiroshima University) Left: Plasmoid formation in simulation of

  8. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  9. Replacement of tritiated water from irradiated fuel storage bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S.; Kennedy, B.; Minichilli, A.; Mitchell, T.

    2015-03-15

    Recently, AECL developed a novel method to reduce tritium emissions (to groundwater) and personnel doses at the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor irradiated fuel storage bay (also known as rod or spent fuel bay) through a water swap process. The light water in the fuel bay had built up tritium that had been transferred from the heavy water moderator through normal fuel transfers. The major advantage of the thermal stratification method was that a very effective tritium reduction could be achieved by swapping a minimal volume of bay water and warm tritiated water would be skimmed off the bay surface. A demonstration of the method was done that involved Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of the swap process and a test program that showed excellent agreement with model prediction for the effective removal of almost all the tritium with a minimal water volume. Building on the successful demonstration, AECL fabricated, installed, commissioned and operated a full-scale system to perform a water swap. This full-scale water swap operation achieved a tritium removal efficiency of about 96%.

  10. Load test of the 272W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-09-28

    This reports the results of the Load Test of the 272W Building High Bay Roof Deck and Support Structure.

  11. Geek-Up[2.24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay Geek-Up[2.24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay February 25, 2011 - 4:37pm Addthis Nuclear power plants like the twin Daya Bay reactors, yield large amounts of electron antineutrinos -- millions of quadrillions of them every second. | Photo Courtesy of Roy Kaltschmidt, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Nuclear power plants like the twin Daya Bay reactors, yield large amounts of electron antineutrinos -- millions of quadrillions

  12. Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State Lighting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting You ...

  13. Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for LED based Solid State Lighting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based ...

  14. Project Reports for Bristol Bay Native Corporation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC), through its subsidiary, Bristol Environmental and Engineering Services Corporation, will assess renewable energy opportunities within the BBNC region of southwest Alaska. The goals of this initiative are to encourage tribal self-sufficiency, create jobs, improve environmental quality, and help make our nation more secure through the development of clean, affordable, and reliable renewable energy technologies. The study will identify technologies or systems that could potentially reduce the cost or improve the sustainability of electricity within the Bristol Bay region.

  15. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  16. San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases

  17. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana Open Bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1995-06-23

    Data were collected prior to termination of discharge at three sites (including two open bay sites at Delacroix Island and Bay De Chene) for the risk assessments. The Delacroix Island Oil and Gas Field has been in production since the first well drilling in 1940; the Bay De Chene Field, since 1942. Concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Po, and 228Th were measured in discharges. Radium conc. were measured in fish and shellfish tissues. Sediment PAH and metal conc. were also available. Benthos sampling was conducted. A survey of fishermen was conducted. The tiered risk assessment showed that human health risks from radium in produced water appear to be small; ecological risk from radium and other radionuclides in produced water also appear small. Many of the chemical contaminants discharged to open Louisiana bays appear to present little human health or ecological risk. A conservative screening analysis suggested potential risks to human health from Hg and Pb and a potential risk to ecological receptors from total effluent, Sb, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag, Zn, and phenol in the water column and PAHs in sediment; quantitiative risk assessments are being done for these contaminants.

  18. Aspects of Western Refining, Inc.'s Proposed Acquisition of Giant Industries, Inc.

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Presentation of company-level, non-proprietary data and relevant aggregate data for U.S. refinery capacity and gasoline marketing of Western Refining and Giant Industries to inform discussions of Western Refining Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Giant Industries Inc. for a total of $1.5 billion, which was announced August 28, 2006.

  19. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  20. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F:

  1. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  2. A Decade of Giant Earthquakes - What does it mean?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Terry C. Jr.

    2012-07-16

    On December 26, 2004 the largest earthquake since 1964 occurred near Ache, Indonesia. The magnitude 9.2 earthquake and subsequent tsunami killed a quarter of million people; it also marked the being of a period of extraordinary seismicity. Since the Ache earthquake there have been 16 magnitude 8 earthquakes globally, including 2 this last April. For the 100 years previous to 2004 there was an average of 1 magnitude 8 earthquake every 2.2 years; since 2004 there has been 2 per year. Since magnitude 8 earthquakes dominate global seismic energy release, this period of seismicity has seismologist rethinking what they understand about plate tectonics and the connectivity between giant earthquakes. This talk will explore this remarkable period of time and its possible implications.

  3. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plujko, V.A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O.M.

    2011-09-15

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010. - Highlights: {yields} Experimental {sigma} ({gamma}, abs) or a sum of partial cross sections are taken as input to the fitting. {yields} Data include contributions from photoproton reactions. {yields} Standard (SLO) or modified (SMLO) Lorentzian approaches are used for formulating GDR models. {yields} Spherical or axially deformed nuclear shapes are used in GDR least-squares fit. {yields} Values and uncertainties of the SLO and SMLO GDR model parameters are tabulated.

  4. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Johannes J. (Berkeley, CA); Thomas, Gareth (Oakland, CA); Huetten, Andreas R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  7. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Johannes J. (Berkeley, CA); Thomas, Gareth (Oakland, CA); Huetten, Andreas R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  8. Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study - Bristol Bay Native Corporation Anchorage, Alaska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bristol Bristol Bay Bay Native Native Corporation Corporation Wind and Wind and Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Feasibility Feasibility Study Study Tiel Smith Tiel Smith - - BBNC BBNC Doug Vaught, PE Doug Vaught, PE - - Consultant Consultant A Landscape of Promise Bristol Bay Native Corporation Invested in the Region * Southwest Alaska - 29 communities - 7,800 residents - 10,000 brown bears - 55,000,000 salmon * 40,000 square miles- about size of Ohio * 68% Native - Yup'ik Eskimo - Athabascan -

  9. Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer August 6, 2015 Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 To help prepare students from underrepresented groups learn about careers in a variety of IT fields, the Laney College Computer Information Systems Department offered its Upgrade: Computer Science Program. Thirty-eight students from 10 East Bay high schools registered for the eight-week

  10. Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    --Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduc<on Feasibility Study Chris K ushman Thank You *DOE Tribal Energy Program *Tribal Energy Program Review presenters *Bay Mills Indian Community Bay Mills Indian Community * Upper Peninsula of Michigan - Cold temperatures - Prolonged exposure to strong north winds off Lake Superior - Short winter daylight * Fishing and fish consuming community * Electricity largely supplied by coal fired

  11. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    California | Department of Energy 5: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California SUMMARY The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS/Environmental Impact Report that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Bay Delta Conservation Plan for

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    43% energy savings are achieved in a 1970s multifamily building through standard, non-invasive retrofit measures. Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep...

  13. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Bay, Wisconsin - September 14, 2006 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones, DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM Regular Members in Attendance: Sandra Alexander...

  14. Design of a basinwide monitoring program for the Tampa Bay estuary. Final technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochberg, R.J.; Weisberg, S.B.; Frithsen, J.B.

    1992-10-30

    The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (TBNEP) is developing a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) to recommend management actions for protecting the Tampa Bay estuary. The purpose of the document is to facilitate development of the monitoring program by assisting the TBNEP to define the objectives of a monitoring program for Tampa Bay identifying indicators and a sampling design that are appropriate to those objectives, and identifying how existing Tampa Bay monitoring programs can be incorporated and modified (if necessary) to meet the monitoring objectives.

  15. Key Neutrino behavior observed at Daya Bay (The College of William and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mary) | Jefferson Lab www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/key-neutrino-behavior-observed-at-daya-bay-123.php Submitted: Thursday, March 8, 2012

  16. MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  17. GIANT LOBES OF CENTAURUS A RADIO GALAXY OBSERVED WITH THE SUZAKU

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons up to 10 TeV energies is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A,...

  18. A LITHIUM-RICH RED GIANT BELOW THE CLUMP IN THE KEPLER CLUSTER, NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Rich, Evan; Twarog, Bruce A.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: evan66210@gmail.com E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu

    2013-04-10

    WIYN/HYDRA spectra in the Li 6708 A region have been obtained for 332 probable members of the old open cluster, NGC 6819. Preliminary analysis shows a pattern of Li depletion from the top of the turnoff to the base of the giant branch. Starting 1 mag below the level of the clump, all brighter giants have A(Li) below 1.0, with most having upper limits below 0.5. Star W007017, located below the first-ascent red giant bump is Li-rich with A(Li) = 2.3. As a highly probable single-star astrometric and radial-velocity cluster member, its discrepant asteroseismic membership could be a by-product of the processes that triggered Li enhancement. Its color-magnitude diagram location is consistent with only one proposed enhanced mixing process among first-ascent red giants.

  19. Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting Authors: Kundu, Janardan [1] ; Ghosh, Yagnaseni [1] ; Dennis, Allison M. [1] ; Htoon, Han [1] ; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A

  20. Orbitally-driven giant phonon anharmonicity in SnSe (Journal Article) | DOE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PAGES Orbitally-driven giant phonon anharmonicity in SnSe This content will become publicly available on October 19, 2016 « Prev Next » Title: Orbitally-driven giant phonon anharmonicity in SnSe We understand that elementary excitations and their couplings in condensed matter systems is critical to develop better energy-conversion devices. In thermoelectric materials, the heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency is directly improved by suppressing the propagation of phonon quasiparticles

  1. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant" Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant" Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Due to their characteristic bright and stable photoluminescence, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient

  2. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant" Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant" Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical

  3. Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting Authors: Kundu, Janardan [1] ; Ghosh, Yagnaseni [1] ; Dennis, Allison M. [1] ; Htoon, Han [1] ; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A

  4. "Giant" nanocrystal quantum dots for light-emission applications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect "Giant" nanocrystal quantum dots for light-emission applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Giant" nanocrystal quantum dots for light-emission applications Authors: Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-02-15 OSTI Identifier: 1063241 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-21028 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  5. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP ACT FOR THE SLEEPING GIANT HYDROPOWER PROJECT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP ACT FOR THE SLEEPING GIANT HYDROPOWER PROJECT LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY, MONTANA DOE/EA - 2022 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration ACTION: Adoption and Approval of Environmental Assessment and Issuance of Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Helena Valley Jrrigation District (District) J1as reque ted approval from the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to develop the 9.4 megawatt (MW) Sleeping Giant Hydroelectric Project (Project) at

  6. DISCOVERY OF RELATIVELY HYDROGEN-POOR GIANTS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER ?CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hema, B. P.; Pandey, Gajendra E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in

    2014-09-10

    In this Letter, the results of our low-resolution spectroscopic survey for identifying hydrogen-deficient stars in the red giant sample of the globular cluster ?Cen are reported. Spectral analyses were carried out on the basis of the strengths of the (0,0) MgH band and the Mgb triplet. In our sample, four giants were identified with weak/absent MgH bands in their observed spectra, which was unexpected for their well determined stellar parameters. The Mg abundances for the program stars were determined from the subordinate lines of the MgH band to the blue of the Mgb triplet, using the spectral synthesis technique. The derived Mg abundances for the program stars were as expected for the red giants of ?Cen, except for the four identified candidates. The determined Mg abundances of these four candidates are much lower than that expected for the red giants of ?Cen, and are unacceptable based on the strengths of the Mgb triplet in their observed spectra. Hence, a plausible explanation for the weak/absent MgH bands in the observed spectra of these stars is a relatively lower abundance of hydrogen in their atmospheres. These giants may belong to the group of helium-enriched red giants of ?Cen.

  7. EIS-0139: Trans-Alaska Gas System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Yukon Pacific Corporation's proposed construction of the Trans-Alaska Gas System (TAGS), a 796.5-mile long, 36-inch diameter pipeline to transport high-pressured natural gas between Prudhoe Bay and a tidewater terminal and liquefied natural gas plant near Anderson Bay, Alaska.

  8. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  9. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois Basin Forest City Basin Northern Appalachian Basin Powder River Basin Uinta Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin Southwestern Coal Region Piceance Basin Big Horn Basin Wind River Basin Raton Basin Black Mesa Basin Terlingua Field Kaiparowits Basin Deep River Basin SW Colorado

  10. ESnet, Orange Silicon Valley, and Bay Microsystems Demonstrate the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World's First Long Distance 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfer ESnet, Orange Silicon Valley, and Bay Microsystems Demonstrate the World's First Long Distance 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfer News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Media Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 or Media@es.net Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607

  11. Giant wormholes in ghost-free bigravity theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sushkov, Sergey V.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2015-06-09

    We study Lorentzian wormholes in the ghost-free bigravity theory described by two metrics, g and f. Wormholes can exist if only the null energy condition is violated, which happens naturally in the bigravity theory since the graviton energy-momentum tensors do not apriori fulfill any energy conditions. As a result, the field equations admit solutions describing wormholes whose throat size is typically of the order of the inverse graviton mass. Hence, they are as large as the universe, so that in principle we might all live in a giant wormhole. The wormholes can be of two different types that we call W1 and W2. The W1 wormholes interpolate between the AdS spaces and have Killing horizons shielding the throat. The Fierz-Pauli graviton mass for these solutions becomes imaginary in the AdS zone, hence the gravitons behave as tachyons, but since the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound is fulfilled, there should be no tachyon instability. For the W2 wormholes the g-geometry is globally regular and in the far field zone it becomes the AdS up to subleading terms, its throat can be traversed by timelike geodesics, while the f-geometry has a completely different structure and is not geodesically complete. There is no evidence of tachyons for these solutions, although a detailed stability analysis remains an open issue. It is possible that the solutions may admit a holographic interpretation.

  12. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio; Vela, Javier; Schaller, Richard D; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Klimov, Victor I; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  13. Radial velocity curves of ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: peter.wood@anu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsoidal red giant binaries are close binary systems where an unseen, relatively close companion distorts the red giant, leading to light variations as the red giant moves around its orbit. These binaries are likely to be the immediate evolutionary precursors of close binary planetary nebula and post-asymptotic giant branch and post-red giant branch stars. Due to the MACHO and OGLE photometric monitoring projects, the light variability nature of these ellipsoidal variables has been well studied. However, due to the lack of radial velocity curves, the nature of their masses, separations, and other orbital details has so far remained largely unknown. In order to improve this situation, we have carried out spectral monitoring observations of a large sample of 80 ellipsoidal variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud and we have derived radial velocity curves. At least 12 radial velocity points with good quality were obtained for most of the ellipsoidal variables. The radial velocity data are provided with this paper. Combining the photometric and radial velocity data, we present some statistical results related to the binary properties of these ellipsoidal variables.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- W R Grace Co - Curtis Bay - MD 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - Curtis Bay - MD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites W.R. Grace Co., MD Alternate Name(s): W.R. Grace Rare Earths, Inc. Davison Chemical Division Curtis Bay Plant MD.01-2 MD.01-3 Location: Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Maryland MD.01-2 Historical Operations: Conducted developmental research and thorium extraction from monazite ore for AEC. MD.01-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MD.01-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MD.01-3 MD.01-4 MD.01-5 MD.01-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army

  15. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Giant Haemangiomas of the Liver: Embolisation With Bleomycin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozkaya, Halil Cinar, Celal; Besir, Fahri Halit; Par?ldar, Mustafa Oran, Ismail

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThe management of patients with giant haemangioma of the liver remains controversial. Although the usual treatment method for symptomatic giant haemangioma is surgery, the classical paradigm of operative resection remains. In this study, we evaluated the symptomatic improvement and size-reduction effect of embolisation with bleomycin mixed with lipiodol for the treatment of symptomatic giant hepatic haemangioma.MethodsThis study included 26 patients [21 female, five male; age 4165years (mean 49.831.53)] with symptomatic giant haemangioma unfit for surgery and treated with selective embolisation by bleomycin mixed with lipiodol. The patients were followed-up (mean 7.40.81months) clinically and using imaging methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0, and p<0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance.ResultsEmbolisation of 32 lesions in 26 patients was performed. The mean volume of the haemangiomas was 446.2888cm{sup 3} (range 3.391559cm{sup 3}) before intervention and 244.4354.38cm{sup 3} (range 94967cm{sup 3}) after intervention. No mortality or morbidity related to the treatment was identified. Symptomatic improvement was observed in all patients, and significant volume reduction was achieved (p=0.001).ConclusionThe morbidity of surgical treatment in patients with giant liver hemangioma were similar to those obtained in patients followed-up without treatment. Therefore, follow-up without treatment is preferred in most patients. Thus, minimally invasive embolisation is an alternative and effective treatment for giant symptomatic haemangioma of the liver.

  16. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  17. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  18. Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-04-22

    In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME). Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

  19. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  20. Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20 Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup 15} G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short

  1. Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: Fine Structure of Spin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasmons (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: Fine Structure of Spin Plasmons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Collective Spin-Orbit Field in a Quantum Well: Fine Structure of Spin Plasmons Authors: Baboux, F. ; Perez, F. ; Ullrich, C. A. ; D'Amico, I. ; Gómez, J. ; Bernard, M. Publication Date: 2012-10-15 OSTI Identifier: 1101593 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal

  2. Next-Generation "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lighting | Department of Energy "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for Lighting Next-Generation "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for Lighting Lead Performer: Los Alamos National Laboratory - Los Alamos, NM Partners: Cree, Inc. - Durham, NC DOE Total Funding: $1,000,366 Cost Share: $250,006 Project Term: 7/1/15 - 6/30/17 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0001171) Project Objective This project seeks to

  3. MHK Projects/OpenHydro Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase Phase 1 Project Details OpenHydro is working with Canadian utility Nova Scotia Power to create a tidal demonstration project in the Bay of Fundy. Following successful...

  4. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  5. Comprehensive characterization report on Winter Quarters Bay, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, A.B.; White, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Winter Quarters Bay is a small embayment located adjacent to the United States largest base in Antarctica, McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station, which is managed by the National Science Foundation`s Office of Polar Programs, was constructed in 1955, has been in constant use since that time, and has a population of about 1,000 persons during the summer and about 250 people for the winter. The bay offers shelter for ships and an ice dock is used during January and February to off load fuel and cargo. During earlier times, trash from the McMurdo Station was piled on the steep shoreline of the bay, doused with several thousand gallons of fuel and ignited. That practice has ceased and the site has been regraded to cover the waste. The bottom of the bay is littered with drums, equipment, tanks, tires, all sorts of metal objects, cables, etc., especially the southeastern side where dumping took place. The sediments are gravel in some places yet fine and fluid at other sites with coarse particles intermixed. The original benthic community is not well recorded but significant ecological changes have occurred. Sediments are contaminated with PCBs, metals, and hydrocarbon fuels. This report summarizes available information on Winter Quarters Bay and was originally intended to be used by workshop participants to become familiar with the bay prior to becoming updated with unpublished data by various Antarctic investigators. The proposed workshop was to assist the National Science Foundation in determining whether and how the bay should be remediated and to develop an integrated research plan if additional data were needed. However, plans changed, the workshop was never conducted, but the briefing report was prepared. Most of this report reviews and summarizes other published data. The only new data are those from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory`s investigation into the distribution of organic contaminants in the bay and sediment toxicity testing.

  6. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay Ridge Gardens

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy HomesBay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) Approximately 43% energy savings are achieved in a 1970s multifamily

  7. Biomass resource potential for selected crops in Hawaii. [Koa haole (giant leucaena); napier and guinea grass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, A.

    1982-06-01

    The biomass crops selected for review were koa haole (giant leucaena), napier and guinea grass, and eucalyptus (saligna, grandis, and globulus). The islands examined were Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Molokai. The potential land acreage for growing these crops was estimated grossly. As anticipated, the island of Hawaii had the largest land potential with eucalyptus having the greatest potential land acreage.

  8. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H{sub 2}O, MgO, and SiO{sub 2} dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures.

  9. Surface activity and oscillation amplitudes of red giants in eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaulme, P.; Jackiewicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Mosser, B.

    2014-04-10

    Among the 19 red-giant stars belonging to eclipsing binary systems that have been identified in Kepler data, 15 display solar-like oscillations. We study whether the absence of mode detection in the remaining 4 is an observational bias or possibly evidence of mode damping that originates from tidal interactions. A careful analysis of the corresponding Kepler light curves shows that modes with amplitudes that are usually observed in red giants would have been detected if they were present. We observe that mode depletion is strongly associated with short-period systems, in which stellar radii account for 16%-24% of the semi-major axis, and where red-giant surface activity is detected. We suggest that when the rotational and orbital periods synchronize in close binaries, the red-giant component is spun up, so that a dynamo mechanism starts and generates a magnetic field, leading to observable stellar activity. Pressure modes would then be damped as acoustic waves dissipate in these fields.

  10. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  11. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) In this paper we demonstrate evidence of a cluster spin glass in Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) (a compound with a giant cubic unit cell) via ac and dc magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic relaxation and heat capacity

  12. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) In this paper we demonstrate evidence of a cluster spin glass in Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) (a compound with a giant cubic unit cell) via ac and dc magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic relaxation and heat capacity measurements. The results clearly show

  13. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  14. HOOPER BAY HOUSING ANALYSIS AND ENERGY FEASIBILITY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEA LION CORPORATION; COLD CLIMATE HOUSING RESEARCH CENTER; SOLUTIONS FOR HEALTHY BREATHING; WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION

    2012-12-30

    Sea Lion applied for and received a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) towards this end titled ??Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country?. The initial objectives of the Hooper Bay Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study were to demonstrate a 30% reduction in residential/commercial energy usage and identify the economic benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures to the Tribe through: (1) partnering with Whitney Construction and Solutions for Healthy Breathing in the training and hire of 2 local energy assessors to conduct energy audits of 9 representative housing models and 2 commercial units in the community. These homes are representative of 52 homes constructed across different eras. (2) partnering with Cold Climate Housing Research Center to document current electrical and heating energy consumption and analyze data for a final feasibility report (3) assessing the economics of electricity & heating fuel usage; (4) projecting energy savings or fossil fuel reduction by modeling of improvement scenarios and cost feasibility The following two objectives will be completed after the publication of this report: (5) the development of materials lists for energy efficiency improvements (6) identifying financing options for the follow-up energy efficiency implementation phase.

  15. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XXI. A GAS-GIANT PLANET IN A ONE YEAR ORBIT AND THE HABITABILITY OF GAS-GIANT SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy A.; Horner, J.; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-05-01

    We have detected the Doppler signature of a gas-giant exoplanet orbiting the star HD 38283, in an eccentric orbit with a period of almost exactly one year (P = 363.2 {+-} 1.6 d, m sin i = 0.34 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Jup}, e = 0.41 {+-} 0.16). The detection of a planet with period very close to one year critically relied on year-round observation of this circumpolar star. Discovering a planet in a 1 AU orbit around a G dwarf star has prompted us to look more closely at the question of the habitability of the satellites of such planets. Regular satellites orbit all the giant planets in our solar system, suggesting that their formation is a natural by-product of the planet formation process. There is no reason for exomoon formation not to be similarly likely in exoplanetary systems. Moreover, our current understanding of that formation process does not preclude satellite formation in systems where gas giants undergo migration from their formation locations into the terrestrial planet habitable zone. Indeed, regular satellite formation and Type II migration are both linked to the clearing of a gap in the protoplanetary disk by a planet, and so may be inextricably linked. Migration would also multiply the chances of capturing both irregular satellites and Trojan companions sufficiently massive to be habitable. The habitability of such exomoons and exo-Trojans will critically depend on their mass, whether or not they host a magnetosphere, and (for the exomoon case) their orbital radius around the host exoplanet.

  16. The light curve shapes as a key to resolving the origin of long secondary periods in red giant stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soszy?ski, I.; Udalski, A. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment light curves of red giant stars exhibiting long secondary periods (LSPs)an enigmatic phenomenon commonly observed in stars on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. We show that the light curves of LSP stars are essentially identical to those of the spotted variables with one dark spot on their photospheres. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of a dusty cloud orbiting the red giant together with a low-mass companion in a close, circular orbit. We argue that the binary scenario is in agreement with most of the observational properties of LSP variables, including non-sinusoidal shapes of their radial velocity curves.

  17. Understanding the Flushing Capability of Bellingham Bay and Its Implication on Bottom Water Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2015-05-05

    In this study, an unstructured-grid finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to simulate hydrodynamic circulation and assess the flushing capability in Bellingham Bay, Washington, USA. The model was reasonably calibrated against field observations for water level, velocity and salinity, and was further used to calculate residence time distributions in the study site. The model results suggest that, despite the large tidal ranges (~4 m during spring tide), tidal currents are relatively weak in Bellingham Bay with surface currents generally below 0.5 m/s. The local residence time in Bellingham Bay varies from to near zero to as long as 15 days, depending on the location and river flow condition. In general, Bellingham Bay is a well-flushed coastal embayment affected by freshwater discharge, tides, wind, and density-driven circulation. The basin-wide global residence time ranges from 5-7 days. The model results also provide useful information on possible causes of the emerging summertime hypoxia problem in the north central region of Bellingham Bay. It was concluded that the formation of the bottom hypoxic water should result from the increased consumption rate of oxygen in the bottom oceanic inflow with low dissolved oxygen by organic matters accumulated at the regions characterized with relatively long residence time in summer months.

  18. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  19. Simplest photonuclear reactions accompanied by the excitation of isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances: Semimicroscopic description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2012-09-15

    A semimicroscopic approach based on the continuum version of the random-phase approximation (CRPA) and on a semiphenomenological inclusion of the fragmentation effect is applied to describing cross sections for photoabsorption and direct plus semidirect and inverse reactions accompanied by the excitation of isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances. In addition to the spinless part of the Landau-Migdal interaction and a partly self-consistent phenomenological mean field of the nucleus, that version of the approach which is used here takes into account isovector separable velocity-dependent forces, as well as the effect of the fragmentation shift of the giant-resonance energy. The results obtained by calculating various features of the aforementioned cross sections for a number of magic and semimagic medium-mass nuclei are compared with respective experimental data.

  20. EA-1992: Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

  1. M dwarf metallicities and giant planet occurrence: Ironing out uncertainties and systematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2014-08-10

    Comparisons between the planet populations around solar-type stars and those orbiting M dwarfs shed light on the possible dependence of planet formation and evolution on stellar mass. However, such analyses must control for other factors, i.e., metallicity, a stellar parameter that strongly influences the occurrence of gas giant planets. We obtained infrared spectra of 121 M dwarfs stars monitored by the California Planet Search and determined metallicities with an accuracy of 0.08 dex. The mean and standard deviation of the sample are 0.05 and 0.20 dex, respectively. We parameterized the metallicity dependence of the occurrence of giant planets on orbits with a period less than two years around solar-type stars and applied this to our M dwarf sample to estimate the expected number of giant planets. The number of detected planets (3) is lower than the predicted number (6.4), but the difference is not very significant (12% probability of finding as many or fewer planets). The three M dwarf planet hosts are not especially metal rich and the most likely value of the power-law index relating planet occurrence to metallicity is 1.06 dex per dex for M dwarfs compared to 1.80 for solar-type stars; this difference, however, is comparable to uncertainties. Giant planet occurrence around both types of stars allows, but does not necessarily require, a mass dependence of ?1 dex per dex. The actual planet-mass-metallicity relation may be complex, and elucidating it will require larger surveys like those to be conducted by ground-based infrared spectrographs and the Gaia space astrometry mission.

  2. Fluxes and spectra of quasimonochromatic annihilation photons for studying E1 giant resonances in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z.

    2014-12-15

    The fluxes and spectra of quasimonochromatic photons originating from the in-flight annihilation of positrons interacting with electrons of targets are analyzed in the energy region characteristic of the excitation of E1 giant resonances in nuclei. Targets of small thickness and low atomic number are used. The dependences of the spectra on the energy and angle (and their scatter) for positrons incident to the target, on the collimation angle for photons, and on the target thickness are studied.

  3. OBSERVABLE SIGNATURES OF PLANET ACCRETION IN RED GIANT STARS. I. RAPID ROTATION AND LIGHT ELEMENT REPLENISHMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu E-mail: cunha@noao.edu

    2012-10-01

    The orbital angular momentum of a close-orbiting giant planet can be sufficiently large that, if transferred to the envelope of the host star during the red giant branch (RGB) evolution, it can spin-up the star's rotation to unusually large speeds. This spin-up mechanism is one possible explanation for the rapid rotators detected among the population of generally slow-rotating red giant stars. These rapid rotators thus comprise a unique stellar sample suitable for searching for signatures of planet accretion in the form of unusual stellar abundances due to the dissemination of the accreted planet in the stellar envelope. In this study, we look for signatures of replenishment in the Li abundances and (to a lesser extent) {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C, which are both normally lowered during RGB evolution. Accurate abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise echelle spectra for samples of both slow and rapid rotator red giant stars. We find that the rapid rotators are on average enriched in lithium compared to the slow rotators, but both groups of stars have identical distributions of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C within our measurement precision. Both of these abundance results are consistent with the accretion of planets of only a few Jupiter masses. We also explore alternative scenarios for understanding the most Li-rich stars in our sample-particularly Li regeneration during various stages of stellar evolution. Finally, we find that our stellar samples show non-standard abundances even at early RGB stages, suggesting that initial protostellar Li abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C may be more variable than originally thought.

  4. HH 222: A GIANT HERBIG-HARO FLOW FROM THE QUADRUPLE SYSTEM V380 ORI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reipurth, Bo; Aspin, Colin; Connelley, M. S.; Bally, John; Geballe, T. R.; Kraus, Stefan; Appenzeller, Immo; Burgasser, Adam E-mail: caa@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: John.Bally@colorado.edu E-mail: stefan.kraus@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: aburgasser@ucsd.edu

    2013-11-01

    HH 222 is a giant shocked region in the L1641 cloud, and is popularly known as the Orion Streamers or ''the waterfall'' on account of its unusual structure. At the center of these streamers are two infrared sources coincident with a nonthermal radio jet aligned along the principal streamer. The unique morphology of HH 222 has long been associated with this radio jet. However, new infrared images show that the two sources are distant elliptical galaxies, indicating that the radio jet is merely an improbable line-of-sight coincidence. Accurate proper motion measurements of HH 222 reveal that the shock structure is a giant bow shock moving directly away from the well-known, very young, Herbig Be star V380 Ori. The already known Herbig-Haro object HH 35 forms part of this flow. A new Herbig-Haro object, HH 1041, is found precisely in the opposite direction of HH 222 and is likely to form part of a counterflow. The total projected extent of this HH complex is 5.3 pc, making it among the largest HH flows known. A second outflow episode from V380 Ori is identified as a pair of HH objects, HH 1031 to the northwest and the already known HH 130 to the southeast, along an axis that deviates from that of HH 222/HH 1041 by only 3.7. V380 Ori is a hierarchical quadruple system, including a faint companion of spectral type M5 or M6, which at an age of ?1 Myr corresponds to an object straddling the stellar-to-brown dwarf boundary. We suggest that the HH 222 giant bow shock is a direct result of the dynamical interactions that led to the conversion from an initial non-hierarchical multiple system into a hierarchical configuration. This event occurred no more than 28,000 yr ago, as derived from the proper motions of the HH 222 giant bow shock.

  5. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors and Magnetic Labels for Chip-Scale Detection of Immunosorbent Assays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Lora Millen

    2005-12-17

    The combination of giant magnetoresistive sensors, magnetic labeling strategies, and biomolecule detection is just beginning to be explored. New readout methods and assay formats are necessary for biomolecules detection to flourish. The work presented in this dissertation describes steps toward the creation of a novel detection method for bioassays utilizing giant magnetoresistive sensors as the readout method. The introduction section contains a brief review of some of the current methods of bioassay readout. The theoretical underpinnings of the giant magnetoresistive effect are also discussed. Finally, the more prominent types of giant magnetoresistive sensors are described, as well as their complicated fabrication. Four data chapters follow the introduction; each chapter is presented as a separate manuscript, either already published or soon to be submitted. Chapter 1 presents research efforts toward the production of a bioassay on the surface of a gold-modified GMR sensor. The testing of this methodology involved the capture of goat a-mouse-coated magnetic nanoparticles on the mouse IgG-modified gold surface. The second, third and fourth chapters describe the utilization of a self-referenced sample stick for scanning across the GMR sensor. The sample stick consisted of alternating magnetic reference and bioactive gold addresses. Chapter 2 is concerned with the characterization of both the scanning readout method and the binding and detection of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles to a biotinylated surface. Chapter 3 advances the sample stick readout with the use of the system for detection of a sandwich immunoassay with rabbit IgG proteins. Finally, simultaneous detection of three IgG proteins is demonstrated in Chapter 4. The dissertation is concluded with a brief summary of the research presented and a discussion of the possible future applications and direction of this work.

  6. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box etal., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box etal. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  7. ASTEROSEISMIC CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR POPULATIONS AMONG 13,000 RED GIANTS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Benomar, Othman; White, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Mosser, Benoit

    2013-03-10

    Of the more than 150,000 targets followed by the Kepler Mission, about 10% were selected as red giants. Due to their high scientific value, in particular for Galaxy population studies and stellar structure and evolution, their Kepler light curves were made public in late 2011. More than 13,000 (over 85%) of these stars show intrinsic flux variability caused by solar-like oscillations making them ideal for large-scale asteroseismic investigations. We automatically extracted individual frequencies and measured the period spacings of the dipole modes in nearly every red giant. These measurements naturally classify the stars into various populations, such as the red giant branch, the low-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 1.8) helium-core-burning red clump, and the higher-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}> 1.8) secondary clump. The period spacings also reveal that a large fraction of the stars show rotationally induced frequency splittings. This sample of stars will undoubtedly provide an extremely valuable source for studying the stellar population in the direction of the Kepler field, in particular when combined with complementary spectroscopic surveys.

  8. MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES AND THEIR PRECURSORS-FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS WITH CURRENT SHEETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Cong

    2013-07-10

    We propose a catastrophic magnetospheric model for magnetar precursors and their successive giant flares. Axisymmetric models of the magnetosphere, which contain both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet, are established based on force-free field configurations. In this model, the helically twisted flux rope would lose its equilibrium and erupt abruptly in response to the slow and quasi-static variations at the ultra-strongly magnetized neutron star's surface. In a previous model without current sheets, only one critical point exists in the flux rope equilibrium curve. New features show up in the equilibrium curves for the flux rope when current sheets appear in the magnetosphere. The causal connection between the precursor and the giant flare, as well as the temporary re-entry of the quiescent state between the precursor and the giant flare, can be naturally explained. Magnetic energy would be released during the catastrophic state transitions. The detailed energetics of the model are also discussed. The current sheet created by the catastrophic loss of equilibrium of the flux rope provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection. We point out the importance of magnetic reconnection for further enhancement of the energy release during eruptions.

  9. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.; Walker, A.; Roberts, J.; Falcey, J.

    2011-11-01

    DOD's U.S. Pacific Command has partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii installations. NREL selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  10. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy | Department of Energy Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy January 31, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the Energy Department's ongoing efforts to highlight President Obama's State of the Union address and discuss the Obama Administration's commitment

  11. RED GIANTS IN ECLIPSING BINARY AND MULTIPLE-STAR SYSTEMS: MODELING AND ASTEROSEISMIC ANALYSIS OF 70 CANDIDATES FROM KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaulme, P.; McKeever, J.; Rawls, M. L.; Jackiewicz, J.; Mosser, B.; Guzik, J. A.

    2013-04-10

    Red giant stars are proving to be an incredible source of information for testing models of stellar evolution, as asteroseismology has opened up a window into their interiors. Such insights are a direct result of the unprecedented data from space missions CoRoT and Kepler as well as recent theoretical advances. Eclipsing binaries are also fundamental astrophysical objects, and when coupled with asteroseismology, binaries provide two independent methods to obtain masses and radii and exciting opportunities to develop highly constrained stellar models. The possibility of discovering pulsating red giants in eclipsing binary systems is therefore an important goal that could potentially offer very robust characterization of these systems. Until recently, only one case has been discovered with Kepler. We cross-correlate the detected red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs from Kepler data to find possible candidate systems. Light-curve modeling and mean properties measured from asteroseismology are combined to yield specific measurements of periods, masses, radii, temperatures, eclipse timing variations, core rotation rates, and red giant evolutionary state. After using three different techniques to eliminate false positives, out of the 70 systems common to the red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs we find 13 strong candidates (12 previously unknown) to be eclipsing binaries, one to be a non-eclipsing binary with tidally induced oscillations, and 10 more to be hierarchical triple systems, all of which include a pulsating red giant. The systems span a range of orbital eccentricities, periods, and spectral types F, G, K, and M for the companion of the red giant. One case even suggests an eclipsing binary composed of two red giant stars and another of a red giant with a {delta}-Scuti star. The discovery of multiple pulsating red giants in eclipsing binaries provides an exciting test bed for precise astrophysical modeling, and follow-up spectroscopic observations of many of the candidate systems are encouraged. The resulting highly constrained stellar parameters will allow, for example, the exploration of how binary tidal interactions affect pulsations when compared to the single-star case.

  12. Summer food habits of juvenile Arctic foxes in northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrott, R.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Hanson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The absence of garbage in fox scats collected in the Colville Delta area was expected because garbage was unavailable to these foxes. Foxes from Prudhoe Bay, however, had access to quantities of garbage as a result of petroleum development activities. Most occupied dens in the Prudhoe Bay area were littered with garbage. Telemetry investigations conducted in conjunction with our study of food habits indicated that foxes frequented areas of human activity to solicit handouts and forage garbage disposal sites. The reason for the low occurrence of garbage in Prudhoe Bay scats is undoubtedly related to the lack of undigestible matter in most forms of garbage. The small number of scats that were classified as containing garbage typically contained only packaging materials associated with processed food such as plastic wrap and aluminum foil. The highly digestible nature of most forms of garbage made it impossible to quantify its importance in the diet of foxes. Prudhoe Bay foxes undoubtedly use garbage; however, the diversity and abundance of natural prey in the scat indicates that these foxes only supplement their summer diet with garbage. Dependence on this food resource may increase during the winter when foxes must rely almost exclusively on the fluctuating lemming poulations for sustenance. 11 references, 2 tables.

  13. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration proposes to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  14. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed action to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  15. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  16. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an NREL assessment of Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to appraise the potential of achieving net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense's U.S. Pacific Command partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency at Hawaii military installations. DOE selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. This paper summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. The analysis shows that MCBH Kaneohe Bay has the potential to make significant progress toward becoming a net zero installation. Wind, solar photovoltaics, solar hot water, and hydrogen production were assessed, as well as energy efficiency technologies. Deploying wind turbines is the most cost-effective energy production measure. If the identified energy projects and savings measures are implemented, the base will achieve a 96% site Btu reduction and a 99% source Btu reduction. Using excess wind and solar energy to produce hydrogen for a fleet and fuel cells could significantly reduce energy use and potentially bring MCBH Kaneohe Bay to net zero. Further analysis with an environmental impact and interconnection study will need to be completed. By achieving net zero status, the base will set an example for other military installations, provide environmental benefits, reduce costs, increase energy security, and exceed its energy goals and mandates.

  17. THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF GIANT STARS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE FLARING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE POPULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico E-mail: jfg@ucolick.org

    2012-10-01

    Sun-like stars are thought to be regularly disrupted by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) within galactic nuclei. Yet, as stars evolve off the main sequence their vulnerability to tidal disruption increases drastically as they develop a bifurcated structure consisting of a dense core and a tenuous envelope. Here we present the first hydrodynamic simulations of the tidal disruption of giant stars and show that the core has a substantial influence on the star's ability to survive the encounter. Stars with more massive cores retain large fractions of their envelope mass, even in deep encounters. Accretion flares resulting from the disruption of giant stars should last for tens to hundreds of years. Their characteristic signature in transient searches would not be the t {sup -5/3} decay typically associated with tidal disruption events, but a correlated rise over many orders of magnitude in brightness on timescales of months to years. We calculate the relative disruption rates of stars of varying evolutionary stages in typical galactic centers, then use our results to produce Monte Carlo realizations of the expected flaring event populations. We find that the demographics of tidal disruption flares are strongly dependent on both stellar and black hole mass, especially near the limiting SMBH mass scale of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. At this black hole mass, we predict a sharp transition in the SMBH flaring diet beyond which all observable disruptions arise from evolved stars, accompanied by a dramatic cutoff in the overall tidal disruption flaring rate. Black holes less massive than this limiting mass scale will show observable flares from both main-sequence and evolved stars, with giants contributing up to 10% of the event rate. The relative fractions of stars disrupted at different evolutionary states can constrain the properties and distributions of stars in galactic nuclei other than our own.

  18. Pygmy and Giant Dipole Response Function in Neutron Rich Nuclei at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahin, Ersin; Bozkurt, Kutsal; Sirin, Mehmet

    2010-01-21

    We investigate pygmy and giant dipole resonance (PDR-GDR) for the case of neutron rich soft nuclei {sup 68}Ni and heavy nuclei {sup 208}Pb using effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions SLy7 and KDEO at finite temperature. We use the mean-field theory (HF) and employ the random phase approximation (RPA) in a coordinate space. We then compare the PDR calculations for the different Skyrme interactions with their experimental results. We find that the PDR and GDR strength distribution depends sensitively on temperature, and especially for {sup 68}Ni the collective effects almost disappear at T = 4 MeV.

  19. Tunable giant magnetic anisotropy in amorphous SmCo thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnus, F.; Moubah, R.; Roos, A. H.; Kapaklis, V.; Hjoervarsson, B.; Andersson, G.; Kruk, A.; Hase, T.

    2013-04-22

    SmCo thin films have been grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature with a composition of 2-35 at. % Sm. Films with 5 at. % or higher Sm are amorphous and smooth. A giant tunable uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy is induced in the films which peaks in the composition range 11-22 at. % Sm. This cross-over behavior is not due to changes in the atomic moments but rather the local configuration changes. The excellent layer perfection combined with highly tunable magnetic properties make these films important for spintronics applications.

  20. Radon emanation from giant landslides of Koefels (Tyrol, Austria) and Langtang Himal (Nepal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtscheller, F.; Pirchl, T.; Sieder, G.

    1995-07-01

    The identification of extremely high indoor radon concentrations in the village Umhausen (Tyrol, Austria) initiated a scientific program to get information about the source and distribution of this noble gas. The high concentrations can not be related to U anomalies or large-scale fault zones. The nearby giant landslide of Koefels, with its highly fractured and crushed orthogneisses, are the only possible source of radon, despite the fact that the U and Ra content of the rocks is by no means exceptional. The reasons for the high emanation rates from the landslide are discussed and compared to results gained from a similar examination of the giant landslide of Langtang Himal (Nepal). The exceptional geologic situation in both cases, as well as the spatial distribution of different concentration levels, indicate that both landslides must be considered as the production sites of radon. Independent of the U and Ra contents of the rocks, the most important factors producing high emanation rates are the production of a high active surface area in circulation pathways for Rn-enriched soil air by brittle deformation due to the impact of the landslidemass. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jnsson, H.; Ryde, N. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Richter, M. J. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hinkle, K. H., E-mail: henrikj@astro.lu.se [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ? nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 ?m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 ?m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 ?m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ? process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  2. Photodisintegration of heavy nuclei in the energy region above the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Makarenko, I. V. Orlin, V. N.

    2010-05-15

    Experimental data on yields of multiparticle photonuclear reactions (involving the emission of up to seven neutrons from the nucleus involved) on {sup 197}Au, {sup 203,205}Tl, and {sup 209}Bi nuclei in the region extending from the giant dipole resonance to an energy of 67.7 MeV are presented. These data are compared with the results of modern theoretical calculations that take into account both the excitation of a giant dipole resonance (GDR) in a nucleus and the photodisintegration of quasideutrons (QD) in it. By and large, experimental data confirm the results of theoretical calculations-that is, only upon taking simultaneously into account both alternative photodisintegration mechanisms (GDR excitation and QD photodisintegration) can one describe these experimental data. The contribution of QD photodisintegration grows with increasing photon energy and neutron multiplicity and becomes dominant for reactions involving the emission of not less than five neutrons from the nucleus being considered. The integrated cross sections for the processes in question were estimated on the basis of simultaneously employing experimental yields of multinucleon photonuclear reactions and the respective cross-section shapes calculated theoretically.

  3. Giant magnetoresistance modulated by magnetic field in graphene p-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuan; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Zhou, Guanghui

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the tunneling transport across a graphene p-n junction under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field (B field). We observe a sideway deflection of the transmission profile, which can be quantitatively explained by invoking the classical Lorentz force. By considering the trajectory of the Dirac fermions along their cyclotron orbits, we analytically derive the incident angles for transmission across the graphene junction under a B field, as well as the critical magnetic field for full suppression of tunneling across the junction. These analytical predictions are consistent with the numerical results obtained via the non-equilibrium Green's function method. A stronger B-field conductance modulation is obtained for a p-n as opposed to an n-n or p-p type graphene junction. The magnetic field also induces a forbidden region of almost zero transmission for electron energy close to the Dirac point, which can be utilized to achieve a giant magnetoresistance effect. Based on our analysis, we devise an optimal magneto-electrical transport modulation, which can potentially realize a giant magnetoresistance effect in graphene p-n junction systems.

  4. The development of the ''Sleeping Giant'' deep basin natural gas, Alberta Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    During the past seven years attention has been focused on ''mega'' projects and the frontier areas for continental energy self sufficiency. However, a giant conventional resource project has been developing without fanfare. This project has potential impact on the well being of Canada and the North American energy scene. This ''Sleeping Giant'', which delivered its initial sales gas on November 1, 1979 is the Alberta (Elmworth) Deep Basin. The project area covers 67,400 square km (26,000 square miles) and contains potentially hydrocarbon bearing sediments over a thickness of 4,572 meters (15,000 feet). This basin is best equated in terms of size and reserves to the famous San Juan Basin. Since its discovery in 1976 approximately 1,000 multi-zoned gas wells have been drilled and reserves in the order of 140,000 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/ (5 trillion cubic feet) have been recognized by gas purchasers. Ten gas plants have been constructed with capacity of roughly 28,174 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/ (1 billion cubic feet) per day. This paper documents the development of these reserves and the stages in the construction of field facilities.

  5. Evaluation of CALPUFF nitrogen deposition modeling in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Area using NADP data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, M.; Mayes, P.; Sherwell, J.

    1998-12-31

    The CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system has been used to estimate nitrogen deposition in an area surrounding Baltimore and the northern portion of the Chesapeake Bay. Comprehensive NO{sub x} emissions inventories and meteorological data bases have been developed to conduct the modeling. This paper discusses the results of an evaluation of predicted nitrogen wet deposition rates compared to measured rates at two NADP/NTN sites in Maryland, Wye and White Rock. Underprediction of wet deposition rates is investigated through the use of sensitivity and diagnostic evaluations of model performance. A suggested change to the calculation of NO{sub x} transformation rates involving an alternative specification of minimum NO{sub x} concentrations was made to CALPUFF and the performance evaluation was re-done. Results of the new evaluation show significantly improved model performance, and therefore the modification is tentatively proposed for use in further applications of CALPUFF to the assessment of nitrogen deposition in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  6. Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen-Storage Challenge Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive Hydrogen-Storage Challenge - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering

  7. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations K. Burman, A. Kandt, L. Lisell, S. Booth, A. Walker, J. Roberts and J. Falcey Technical Report NREL/ TP-7A40-52897 November 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  8. Final Report: Energy Efficiency and Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Award # DE-EE0005173 Project Officer: Lizana K. Pierce lizana.pierce@go.doe.gov Prepared by: Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 Technical Contact: Chris Kushman ckushman@itcmi.org March 2014 1 Executive Summary In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy

  9. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community: 'First Steps' Toward Tribal Weatherization Human Capacity Building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community 'First Steps' Toward Tribal Weatherization Human Capacity Building Denver, CO - October 29 th , 2010 Debra L. Picciano . CAP Administrator Federally Recognized in 1934 Enrolled Members 3,500 - 1,200 on Rez. Land Base 59,071 Acres - 92 Sq. Miles Promote energy sufficiency in the community Increase staff knowledge base through training Expand energy efficiency programs Provide and Evaluate energy audits Collaborative Training Effort Involving: The Community Assistance

  10. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians - Renewable Energy Strategic Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Plan Little Traverse Bay Bands Of Odawa Indians Albert Colby Jr. and Steve Smiley Tribal History 1855 Treaty established present reservation boundaries in Northern Michigan. Tribe reaffirmed on September 21, 1994. 1995 Tribe received first BIA contract designed to establish service programs to Tribal members, including Law Enforcement, Tribal Court, Housing, Natural Resources, Human Services and Enrollment Departments. Tribal History 1995 Tribe received first Indian Health Service

  11. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Bay, Wisconsin - September 14, 2006 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones, DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM Regular Members in Attendance: Sandra Alexander (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, CTUIR); Kenny Anderson, Las Vegas Paiute Tribe; Richard Arnold, Las Vegas Indian Center/Pahrump Paiute Tribe); Kevin Tafoya, Santa Clara Pueblo; Christina Nelson, National Conference of State Legislatures; Ed Gonzales, ELG Engineering/Pueblo de San Ildefonso;

  12. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G. )

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  13. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  14. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed-Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, J.; Moore, M.; Thompson, M.

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a 'base scope' retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a 'DER scope' which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  15. Ecological Forecasting in Chesapeake Bay: Using a Mechanistic-Empirical Modelling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Long, Wen; Jacobs, John M.; Ramers, D. L.; Wazniak, C.; Wiggert, J. D.; Wood, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Ecological Prediction System (CBEPS) automatically generates daily nowcasts and three-day forecasts of several environmental variables, such as sea-surface temperature and salinity, the concentrations of chlorophyll, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen, and the likelihood of encountering several noxious species, including harmful algal blooms and water-borne pathogens, for the purpose of monitoring the Bay's ecosystem. While the physical and biogeochemical variables are forecast mechanistically using the Regional Ocean Modeling System configured for the Chesapeake Bay, the species predictions are generated using a novel mechanistic empirical approach, whereby real-time output from the coupled physical biogeochemical model drives multivariate empirical habitat models of the target species. The predictions, in the form of digital images, are available via the World Wide Web to interested groups to guide recreational, management, and research activities. Though full validation of the integrated forecasts for all species is still a work in progress, we argue that the mechanisticempirical approach can be used to generate a wide variety of short-term ecological forecasts, and that it can be applied in any marine system where sufficient data exist to develop empirical habitat models. This paper provides an overview of this system, its predictions, and the approach taken.

  16. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Giant Mimivirus Particle with an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-05-26

    This dataset contains the diffraction patterns that were used for the first three-dimensional reconstruction of a virus using FEL data. The sample was the giant mimivirus particle, which is one of the largest known viruses with a diameter of 450 nm. The dataset consists of the 198 diffraction patterns that were used in the analysis.

  17. THE FIRST H-BAND SPECTRUM OF THE GIANT PLANET ? PICTORIS b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Larkin, James E.; Barman, Travis; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Macintosh, Bruce; Ingraham, Patrick; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Goodsell, Stephen J.; and others

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we have obtained the first H-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star ? Pictoris. GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter-sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. These observations were taken covering the H band (1.65 ?m). The spectrum has a resolving power of ?45 and demonstrates the distinctive triangular shape of a cool substellar object with low surface gravity. Using atmospheric models, we find an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). These values agree well with ''hot-start'' predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M {sub Jup} and age between 10 and 20 Myr.

  18. Shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio from giant dipole resonances in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2011-09-15

    The Green-Kubo relation and fluctuation-dissipation theorem are employed to calculate the shear viscosity {eta} of a finite hot nucleus directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of this nucleus. The ratio {eta}/s of shear viscosity {eta} to entropy density s is extracted from the experimental systematics of the GDR in copper, tin, and lead isotopes at finite temperature T. These empirical results are then compared with the predictions by several independent models as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio {eta}/s in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing temperature T to reach (1.3--4)x({h_bar}/2{pi})/(4{pi}k{sub B}) at T=5 MeV.

  19. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  20. Proton decay from the isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunyadi, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Itoh, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Li, T.; Garg, U.; Hoffman, J.; Nayak, B. K.; Akimune, H.; Gacsi, Z.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2009-10-15

    Proton decay from the 3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) in {sup 58}Ni has been measured using the ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}p) reaction at a bombarding energy of 386 MeV to investigate its decay properties. We have extracted the ISGDR strength under the coincidence condition between inelastically scattered {alpha} particles at forward angles and decay protons emitted at backward angles. Branching ratios for proton decay to low-lying states of {sup 57}Co have been determined, and the results compared with predictions of recent continuum-RPA calculations. The final-state spectra of protons decaying to the low-lying states in {sup 57}Co were analyzed for a more detailed understanding of the structure of the ISGDR. It is found that there are differences in the structure of the ISGDR as a function of excitation energy.

  1. Investigation of giant magnetoconductance in organic devices based on hopping mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F. J.; Qin, W.; Xie, S. J.

    2014-04-14

    We suggest a spin-dependent hopping mechanism which includes the effect of the external magnetic field as well as hyperfine interaction (HFI) to explain the observed giant magnetoconductance (MC) in non-magnetic organic devices. Based on the extended Marcus theory, we calculate the MC by using the master equation. It is found that a MC value as large as 91% is obtained under a low driving voltage. For suitable parameters, the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Influences of the carrier density, HFI, and the carrier localization on the MC value are investigated. Especially, it is found that a low-dimensional structure of the organic materials is favorable to get a large MC value.

  2. Giant electrocaloric effect in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang Infante, Ingrid C.; Dkhil, Brahim; Lou, Xiaojie

    2014-02-24

    Room-temperature electrocaloric properties of Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are studied by using a multiscale thermodynamic model. It is found that there is a divergence in the adiabatic temperature change ΔT for the two opposite polarization orientations. This difference under a typical writing voltage of 3 V can reach over 1 K as the barrier thickness decreases. Thanks to the ultrahigh external stimulus, a giant electrocaloric effect (1.53 K/V) with ΔT being over 4.5 K can be achieved at room temperature, which demonstrates the perspective of FTJs as a promising solid-state refrigeration.

  3. Giant persistent photoconductivity in BaTiO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, Milivoj; anti?, Ana; Gajovi?, Andreja; Zavanik, Janez; ?eh, Miran

    2014-10-13

    The persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect in nanotube arrays of barium titanate and TiO{sub 2} (BTO/TiO{sub 2}NT) was studied at room temperature under daylight illumination. The BTO/TiO{sub 2}NT heterostructures exhibited a giant PPC effect that was six orders of magnitude higher than the dark conductivity, followed by a slow relaxation for 3 h. The PPC in this material was explained by the existence of defects at the surfaces and the interfaces of the investigated heterostructures. The sample was prepared using a two-step synthesis: the anodization of a Ti-foil and a subsequent hydrothermal synthesis. The structural and electrical characteristics were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy, field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy.

  4. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF A NEUTRON-CAPTURE ENHANCED RED GIANT IN THE BULGE PLAUT FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: cijohnson@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)] [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present chemical abundances for 27 elements ranging from oxygen to erbium in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = 1.67) bulge red giant branch star 2MASS 18174532-3353235. The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of a high-resolution (R ? 30, 000) spectrum obtained with the Magellan-MIKE spectrograph. While the light (Z ?< 30) element abundance patterns match those of similar metallicity bulge and halo stars, the strongly enhanced heavy element abundances are more similar to 'r-II' halo stars (e.g., CS 22892-052) typically found at [Fe/H] ?< 2.5. We find that the heaviest elements (Z ? 56) closely follow the scaled-solar r-process abundance pattern. We do not find evidence supporting significant s-process contributions; however, the intermediate mass elements (e.g., Y and Zr) appear to have been produced through a different process than the heaviest elements. The light and heavy element abundance patterns of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are in good agreement with the more metal-poor r-process enhanced stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17{sup o}3248. 2MASS 18174532-3353235 also shares many chemical characteristics with the similar metallicity but comparatively ?-poor Ursa Minor dwarf galaxy giant COS 82. Interestingly, the Mo and Ru abundances of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are also strongly enhanced and follow a similar trend recently found to be common in moderately metal-poor main-sequence turn-off halo stars.

  5. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNCs technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clarks Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clarks Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  6. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

  7. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  8. Systematic vegetation change analysis of mangrove dieoff in Florida Bay and southern Everglades National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, M.M.; Sargent, F.J.; Sargent, W.B.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a project to link hydrological and ecological relationships of the Florida Everglades watershed and the Florida Bay estuary. The creation of vegetation maps and systematic spatial analysis of vegetation and hydrological features will provide information about the interaction between these two ecosystems. The distribution of mangroves, salt marshes, and related vegetative communities are being mapped using existing aerial photography. Historical photographic records are being used to create geographic information system data layers. Changes in the composition of wetlands and vegetative patterns will be compared over a 45-year period.

  9. A fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory for the San Francisco Bay area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.R.; Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.; Martien, P.T.; Fanai, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    Traditionally, regional motor vehicle emission inventories (MVEI) have been estimated by combining travel demand model and emission factor model predictions. The accuracy of traditional MVEIs is frequently challenged, and development of independent methods for estimating vehicle emissions has been identified as a high priority for air quality research. In this study, an alternative fuel-based MVEI was developed for the San Francisco Bay Area using data from 1990--1992. To estimate CO emissions from motor vehicles in the Bay Area, estimates of gasoline sales were combined with infrared remote sensing measurements of CO and CO{sub 2} exhaust concentrations from over 10,000 light-duty vehicles in summer 1991. Once absolute estimates of CO emissions have been computed, it is possible to use ambient NO{sub x}/CO and NMOC/CO ratios from high traffic areas to estimate emissions for NO{sub x} and NMOC (excluding some resting loss and diurnal evaporative emissions). Ambient ratios were generated from special-study measurements of NMOC and CO in 1990 and 1992, and from routine sampling of NO{sub x} and CO in 1991. All pollutant concentrations were measured on summer mornings at Bay Area monitoring sites in areas with high levels of vehicle traffic and no other significant sources nearby. Stabilized CO emissions calculated by the fuel-based method for cars and light-duty trucks were 1720{+-}420 tons/day. This value is close to California`s MVEI 7G model estimates. Total on-road vehicle emissions of CO in the Bay Area were estimated to be 2900{+-}800 tons/day. Emissions of NMOC were estimated to be 570{+-}200 tons/day, which is 1.6{+-}0.6 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G. In the present study, emissions of NO{sub x} from on-road vehicles were estimated to be 250{+-}90 tons/day, which is 0.6{+-}0.2 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G.

  10. Renewable Energy Resoure Assessment for the Communities of Cold Bay, False Pass, and Nelson Lagoon

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Resource Assessment Aleutians East Borough 5/18/10 PAGE 1 OF 56 "Celebrate the power of nature"TM ... with YourCleanEnergy LLC 308 G Street #212, Anchorage AK 99501 907-274-2007 www.yourcleanenergy.us Renewable Energy Resource Assessment for the Communities of Cold Bay, False Pass, and Nelson Lagoon This report for Aleutians East Borough was funded by a grant from the Alaska Energy Authority, Project No. 407051 FINAL REPORT COMPLETED MAY 18, 2010 BY: ANDY BAKER, P.E. & LEE

  11. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (? 10{sup 7} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  12. THE GEMINI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Ftaclas, Christ; Chun, Mark; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Kuchner, Marc; Reid, I. Neill; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Boss, Alan; Lin, Douglas N. C.; and others

    2013-08-20

    We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.''5 and 14.1 mag at 1'' separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation <500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known {beta} Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a {>=}5 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly imaged planets as d {sup 2} N/dMda{proportional_to}m {sup {alpha}} a {sup {beta}}, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of a{sub max}). We find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} > 1.7. Likewise, we find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 200 AU. For the case where the planet frequency rises sharply with mass ({alpha} > 1.7), this occurs because all the planets detected to date have masses above 5 M{sub Jup}, but planets of lower mass could easily have been detected by our search. If we ignore the {beta} Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that <20% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 10 AU, and {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} < -1.5. Likewise, {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 125 AU. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet frequency on stellar host mass. Studies of transition disks have suggested that about 20% of stars are undergoing planet formation; our non-detections at large separations show that planets with orbital separation >40 AU and planet masses >3 M{sub Jup} do not carve the central holes in these disks.

  13. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Under this project, the BA-PIRC research team evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This case study summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete.

  14. NON-RADIAL OSCILLATIONS IN M-GIANT SEMI-REGULAR VARIABLES: STELLAR MODELS AND KEPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stello, Dennis; Compton, Douglas L.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Bellamy, Beau; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jrgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Garca, Rafael A.

    2014-06-10

    The success of asteroseismology relies heavily on our ability to identify the frequency patterns of stellar oscillation modes. For stars like the Sun this is relatively easy because the mode frequencies follow a regular pattern described by a well-founded asymptotic relation. When a solar-like star evolves off the main sequence and onto the red giant branch its structure changes dramatically, resulting in changes in the frequency pattern of the modes. We follow the evolution of the adiabatic frequency pattern from the main sequence to near the tip of the red giant branch for a series of models. We find a significant departure from the asymptotic relation for the non-radial modes near the red giant branch tip, resulting in a triplet frequency pattern. To support our investigation we analyze almost four years of Kepler data of the most luminous stars in the field (late K and early M type) and find that their frequency spectra indeed show a triplet pattern dominated by dipole modes even for the most luminous stars in our sample. Our identification explains previous results from ground-based observations reporting fine structure in the Petersen diagram and sub-ridges in the period-luminosity diagram. Finally, we find ''new ridges'' of non-radial modes with frequencies below the fundamental mode in our model calculations, and we speculate they are related to f modes.

  15. Special features of the isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in the {sup 90}Zr nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlamov, V. V. Peskov, N. N.; Stepanov, M. E.

    2009-02-15

    Data on the proton and neutron channels of the {sup 90}Zr photodisintegration were analyzed in detail, basic parameters of the isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in {sup 90}Zr being determined by the properties of these channels. New data concerning the cross sections for the partial photoneutron reactions {sup 90}Zr({gamma}, n){sup 89}Zr and {sup 90}Zr({gamma}, 2n){sup 88}Zr and resulting from a simultaneous correction of data from experiments performed in Livermore (USA) and Saclay (France) by using beams of quasimonoenergetic annihilation photons were invoked. Use was made of information about the positions on the energy scale of states characterized by different isospin values in the {sup 90}Zr nucleus and nuclei neighboring it, which are members of the respective isospin multiplet. New data on the parameters of the isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in the {sup 90}Zr nucleus were obtained on the basis of a global analysis of data on the giant-dipole-resonance states of the {sup 90}Zr nucleus, which are manifested in the respective photoneutron and photoproton cross sections and in their decay channels involving states of different isospin in neighboring nuclei.

  16. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, James; Moore, Mike; Thompson, Margo

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit (DER) at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  17. Beta (β) tungsten thin films: Structure, electron transport, and giant spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Qiang; Chen, Wenzhe; Xiao, Gang

    2015-05-04

    We use a simple magnetron sputtering process to fabricate beta (β) tungsten thin films, which are capable of generating giant spin Hall effect. As-deposited thin films are always in the metastable β-W phase from 3.0 to 26.7 nm. The β-W phase remains intact below a critical thickness of 22.1 nm even after magnetic thermal annealing at 280 °C, which is required to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a layered structure of β-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO. Intensive annealing transforms the thicker films (>22.1 nm) into the stable α-W phase. We analyze the structure and grain size of both β- and α-W thin films. Electron transport in terms of resistivity and normal Hall effect is studied over a broad temperature range of 10 K to at least 300 K on all samples. Very low switching current densities are achieved in β-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO with PMA. These basic properties reveal useful behaviors in β-W thin films, making them technologically promising for spintronic magnetic random access memories and spin-logic devices.

  18. LIGHT-ELEMENT ABUNDANCES OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M71 (NGC6838)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordero, M. J.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Vesperini, E.; Johnson, C. I. E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-02-10

    Aluminum is the heaviest light element displaying large star-to-star variations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). This element may provide additional insight into the origin of the multiple populations, now known to be common place in GCs, and also the nature of the first-generation stars responsible for a cluster's chemical inhomogeneities. In a previous analysis, we found that unlike more metal-poor GCs, 47 Tuc did not exhibit a strong Na-Al correlation, which motivates a careful study of the similar metallicity but less massive GC M71. We present chemical abundances of O, Na, Al, and Fe for 33 giants in M71 using spectra obtained with the WIYN-Hydra spectrograph. Our spectroscopic analysis finds that similar to 47 Tuc and in contrast with more metal-poor GCs, M71 stars do not exhibit a strong Na-Al correlation and span a relatively narrow range in [Al/Fe], which are characteristics that GC formation models must reproduce.

  19. Red giant stars from the Sloan digital sky survey. II. Distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Kefeng; Chen, Yuqin; Carrell, Kenneth; Zhao, Jingkun; Zhao, Gang

    2014-10-10

    We present distance determinations for a large and clean sample of red giant branch stars selected from the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The distances are calculated based on both observational cluster fiducials and theoretical isochrones. Distributions of distances from the two methods are very similar with peaks at about 10 kpc and tails extending to more than 70 kpc. We find that distances from the two methods agree well for the majority of the sample stars; though, on average, distances based on isochrones are 10% higher than those based on fiducials. We test the accuracy of our distance determinations using 332 stars from 10 Galactic globular and open clusters. The average relative deviation from the literature cluster distances is 4% for the fiducial-based distances and 8% for the isochrone-based distances, both of which are within the uncertainties. We find that the effective temperature and surface gravity derived from low-resolution spectra are not accurate enough to essentially improve the performance of distance determinations. However, for stars with significant extinction, effective temperature may help to better constrain their distances to some extent. We make our sample stars and their distances available from an online catalog. The catalog comprises 17,941 stars with reasonable distance estimations reaching to more than 70 kpc, which is suitable for the investigation of the formation and evolution of the Galaxy, especially the Galactic halo.

  20. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ?5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub ?0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub ?0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub ?0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  1. Scaling of the giant dipole resonance widths in hot rotating nuclei from the ground state values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-12-15

    The systematics of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) widths in hot and rotating nuclei are studied in terms of temperature T, angular momentum J, and mass A. The different experimental data in the temperature range of 1-2 MeV have been compared with the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) in the liquid drop formalism using a modified approach to estimate the average values of T, J, and A in the decay of the compound nucleus. The values of the ground state GDR widths have been extracted from the TSFM parametrization in the liquid drop limit for the corrected T, J, and A for a given system and compared with the corresponding available systematics of the experimentally measured ground state GDR widths for a range of nuclei from A=45 to 194. Amazingly, the nature of the theoretically extracted ground state GDR widths matches remarkably well, though 1.5 times smaller, with the experimentally measured ground state GDR widths consistently over a wide range of nuclei.

  2. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  3. Apparatus and method for imaging metallic objects using an array of giant magnetoresistive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A portable, low-power, metallic object detector and method for providing an image of a detected metallic object. In one embodiment, the present portable low-power metallic object detector an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The array of GMR sensors is adapted for detecting the presence of and compiling image data of a metallic object. In the embodiment, the array of GMR sensors is arranged in a checkerboard configuration such that axes of sensitivity of alternate GMR sensors are orthogonally oriented. An electronics portion is coupled to the array of GMR sensors. The electronics portion is adapted to receive and process the image data of the metallic object compiled by the array of GMR sensors. The embodiment also includes a display unit which is coupled to the electronics portion. The display unit is adapted to display a graphical representation of the metallic object detected by the array of GMR sensors. In so doing, a graphical representation of the detected metallic object is provided.

  4. Wilderness study area, mineral resources of the Sleeping Giant, Lewis and Clark County, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tysdal, G.; Reynold, M.W.; Carlson, R.R.; Kleinkopf, M.D.; Rowan, L.C. ); Peters, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    A Mineral resource survey was conducted in 1987 by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to evaluate mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the Sleeping Giant Wilderness Study Area (MT-075-111) in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. The only economic resource in the study area is an inferred 1.35-million-ton reserve of decorative stone (slate); a small gold placer resource is subeconomic. A high resource potential for decorative slate exists directly adjacent to the area of identified slate resource and in the northeastern part of the study area. The rest of the study area has a low potential for decorative slate. The westernmost part of the study area has a moderate resource potential for copper and associated silver in state-bound deposits in green beds and limestone; potential is low in the rest of the study are. The study area has a low resource potential for sapphires in placer deposits, gold in placer deposits (exclusive of subeconomic resource mentioned above), phosphate in the Spokane Formation, diatomite in lake deposits, uranium, oil, gas, geothermal energy, and no resource potential for phosphate in the Phosphoria Formation.

  5. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  6. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  7. Bay Area

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  8. Metals in tissues of migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) from Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Niles, Lawrence; Dey, Amanda; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Tsipoura, Nellie

    2014-08-15

    There is an abundance of field data on levels of metals for feathers in a variety of birds, but relatively few data for tissues, especially for migrant species from one location. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in muscle, liver, brain, fat and breast feathers from migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) collected from Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Our primary objectives were to (1) examine variation as a function of tissue, (2) determine the relationship of metal levels among tissues, and (3) determine the selenium:mercury molar ratio in different tissues since selenium is thought to protect against mercury toxicity. We were also interested in whether the large physiological changes that occur while shorebirds are on Delaware Bay (e.g. large weight gains in 2–3 weeks) affected metal levels, especially in the brain. There were significant differences among tissues for all metals. The brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium, and was tied for the lowest levels of all other metals except lead and selenium. Correlations among metals in tissues were varied, with mercury levels being positively correlated for muscle and brain, and for liver and breast feathers. Weights vary among individuals at the Delaware Bay stopover, as they arrive light, and gain weight prior to migration north. Bird weight and levels of arsenic, cadmium, and selenium in the brain were negatively correlated, while they were positively correlated for lead. There was no positive correlation for mercury in the brain as a function of body weight. The selenium:mercury molar ratio varied significantly among tissues, with brain (ratio of 141) and fat having the highest ratios, and liver and breast feathers having the lowest. In all cases, the ratio was above 21, suggesting the potential for amelioration of mercury toxicity. - Highlights: • Metal levels were examined for migrant semipalmated sandpipers. • There were differences in metal levels among internal tissues. • Brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium. • Bird weight and arsenic, cadmium, and selenium levels in brain were negatively correlated. • Selenium:mercury molar ratio varied among tissues (21–141, suggesting protection)

  9. On the shoulders of giants: properties of the stellar halo and the Milky Way mass distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kafle, Prajwal Raj; Sharma, Sanjib; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-10-10

    Halo stars orbit within the potential of the Milky Way, and hence their kinematics can be used to understand the underlying mass distribution. However, the inferred mass distribution depends sensitively on assumptions made on the density and the velocity anisotropy profiles of the tracer population. Also, there is a degeneracy between the parameters of the halo and those of the disk or bulge. Most previous attempts that use halo stars have made arbitrary assumptions about these. In this paper, we decompose the Galaxy into three major componentsa bulge, a Miyamoto-Nagai disk, and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo - and then model the kinematic data of the halo blue horizontal branch and K-giant stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. Additionally, we use the gas terminal velocity curve and the Sgr A* proper motion. With the distance of the Sun from the center of the Galaxy R {sub ?} = 8.5 kpc, our kinematic analysis reveals that the density of the stellar halo has a break at 17.2{sub ?1.0}{sup +1.1} kpc and an exponential cutoff in the outer parts starting at 97.7{sub ?15.8}{sup +15.6} kpc. Also, we find that the tracer velocity anisotropy is radially biased with ? {sub s} = 0.4 0.2 in the outer halo. We measure halo virial mass M {sub vir} to be 0.80{sub ?0.16}{sup +0.31}10{sup 12} M{sub ?}, concentration c to be 21.1{sub ?8.3}{sup +14.8}, disk mass to be 0.95{sub ?0.30}{sup +0.24}10{sup 11} M{sub ?}, disk scale length to be 4.9{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.4} kpc, and bulge mass to be 0.91{sub ?0.38}{sup +0.31}10{sup 10} M{sub ?}. The halo mass is found to be small, and this has important consequences. The giant stars reveal that the outermost halo stars have low velocity dispersion, but interestingly this suggests a truncation of the stellar halo density rather than a small overall mass of the Galaxy. Our estimates of local escape velocity v{sub esc}=550.9{sub ?22.1}{sup +32.4} km s{sup ?1} and dark matter density ?{sub ?}{sup DM}=0.0088{sub ?0.0018}{sup +0.0024} M{sub ?} pc{sup ?3} (0.35{sub ?0.07}{sup +0.08} GeV cm{sup 3}) are in good agreement with recent estimates. Some of the above estimates, in particular M {sub vir}, are dependent on the adopted value of R {sub ?} and also on the choice of the outer power-law index of the tracer number density.

  10. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ?}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ?}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ?}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ?10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ?}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ?}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ? 3 Myr and E = 1.2 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} yr for M {sub initial} ? 2 M {sub ?} (t ? 2 Myr for luminosities brighter than the red giant branch tip at log (L/L {sub ?}) > 3.4), decreasing to t = 0.4 Myr and E = 6.1 10{sup 9} L {sub ?} yr for stars with M {sub initial} ? 3.5 M {sub ?}. The implications of these results are discussed, especially with respect to general studies aimed at characterizing the integrated light output of TP-AGB stars in population synthesis models.

  11. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE NON-GRAND DESIGN SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebolledo, David; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam; Koda, Jin; Meyer, Jennifer Donovan

    2012-10-01

    We present high spatial resolution observations of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the eastern part of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6946 obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We have observed CO(1 {yields} 0), CO(2 {yields} 1) and {sup 13}CO(1 {yields} 0), achieving spatial resolutions of 5.''4 Multiplication-Sign 5.''0, 2.''5 Multiplication-Sign 2.''0, and 5.''6 Multiplication-Sign 5.''4, respectively, over a region of 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 kpc. This region extends from 1.5 kpc to 8 kpc galactocentric radius, thus avoiding the intense star formation in the central kpc. We have recovered short-spacing u-v components by using single dish observations from the Nobeyama 45 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes. Using the automated CPROPS algorithm, we identified 45 CO cloud complexes in the CO(1 {yields} 0) map and 64 GMCs in the CO(2 {yields} 1) maps. The sizes, line widths, and luminosities of the GMCs are similar to values found in other extragalactic studies. We have classified the clouds into on-arm and inter-arm clouds based on the stellar mass density traced by the 3.6 {mu}m map. Clouds located on-arm present in general higher star formation rates than clouds located in inter-arm regions. Although the star formation efficiency shows no systematic trend with galactocentric radius, some on-arm clouds-which are more luminous and more massive compared to inter-arm GMCs-are also forming stars more efficiently than the rest of the identified GMCs. We find that these structures appear to be located in two specific regions in the spiral arms. One of them shows a strong velocity gradient, suggesting that this region of high star formation efficiency may be the result of gas flow convergence.

  12. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S. E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  13. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

  14. A MULTI-SPACECRAFT VIEW OF A GIANT FILAMENT ERUPTION DURING 2009 SEPTEMBER 26/27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosain, Sanjay; Schmieder, Brigitte; Artzner, Guy; Bogachev, Sergei; Toeroek, Tibor

    2012-12-10

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations of a giant filament eruption that occurred during 2009 September 26 and 27. The filament eruption was associated with a relatively slow coronal mass ejection. The filament consisted of a large and a small part, and both parts erupted nearly simultaneously. Here we focus on the eruption associated with the larger part of the filament. The STEREO satellites were separated by about 117 Degree-Sign during this event, so we additionally used SoHO/EIT and CORONAS/TESIS observations as a third eye (Earth view) to aid our measurements. We measure the plane-of-sky trajectory of the filament as seen from STEREO-A and TESIS viewpoints. Using a simple trigonometric relation, we then use these measurements to estimate the true direction of propagation of the filament which allows us to derive the true R/R{sub Sun }-time profile of the filament apex. Furthermore, we develop a new tomographic method that can potentially provide a more robust three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by exploiting multiple simultaneous views. We apply this method also to investigate the 3D evolution of the top part of filament. We expect this method to be useful when SDO and STEREO observations are combined. We then analyze the kinematics of the eruptive filament during its rapid acceleration phase by fitting different functional forms to the height-time data derived from the two methods. We find that for both methods an exponential function fits the rise profile of the filament slightly better than parabolic or cubic functions. Finally, we confront these results with the predictions of theoretical eruption models.

  15. Red giant stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. The general field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.; Nissen, P. E.; Wei, P. E-mail: pen@phys.au.dk

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained a sample of ?22,000 red giant branch (RGB) stars based on stellar parameters, provided by the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the CH(G)/MgH indices, measured from the included spectra. The Galactic rest-frame velocity of V {sub gsr} versus longitude for the sample shows the existence of several groups of stars from globular clusters and known streams. Excluding these substructures, a sample of ?16,000 RGB stars from the general field is used to investigate the properties of the thick disk, the inner halo, and the outer halo of our Galaxy. The metallicity and rotational velocity distributions are investigated for stars at 0 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. It is found that the canonical thick disk dominates at 0 kpc < |Z| < 2 kpc and its contribution becomes negligible at |Z| > 3 kpc. The MWTD is present and overlaps with the inner halo at 1 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc. The inner halo starts at 2 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc and becomes the dominated population for 4 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. For halo stars with |Z| > 5 kpc, bimodal metallicity distributions are found for 20 kpc < |Z| < 25 kpc and 35 kpc < RR < 45 kpc, which suggests a dual halo, the inner and the outer halo, as reported in Carollo et al. at low |Z| values. The peak of metallicity for the inner halo is at [Fe/H] ? 1.6 and appears to be at [Fe/H] ? 2.3 for the outer halo. The transition point from the inner to the outer halo is located at |Z| ? 20 kpc and RR ? 35 kpc.

  16. Observations of giant pulses from pulsar B0950+08 using LWA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jr-Wei; Simonetti, John H.; Bear, Brandon; Akukwe, Bernadine; Quezada, Leandro; Kavic, Michael; Cutchin, Sean E.; Dowell, Jayce; Schinzel, Frank K.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Gough, Jonathan D.; Kanner, Jonah; Kassim, Namir E.; Shawhan, Peter; Yancey, Cregg C.

    2015-02-01

    We report the detection of giant pulse (GP) emission from PSR B0950+08 in 24 hours of observations made at 39.4 MHz, with a bandwidth of 16 MHz, using the first station of the Long Wavelength Array. We detected 119 GPs from PSR B0950+08 (at its dispersion measure (DM)), which we define as having a signal-to-noise ratio at least 10 times larger than for the mean pulse in our data set. These 119 pulses are 0.035% of the total number of pulse periods in the 24 hours of observations. The rate of GPs is about 5.0 per hour. The cumulative distribution of pulse strength S is a steep power law, N(>S)?S{sup ?4.7}, but much less steep than would be expected if we were observing the tail of a Gaussian distribution of normal pulses. We detected no other transient pulses in a DM range from 1 to 90 pc cm{sup ?3}, in the beam tracking PSR B0950+08. The GPs have a narrower temporal width than the mean pulse (17.8 ms, on average, versus 30.5 ms). The pulse widths are consistent with a previously observed weak dependence on observing frequency, which may be indicative of a deviation from a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density irregularities along the line of sight. The rate and strength of these GPs is less than has been observed at ?100 MHz. Additionally, the mean (normal) pulse flux density we observed is less than at ?100 MHz. These results suggest this pulsar is weaker and produces less frequent GPs at 39 MHz than at 100 MHz.

  17. GIANT GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT OF RELATIVISTIC SOLAR PROTONS ON 2005 JANUARY 20. I. SPACESHIP EARTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Pyle, R.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. E-mail: clem@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: pyle@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th

    2013-07-10

    A ground level enhancement (GLE) is a solar event that accelerates ions (mostly protons) to GeV range energies in such great numbers that ground-based detectors, such as neutron monitors, observe their showers in Earth's atmosphere above the Galactic cosmic ray background. GLEs are of practical interest because an enhanced relativistic ion flux poses a hazard to astronauts, air crews, and aircraft electronics, and provides the earliest direct indication of an impending space radiation storm. The giant GLE of 2005 January 20 was the second largest on record (and largest since 1956), with up to 4200% count rate enhancement at sea level. We analyzed data from the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitor stations with distinct asymptotic viewing directions and Polar Bare neutron counters at South Pole, to determine the time evolution of the relativistic proton density, energy spectrum, and three-dimensional directional distribution. We identify two energy-dispersive peaks, indicating two solar injections. The relativistic solar protons were initially strongly beamed, with a peak maximum-to-minimum anisotropy ratio over 1000:1. The directional distribution is characterized by an axis of symmetry, determined independently for each minute of data, whose angle from the magnetic field slowly varied from about 60 Degree-Sign to low values and then rose to about 90 Degree-Sign . The extremely high relativistic proton flux from certain directions allowed 10 s tracking of count rates, revealing fluctuations of period {approx}> 2 minutes with up to 50% fractional changes, which we attribute to fluctuations in the axis of symmetry.

  18. Project Reports for Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  19. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

  20. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-05-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

  1. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages from three middle Holocene sites located in the Bodega Dunes, and from three late Holocene sites, including Kili (CASON-299), the oldest known village site in the region. Bodega Bay (38 degrees 19 minutes N, 123 degrees 03 minutes W) is situated about 90 km north of San Francisco Bay, California (Figure 1). The Pacific, in conjunction with prominent geomorphological features, has given rise to a series of coastal habitats (e.g. semi-protected and protected shorelines) around Bodega Bay that are rather unique for the unprotected, surf swept rocky shores of northern California. This stretch of coastline also lies within a zone of particularly strong seasonal upwelling between Point Reyes Peninsula and Cape Mendocino; a region characterized by high Ekman transport (Huyer 1983), and high coastal concentrations of the nutrients silica and phosphate (van Geen and Husby 1996). The interaction between land and sea results in a productive marine ecosystem that has attracted hunter-gatherers for much of the Holocene.

  2. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Qualitymore » Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr⁻¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.« less

  3. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 60 GgCH4 yr? (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (20092012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.52.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.

  4. Search for the giant pairing vibration through (p,t) reactions around 50 and 60 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouginot, B.; Khan, E.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Ramus, A.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stefan, I.; Neveling, R.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Usman, I.; Mabiala, J.; Mira, J. P.; Swartz, J. A.; Papka, P.

    2011-03-15

    The existence of the giant pairing vibration (GPV) in {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb was investigated using the (p,t) reaction at incident proton energies of 50 MeV and 60 MeV for the scattering angles 0 deg. and 7 deg. No clear signature for the GPV was found, providing an upper limit for the cross section of {sigma}{sub max} = 0.2 mb. Theoretical interpretations for the low cross section of the GPV are discussed.

  5. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n){sup 240}Am reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-15

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus {sup 241}Am has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams from the HI{gamma}S facility. The induced activity of {sup 240}Am produced via the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  6. More collapse tests add to coiled tubing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. ); Costall, D. )

    1991-06-17

    The collapse limits of thicker-walled coiled tubing have been determined to ensure safe and successful workover operations. Prudhoe Bay has been using 1.75-in OD coiled tubing for 2 years. When BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. initially started using this larger size coil, collapse tests were run on 0.109-in. wall thickness coil. These tests provide a base curve by which much work has been performed in the western operating area of the Prudhoe Bay Unit. However, use of 1.75-in. coiled tubing has been expanded to include wall thickness of 0.125, 0.134, and 0.156-in. Except for theoretical calculations, no data were available to ensure that we would know the collapsed limitations for these sizes. To fill in this gap, further collapse testing has been done.

  7. Heavy ion Coulomb excitation and gamma decay studies of the one and two phonon giant dipole resonances in {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, P.E.; Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.

    1993-12-01

    Projectile -- photon coincidences were measured for the scattering of an 80 MeV/nucleon {sup 64}Zn beam from {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi targets at the GANIL heavy ion accelerator facility. Projectile-like particles between 0.5{degrees} and 4.5{degrees} relative to the incident beam direction were detected in the SPEG energy loss spectrometer where their momentum, charge, and mass were determined. Photons were detected in the BaF{sub 2} scintillation detector array TAPS. Light charged particles produced in the reaction were detected in the KVI Forward Wall. The analysis of the data acquired in this experiment is focused on three different phenomena: (1) the two phonon giant dipole resonance, (2) time dependence of the decay of the one phonon giant dipole resonance, and (3) giant resonance strength in projectile nuclei.

  8. Giant magnetocaloric effect and temperature induced magnetization jump in GdCrO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. H.; Yang, J.; Kan, X. C.; Song, W. H.; Dai, J. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-04-07

    We report on a systematic study of the single-crystal GdCrO{sub 3}, which shows various novel magnetic features, such as temperature-induced magnetization reversal (TMR), temperature-induced magnetization jump (TMJ), spin reorientation, and giant magnetocaloric effect (MCE). In the field-cooled cooling process with modest magnetic field along the c axis, GdCrO{sub 3} first shows a TMR at T{sub comp}∼120−130 K and then an abrupt TMJ with a sign change of magnetization at T{sub jump}∼52−120 K, and finally a spin reorientation at T{sub SR}∼4−7 K. Interestingly, the remarkable TMJ behavior, which was not reported ever before, persists at higher fields up to 10 kOe even when TMR disappears. In addition, giant MCE with the maximum value of magnetic entropy change reaching ∼31.6 J/kg K for a field change of 44 kOe was also observed in GdCrO{sub 3} single crystal, suggesting it could be a potential material for low-T magnetic refrigeration. A possible mechanism for these peculiar magnetic behaviors is discussed based on the various competing magnetic interactions between the 3d electrons of Cr{sup 3+} ions and 4f electrons of Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  9. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H]=0.94 0.01, ? = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =0.83 0.01, ? = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  10. POSSIBLE ORIGIN OF THE G2 CLOUD FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A KNOWN GIANT STAR BY SGR A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillochon, James; Loeb, Abraham; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-05-10

    The discovery of the gas cloud G2 on a near-radial orbit about SgrA* has prompted much speculation on its origin. In this Letter, we propose that G2 formed out of the debris stream produced by the removal of mass from the outer envelope of a nearby giant star. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of the returning tidal debris stream with cooling and find that the stream condenses into clumps that fall periodically onto SgrA*. We propose that one of these clumps is the observed G2 cloud, with the rest of the stream being detectable at lower Br? emissivity along a trajectory that would trace from G2 to the star that was partially disrupted. By simultaneously fitting the orbits of S2, G2, and ?2000 candidate stars, and by fixing the orbital plane of each candidate star to G2 (as is expected for a tidal disruption), we find that several stars have orbits that are compatible with the notion that one of them was tidally disrupted to produce G2. If one of these stars were indeed disrupted, it last encountered SgrA* hundreds of years ago and has likely encountered SgrA* repeatedly. However, while these stars are compatible with the giant disruption scenario given their measured positions and proper motions, their radial velocities are currently unknown. If one of these stars' radial velocity is measured to be compatible with a disruptive orbit, it would strongly suggest that its disruption produced G2.

  11. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ?} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ?1.6M {sub ?} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  12. THREE DISCRETE GROUPS WITH HOMOGENEOUS CHEMISTRY ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC2808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carretta, E.

    2014-11-10

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation because they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps, each with different chemical compositions. One group (P) shows a primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of giants with homogeneous chemistry. The composition of the I group cannot be reproduced by mixing of matter with extreme processing in hot H-burning and gas with pristine, unprocessed composition, as also found in the recent analysis of three discrete groups in NGC6752. This finding suggests that different classes of polluters were probably at work in NGC2808 as well.

  13. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2010-04-08

    In the 50 years since the laser was first demonstrated in Malibu, California, on May 16, 1960, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a world leader in laser technology and the home for many of the world's most advanced laser systems. That tradition continues today at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system. NIF's completion in March 2009 not only marked the dawn of a new era of scientific research - it could also prove to be the next big step in the quest for a sustainable, carbon-free energy source for the world. NIF consists of 192 laser beams that will focus up to 1.8 million joules of energy on a bb-sized target filled with isotopes of hydrogen - forcing the hydrogen nuclei to collide and fuse in a controlled thermonuclear reaction similar to what happens in the sun and the stars. More energy will be produced by this 'ignition' reaction than the amount of laser energy required to start it. This is the long-sought goal of 'energy gain' that has eluded fusion researchers for more than half a century. Success will be a scientific breakthrough - the first demonstration of fusion ignition in a laboratory setting, duplicating on Earth the processes that power the stars. This impending success could not be achieved without the valuable partnerships forged with other national and international laboratories, private industry and universities. One of the most crucial has been between LLNL and the community in which it resides. Over 155 businesses in the local Tri-Valley area have contributed to the NIF, from industrial technology and engineering firms to tool manufacturing, electrical, storage and supply companies. More than $2.3B has been spent locally between contracts with nearby merchants and employee salaries. The Tri-Valley community has enabled the Laboratory to complete a complex and far-reaching project that will have national and global impact in the future. The first experiments were conducted on NIF last summer and fall, successfully delivering a world-record level of ultraviolet laser energy - more than 1.2 million joules - to a target. The experiments also demonstrated the target drive and target capsule conditions required to achieve fusion ignition. When ignition experiments begin later this year, NIF's lasers will create temperatures and pressures in the hydrogen target that exist only in the cores of stars and giant planets and inside thermonuclear weapons. As a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Stockpile Stewardship Program, NIF will offer the means for sustaining a safe, secure and reliable U.S. nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. NIF is uniquely capable of providing the experimental data needed to develop and validate computer models that will enable scientists to assess the continuing viability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Along with this vital national security mission, success at NIF also offers the possibility of groundbreaking scientific discoveries in a wide variety of disciplines ranging from hydrodynamics to astrophysics. As a unique facility in the world that can create the conditions that exist in supernovas and in the cores of giant planets, NIF will help unlock the secrets of the cosmos and inspire the next generation of scientists. It is NIF's third mission, energy security that has been generating the most excitement in the news media and the international scientific community. The reasons are obvious: global energy demand, driven by population growth and the aspirations of the developing world, already is straining the planet's existing energy resources. Global need for electricity is expected to double from its current level of about two trillion watts (TW) to four TW by 2030 and could reach eight to ten TW by the end of the century. As many as 10,000 new billion-watt power plants will have to be built to keep up with this demand. Meeting this pressing need will require a sustainable carbon-free energy technology that can supply base load electricity to the world. Successful ignition experim

  14. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2015-11-24

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  15. Evolution of Florida Bay islands from a supratidal precursor: evidence from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T.M.; Merriam, D.F.

    1988-05-01

    Cores from the interior portions of westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key document island nucleation from a supratidal precursor developed on a paralic peat deposit; whereas cores from exterior portions of these islands document development of marine mudbanks, progradation or colonization by mangroves, and supratidal sedimentation. The supratidal precursor beneath these islands consists of eroded remnants of coastal tidal flats or local topographic highs that remained supratidal throughout the Holocene sea-level rise. Sedimentologic and biostratigraphic evidence suggest erosion of mangroves by storms or inundation of mangroves by storm deposits is a common precursor to subsequent sediment aggradation on both islands. If other Florida Bay islands develop from mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks, then data from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key indicate that nucleation from a supratidal precursor and mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks are both viable mechanisms for island initiation. The absence of evidence of a supratidal nucleus beneath an island can result from (a) island migration and subsequent erosion or (b) insufficient sampling density. Stratigraphic data from Florida Bay are insufficient to discriminate between the relative importance of these two models of island evolution; the authors contend that any model of the evolution of Florida Bay islands must incorporate island nucleation from a supratidal precursor as a viable mechanism for island evolution.

  16. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the θ13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the θ13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22θ13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillationmore » model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22θ13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.« less

  17. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle ?13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the ?13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the ?13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22?13=0.0830.018 in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22?13=0.0890.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  18. New measurement of antineutrino oscillation with the full detector configuration at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; et al

    2015-09-11

    We report a new measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance using the fully constructed Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The final two of eight antineutrino detectors were installed in the summer of 2012. Including the 404 days of data collected from October 2012 to November 2013 resulted in a total exposure of 6.9×105 GWth ton days, a 3.6 times increase over our previous results. Improvements in energy calibration limited variations between detectors to 0.2%. Removal of six 241Am- 13C radioactive calibration sources reduced the background by a factor of 2 for the detectors in the experimental hall furthest from the reactors.more » Direct prediction of the antineutrino signal in the far detectors based on the measurements in the near detectors explicitly minimized the dependence of the measurement on models of reactor antineutrino emission. The uncertainties in our estimates of 2sin2θ13 and |Δm2ee| were halved as a result of these improvements. An analysis of the relative antineutrino rates and energy spectra between detectors gave 2sin2θ13=0.084±0.005 and |Δm2ee|=(2.42±0.11)×10–3 eV2 in the three-neutrino framework.« less

  19. New measurement of antineutrino oscillation with the full detector configuration at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, K. Y.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S. S.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-09-11

    We report a new measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance using the fully constructed Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The final two of eight antineutrino detectors were installed in the summer of 2012. Including the 404 days of data collected from October 2012 to November 2013 resulted in a total exposure of 6.9105 GWth ton days, a 3.6 times increase over our previous results. Improvements in energy calibration limited variations between detectors to 0.2%. Removal of six 241Am- 13C radioactive calibration sources reduced the background by a factor of 2 for the detectors in the experimental hall furthest from the reactors. Direct prediction of the antineutrino signal in the far detectors based on the measurements in the near detectors explicitly minimized the dependence of the measurement on models of reactor antineutrino emission. The uncertainties in our estimates of 2sin2?13 and |?m2ee| were halved as a result of these improvements. An analysis of the relative antineutrino rates and energy spectra between detectors gave 2sin2?13=0.0840.005 and |?m2ee|=(2.420.11)103 eV2 in the three-neutrino framework.

  20. Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-12-02

    The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

  1. Modeling and forecasting the distribution of Vibrio vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, John M.; Rhodes, M.; Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Leight, A.; Long, Wen; Wood, R.

    2014-11-01

    The aim is to construct statistical models to predict the presence, abundance and potential virulence of Vibrio vulnificus in surface waters. A variety of statistical techniques were used in concert to identify water quality parameters associated with V. vulnificus presence, abundance and virulence markers in the interest of developing strong predictive models for use in regional oceanographic modeling systems. A suite of models are provided to represent the best model fit and alternatives using environmental variables that allow them to be put to immediate use in current ecological forecasting efforts. Conclusions: Environmental parameters such as temperature, salinity and turbidity are capable of accurately predicting abundance and distribution of V. vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay. Forcing these empirical models with output from ocean modeling systems allows for spatially explicit forecasts for up to 48 h in the future. This study uses one of the largest data sets compiled to model Vibrio in an estuary, enhances our understanding of environmental correlates with abundance, distribution and presence of potentially virulent strains and offers a method to forecast these pathogens that may be replicated in other regions.

  2. Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

  3. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE FUEL OIL TANK AREA HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WADE C. ADAMS

    2012-04-09

    During the period of February 14 to 15, 2012, ORISE performed radiological confirmatory survey activities for the former Fuel Oil Tank Area (FOTA) and additional radiological surveys of portions of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant site in Eureka, California. The radiological survey results demonstrate that residual surface soil contamination was not present significantly above background levels within the FOTA. Therefore, it is ORISE’s opinion that the radiological conditions for the FOTA surveyed by ORISE are commensurate with the site release criteria for final status surveys as specified in PG&E’s Characterization Survey Planning Worksheet. In addition, the confirmatory results indicated that the ORISE FOTA survey unit Cs-137 mean concentrations results compared favorably with the PG&E FOTA Cs-137 mean concentration results, as determined by ORISE from the PG&E characterization data. The interlaboratory comparison analyses of the three soil samples analyzed by PG&E’s onsite laboratory and the ORISE laboratory indicated good agreement for the sample results and provided confidence in the PG&E analytical procedures and final status survey soil sample data reporting.

  4. Measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    D. E. Jaffe; Bishai, M; Diwan, M.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hans, S.; Hu, L. M.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Tang, W.; et al

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GWth nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ± 0.04) × 10–18 cm2/GW/day or (5.92 ± 0.14) × 10–43 cm2/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946 ± 0.022more » (0.991 ± 0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ~4σ between 4-6 MeV. Furthermore, a reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.« less

  5. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has a program of research in the environmental aspects of oil and gas extraction. This sampling project will characterize the environmental impacts associated with the discharge of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), metals and organics in produced water. This report is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico, supported by the USDOE. These assessments are being coordinated with the field study, using the collected data to perform human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the development and use of appropriate discharge practices. The initial human health and ecological risk assessments consist of conservative screening analyses meant to identify potentially important contaminants, and to eliminate others from further consideration. More quantitative assessments were done for contaminants identified, in the screening analysis, as being of potential concern. Section 2 gives an overview of human health and ecological risk assessment to help put the analyses presented here in perspective. Section 3 provides the hazard assessment portion of the risk assessment, and identifies the important receptors and pathways of concern. Section 3 also outlines the approach taken to the risk assessments presented in the rest of the report. The remaining sections (4 through 9) present the human health and ecological risk assessments for discharges of produced water to open bays in Louisiana.

  6. Final Report: Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-01

    Potential human health and environmental impacts from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico are of concern to regulators at the State and Federal levels, the public, environmental interest groups and industry. Current and proposed regulations require a zero discharge limit for coastal facilities, based primarily on studies in low energy, poorly flushed environments. However, produced water discharges in coastal Louisiana include a number of open bay sites, where potential human health and environmental impacts are likely to be smaller than those demonstrated for low energy canal environments, but greater than the minimal impacts associated with offshore discharges. Additional data and assessments are needed to support risk managers at the State and Federal levels in the development of regulations that protect human health and the environment without unnecessary cost to the economic welfare of the region and the nation. This project supports the Natural Gas and Oil Initiative objectives to: (1) improve coordination on environmental research; (2) streamline State and Federal regulation; (3) enhance State, and Federal regulatory decision making capability; (4) enhance dialogue through industry/government/public partnerships; and (5) work with States and Native American Tribes.

  7. Epitaxial Mn{sub 2.5}Ga thin films with giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Feng; Mizukami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Oogane, Mikihiko; Ando, Yasuo

    2009-03-23

    We report on epitaxial growth and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 2.5}Ga thin films, which were deposited on Cr/MgO single crystal substrates by magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction results revealed the epitaxial relationships as Mn{sub 2.5}Ga(001)[100] parallel Cr(001)[110] parallel MgO(001)[100]. The presence of (002) and (011) superlattice peaks indicates that the films were crystallized into DO{sub 22} ordered structures. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) properties were found to be related to the extent of DO{sub 22} chemical ordering. A giant PMA (K{sub u}{sup eff}=1.2x10{sup 7} erg/cm{sup 3}) and low saturation magnetization (M{sub s}=250 emu/cm{sup 3}) can be obtained for the film with highest chemical ordering parameter (S=0.8)

  8. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24??m variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 ?m variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ?750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.80.9)10{sup 4} L{sub ?} and a total DPR of (2.30.1)10{sup ?5} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} 54,000 L{sub ?}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  9. Emission Changes Resulting from the San Pedro Bay, California Ports Truck Retirement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, G. A.; Schuchmann, B. G.; Stedman, D. H.; Lawson, D. R.

    2012-01-03

    Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions regulations have resulted in lower emissions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen from heavy-duty diesel trucks. To accelerate fleet turnover the State of California in 2008 along with the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (San Pedro Bay Ports) in 2006 passed regulations establishing timelines forcing the retirement of older diesel trucks. On-road emissions measurements of heavy-duty diesel trucks were collected over a three-year period, beginning in 2008, at a Port of Los Angeles location and an inland weigh station on the Riverside freeway (CA SR91). At the Port location the mean fleet age decreased from 12.7 years in April of 2008 to 2.5 years in May of 2010 with significant reductions in carbon monoxide (30%), oxides of nitrogen (48%) and infrared opacity (a measure of particulate matter, 54%). We also observed a 20-fold increase in ammonia emissions as a result of new, stoichiometrically combusted, liquefied natural gas powered trucks. These results compare with changes at our inland site where the average ages were 7.9 years in April of 2008 and 8.3 years in April of 2010, with only small reductions in oxides of nitrogen (10%) being statistically significant. Both locations have experienced significant increases in nitrogen dioxide emissions from new trucks equipped with diesel particle filters; raising the mean nitrogen dioxide to oxides of nitrogen ratios from less than 10% to more than 30% at the Riverside freeway location.

  10. Sedimentologic succession of uplifted coral community, Urvina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgan, M.W.; Hollander, D.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1954, along the west-central coast of Isabela Island, an upward movement of magma suddenly raised Urvina Bay over 6 m and exposed several square kilometers of carbonate deposits covering a young aa lava flow (around 1000 years old). Results from 6 transect lines across the uplift, 30 cores, and 10 trenches describe the sedimentologic and ecologic transition from barren basalt to diverse carbonate sediments with small coral reefs. Along horizontal transects spanning from 0 to 7 m paleowater depth, there is a seaward progression from beaches, mangroves, and basalt to thick deposits (> 1.6 m) of carbonate sands and small coral reefs. Variation in water depth, degree of wave exposure, and irregularity of the aa lava topography provided many microhabitats where coral, calcareous algae, and mollusks settled and grew. Eight hermatypic coral species are found throughout the shelf, and three species (i.e., Pavona clavus, Pocillopora damicornis, and Porites lobata) produced five small, isolated, monospecific, coral-reef frameworks. The vertical section seen in cores and trenches shows that calcium carbonate increased upward, whereas volcanic sediments decreased; however, episodic layers occur with high concentrations of basaltic sands. In vertical samples from the central portion of the shelf, the coral population changed from small, isolated colonies of Psammocora (Plesioseris) superficalis near the basalt basement to large reef-forming colonies of Pocillopora damicornis farther upsection. Reefs of the Galapagos Islands are small and less diverse than most Pacific reefs. Nonetheless, understanding their temporal successional development should throw light on the origin and history of larger oceanic reefs in the Pacific.

  11. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Dietmar; Voelzke, Holger; Weber, Wolfgang; Noack, Volker; Baeuerle, Guenther

    2007-07-01

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete storage space to allow the radioactivity to decay. For transport of reactor compartments at the shipyard, at the dock and at the storage facility, hydraulic keel blocks, developed and supplied by German subcontractors, are used. In July 2006 the first stage of the reactor compartment storage facility was commissioned and the first seven reactor compartments have been delivered from Nerpa shipyard. Following transports of reactor compartments to the storage facility are expected in 2007. (authors)

  12. Deeya Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: 94539 Region: Bay Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Makes giant "flow-batteries" Website: www.deeyaenergy.com Coordinates: 37.4673572, -121.9166552 Show Map...

  13. Giant Magneto-Resistance in Epitaxial (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)0.5: (ZnO)0.5

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanocomposites (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Giant Magneto-Resistance in Epitaxial (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)0.5: (ZnO)0.5 Nanocomposites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Magneto-Resistance in Epitaxial (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)0.5: (ZnO)0.5 Nanocomposites A great deal of research has been carried out in oxide material systems. Among them, ZnO and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) are of particular interest due to their superb optical properties and colossal magneto-resistive

  14. Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

  15. New asteroseismic scaling relations based on the Hayashi track relation applied to red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-01-20

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust. The cluster members are therefore expected to have some properties in common. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain stellar models and asteroseismically derived M, R, and g when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive new scaling relations based on a relation for stars on the Hayashi track (?(T{sub eff})?g{sup p}R{sup q}) to determine the masses and metallicities of red giant branch stars in open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 from the global oscillation parameters ?? (the large frequency separation) and ?{sub max} (frequency of maximum oscillation power). The ?? and ?{sub max} values are derived from Kepler observations. From the analysis of these new relations we derive: (1) direct observational evidence that the masses of red giant branch stars in a cluster are the same within their uncertainties, (2) new methods to derive M and z of the cluster in a self-consistent way from ?? and ?{sub max}, with lower intrinsic uncertainties, and (3) the mass dependence in the ?? - ?{sub max} relation for red giant branch stars.

  16. Highly Emissive Multiexcitons in Steady-State Photoluminescence of Individual Giant CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Htoon, Han; Malko, Anton V.; Bussian, David A.; Vela, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2010-06-01

    The development of nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) with suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination has been an important goal in colloidal nanostructure research motivated by the needs of prospective applications in lasing devices, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells. Here, we conduct single-nanocrystal spectroscopic studies of recently developed core-shell NQDs (so-called giant NQDs) that comprise a small CdSe core surrounded by a 16-monolayer-thick CdS shell. Using both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation, we observe strong emission features due both to neutral and charged biexcitons, as well as multiexcitons of higher order. The development of pronounced multiexcitonic peaks in steady-state photoluminescence of individual nanocrystals, as well as continuous growth of the emission intensity in the range of high pump levels, point toward a significant suppression of nonradiative Auger decay that normally renders multiexcitons nonemissive. The unusually high multiexciton emission efficiencies in these systems open interesting opportunities for studies of multiexciton phenomena using well-established methods of single-dot spectroscopy, as well as new exciting prospects for applications, that have previously been hampered by nonradiative Auger decay.

  17. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing; Xie, Weiwei; Gschneidner, Karl A; Miller, Gordon J; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2014-10-15

    In this paper we demonstrate evidence of a cluster spin glass in Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) (a compound with a giant cubic unit cell) via ac and dc magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic relaxation and heat capacity measurements. The results clearly show that Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) undergoes a spin glass phase transition at the freezing temperature, ~38?K. The good fit of the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature to the critical slowing down model and Vogel-Fulcher law strongly suggest the formation of cluster glass in the Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) system. The heat capacity data exhibit no evidence for long-range magnetic order, and yield a large value of Sommerfeld coefficient. The spin glass behavior of Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) may be understood by assuming the presence of competing interactions among multiple non-equivalent Tb sites present in the highly complex unit cell.

  18. Disruption of a red giant star by a supermassive black hole and the case of PS1-10jh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanovi?, Tamara; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: rcheng@gatech.edu

    2014-06-20

    The development of a new generation of theoretical models for tidal disruptions is timely, as increasingly diverse events are being captured in surveys of the transient sky. Recently, Gezari et al. reported a discovery of a new class of tidal disruption events: the disruption of a helium-rich stellar core, thought to be a remnant of a red giant (RG) star. Motivated by this discovery and in anticipation of others, we consider tidal interaction of an RG star with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) which leads to the stripping of the stellar envelope and subsequent inspiral of the compact core toward the black hole. Once the stellar envelope is removed the inspiral of the core is driven by tidal heating as well as the emission of gravitational radiation until the core either falls into the SMBH or is tidally disrupted. In the case of the tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, we find that there is a set of orbital solutions at high eccentricities in which the tidally stripped hydrogen envelope is accreted by the SMBH before the helium core is disrupted. This places the RG core in a portion of parameter space where strong tidal heating can lift the degeneracy of the compact remnant and disrupt it before it reaches the tidal radius. We consider how this sequence of events explains the puzzling absence of the hydrogen emission lines from the spectrum of PS1-10jh and gives rise to its other observational features.

  19. Description of the dipole giant resonance in heavy and superheavy nuclei within Skyrme random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinig, W.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Kvasil, J.; Vesely, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2008-10-15

    The E1(T=1) isovector dipole giant resonance (GDR) in heavy and superheavy deformed nuclei is analyzed over a sample of 18 rare-earth nuclei, four actinides, and three chains of superheavy elements (Z=102, 114, and 120). The basis of the description is the self-consistent separable random-phase approximation (SRPA) using the Skyrme force SLy6. The model well reproduces the experimental data in the rare-earth and actinide regions. The trend of the resonance peak energies follows the estimates from collective models, showing a bias to the volume mode for the rare-earth isotopes and a mix of volume and surface modes for actinides and superheavy elements. The widths of the GDR are mainly determined by the Landau fragmentation, which in turn is found to be strongly influenced by deformation. A deformation splitting of the GDR can contribute to about one-third of the width, and about 1 MeV further broadening can be associated with mechanisms beyond the SRPA description (e.g., escape widths and coupling with complex configurations)

  20. Dipole-Strength Distributions Below the Giant Dipole Resonance in the Stable Even-Mass Molybdenum Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusev, G.; Hutcheson, A. L.; Kwan, E.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C. T.; Hammond, S. L.; Kawowski, H. J.; Beyer, R.; Doenau, F.; Erhard, M.; Grosse, E.; Frauendorf, S.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Nikolov, N.; Schilling, K.-D.; Schwengner, R.

    2009-03-10

    Dipole-strength distributions in the stable even-mass molybdenum isotopes up to the neutron-separation energies have been studied in photon-scattering experiments with bremsstrahlung at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE at the Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany, and with mono-energetic photon beams at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. In order to determine the dipole-strength distribution, statistical methods were developed for the analysis of the measured spectra. The data obtained for the stable even-mass molybdenum isotopes from the present ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments are combined with ({gamma},n) cross sections from the literature resulting in a photoabsorption cross section covering the full range from about 4 to 15 MeV, which is of interest for nuclear structure as well as for nuclear astrophysics network calculations. Novel information about the low-energy tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance and the energy spreading of its strength is derived.

  1. KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C.; Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R.; Lund, Mikkel N.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Everett, Mark E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Horch, Elliott P.; and others

    2013-09-20

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m{sub Kp} = 11.6, T{sub eff} = 5576 K, M{sub *} = 0.98 M{sub ?}). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 0.2 R{sub ?}, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M{sub ?} (3?). The host star has a high obliquity (? = 104), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.

  2. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

  4. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  5. On the onset of secondary stellar generations in giant star-forming regions and massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palou, J.; Wnsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-10

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ? 10{sup 4} K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ? 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  6. The Tip of the red giant branch distance to the perfect spiral galaxy M74 hosting three core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung Jang, In; Gyoon Lee, Myung E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    M74 (NGC 628) is a famous face-on spiral galaxy, hosting three core-collapse supernovae (SNe): SN Ic 2002ap, SN II-P 2003gd, and SN II-P 2013ej. However, its distance is not well known. We present a distance estimation for this galaxy based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) method. We obtain photometry of the resolved stars in the arm-free region of M74 from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars shows a dominant red giant branch (RGB) as well as blue main sequence stars, red helium burning stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars. The I-band luminosity function of the RGB stars shows the TRGB to be at I {sub TRGB} = 26.13 0.03 mag, and T {sub RGB} = 25.97 0.03. From this, we derive the distance modulus to M74 to be 30.04 0.04 (random) 0.12 (systematic) (corresponding to a linear distance of 10.19 0.14 0.56 Mpc). With this distance estimate, we calibrate the standardized candle method for SNe II-P. From the absolute magnitudes of SN 2003gd, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H {sub 0} = 72 6 (random) 7 (systematic) km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1}. It is similar to recent estimates based on the luminosity calibration of Type Ia supernovae.

  7. An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metaloxidesemiconductor integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldn, A. Roldn, J. B.; Reig, C.; Cardoso, S.; Cardoso, F.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-05-07

    Full instrumentation bridges based on spin valve of giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junction devices have been microfabricated and experimentally characterized from the DC and noise viewpoint. A more realistic model of these devices was obtained in this work, an electrical and thermal model previously developed have been improved in such a way that noise effects are also included. We have implemented the model in a circuit simulator and reproduced the experimental measurements accurately. This provides a more realistic and complete tool for circuit design where magnetoresistive elements are combined with well-known complementary metaloxidesemiconductor modules.

  8. Core Perylene Diimide Designs via Direct Bay and Ortho (Poly)trifluoromethylation: Synthesis, Isolation, X-ray Structures, Optical and Electronic Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Rumbles, Garry; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2015-10-01

    We developed an efficient solvent- and catalyst-free direct polytrifluoromethylation of solid perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride that produced a new family of (poly)perfluoroalkyl bay and ortho substituted PDIs with two different imide substituents. Direct hydrogen substitution with CN group led to the synthesis of a cyanated perfluoroalkyl PDI derivative for the first time. Absorption, steady-state and time-resolved emission, X-ray diffraction, electrochemical, and gas-phase electron affinity data allowed for systematic studies of substitution effects at bay, ortho, and imide positions in the new PDIs. Solid-state packing showed remarkable variations in the intermolecular interactions that are important for charge transport and photophysical properties. Analysis of the electrochemical data for 143 electron poor PDIs, including newly reported compounds, revealed some general trends and peculiar effects of electron withdrawing group substitution at all three positions.

  9. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, NTU/AS, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Volk, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infraredSpitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 ?m band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  10. SPOON-FEEDING GIANT STARS TO SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: EPISODIC MASS TRANSFER FROM EVOLVING STARS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE QUIESCENT ACTIVITY OF GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Grady, Sean; Guillochon, James

    2013-11-10

    Stars may be tidally disrupted if, in a single orbit, they are scattered too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Tidal disruption events are thought to power luminous but short-lived accretion episodes that can light up otherwise quiescent SMBHs in transient flares. Here we explore a more gradual process of tidal stripping where stars approach the tidal disruption radius by stellar evolution while in an eccentric orbit. After the onset of mass transfer, these stars episodically transfer mass to the SMBH every pericenter passage, giving rise to low-level flares that repeat on the orbital timescale. Giant stars, in particular, will exhibit a runaway response to mass loss and 'spoon-feed' material to the black hole for tens to hundreds of orbital periods. In contrast to full tidal disruption events, the duty cycle of this feeding mode is of order unity for black holes M{sub bh} ?> 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. This mode of quasi-steady SMBH feeding is competitive with indirect SMBH feeding through stellar winds, and spoon-fed giant stars may play a role in determining the quiescent luminosity of local SMBHs.

  11. THE CALIFORNIA PLANET SURVEY IV: A PLANET ORBITING THE GIANT STAR HD145934 AND UPDATES TO SEVEN SYSTEMS WITH LONG-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherina Feng, Y.; Wright, Jason T.; Nelson, Benjamin; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.

    2015-02-10

    We present an update to seven stars with long-period planets or planetary candidates using new and archival radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and literature velocities from other telescopes. Our updated analysis better constrains orbital parameters for these planets, four of which are known multi-planet systems. HD24040 b and HD183263 c are super-Jupiters with circular orbits and periods longer than 8yr. We present a previously unseen linear trend in the residuals of HD66428 indicative of an additional planetary companion. We confirm that GJ 849 is a multi-planet system and find a good orbital solution for the c component: it is a 1 M {sub Jup} planet in a 15yr orbit (the longest known for a planet orbiting an M dwarf). We update the HD74156 double-planet system. We also announce the detection of HD145934 b, a 2 M {sub Jup} planet in a 7.5yr orbit around a giant star. Two of our stars, HD187123 and HD217107, at present host the only known examples of systems comprising a hot Jupiter and a planet with a well constrained period greater than 5yr, and with no evidence of giant planets in between. Our enlargement and improvement of long-period planet parameters will aid future analysis of origins, diversity, and evolution of planetary systems.

  12. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit: Annapolis, Maryland. Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  13. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  14. Establishment of the United States Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosclski, J.L.; Boyer, R.; Sloger, W.

    1997-08-01

    The proposed establishment of the US Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence (MWCE) in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas, involved the collocation of the Navy`s Mine Warfare and Mine Counter Measures assets in proximity to each other at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Ingleside and Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Collocation of these Navy forces would provide significant advantages in meeting mission and operational requirements. This action would improve the operational training and readiness of the forces. In addition to new construction or modifications at NAVSTA Ingleside, NAS Corpus Christi, and off-base; the establishment of offshore training and operating areas was required. When the project was first proposed in 1993, considerable concern was expressed by environmental interests, shrimpers, and state and federal resource agencies regarding the impact of the proposed training activities within Gulf waters. The Navy and Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., under contract to the Navy, conducted several technical studies and extensive coordination with concerned interests during the environmental impact statement process to identify and document the potential intensity, magnitude, and duration of impact from each proposed training activity.

  15. Natural gas hydrates on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, mainly methane, in which a solid-water lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure, or clathrate. These substances often have been regarded as a potential (unconventional) source of natural gas. Significant quantities of naturally occurring gas hydrates have been detected in many regions of the Arctic including Siberia, the Mackenzie River Delta, and the North Slope of Alaska. On the North Slope, the methane-hydrate stability zone is areally extensive beneath most of the coastal plain province and has thicknesses as great as 1000 meters in the Prudhoe Bay area. Gas hydrates have been identified in 50 exploratory and production wells using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by ARCO Alaska and EXXON. Most of these gas hydrates occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these gas hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. The volume of gas within these gas hydrates is estimated to be about 1.0 {times} 10{sup 12} to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 12} cubic meters (37 to 44 trillion cubic feet), or about twice the volume of conventional gas in the Prudhoe Bay Field. Geochemical analyses of well samples suggest that the identified hydrates probably contain a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. The thermogenic gas probably migrated from deeper reservoirs along the same faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil that occur in this area. 51 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Observation of giant exchange bias in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Suresh, K. G.

    2015-02-16

    We report a giant exchange bias (EB) field of 3520?Oe in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy. The low temperature magnetic state of the martensite phase has been studied by DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements. Frequency dependence of spin freezing temperature (T{sub f}) on critical slowing down relation and observation of memory effect in zero field cooling mode confirms the super spin glass (SSG) phase at low temperatures. Large EB is attributed to the strong exchange coupling between the SSG clusters formed by small regions of ferromagnetic order embedded in an antiferromagnetic (AFM) matrix. The temperature and cooling field dependence of EB have been studied and related to the change in unidirectional anisotropy at SSG/AFM interface. The training effect also corroborates with the presence of frozen (SSG) moments at the interface and their role in EB.

  17. Investigation of giant-dipole-resonance decay in the ({gamma}, n) reactions on {sup 52}Cr and {sup 51}V nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbitsky, S. S.; Lapic, A.M. Ratner, B. S.; Rusakov, A. V.; Tikanov, M. A.; Tulupov, B. A.; Tzelebrovsky, A. N.

    2009-03-15

    The cross sections for the emission of fast neutrons ({epsilon}{sub n} > 3.7 MeV) in the reactions {sup 52}Cr({gamma}, n){sup 51}Cr and {sup 51}V({gamma}, n){sup 50}V at incident-photon energies in the range between 16.0 and 25.8 MeV were studied. The neutron energy spectra were measured at the bremsstrahlung-photon endpoint energies of 18.5, 21.0, and 23.0 MeV for the {sup 52}Cr and {sup 51}V nuclei and at the bremsstrahlung-photon energy of 25.5 MeV for the {sup 51}V nucleus. Special features of giant-dipole-resonance decay that are associated with the existence of a structure in photoneutron cross sections and spectra are discussed.

  18. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  19. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar .; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  20. publications-archive | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    publications-archive Reports 2014: December, 2014 Final Project Report 10121-4405-02 Ultra-Deepwater Dry Tree System for Drilling and Production in the Gulf of Mexico [PDF-5.76MB] December, 2014 Final Project Report DE-FC26-01NT41332 Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska [PDF-30.1MB] December, 2014 Final Project Report 09121-3300-06 High Resolution 3D Laser

  1. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit Annapolis, Maryland PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing Type: Apartment building: Bay Ridge Gardens Annapolis, MD www.bayridgegardens.com Size: 12 apartment units, 713 ft 2 and 909 ft 2 each Year of construction: 1970s Date completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Mixed-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Pre-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 28.4 kilowatt-hour per square foot (kWh/ft 2 ) Post-retrofit annual energy use

  2. DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST GIANT DOUBLE RADIO RELIC IN A GALAXY CLUSTER FOUND IN THE PLANCK SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH CLUSTER SURVEY: PLCK G287.0+32.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Paul, Surajit; Sirothia, S. K.; Kantharia, Nimisha G.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Gopal-Krishna; Werner, Norbert; Pandge, Mahadev B.; Joshi, Santosh

    2011-07-20

    We report the discovery of large-scale diffuse non-thermal radio emission in PLCK G287.0+32.9, an exceptionally hot (T {approx} 13 keV), massive, and luminous galaxy cluster, strongly detected by the Planck satellite in a recent, all-sky blind search for new clusters through Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 150 MHz and Very Large Array 1.4 GHz radio data reveal a pair of giant (>1 Mpc) 'arc'-shaped peripheral radio relics (signatures of shock waves) of unprecedented scale (linear separation {approx}4.4 Mpc at redshift 0.39), located at distances from the cluster center that are about 0.7 and 1.3 of the cluster's virial radius, respectfully. Another possible giant relic and a radio halo is detected closer to the cluster center. These relic sources are unique 'signposts' of extremely energetic mergers and shocks (both ongoing and past) that are assembling and heating up this very massive galaxy cluster. They are also a probe of the filamentary cosmic-web structure beyond the cluster virial radius. Optical imaging with the IUCAA 2 m telescope and XMM-Newton X-ray data confirm a very rich galaxy cluster with a morphologically disturbed core region, suggesting a dynamically perturbed merging system.

  3. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  4. Bay Area Industrial Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michael Bauer, President, Chief Product Officer and Founder, Sentient Energy; Lloyd Hackel, Vice President for Advanced Technologies, Metal Improvement Corporation; and Charlie Hotz, Vice President of Research and Development, Nanosys, Inc. each presented on partnership with the National Labs.

  5. Molecular Foundry Bay Cam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baycam The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility at Berkeley Lab that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. twitter instagram facebook

  6. Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film-shape memory alloy composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Qingxin Xu, Jia

    2014-05-07

    Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive filmshape memory alloy (GMFSMA) composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation were studied. Van der Pol items were improved to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of both GMF and SMA, and the nonlinear dynamic model of a GMFSMA composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation was developed. The probability density function of the dynamic response of the system was obtained, and the conditions of stochastic Hopf bifurcation were analyzed. The conditions of noise-induced chaotic response were obtained in the stochastic Melnikov integral method, and the fractal boundary of the safe basin of the system was provided. Finally, the chaos control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the parameter variation process. The boundary of the safe basin of the system has fractal characteristics, and its area decreases when the noise intensifies. The system reliability was improved through stochastic optimal control, and the safe basin area of the system increased.

  7. 'Giant' multishell CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots with supporessed blinking: novel fluorescent probes for real-time detection of single-molecule events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Vela, Javier; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I; Casson, Amy R; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    We reported for the first time that key nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) optical properties-quantum yield, photobleaching and blinking-can be rendered independent ofNQD surface chemistry and environment by growth of a very thick, defect-free inorganic shell. Here, we show the precise shell-thickness dependence of these effects. We demonstrate that 'giant-shell' NQDs can be largely non-blinking for observation times as long as 54 minutes and lhat on-time fractions are independent of experimental time-resolution from 1-200 ms. These effects are primarily demonstrated on (CdSe)CdS (core)shell NQDs, but we also show that alloyed shells comprising Cd.Znl.'S and terminated with a non-cytotoxic ZnS layer exhibit similar properties. The mechanism for suppressed blinking and dramatically enhanced stability is attributed to both effective isolation of the NQD core excitonic wavefunction from the NQD surface, as well as a quasi-Type II electronic structure. The unusual electronic structure provides for effective spatial separation of the electron and hole into the shell and core, respectively, and, thereby, for reduced efficiencies in non-radiative Auger recombination.

  8. Towards sub-200 nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low μm range. Deposition of a protective layer (50 nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ∼300 nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  9. K{sub s} -BAND LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH POPULATION BASED ON STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-10

    We present a study of K{sub s} -band luminosity evolution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in simple stellar systems using star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We determine physical parameters of LMC star clusters including center coordinates, radii, and foreground reddenings. Ages of 83 star clusters are derived from isochrone fitting with the Padova models, and those of 19 star clusters are taken from the literature. The AGB stars in 102 star clusters with log(age) = 7.3-9.5 are selected using near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Then we obtain the K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars in these star clusters as a function of ages. The K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars increases, on average, as age increases from log(age) ? 8.0, reaching a maximum at log(age) ? 8.5, and it decreases thereafter. There is a large scatter in the AGB luminosity fraction for given ages, which is mainly due to stochastic effects. We discuss this result in comparison with five simple stellar population models. The maximum K{sub s} -band AGB luminosity fraction for bright clusters is reproduced by the models that expect the value of 0.7-0.8 at log(age) = 8.5-8.7. We discuss the implication of our results with regard to the study of size and mass evolution of galaxies.

  10. Globular cluster scale sizes in giant galaxies: The case of M87 and the role of orbital anisotropy and tidal filling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2013-12-20

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the outer regions of M87 in order to study its globular cluster (GC) population out to large galactocentric distances. We discuss, particularly, the relationship between GC effective radii r{sub h} and projected galactocentric distance R {sub gc}. The observations suggest a shallow trend r{sub h}?R{sub gc}{sup 0.14} out to R {sub gc} ? 100 kpc, in agreement with studies of other giant elliptical galaxies. To theoretically reproduce this relationship, we simulate GC populations with various distributions of orbits. For an isotropic distribution of cluster orbits, we find a steeper trend of r{sub h}?R{sub gc}{sup 0.4}. Instead, we suggest that (1) if the cluster system has an orbital anisotropy profile, where orbits become preferentially radial with increasing galactocentric distance, and (2) if clusters become more tidally underfilling with galactocentric distance, then the observed relationship can be recovered. We also apply this approach to the red and blue GC populations separately and predict that red clusters are preferentially underfilling at large R {sub gc} and have a more isotropic distribution of orbits than blue clusters.

  11. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2011-04-01

    The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contaminationzircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

  12. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  13. A NEW CEPHEID DISTANCE TO THE GIANT SPIRAL M101 BASED ON IMAGE SUBTRACTION OF HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shappee, Benjamin J.; Stanek, K. Z. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2011-06-01

    We accurately determine a new Cepheid distance to M101 (NGC 5457) using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I time series photometry of two fields within the galaxy. We make a slight modification to the ISIS image subtraction package to obtain optimal differential light curves from HST data. We discovered 827 Cepheids with periods between 3 and 80 days, the largest extragalactic sample of Cepheids observed with HST by a factor of two. With this large Cepheid sample, we find that the relative distance of M101 from the Large Magellanic Cloud is {Delta}{mu}{sub LMC} = 10.63 {+-} 0.04 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag. If we use the geometrically determined maser distance to NGC 4258 as our distance anchor, the distance modulus of M101 is {mu}{sub 0} = 29.04 {+-} 0.05 (random) {+-} 0.18 (systematic) mag or D = 6.4 {+-} 0.2 (random) {+-} 0.5 (systematic) Mpc. The uncertainty is dominated by the maser distance estimate ({+-}0.15 mag), which should improve over the next few years. We determine a steep metallicity dependence, {gamma}, for our Cepheid sample through two methods, yielding {gamma} = -0.80 {+-} 0.21 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1} and {gamma} = -0.72{sup +0.22}{sub -0.25} (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1}. We see marginal evidence for variations in the Wesenheit period-luminosity relation slope as a function of deprojected galactocentric radius. We also use the tip of the red giant branch method to independently determine the distance modulus to M101 of {mu}{sub 0} = 29.05 {+-} 0.06 (random) {+-} 0.12 (systematic) mag.

  14. Source-plane reconstruction of the giant gravitational arc in A2667: A candidate Wolf-Rayet galaxy at z ? 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Shuo; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Covone, Giovanni; Jullo, Eric; Richard, Johan; Izzo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Very Large Telescope imaging and spectroscopic data of a bright lensed galaxy at z = 1.0334 in the lensing cluster A2667. Using this high-resolution imaging, we present an updated lens model that allows us to fully understand the lensing geometry and reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc gives a unique opportunity to view the structure of a high-redshift disk galaxy. We find that the lensed galaxy of A2667 is a typical spiral galaxy with a morphology similar to the structure of its counterparts at higher redshift, z ? 2. The surface brightness of the reconstructed source galaxy in the z {sub 850} band reveals the central surface brightness I(0) = 20.28 0.22 mag arcsec{sup 2} and a characteristic radius r{sub s} = 2.01 0.16 kpc at redshift z ? 1. The morphological reconstruction in different bands shows obvious negative radial color gradients for this galaxy. Moreover, the redder central bulge tends to contain a metal-rich stellar population, rather than being heavily reddened by dust due to high and patchy obscuration. We analyze the VIMOS/integral field unit spectroscopic data and find that, in the given wavelength range (?1800-3200 ), the combined arc spectrum of the source galaxy is characterized by a strong continuum emission with strong UV absorption lines (Fe II and Mg II) and shows the features of a typical starburst Wolf-Rayet galaxy, NGC 5253. More specifically, we have measured the equivalent widths of Fe II and Mg II lines in the A2667 spectrum, and obtained similar values for the same wavelength interval of the NGC 5253 spectrum. Marginal evidence for [C III] 1909 emission at the edge of the grism range further confirms our expectation.

  15. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fabrizio, M.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nonino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dall'Ora, M. [INAFOsservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Thvenin, F., E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Universit de Nice Sophia-antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ?12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U B) (B I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =2.32 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =1.82 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  16. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE VIRGO GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4636. I. SUBARU/FAINT OBJECT CAMERA AND SPECTROGRAPH SPECTROSCOPY AND DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong; Arimoto, Nobuo; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.k E-mail: masato.onodera@cea.f E-mail: naoyuki@subaru.naoj.or

    2010-01-20

    We present a spectroscopic study of the globular clusters (GCs) in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4636 in the Virgo Cluster. We selected target GC candidates using the Washington photometry derived from the deep CCD images taken at the KPNO 4 m Telescope. Then we obtained the spectra of 164 target objects in the field of NGC 4636 using the Multi-Object Spectroscopy mode of Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope. We have measured the velocities for 122 objects: 105 GCs in NGC 4636, the nucleus of NGC 4636, 11 foreground stars, two background galaxies, and three probable intracluster GCs in the Virgo Cluster. The GCs in NGC 4636 are located in the projected galactocentric radius within 10' (corresponding to 43 kpc). The measured velocities for the GCs range from approx300 km s{sup -1} to approx1600 km s{sup -1}, with a mean value of 932{sup +25}{sub -22} km s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with the velocity for the nucleus of NGC 4636, 928 +- 45 km s{sup -1}. The velocity dispersion of the GCs in NGC 4636 is derived to be 231{sup +15}{sub -17} km s{sup -1}, and the velocity dispersion of the blue GCs is slightly larger than that of the red GCs. Combining our results with data in the literature, we produce a master catalog of radial velocities for 238 GCs in NGC 4636. The velocity dispersion of the GCs in the master catalog is found to be 225{sup +12}{sub -9} km s{sup -1} for the entire sample, 251{sup +18}{sub -12} km s{sup -1} for 108 blue GCs, and 205{sup +11}{sub -13} km s{sup -1} for 130 red GCs.

  17. Accumulation of Pb and Cu heavy metals in sea water, sediment, and leaf and root tissue of Enhalus sp. in the seagrass bed of Banten Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauziah, Faiza Choesin, Devi N.

    2014-03-24

    Banten Bay in Indonesia is a coastal area which has been highly affected by human activity. Previous studies have reported the presence of lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) heavy metals in the seawater of this area. This study was conducted to measure the accumulation of Pb and Cu in seawater, sediment, leaf tissue, and root tissue of the seagrass species Enhalus sp. Sampling was conducted at two observation stations in Banten Bay: Station 1 (St.1) was located closer to the coastline and to industrial plants as source of pollution, while Station 2 (St.2) was located farther away offshore. At each station, three sampling points were established by random sampling. Field sampling was conducted at two different dates, i.e., on 29 May 2012 and 30 June 2012. Samples were processed by wet ashing using concentrated HNO{sub 3} acid and measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Accumulation of Pb was only detected in sediment samples in St.1, while Cu was detected in all samples. Average concentrations of Cu in May were as follows: sediment St.1 = 0.731 ppm, sediment St.2 = 0.383 ppm, seawater St.1 = 0.163 ppm, seawater St.2 = 0.174 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.102 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.132 ppm, root St.1= 0.139 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.075 ppm. Average measurements of Cu in June were: sediment St.1 = 0.260 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.335 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.301 ppm, root St.1= 0.047 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.060 ppm. In June, Cu was undetected in St.2 sediment and seawater at both stations. In May, Cu concentration in seawater exceeded the maximum allowable threshold for water as determined by the Ministry of the Environment. Spatial and temporal variation in Pb and Cu accumulation were most probably affected by distance from source and physical conditions of the environment (e.g., water current and mixing)

  18. FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  19. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test for non-identically distributed random variables: with application to empirical Bayes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, W.J.; Cox, D.D.; Martz, H.F.

    1997-12-01

    When using parametric empirical Bayes estimation methods for estimating the binomial or Poisson parameter, the validity of the assumed beta or gamma conjugate prior distribution is an important diagnostic consideration. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests of the beta or gamma prior hypothesis are developed for use when the binomial sample sizes or Poisson exposure times vary. Nine examples illustrate the application of the methods, using real data from such diverse applications as the loss of feedwater flow rates in nuclear power plants, the probability of failure to run on demand and the failure rates of the high pressure coolant injection systems at US commercial boiling water reactors, the probability of failure to run on demand of emergency diesel generators in US commercial nuclear power plants, the rate of failure of aircraft air conditioners, baseball batting averages, the probability of testing positive for toxoplasmosis, and the probability of tumors in rats. The tests are easily applied in practice by means of corresponding Mathematica{reg_sign} computer programs which are provided.

  20. Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, P.G.; Xiang, X.; Goldwasser, I.

    1998-07-07

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties. 58 figs.

  1. Giant magnetoresistive cobalt oxide compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  2. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  3. Giant strain with ultra-low hysteresis and high temperature stability in grain oriented lead-free K₀̣₅Bi₀̣₅TiO₃-BaTiO₃-Na₀̣₅Bi₀̣₅TiO₃ piezoelectric materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yaojin; Yan, Yongke; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight; Priya, Shashank

    2015-02-26

    We synthesized grain-oriented lead-free piezoelectric materials in (K₀̣₅Bi₀̣₅TiO₃-BaTiO₃-xNa₀̣₅Bi₀̣₅TiO₃ (KBT-BT-NBT) system with high degree of texturing along the [001]c (c-cubic) crystallographic orientation. We demonstrate giant field induced strain (~0.48%) with an ultra-low hysteresis along with enhanced piezoelectric response (d₃₃ ~ 190pC/N) and high temperature stability (~160°C). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrate smaller size highly ordered domain structure in grain-oriented specimen relative to the conventional polycrystalline ceramics. The grain oriented specimens exhibited a high degree of non-180° domain switching, in comparison to the randomly axed ones. These results indicate the effective solution to the lead-free piezoelectricmore » materials.« less

  4. Giant strain with ultra-low hysteresis and high temperature stability in grain oriented lead-free K???Bi???TiO?-BaTiO?-Na???Bi???TiO? piezoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yaojin; Yan, Yongke; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight; Priya, Shashank

    2015-02-26

    We synthesized grain-oriented lead-free piezoelectric materials in (K???Bi???TiO?-BaTiO?-xNa???Bi???TiO? (KBT-BT-NBT) system with high degree of texturing along the [001]c (c-cubic) crystallographic orientation. We demonstrate giant field induced strain (~0.48%) with an ultra-low hysteresis along with enhanced piezoelectric response (d?? ~ 190pC/N) and high temperature stability (~160C). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrate smaller size highly ordered domain structure in grain-oriented specimen relative to the conventional polycrystalline ceramics. The grain oriented specimens exhibited a high degree of non-180 domain switching, in comparison to the randomly axed ones. These results indicate the effective solution to the lead-free piezoelectric materials.

  5. Marbled murrelet abundance and breeding activity at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, and Kachemak Bay, Alaska, before and after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bird study number 6. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuletz, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The author compared pre- and post-spill abundance and breeding activity of murrelets near the Naked Island group in central Prince William Sound, and in Kachemak Bay in lower Cook Inlet. Murrelet numbers at Naked Island were lower in 1989 than in 1978-1980 but not in 1990-1992. At Kachemak Bay, where oiling was minimal, murrelet densities did not change between 1988 and 1989. The results suggest that the murrelet population at Kachemak Bay, further removed temporally and spatially from the spill epicenter, was not affected as the Naked Island populations in 1989. Murrelet numbers were negatively correlated to numbers of boats at both study sites, and cleanup activities likely contributed to disruption in 1989.

  6. Vermilion Bay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Proposed Owner Coastal Point Energy LLC Developer Coastal Point Energy LLC Location Gulf of Mexico LA Coordinates 29.741, -92.057 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ao Nuclear Power Plant reactors. The experiment is being built by blasting three kilometers of tunnel through the granite rock under the mountains where the power plants are...

  8. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community PRESENTATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Community PRESENTATION Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands November 14 - 18, 2011 Gregg Nominelli, J.D. Economic Developer BACKGROUND INFORMATION n U.S. Department of Justice - Community Capacity Development Office n Alternative & Renewable Energy Committee Established by Tribal Council n Council for Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) - Developed Strategic Energy Plan n Targeted Wind Power & Energy Efficiency U.S. Dept. of

  9. Grain size effect on the giant dielectric constant of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} nanoceramics prepared by mechanosynthesis and spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Mohamad M.; Yamada, Koji

    2014-04-21

    In the present work, CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) nanoceramics with different grain sizes were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at different temperatures (SPS-800, SPS-900, SPS-975, and SPS-1050) of the mechanosynthesized nano-powder. Structural and microstructural properties were studied by XRD and field-emission scanning electron microscope measurements. The grain size of CCTO nanoceramics increases from 80?nm to ?200?nm for the ceramics sintered at 800?C and 975?C, respectively. Further increase of SPS temperature to 1050?C leads to micro-sized ceramics of 23??m. The electrical and dielectric properties of the investigated ceramics were studied by impedance spectroscopy. Giant dielectric constant was observed in CCTO nanoceramics. The dielectric constant increases with increasing the grain size of the nanoceramics with values of 8.3??10{sup 3}, 2.4??10{sup 4}, and 3.2??10{sup 4} for SPS-800, SPS-900, and SPS-975, respectively. For the micro-sized SPS-1050 ceramics, the dielectric constant dropped to 2.14??10{sup 4}. The dielectric behavior is interpreted within the internal barrier layer capacitance picture due to the electrical inhomogeneity of the ceramics. Besides the resistive grain boundaries that are usually observed in CCTO ceramics, domain boundaries appear as a second source of internal layers in the current nanoceramics.

  10. Exploring atmospheres of hot mini-Neptune and extrasolar giant planets orbiting different stars with application to HD 97658b, WASP-12b, CoRoT-2b, XO-1b, and HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.

    2014-01-10

    We calculated an atmospheric grid for hot mini-Neptune and giant exoplanets that links astrophysical observable parametersorbital distance and stellar typewith the chemical atmospheric species expected. The grid can be applied to current and future observations to characterize exoplanet atmospheres and serves as a reference to interpret atmospheric retrieval analysis results. To build the grid, we developed a one-dimensional code for calculating the atmospheric thermal structure and linked it to a photochemical model that includes disequilibrium chemistry (molecular diffusion, vertical mixing, and photochemistry). We compare the thermal profiles and atmospheric composition of planets at different semimajor axes (0.01 AU ? a ? 0.1 AU) orbiting F, G, K, and M stars. Temperature and UV flux affect chemical species in the atmosphere. We explore which effects are due to temperature and which are due to stellar characteristics, showing the species most affected in each case. CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O are the most sensitive to UV flux, H displaces H{sub 2} as the most abundant gas in the upper atmosphere for planets receiving a high UV flux. CH{sub 4} is more abundant for cooler planets. We explore vertical mixing, to inform degeneracies on our models and in the resulting spectral observables. For lower pressures, observable species like H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2} can indicate the efficiency of vertical mixing, with larger mixing ratios for a stronger mixing. By establishing the grid, testing the sensitivity of the results, and comparing our model to published results, our paper provides a tool to estimate what observations could yield. We apply our model to WASP-12b, CoRoT-2b, XO-1b, HD189733b, and HD97658b.

  11. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 10?% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 10?% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb?. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed tomorethe change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.less

  12. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 10?% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 10?% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb?. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.

  13. Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... states of Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, and New Mexico. ... any person because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disabiUty. ...

  14. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes...

  15. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat...

  16. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with...

  17. The Rising of a Giant Collider

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University New Directions in Neutrino Physics Aspen Winter Conference, February 6, 2013 ... data in vacuum. 5 th Milestone: First physics dataset analyzed for sterile nu search. - ...

  18. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and...

  19. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly...

  20. China: A sleeping giant awakens to environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni Shaoxiang

    1995-07-01

    This article discusses the approach the Chinese government is taking to environmental issues. Included are the following topics: pollution abatement; improved rural environment by curbing the production and use of highly toxic pesticides; limiting erosion; natural reserves. Problems awaiting solutions are also discussed: air pollution (particularly coal combustion); water pollution; solid-waste pollution; rural pollution; soil erosion; desertification; soil salinization; deforestation; grassland deterioration; natural disasters.

  1. Sour gas dehydration in Mobile Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, F.C. Jr.; Lay, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    An evaluation of Mobil`s different methods of sour gas development utilized offshore and processes selected are presented with the maintenance history. The conclusions are based on field data showing past performance with a correlation made for future development and the selection criteria for dehydration.

  2. Cleveland Bay Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation Great Lakes Ohio Wind Great Lakes Energy Wind LLC Freshwater Wind LLC Cavallo Great...

  3. Old Harbor Scammon Bay Hydro Feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Petrie

    2007-06-27

    The grantee, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC), is a non-profit member owned rural electric generation and distribution cooperative. The proposed Project is located near the community of Old Harbor, Alaska. Old Harbor is on the southeastern coast of Kodiak Island, approximately 70 miles southwest of the City of Kodiak and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. In 1998 sufficient information had been developed to apply for a license to construct the project and the cost was estimated to be $2,445,000 for a 500 KW project on Lagoon Creek. Major features of the project included an eight-foot high diversion dam on Mountain Creek, a desander box, a 9,800-foot long penstock to the powerhouse on Lagoon Creek, and a 5,500-foot long access road. It was also anticipated that the project could provide an additional source of water to Old Harbor. The report details the history and lessons learned in designing and permiting the proposed hydroelectric facility.

  4. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A feasibility study was proposed for a 35 mW cogeneration plant by the Keweenaw Tribe of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The study considered the relevant aspects of fuel availability, power sales agreements, transmission requirements, and environmental studies.

  5. Clean Cities: Tampa Bay Clean Cities coalition

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    the largest transit agency in the state with revisions of their bus and rail fleet management procedures, staffed a legislatively created board charged with making policy...

  6. Bayes Method Plant Aging Risk Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-13

    DORIAN is an integrated package for performing Bayesian aging analysis of reliability data; e.g. for identifying trends in component failure rates and/or outage durations as a function of time. The user must specify several alternatives hypothesized aging models (i.e. possible trends) along with prior probabilities indicating the subjective probability that each trend is actually the correct one. DORIAN then uses component failure and/or repair data over time to update these prior probabilities and develop amore »posterior probability for each aging model, representing the probability that each model is the correct one in light of the observed data rather than a priori. Mean, median, and 5th and 95th percentile trends are also compiled from the posterior probabilities.« less

  7. Bristol Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "b" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test Comment:...

  8. Massachusetts Bay Trans Auth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NPCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  9. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  10. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  11. Coiled tubing 1994 update: Expanding applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, M.E.

    1994-06-01

    The coiled tubing (CT) resurgence, which began in late 1989 shows little sign of moderating in spite of lower oil and gas prices. In fact, this so-called revolution continues to expand into major new services and applications. CT units are replacing workover rigs and snubbing units in some areas and have recently started to replace drilling rigs even outside Alaska's North Slope Prudhoe Bay field. Activity is reaching record levels in many areas. Although drilling, completions and flowlines generate a lot of interest, these are currently only a small part of total CT business. About 75% of activity is split evenly between nitrogen, acidizing and cleanouts. The other 25% includes newer services like cementing, fishing, sliding sleeves, logging, underreaming to remove scale or cement and drilling. CT is used to drill slimholes and reentry drainholes up to 6 1/8-in. CT has been used as casing and more casing applications are planned. CT ODs to 3 1/2-in. are produced and 4 1/2-in. OD CT production is scheduled later this year. Larger ODs make CT feasible for replacing conventional jointed tubing and welded flowlines.

  12. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  13. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J.L. ); Whitlow, R.R. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that pulling tubing to clean out a production liner at Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBU WOA) averages $600,000 to $800,000. Coiled tubing underreaming was developed to accomplish this objective at lower costs. Beginning in 1988, these operations have been improved through several generations of procedures and tool designs. Using current technology, the underreamer, in conjunction with coiled tubing, can reduce the cost of drilling out to a liner to about $50,000 or $100,000, depending on the amount and type of material to be removed. PBU WOA, operated by BP Exploration, produces about 600,000 bopd from 395 wells. Another 61 wells are used to inject produced water, seawater and miscible fluids. Most of the remedial well servicing operations are conducted using coiled tubing (CT). Three contract coiled tubing units (CTUs) work daily, performing wellbore cleanouts, stimulations, inflatable bridge plug installations and cement squeeze operations. About 42 underreaming jobs were performed from 1990 to 1991 at PBU WOA for an average cost of between $75,000 and $100,000, a cost savings of $500,000 power well compared to pulling tubing and cleaning out the wells conventionally.

  14. Field Exploration of Methane Seep Near Atqasuk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katey Walter, Dennis Witmer, Gwen Holdmann

    2008-12-31

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

  15. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  16. "Giant" nanocrystal quantum dots for light-emission applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: Energy Sciences; Material Science; Applied Life Science(60); Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization(32); Materials Science(36); Nanoscience & ...

  17. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this article, terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric thin-film BiFeO3 while monitoring the time-dependent ferroelectric polarization through...

  18. Giant switchable photovoltaic effect in organometal trihalide perovskite devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Dong, Qingfeng; Bi, Cheng; Sharma, Pankaj; Gruverman, Alexei; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-08

    Organolead trihalide perovskite (OTP) materials are emerging as naturally abundant materials for low-cost, solution-processed and highly efficient solar cells. Here, we show that, in OTP-based photovoltaic devices with vertical and lateral cell configurations, the photocurrent direction can be switched repeatedly by applying a small electric field of <1 V μm–1. The switchable photocurrent, generally observed in devices based on ferroelectric materials, reached 20.1 mA cm–2 under one sun illumination in OTP devices with a vertical architecture, which is four orders of magnitude larger than that measured in other ferroelectric photovoltaic devices. This field-switchable photovoltaic effect can be explained by themore » formation of reversible p–i–n structures induced by ion drift in the perovskite layer. Furthermore, the demonstration of switchable OTP photovoltaics and electric-field-manipulated doping paves the way for innovative solar cell designs and for the exploitation of OTP materials in electrically and optically readable memristors and circuits.« less

  19. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this article, terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Advanced Materials; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 41 ...

  20. Giant switchable photovoltaic effect in organometal trihalide perovskite devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Dong, Qingfeng; Bi, Cheng; Sharma, Pankaj; Gruverman, Alexei; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-08

    Organolead trihalide perovskite (OTP) materials are emerging as naturally abundant materials for low-cost, solution-processed and highly efficient solar cells. Here, we show that, in OTP-based photovoltaic devices with vertical and lateral cell configurations, the photocurrent direction can be switched repeatedly by applying a small electric field of <1 V ?m1. The switchable photocurrent, generally observed in devices based on ferroelectric materials, reached 20.1 mA cm2 under one sun illumination in OTP devices with a vertical architecture, which is four orders of magnitude larger than that measured in other ferroelectric photovoltaic devices. This field-switchable photovoltaic effect can be explained by the formation of reversible pin structures induced by ion drift in the perovskite layer. Furthermore, the demonstration of switchable OTP photovoltaics and electric-field-manipulated doping paves the way for innovative solar cell designs and for the exploitation of OTP materials in electrically and optically readable memristors and circuits.

  1. EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. The new hydropower generator would interconnect to Western's transmission system at an existing...

  2. Giant Leap Forward Toward Quality Assurance of PV Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.

    2012-03-01

    The presentation describes the composition of and motivation for the International PV QA Task Force, then describes the presentations and discussion that occurred at the workshop on Feb. 29th, 2012.

  3. "Giant" nanocrystal quantum dots for light-emission applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: Energy Sciences; Material Science; Applied Life Science(60); Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization(32); Materials Science(36); Nanoscience &...

  4. Giant Anaharmonic Phonon Scattering in PbTe (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: solar (photovoltaic), solar (thermal), solid state lighting, phonons, thermal conductivity, thermoelectric, ...

  5. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized "Giant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient light emitters for applications from single-particle tracking to solid-state lighting. ...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | July 30, 2014: Giant electromag...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jpeg images. When using these images, please credit each photo as indicated. Med Res | Hi Res The 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet at rest inside the Fermilab building that...

  7. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  8. Giant room-temperature spin caloritronics in spin-semiconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of...

  9. Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the space in which the solenoid fits - the hole in the middle of the doughnut-shaped tokamak - is relatively small and limits the size and strength of the solenoid. A clear...

  10. Local government: The sleeping giant in electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, S.

    1997-11-01

    Public power has long been a cornerstone of consumer leverage in the electric industry. But its foundation consists of a much broader and deeper consumer authority. Understanding that authority - and present threats to it - is critical to restructuring of the electric industry as well as to the future of public power. The country has largely forgotten the role that local governments have played and continue to play in the development of the electric industry. Moreover, we risk losing sight of the options local governments may offer to protect consumers, to advance competition in the marketplace, and to enhance opportunities for technology and economic development. The future role of local government is one of the most important issues in the restructuring discussion. The basic authority of consumers rests at the local level. The resulting options consumers have to act as more than just respondents to private brokers and telemarketing calls are at the local level. And the ability for consumers to shape the marketplace and standards for what it will offer exists at the local level as well.

  11. Bay Hill, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hill, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.4680604, -81.5161839 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  12. Bay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.1805306, -85.684578 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  13. East Bay Municipal Util Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This article is a stub. You...

  14. EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    prepared, with DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve estuary...

  15. MHK Projects/Whiskey Bay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Butte la Rose, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  16. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SUMMARY The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS...

  17. Trestle Bay Restoration Project Draft Feasibility Study and Draft

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Local Operating Procedures for Endangered Species to Administer Stream Restoration and Fish Passage Improvement Actions Authorized or Carried Out by the U.S. Army Corps of...

  18. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-06-14

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. In addition, this allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. Amore » time-correlated measurement of Am–Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.« less

  19. Location and identification of radioactive waste in Massachusetts Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, D.P.; Louft, H.L.

    1993-12-31

    The accurate location and identification of hazardous waste materials dumped in the world`s oceans are becoming an increasing concern. For years, the oceans have been viewed as a convenient and economical place to dispose of all types of waste. In all but a few cases, major dump sites have been closed leaving behind years of accumulated debris. The extent of past environmental damage, the possibility of continued environmental damage, and the possibility of hazardous substances reaching the human food chain need to be carefully investigated. This paper reports an attempt to accurately locate and identify the radioactive component of the waste material. The Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), provided the precision navigation system and prototype underwater radiological monitoring equipment that were used during this project. The paper also describes the equipment used, presents the data obtained, and discusses future equipment development.

  20. MHK Projects/Swansea Bay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The proposed project will be located one mile offshore and will measure five square kilometers in area. WS Atkins has conducted a feasibility study on the proposed project and...

  1. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 23.206 requires Federal agencies to insert the ... Also, T5HO lamp operation is optimized at a higher ambient temperature than it is for T8s; ...

  2. JLab Scientist Discusses Higgs Announcement (Tampa Bay Online) | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab www2.tbo.com/news/opinion/2012/jul/16/naopino1-no-cause-for-envy-in-higgs-boson-find-ar-432383/ Submitted: Monday, July 16, 2012 - 12

  3. Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Features: Relict Geothermal Features: Volcanic Age: Host Rock Age: Host Rock Lithology: Cap Rock Age: Cap Rock Lithology: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Geofluid...

  4. Photo of the Week: The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    detector. Neutrinos and antineutrinos are neutral particles produced in nuclear beta decay when neutrons turn into protons. This experiment aims to measure the final...

  5. Trestle Bay Restoration Project Final Feasibility Study and Environmen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Nesting begins in late March and continues into June and consists of a shallow depression built in the open or near a grass clump and lined with fine dead grasses. The streaked ...

  6. Hot Springs Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Environmental Issues Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Exploration History First Discovery Well Completion Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow...

  7. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  8. Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the diluted spring waters suggest that the diluting water is old. Authors J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser and W. C. Evans Published Journal Journal...

  9. NIF Construction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF Construction After careful preparation, a giant rotating crane lifted the NIF target chamber and gently placed it in the Target Bay, a breathtaking event that took only about 30 minutes. Building the World's Largest Laser Planning for NIF began in the early 1990s, and ground was broken on May 29, 1997. Energy Secretary Federico Peña said at the groundbreaking: "NIF will unleash the power of the heavens to make Earth a better place." To prepare the site for construction, more than

  10. Italy - Adriatic Sea - Barbara - A giant gas field marked by seismic velocity anomaly - A subtle trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianniello, A.; Bolelli, W.; Di Scala, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Barbara gas field, discovered in 1971, is located in the northern sector of the Adriatic offshore. The field is a gentle anticline involving Quaternary clastic sediments and shaped by carbonate Mesozoic morphology. The presence of shallow gas pockets at the crest of the structure distort the seismic signal to such an extent that structural reconstruction using seismic data is not possible. Moreover, time delays and ray-path anomalies do not allow the use of staking velocities for the depth conversion. Seismic attribute analysis, instead of velocities, and time delays on the isochrone maps are providing a key to the understanding of seismic anomalies and are an indirect tool for reconstructing the real structural configuration of the field. The appraisal story of the field illustrates how the previously mentioned complications influenced its delineation and how an understanding of these complications helped in upgrading the reserves from an initial value of 10 billion ECM of gas to 40 billion ECM. Additional data acquired with the development wells tend to increase the estimate. Therefore, Barbara field is the most important Italian gas field of the decade. The producing formation is composed of very thin-bedded sandstone and shale intercalations, representing the peculiarity of this reservoir. Development of the field is being achieved with six production platforms and 72 wells.

  11. Nano-electromechanical rotation of graphene and giant enhancement in dielectric anisotropy in a liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rajratan Kinnamon, Daniel; Garvey, Alfred

    2015-05-18

    A nematic liquid crystal (LC) is doped with dilute concentrations of pristine monolayer graphene (GP) flakes, and the LC + GP hybrids are found to exhibit a dramatic increase in the dielectric anisotropy. Electric field-dependent conductance studies reveal that the graphene flakes follow the nematic director that mechanically rotates on increasing an applied electric field. Further studies show that the ?? electron stacking, between the graphene's honeycomb structure and the LC's benzene rings, stabilizes pseudo-nematic domains that collectively amplify the dielectric anisotropy by improving the orientational order parameter in the nematic phase. These anisotropic domains interact with the external electric field, resulting in a nonzero dielectric anisotropy in the isotropic phase as well. The enhancement in dielectric anisotropy, due to the LCgraphene coupling, is found to have subsequent positive impacts on the LC's orientational threshold field and elasticity that allows the nematic director to respond quicker on switching the electric field off.

  12. Progress Report 2011: Understanding compound phase transitions in Heusler alloy giant magnetocaloric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane Stadler

    2011-12-13

    Our goal is to gain insight into the fundamental physics that is responsible for magnetocaloric effects (MCE) and related properties at the atomic level. We are currently conducting a systematic study on the effects of atomic substitutions in Ni2MnGa-based alloys, and also exploring related full- and half-Heusler alloys, for example Ni-Mn-X (X=In, Sn, Sb), that exhibit a wide variety of interesting and potentially useful physical phenomena. It is already known that the magnetocaloric effect in the Heusler alloys is fundamentally connected to other interesting phenomena such as shape-memory properties. And the large magnetic entropy change in Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25Ga has been attributed to the coupling of the first-order, martensitic transition with the second-order ferromagneticâ??paramagnetic (FM-PM) transition. Our research to this point has focused on understanding the fundamental physics at the origin of these complex, compound phase transitions, and the novel properties that emerge. We synthesize the materials using a variety of techniques, and explore their material properties through structural, magnetic, transport, and thermo-magnetic measurements.

  13. Point matching: A new electronic method for homogenizing the phase characteristics of giant magnetoimpedance sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, E. Costa Gusmo, L. A. P.; Barbosa, C. R. Hall; Leipner, Y.; Fortaleza, L. G. S.; Monteiro, E. Costa

    2014-08-15

    Recently, our research group at PUC-Rio discovered that magnetic transducers based on the impedance phase characteristics of GMI sensors have the potential to multiply by one hundred the sensitivity values when compared to magnitude-based GMI transducers. Those GMI sensors can be employed in the measurement of ultra-weak magnetic fields, which intensities are even lower than the environmental magnetic noise. A traditional solution for cancelling the electromagnetic noise and interference makes use of gradiometric configurations, but the performance is strongly tied to the homogeneity of the sensing elements. This paper presents a new method that uses electronic circuits to modify the equivalent impedance of the GMI samples, aiming at homogenizing their phase characteristics and, consequently, improving the performance of gradiometric configurations based on GMI samples. It is also shown a performance comparison between this new method and another homogenization method previously developed.

  14. Condensation of refractory metals in asymptotic giant branch and other stellar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwander, D.; Berg, T.; Schnhense, G.; Ott, U.

    2014-09-20

    The condensation of material from a gas of solar composition has been extensively studied, but less so condensation in the environment of evolved stars, which has been mainly restricted to major compounds and some specific element groups such as the Rare Earth elements. Also of interest, however, are refractory metals like Mo, Ru, Os, W, Ir, and Pt, which may condense to form refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) like the ones that have been found in association with presolar graphite. We have performed calculations describing the condensation of these elements in the outflows of s-process enriched AGB stars as well as from gas enriched in r-process products. While in carbon-rich environments (C > O), the formation of carbides is expected to consume W, Mo, and V (Lodders and Fegley), the condensation sequence for the other refractory metals under these conditions does not significantly differ from the case of a cooling gas of solar composition. The composition in detail, however, is significantly different due to the completely different source composition. Condensation from an r-process enriched source differs less from the solar case. Elemental abundance ratios of the refractory metals can serve as a guide for finding candidate presolar grains among the RMNs in primitive meteoritesmost of which have a solar system originfor confirmation by isotopic analysis. We apply our calculations to the case of the four RMNs found by Croat et al., which may very well be presolar.

  15. A giant dune-dammed lake on the North Platte River, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinehart, J.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.); Loope, D.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The recent work in the Nebraska Sand Hills, just north of the North Platte Valley, has revealed the presence of numerous dune dams--sites where eolian sand has filled Pleistocene paleovalleys and caused the formation of lake basins containing abundant small, interdunal lakes. Although the Platte River is considered the southern margin of the Sand Hills, there is a 1,200 sq km triangular area of large dunes in Lincoln County just south of the South Platte. The authors hypothesize that large dunes migrated southward to fill the North Platte Valley during glacial maximum when both the North and South Platte were dry. As Rocky Mountain snowmelt and Great Plains precipitation increased during deglaciation, a single 65 km-long, 15 km-wide, 50 m-deep lake formed behind the massive dune dam. The tentative chronology suggests that the lake was in existence for at least several thousand years. They have not yet found compelling evidence of catastrophic flooding downstream of the former lake. Evidence of two large Quaternary lakes on the White Nile between Khartoum and Malakal (Sudan) was discovered in the 1960's. Shoreline deposits indicate the lakes were 400--600 km long and up to 50 km wide. Although the lakes have been attributed to repeated blockage of the White Nile by clay-rich Blue Nile deposits, the distribution and age of dune sand near the confluence of these rivers suggest that, as in the Nebraska example, the course of the White Nile was blocked by dunes when the region was desiccated in the Late Pleistocene. Lakes behind permeable dams rise to a level where input equals output. Earthen dams are vulnerable to overtopping and piping. The relatively high permeability of dune sand prevents or delays overtopping, and piping is prevented by the extremely high low hydraulic gradients that typify extant sand dams.

  16. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarete, F.; Figueredo, E.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Blum, R. D.; Conti, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Spectrophotometric distances in the K band have been reported by different authors for a number of obscured Galactic H II regions. Almost 50% of them show large discrepancies compared to the classical method using radial velocities measured in the radio spectral region. In order to provide a crucial test of both methods, we selected a target that does not present particular difficulty for any method and which has been measured by as many techniques as possible. The W3 star-forming complex, located in the Perseus arm, offers a splendid opportunity for such a task. We used the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope to classify candidate 'naked photosphere' OB stars based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Two of the targets are revealed to be mid-O-type main-sequence stars leading to a distance of d = 2.20 kpc. This is in excellent agreement with the spectrophotometric distance derived in the optical band (d = 2.18 pc) and with a measurement of the W3 trigonometric parallax (d = 1.95 kpc). Such results confirm that the spectrophotometric distances in the K band are reliable. The radio-derived kinematic distance, on the contrary, gives a distance twice as large (d = 4.2 kpc). This indicates that this region of the Perseus arm does not follow the Galactic rotation curve, and this may also be the case for other H II regions for which discrepancies have been found.

  17. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  18. Giant Nanocrystal Quantum Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dots as Stable and Efficient Down-Conversion Phosphor for LED based Solid State Lighting Kundu, Janardan Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ghosh, Yagnaseni Los Alamos...

  19. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO...

  20. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject:...

  1. Giant increase in critical current density of KxFe2-ySe₂ single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2011-12-28

    The critical current density Jabc of KxFe2-ySe₂ single crystals can be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude, up to ~2.1×10⁴ A/cm² by the post annealing and quenching technique. A scaling analysis reveals the universal behavior of the normalized pinning force as a function of the reduced field for all temperatures, indicating the presence of a single vortex pinning mechanism. The main pinning sources are three-dimensional (3D) point-like normal cores. The dominant vortex interaction with pinning centers is via spatial variations in critical temperature Tc (“δTc pinning”).

  2. SECRETLY ECCENTRIC: THE GIANT PLANET AND ACTIVITY CYCLE OF GJ 328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Boss, Alan P.

    2013-09-10

    We announce the discovery of a {approx}2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s{sup -1}. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  3. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XX. A SOLITARY ICE-GIANT PLANET ORBITING HD 102365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-02-01

    We present 12 years of precision Doppler data for the very nearby G3 star HD 102365, which reveals the presence of a Neptune-like planet with a 16.0 M{sub Earth} minimum mass in a 122.1 day orbit. Very few 'Super Earth' planets have been discovered to date in orbits this large and those that have been found reside in multiple systems of between three and six planets. HD 102365 b, in contrast, appears to orbit its star in splendid isolation. Analysis of the residuals to our Keplerian fit for HD 102365 b indicates that there are no other planets with minimum mass above 0.3 M{sub Jup} orbiting within 5 AU and no other 'Super Earths' more massive than 10 M{sub Earth} orbiting at periods shorter than 50 days. At periods of less than 20 days these limits drop to as low as 6 M{sub Earth}. There are now 32 exoplanets known with minimum mass below 20 M{sub Earth}, and interestingly the period distributions of these low-mass planets seem to be similar whether they orbit M-, K-, or G-type dwarfs.

  4. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC6388

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Origlia, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Cirasuolo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh and STFC, UK Astronomy Technology Center Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, EH9 3HJ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 1.5 km s{sup 1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ?9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  5. Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    than the only two previous events, making this flare a once in a century event. This colossal energy release likely occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the...

  6. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dependence of the freezing temperature to the critical slowing down model and Vogel-Fulcher law strongly suggest the formation of cluster glass in the Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) system. ...

  7. Yields of photoneutron reactions on {sup 197}Au nuclei in the giant-dipole-resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kurilik, A. S.; Stopani, K. A.; Troschiev, S. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    Yields of photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were measured in a beam of bremsstrahlung photons, the endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung spectrum being 29.1 MeV. These measurements were performed by means of the gamma-activation procedure. The results obtained in this way were compared with the results of earlier experiments and theoretical calculations.

  8. Bound free electron-positron pair production accompanied by giant dipole resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.

    2011-01-15

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), for example, virtual photons produce many particles. At small impact parameters where the colliding nuclei make peripheral collisions, photon fluxes are very large and these are responsible for the multiple photonuclear interactions. Free pair productions, bound free pair productions, and nuclear Coulomb excitations are important examples of such interactions, and these processes play important roles in the beam luminosity at RHIC and LHC. Here we obtained the impact parameter dependence of bound free pair production cross sections and by using this probability we obtained bound free electron-positron pair production with nuclear breakup for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We also compared our results to the other calculations.

  9. Photonuclear reactions on mercury isotopes in the region of the giant-dipole-resonance energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Troschiev, S. Yu.

    2011-05-15

    The induced-activity method is used to measure yields of photonuclear reactions induced in stable mercury isotopes by beams of bremsstrahlung photons whose spectra have the endpoint energies of 19.5 and 29.1 MeV. On the basis of a collective model, the partial cross sections and yields are calculated for photoproton and photoneutron reactions on these isotopes. The yields calculated theoretically are compared with their measured counterparts. The possibility for the production in photonuclear reactions of the bypassed nucleus {sup 196}Hg, which cannot be formed in astrophysical r and s processes, is analyzed.

  10. Giant magnetoelastic distortions of the crystal structure of the weakly anisotropic compound UFe/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, Y.F.; Levitin, R.Z.; Zeleny, M.; Deryagin, A.V.; Andreev, A.V.

    1980-06-01

    We investigate the temperature dependences of the crystal-lattice parameters, of the anisotropy, and of the Young's modulus of the intermetallide compound UFe/sub 2/. The contribution of the uranium ions to the magnetic moment of this compound is negligible (..mu../sub U/=0.06..mu../sub B/), owing to the almoft complete delocalization of the uranium 5f electrons. The measured magnetic anisotropy is relatively small (K/sub 1/approx. =-10/sup 6/ erg/cm/sup 3/ at 0 K). However, the transition to the magnetically ordered state (T/sub c/=170 K) is accompanied by large rhombohedral distortions of the UFe/sub 2/ crystal structure and by a considerable anomaly of the Young's modulus, thus attesting to a large value of the magnetoelastic interaction in this compound (..delta..K/sub 1/ /sup m/eapprox. =-8 x 10/sup 6/ erg/cm/sup 3/).

  11. Plasmonic giant quantum dots: Hybrid nanostructures for truly simultaneous optical imaging, photothermal effect and thermometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karan, Niladri S.; Keller, Aaron M.; Sampat, Siddharth; Roslyak, Oleksiy; Arefin, Ayesha; Hanson, Christina J.; Casson, Joanna L.; Desireddy, Anil; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Piryatinski, Andrei; et al

    2015-02-09

    Hybrid semiconductor–metal nanoscale constructs are of both fundamental and practical interest. Semiconductor nanocrystals are active emitters of photons when stimulated optically, while the interaction of light with nanosized metal objects results in scattering and ohmic damping due to absorption. In a combined structure, the properties of both components can be realized together. At the same time, metal–semiconductor coupling may intervene to modify absorption and/or emission processes taking place in the semiconductor, resulting in a range of effects from photoluminescence quenching to enhancement. We show here that photostable ‘giant’ quantum dots when placed at the center of an ultrathin gold shellmore » retain their key optical property of bright and blinking-free photoluminescence, while the metal shell imparts efficient photothermal transduction. The latter is despite the highly compact total particle size (40–60 nm “inorganic” diameter and <100 nm hydrodynamic diameter) and the very thin nature of the optically transparent Au shell. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the quantum dot emission to local temperature provides a novel internal thermometer for recording temperature during infrared irradiation-induced photothermal heating.« less

  12. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SLAC) US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) United States 2014-11-20 English Journal Article Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal...

  13. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  14. Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text This content will become publicly...

  15. Waking the sleeping giant: Introducing new heat exchanger technology into the residential air-conditioning marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapp, T.; Voss, M.; Stephens, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Air Conditioning Industry has made tremendous strides in improvements to the energy efficiency and reliability of its product offerings over the past 40 years. These improvement can be attributed to enhancements of components, optimization of the energy cycle, and modernized and refined manufacturing techniques. During this same period, energy consumption for space cooling has grown significantly. In January of 1992, the minimum efficiency requirement for central air conditioning equipment was raised to 10 SEER. This efficiency level is likely to increase further under the auspices of the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA). A new type of heat exchanger was developed for air conditioning equipment by Modine Manufacturing Company in the early 1990's. Despite significant advantages in terms of energy efficiency, dehumidification, durability, and refrigerant charge there has been little interest expressed by the air conditioning industry. A cooperative effort between Modine, various utilities, and several state energy offices has been organized to test and demonstrate the viability of this heat exchanger design throughout the nation. This paper will review the fundamentals of heat exchanger design and document this simple, yet novel technology. These experiences involving equipment retrofits have been documented with respect to the performance potential of air conditioning system constructed with PF{trademark} Heat Exchangers (generically referred to as microchannel heat exchangers) from both an energy efficiency as well as a comfort perspective. The paper will also detail the current plan to introduce 16 to 24 systems into an extended field test throughout the US which commenced in the Fall of 1997.

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bay The 66-acre (26.7 ha) Cypress Bay Set-Aside includes Cypress Bay (also called Bay 92); a 200-meter buffer of maturing loblolly pines (Pinus taeda); and portions of Bay 91 and...

  17. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mona Bay and Woodward Bay Woodward (on left) and Mona The 156.7-acre (63.4 ha) Mona BayWoodward Bay Set-Aside is an isolated assemblage of three Carolina bays (temporary ponds),...

  18. Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney

    2007-07-15

    The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

  19. Review of the findings of the Ignik Sikumi CO2-CH4 gas hydrate exchange field trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Boswell, Ray; Collett, Tim S.; Farrell, Helen; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; White, Mark D.

    2014-08-01

    The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Trial was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope (ANS) during 2011 and 2012. The 2011 field program included drilling the vertical test well and performing extensive wireline logging through a thick section of gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs that provided substantial new insight into the nature of ANS gas hydrate occurrences. The 2012 field program involved an extended, scientific field trial conducted within a single vertical well (huff-and-puff design) through three primary operational phases: 1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; 2) flowback conducted at down-hole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4-hydrate, and 3) extended (30-days) flowback at pressures below the stability threshold of native CH4-hydrate. Ignik Sikumi represents the first field investigation of gas hydrate response to chemical injection, and the longest-duration field reservoir response experiment yet conducted. Full descriptions of the operations and data collected have been fully reported by ConocoPhillips and are available to the science community. The 2011 field program indicated the presence of free water within the gas hydrate reservoir, a finding with significant implications to the design of the exchange trial most notably the use of a mixed gas injectant. While this decision resulted in a complex chemical environment within the reservoir that greatly tests current experimental and modeling capabilities without such a mixture, it is apparent that injection could not have been achieved. While interpretation of the field data are continuing, the primary scientific findings and implications of the program are: 1) gas hydrate destabilizing is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for uncontrolled destabilization; 2) wells must be carefully designed to enable rapid remediation of well-bore blockages that will occur during any cessation in operations; 3) appropriate gas mixes can be successfully injected into hydrate-bearing reservoirs; 4) sand production can be well-managed through standard engineering controls; 5) reservoir heat exchange during depressurization was much more favorable than expected mitigating concerns for near-well-bore freezing and enabling consideration of more aggressive pressure reduction and; 6) CO2-CH4 exchange can be accomplished in natural reservoirs. The next steps in evaluation of exchange technology should feature multiple well applications; however such field programs will require extensive preparatory experimental and numerical modeling studies and will likely be a secondary priority to further field testing of production through depressurization.

  20. QER- Comment of Bay Area Biosolids to Energy Coalition (BAB2E)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Accept the attached written comments as submitted to the: Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on Public Meeting "Water-Energy Nexus, June 19, 2014, Washington DC Please let me know that you received the comments and that they will be put on the record for this comment period Thank You Paul

  1. Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  2. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The visit builds on President Obama's State of the Union address last week, where President Obama presented a new era for American energy and outlined a blueprint for an American ...

  3. MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mooringanchoring and electrical connection system; (2) a 3.7-statute-mile-long, direct current (DC) submarine transmission cable connecting from one of the AquaBuOY's...

  4. Preparation of Gd Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yayun; Zhang Zhiyong

    2010-05-12

    Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is an excellent target material for reactor antineutrino experiments. Ideal Gd-LS should have long attenuation length, high light yield, long term stability, low toxicity, and should be compatible with the material used to build the detector. We have developed a new Gd-LS recipe in which carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as the complexing ligand to gadolinium, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS has been synthesized and tested in a prototype detector. Results show that the Gd-LS has high quality and is suitable for underground experiments in large quantity. Large scale production facility has been built. A full batch production of 4 t Gd-LS has been produced and monitored for several months. The production of 180 t Gd-LS will be carried out in the near future.

  5. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities.

  6. MHK Projects/General Sullivan and Little Bay BRI | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13503 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  7. MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  8. Materials Data on BaY2O4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  10. MHK Projects/Ocean Energy Galway Bay IE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at the Irish Marine Institute-run test site in the waters off Galway, Ireland. Ocean Energy conducted a 2006-2007 winter sea trial on its 28 ton OEBuoy prototype at the Irish...

  11. MHK Projects/Coos Bay OPT Wave Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transit lanes. Each of the four array clusters consists of 50 PowerBuoys. Each array cluster is approximately 5,577 feet long (1,700 meters) by 984 feet wide (300 meters). The...

  12. Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Preparatory Commission Visits NNSA's Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) for First Time NNSA sites take home 15...

  13. MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Main Overseeing Organization UEK Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesUnderwater Electric Kite Turbines Project Timeline and Milestones *712010 Scale bearing...

  14. Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    storage challenge | National Nuclear Security Administration national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library

  15. FEMP ESPC Success Story - U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The project will not only save taxpayers 1.2 million in annual energy costs, but will also save 650,000 gallons of diesel fuel and reduce air pollution by 26 tons of SO 2 and 15 ...

  16. Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at 3 million per year for three years, ... The consortium will address the gaps in solid-state hydrogen storage by leveraging recent ...

  17. EA-1916: Notice of Availability of a Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine

  18. EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine

  19. EA-1916: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine

  20. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  1. Giant magnetocaloric effect in magnetoelectric Eu{sub 1-x}Ba{sub x}TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubi, Km; Kumar, Pawan; Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chen, Ruofan; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Mahendiran, R.

    2014-01-20

    We report the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub m}) in magnetoelectric Eu{sub 1-x}Ba{sub x}TiO{sub 3} for 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.9. We find −ΔS{sub m} = 11 (40) J/kg·K in x = 0.1 for a field change of 1 (5) T, respectively, which is the largest value among all Eu-based oxides. ΔS{sub m} arises from the field-induced suppression of the spin entropy of Eu{sup 2+}:4f{sup 7} localized moments. While ∣−ΔS{sub m}∣ decreases with increasing x, ∣−ΔS{sub m}∣ = 6.58 J/kg·K observed in the high spin diluted composition x = 0.9 is larger than that in many manganites. Our results indicate that these magnetoelectrics are potential candidates for cryogenic magnetic refrigeration.

  2. Sample dependence of giant magnetocaloric effect in a cluster-glass system Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoizumi, Saori Tamaki, Akira; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Terada, Noriki; Tamura, Ryo; Dönni, Andreas; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Morita, Kengo

    2015-05-07

    In order to investigate the effect of vacancy on the magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}, we have carried out X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements in the rare-earth intermetallic compound Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2}(−0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). The maximum magnetic entropy change −ΔS{sub m}{sup max}, the maximum adiabatic temperature change ΔT{sub ad}{sup max}, and the relative cooling power of Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2} take large values at x = 0−0.4 for the field change of 5 T. The paramagnetic Curie temperature θ{sub p} increases with an increase of x. This fact suggests that the enhancement of ferromagnetic coupling among the correlated spins leads to the increase of magnetocaloric effect.

  3. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool, SNL - SWAN, was used to perform model simulations for hourly initial wave conditio ns measured during the month of October 2009. The model was run with an array of 50 wave energy converters (WECs) and compared with model runs without WECs. Maximum changes in H s were found in the lee of the WEC array along the angles of incident wave dire ction and minimal changes were found along the western side of the model domain due to wave shadowing by land. The largest wave height reductions occurred during observed typhoon conditions and resulted in 14% decreases in H s along the Santa Cruz shoreline . Shoreline reductions in H s were 5% during s outh swell wave conditions and negligible during average monthly wave conditions.

  4. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  5. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  6. 105 K East and 105 K West fuel transfer bay crane use strategy for spent nuclear fuel path-forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ard, K.E.

    1996-04-02

    The purpose of this document is to outline the K Basins 30 ton crane qualification strategy for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project fuel relocation campaign.

  7. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Presentation - Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Community PRESENTATION Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands November 18, 2009 Gregg Nominelli, J.D. Economic Developer BACKGROUND INFORMATION  U.S. Department of Justice  Tribal Council formed Committee for Alternative & Renewable Energy  Council for Energy Resource Tribes  Targeted Wind Power Development & Energy Efficiency U.S. Department of Justice  Weed & Seed Program  Community Capacity

  8. Nuclear Structure - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Structure depiction of giant resonance modes (ref. Xinfeng Chen, "Giant Resonance Study By 6Li Scattering" Nuclear structure studies at the Institute explore a wide range...

  9. TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Invited Talk, 7 th International Topical Conference on Giant Resonances, Osaka, Japan (2000). Giant Monopole Resonance and Nuclear Matter Compressibility, D. H. Youngblood,...

  10. Property:Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    @Ventures (California) + Bay Area + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + Greater Boston Area + A A1 Sun, Inc. + Bay Area + A10 Power + Bay Area + A123 Systems + Greater Boston Area + A2BE...

  11. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to...

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainbow Bay Amphibian Reserve This 87.5-acre (35.4 ha) Set-Aside Area is comprised of Rainbow Bay, a 200-m forested buffer area that encircles the entire bay, and a wedge-shaped...

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Craig's Pond and Sarracenia Bay Sarracenia Bay (upper left) and Craig's Pond The 142.9-acre (57.84 ha) Craigs Pond and Sarracenia Bay Set-Aside contains the paired Craigs Pond...

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thunder Bay This 82.2-acre (33.3 ha) Set-Aside is comprised of the semi-permanent, open-water, herbaceous Carolina bay Thunder Bay and a partial 200-m buffer area containing...

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road 6 Bay This 83.7-acre (33.9 ha) Set-Aside is comprised of the largely forested bay-like depression Road 6 Bay and a partial 200-m buffer of different-aged pine plantations....

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 Ellenton Bay Ellenton Bay Field 3-412 The Field 3-412Ellenton Bay Set-Aside Area was one of the areas on the SRS selected for ecological studies in the early 1950's by...

  17. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a true Carolina bay. Historically, Steel Creek Bay was selected for aquatic ecology research because it is bay-like in hydrology and function and it represented a...

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  19. Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station, Alaska Kodiak, Alaska Larsen Bay, Alaska Old Harbor, Alaska Ouzinkie, Alaska Port Lions, Alaska Womens Bay, Alaska Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  20. Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Facility (SIF) that will provide six instrument bays, sample preparation space, control rooms, and staff support space. The instrument bays will provide vibration isolation,...