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Sample records for gi suk hwang

  1. Dr. J. G. Hwang, President Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T Opt.U.S. Department of Energy 4P - P.O. Box 450, MSIN 1-6-60 Richland, Washington 99352 AP R 0 5 U I, , 1 0-ESQ-092 Dr. J. G. Hwang, President Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. P.O. Box 250 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Dr. Hwang: CONTRACT NO. DE-AC27-1I0RV 15051 - DE MINIMIS CHANGES TO THE HANFORD ANALYTICAL SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT (H-ASQARD) Compliance with the HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68, is required by your Contract [Section J, Attachment 1].

  2. Bob Hwang Director, Transportation Energy Center Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bob Hwang Director, Transportation Energy Center Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA Combustion Research Facility - Industry Interactions and Impact 2 Albuquerque, New Mexico Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas Kauai, Hawaii Livermore, California Tonopah, Nevada Sandia Sites CRF - Understanding Combustion Processes A Clearly Defined Partnership Mission from the Beginning * Born out of gasoline crises of 1970's - created in 1980 * Built to tap

  3. GI Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Munich, Bavaria, Germany Zip: 80805 Product: Strategic Equity Partner for mid-sized enterprises and entrepreneurs. References: GI Ventures1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  4. GI Power Corporation Limited GIPCL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip: 110020 Sector: Wind energy Product: Delhi-based start-up wind project developer. References: GI Power Corporation Limited (GIPCL)1 This...

  5. OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NA L S I GNE D B Y OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y

  6. redMaGiC. Selecting Luminous Red Galaxies from the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozo, E.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce redMaGiC, an automated algorithm for selecting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. redMaGiC achieves this by self-training the color-cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sam- ple of constant comoving density. Additionally, we demonstrate that redMaGiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine-learning based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a redMaGiC catalog sampling the redshift range z ? [0.2,0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec zphoto) and scatter (?z=(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017 respectively.The corresponding 5? outlier fraction is 1.4%. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8) and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1% level.

  7. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y Contract DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification 068 SF30 Continuation Page, Block 14 Page 2 of 8 Purpose of Modification: The purpose of this modification is to do the following: 1. Definitize the contract Change Order issued in modification 032 to implement the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP), Phase 1. The addition of this new requirement increased the costs of CLIN 1 by $125,855 and increased fee in the amount of $9,439, for a total

  8. TO: FILE GiR FROM: SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) Past: Current:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 749 '*,. .,;L ----.-. _ 5' . iMEMORANDUM TO: FILE GiR FROM: , SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) ------__ Past: ------------------_----~ Current: Owner contacted q yes qnnc; ~~-~~~---------~~--_______ if yes, date contacted 1 ! I TYPE OF OPERATION --~_--___~---_--_ $ Research b Development a Facility Type 1 I 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical 'Studies 0 Sample & Analysis G Production E Disposal/Storage 0 Research 0 Uther --------------T------ I T'/PE OF CONTRACT

  9. Comparison of GiBUU calculations with MiniBooNE pion production data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    Background: Neutrino-induced pion production can give important informationon the axial coupling to nucleon resonances. Furthermore, pion production represents a major background to quasielastic-like events. one pion production data from the MiniBooNE in charged current neutrino scattering in mineral oil appeared higher than expected within conventional theoretical approaches. Purpose: We aim to investigate which model parameters affect the calculated cross section and how they do this. Method: The Giessen BoltzmannUehlingUhlenbeck (GiBUU) model is used for an investigation of neutrino-nucleus reactions. Results: Presented are integrated and differential cross sections for 1?{sup +} and 1?{sup 0} production before and after final state interactions in comparison with the MiniBooNE data. Conclusions: For the MiniBooNE flux all processes (QE, 1?-background, ?, higher resonance production, DIS) contribute to the observed final state with one pion of a given charge. The uncertainty in elementary pion production cross sections leads to a corresponding uncertainty in the nuclear cross sections. Final state interactions change the shape of the muon-related observables only slightly, but they significantly change the shape of pion distributions.

  10. Dr. J. G. Hwang, President Advanced Technologies and Laboratories...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Group determines a change or interpretation to the HASQAR-D is de minimis (an editorial change or interpretation clarifying but not modifying a requirement - example...

  11. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA Table of Content G.1 TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CORRESPONDENCE/MATTERS .......... 1 G.2 DOE ORGANIZATIONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OFFICER .................... 1 G.3 CONTRACTOR CONTACT ................................................................................. 2 G.4 COST REPORTING PROCEDURES................................................................... 2 DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O G-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G

  12. Microsoft Word - gorchakov-gi.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scattering coefficients caused by the aerosol dry fraction. Estimating the Mass Concentration Aerosol mass concentration M was estimated according to a one-parameter aerosol...

  13. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO COTIUTINS IE DE-AC27-08RV14800/071 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Account code: De-obligating TDD funds for Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Fund 01250 Appr Year 2010 Ailottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Ciass 25200 Program 1111412 Project 0004263 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 Amount:

  14. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics Authors: Im, Mi-Young ; Lee, Ki-Suk ; Vogel, Andreas ; Hong, Jung-Il ; Meier, Guido ; Fischer, Peter Publication...

  16. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO DE-AC27-08RV14800/064 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (F)(F Obligated Amount for this Modification: $53, 327, 186.59 New Total Obdigated Amount for this Award: $1, 181,248,170.41 incremental Funded Amount changed: from $1, 127, 920, 983.82 to $1,181,248,170.41 Account code: WRPS Fund 01250 Appr Year 2007 Aiottee 34

  17. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approval"). G.2 DOE ORGANIZATIONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OFFICER The Contractor may use the Organizational Property Management Officer as a point of contact for guidance and...

  18. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y COTNAINSETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COTNAINSETIREFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED ?AGE OF COTNUTONSEE~DE-AC27-08RV14800/063 12 3 NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) $1,126,320, 983.82 to $1,127,920, 983.82 ARRA Fund 06049 Appr Year 2009 Ailottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25400 Program 1111370 Project 2002110 WFO 0000000 Local Use 0000000 TAS Agency Code 89 TAS Account Code 0253 TAS Subaccount

  19. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y I REEECNO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I REEECNO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED [AE OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR VW.ASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT ()(B) (C) (D) (E) (F) Incremental Funded Amount changed from $18"124",170.41 to $"191251, 7041 Account code: Work Order No. 00083495, !EWO for Idaho Fund 00911 Appr Year 2010 Al1ottee 34 Reporting Entity 421301 Object Class 25400 Program 1721310 Project 0000000 WFO 0425075 Local use 0000000 Ammnt:

  20. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Turner, Joshua J. 1 ; Dakovski, Georgi L. 1 ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. 1 ; Hwang, Harold Y. 2 ; Zarem, Alex 1 ; Schlotter, William F. 1 ; Moeller, Stefan 1 ; ...

  1. Resonant amplification of vortex-core oscillations by coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnetic-field pulses Authors: Yu, Young-Sang ; Han, Dong-Soo ; Yoo, Myoung-Woo ; Lee, Ki-Suk ; Choi, Youn-Seok ; Jung, Hyunsung ; Im, Mi-Young ; Fischer, Peter ; Kim,...

  2. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Im, Mi-Young ; Lee, Ki-Suk ; Vogel, Andreas ; Hong, Jung-Il ; Meier, Guido ; Fischer, Peter Publication...

  3. Resonant amplification of vortex-core oscillations by coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Yu, Young-Sang ; Han, Dong-Soo ; Yoo, Myoung-Woo ; Lee, Ki-Suk ; Choi, Youn-Seok ; Jung, Hyunsung ; Im, Mi-Young ; Fischer, Peter ; Kim,...

  4. ALSNews Vol. 324

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Jeong-Sun Kim's group turned to the ALS for a little help. From left to right: Jane Tanamachi, Jeong-Sun Kim, Hye-Mi Park, George Meigs, Suk-Youl Park, Jeong-Hoh Park,...

  5. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings. Authors: Lee, Jae-Hwang ; Ho, Kai-Ming ; Constant, Kristen P Publication Date: 2013-07-16 OSTI...

  6. UNIRIB Publications: 2007 Bibliography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.H. Hamilton, J.K. Hwang, S. Ilyushkin, A. Korgul, W. Krolas, K. Li, R.D. Page, D. Simpson and J.A. Winger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 212501 (2007) ConferencesMeetings Development...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hwang, Kyung Ryun (1) Jang, Hyojae (1) Jang, Ji-Ho (1) Jin, Hyunchang (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Structural Comparison of n-Type and p-Type LaAlO3SrTiO3 Interfaces Yamamoto, Ryosuke ; Bell, Christopher ; Hikita, Yasuyuki ; Hwang, Harold Y. ;...

  9. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. No abstract prepared. Authors: Grady, Nathaniel 1 ; Perkins, Bradford G. Jr. 2 ; Hwang, Harold Y. 2 ; Singh, Ranjan 1 ; Yang, Hao 3 ;...

  10. Direct Imaging of Antiferromagnetic Vortex States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arenholz, A. Doran, A.T. Young, A. Scholl, C. Hwang, H.W. Zhao, J. Bokor, and Z.Q. Qiu, "Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex states in CoOFeAg(001) discs,"...

  11. NT U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 450, MSIN 1-6-60 Rich land, Washington 99352 OCT 15 2012 1 2-CPM-0 145 Dr. J. G. Hwang, Project Manager Advanced Technologies and Laboratories...

  12. T U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 450, MSIN H6-60

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 450, MSIN H6-60 Richland, Washington 99352 AES OCT 1 12012 12-CPM-0 144 Dr. J. G. Hwang, Project Manager Advanced Technologies and Laboratories...

  13. U S. Department-of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Department-of Energy P.O. Box 450, MSIN 1-6-60 Richland, Washington 99352 SEP 0 6 2012 1 2-CPM-0 122 Dr. J. G. Hwang, Project Manager Advanced Technologies and Laboratories...

  14. The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss December 14, 2010 - 3:53pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management Alice Hwang has a lot on her plate. As the CEO and CFO of Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL), a 150 employee technical and management consulting firm located in Germantown, Maryland, Ms. Hwang oversees her company's

  15. Abbott, Joshua

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CENTER FOR NANOPHASE MATERIALS SCIENCES USER GROUP MEMBERS July 24, 2015 Abdelmalak, Michael ORNL Abu Hatab, Nahla ORISE Adhikari, Shiba Wake Forest U. Agapito, Luis U. North Texas Agapov, Rebecca ORISE Agar, Joshua U. Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Agnoli, Stefano U. Padova Aguiar, Jeffery National Renewable Energy Lab Ahn, Suk-kyun ORISE Akato, Kokouvi ORISE Akbashev, Andrei Drexel U. Akgun, Bulent NIST Akin, Cevat Rutgers U. Alemseghed, Mussie ORISE Alessandri, Ivano INSTM-U. Brescia Alikin,

  16. UNIRIB Publications: 2006 Bibliography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C.R. Bingham, I.G. Draby, G. Drafta, C. Goodin, C.J. Gross, J.H. Hamilton, A.A. Hecht, J.K. Hwang, D.T. Joss, A. Krogul, W. Krolas, K. Lagergran, K. Li, M.N. Tantawy, J....

  17. SAND2015-5879

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-5879 Unlimited Release Printed July 2015 Development and Evaluation of a Sandia Cooler-based Refrigerator Condenser Program Manager: Thomas E. Felter Authors: Terry A. Johnson, Arthur Kariya, Michael T. Leick, and Mark Zimmerman Energy Innovation Department 8366 Manjie Li, Yilin Du, Hoseong Lee, Yunho Hwang, Reinhard Radermacher Center for Environmental Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Maryland Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New

  18. Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of

  19. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Authors: Grady, Nathaniel [1] ; Perkins Jr., Bradford G. [2] ; Hwang, Harold Y. [2] ; Brandt, Nate [2] ; Torchinsky, Darius [2] ; Singh, Ranjan [1] ; Yan, Li [3] ; Jia, Quanxi [1] ; Trugman, Stuart A. [1] ;

  20. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COORDINATORS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark Hartney, Director of the Office of Strategic Planning, SLAC, discussed technology transfer at SLAC. Bob Hwang, Director, Transportation Energy Center, Combustion Research Facility, SNL presented on technology transfer at SNL. Elsie Quaite-Randall, Chief Technology Transfer Officer, Innovation and Partnerships Office, LBNL, presented on technology transfer at LBNL. Richard A. Rankin, Director, Industrial Partnerships Office and Economic Development Office (Interim), LLNL, presented on technology transfer at LLNL.

  1. Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries NREL Commercialization & Tech Transfer Webinar March 27, 2011 Gi-Heon Kim gi-heon.kim@nrel.gov John Ireland, Kyu-Jin Lee,...

  2. Reinvestment Act Reporting Requirements. B. References:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 ORV 15051 Modification MO 12 Page 2 of 10 A. The purpose of this modification is to revise Clause 1. 118, FAR 52.204-11, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Reporting Requirements. B. References: 1. Letter, I10-AMD-23 6, dated July 19, 2009, from S.F. Bechtol. ORP. to J.G. Hwang, ATL, "Incorporation of Revised Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Clause 52.204. 1, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Reporting Requirements" 2. Letter, ATL-2010-159, dated August 17, 2010,

  3. Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TiO 3 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 « Prev Next » Title: Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 Authors: Chi, Songxue ; Ye, Feng ; Zhou, H. D. ; Choi, E. S. ; Hwang, J. ; Cao, Huibo ; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A. Publication Date: 2014-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1181043 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal

  4. DE-AC27-I1ORVI15051 Modification A009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I1ORVI15051 Modification A009 Page 2 of 6 A. The purpose of this modification is to make an equitable adjustment to contract cost relevant to transition cost and the stop work order dated November 27, 2009, and modify the period of performance as detailed below: Reference: 1. ATL Letter dated May 24, 2010, from J.G. Hwang, ATL, to D.A. Gallegos, ORP, "CLIN 1 TRANSITION COST OVERRUN PROPOSAL (Contract Number DE-AC27-1I0RV 1505 1) Background: The contract was awarded on November 20, 2009, and

  5. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOE PAGES Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Jeon, Dong-O" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Total Results3 Pub. Available Full TextPublicly Available Full Text2 Citation Only1 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Jeon, Dong-O (3) Hwang, Kyung Ryun (1) Jang, Hyojae (1) Jang, Ji-Ho (1) Jin, Hyunchang (1) Save Results

  6. Sixth-Order Resonance of High-Intensity Linear Accelerators (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Sixth-Order Resonance of High-Intensity Linear Accelerators Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 5, 2016 Title: Sixth-Order Resonance of High-Intensity Linear Accelerators Authors: Jeon, Dong-O ; Hwang, Kyung Ryun ; Jang, Ji-Ho ; Jin, Hyunchang ; Jang, Hyojae Publication Date: 2015-05-06 OSTI Identifier: 1179719 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-12ER41800 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Amtech Systems, Inc. (Incubator 10) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amtech Systems, Inc. (Incubator 10) PROJECT PROFILE: Amtech Systems, Inc. (Incubator 10) Project Title: Efficiency Enhancement in c-Si Solar cells by Introducing Fixed-charge into SiNx Passivation Film Using a Novel Low-cost Plasma Charging Method Funding Opportunity: SunShot Technology to Market (Incubator 10) SunShot Subprogram: Technology to Market Location: Tempe, Arizona Amount Awarded: $930,664 Awardee Cost Share: $236,000 Project Investigator: Jeong-Mo (James) Hwang Amtech is developing a

  8. International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Presentation International Partnership for Geothermal Technology presentation by Jay Nathwani at the May 7, 2012 Peer Review Meeting PDF icon gtp2012peerreviewipgtiea-gi...

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the seasonal variation of land cover which is dominated by the agricultural land use, primarily winter wheat production. http:gi.ssec.wisc.eduairsknutesonindex.html...

  10. Microsoft Word - DE-EM0003383 Penser Contract (mod 003) Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Workers' Compensation Claims Services Penser North America, Inc. G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION...

  11. NREL: Energy Storage - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Systems Presentation Source: Smith, Kandler; Kim, Gi-Heon; Santhanagopalan, ... Perspective Paper Preprint Source: Smith, K.; Shi, Ying; Santhanagopalan, Shriram. (2015). ...

  12. Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

  13. Interpolating the Coulomb phase of little string theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Ying -Hsuan; Shao, Shu -Heng; Wang, Yifan; Yin, Xi

    2015-12-03

    We study up to 8-derivative terms in the Coulomb branch effective action of (1,1) little string theory, by collecting results of 4-gluon scattering amplitudes from both perturbative 6D super-Yang-Mills theory up to 4-loop order, and tree-level double scaled little string theory (DSLST). In previous work we have matched the 6-derivative term from the 6D gauge theory to DSLST, indicating that this term is protected on the entire Coulomb branch. The 8-derivative term, on the other hand, is unprotected. In this paper we compute the 8-derivative term by interpolating from the two limits, near the origin and near the infinity onmore » the Coulomb branch, numerically from SU(k) SYM and DSLST respectively, for k=2,3,4,5. We discuss the implication of this result on the UV completion of 6D SYM as well as the strong coupling completion of DSLST. As a result, we also comment on analogous interpolating functions in the Coulomb phase of circle-compactified (2,0) little string theory.« less

  14. A=7H (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) A search for 7H in 7Li(π-, π+)7H was unsuccessful (1965GI10). See also (1968CE1A

  15. A=7H (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (Not illustrated) A search for 7H in 7Li(π-, π+)7H was unsuccessful (1965GI10). See also (1975BE31, 1977SP1B; theor.

  16. PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION ......

  17. Microsoft Word - Section G _Rev 01-23-2006_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 M014 G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES......

  18. PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 020 G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION...

  19. PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION ......

  20. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cambardae) OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT, SOUTH CAROLINA ..* ..' by Horton H. Hobbs III James H. Thorp and Gi Ibert E. Anderson A Publ ication of the Savannah River Plant, ...

  1. Energy Review

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    M iggl-003504t11l)sar Energy Review 8 M. IM W I -W All* r ;ai*i el I gi In this issue: Energy-related housing characteristics Propane-provider fleet survey Ordering...

  2. Cours-IX/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Nonlinear stochastic equation) 4 P.Clavin IX IX-2) Turbulent diffusion Einstein 1905 G.I Taylor 1922 Taylor's di usion coecient x 2 (t) 2 t 0 dt t 0 d v(t )v(t ) integration...

  3. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by Source, 2008 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass...

  4. A=17B (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and its ground state probably has J 32- (1974BO05, 1986AJ04) in agreement with the shell model (1992WA22). It has been observed in several heavy ion reactions (1987GI05,...

  5. THIRD GEOPRESSURED-GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CONFERENCE University of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and primary migration--a review and critique: Am. Assoc. ... Petroleum geology of the United States: New Pork, ... SOC. America Spec. Paper 134, p. 1-78. GI-220 Weisman, T ...

  6. Enhancement of [alpha]-Helix Mimicry by an [alpha/beta]-Peptide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Johnson, Lisa M. ; Mortenson, David E. ; Yun, Hyun Gi ; Horne, W. Seth ; Ketas, Thomas J. ; Lu, Min ; Moore, John P. ; Gellman, Samuel H. 1 ; UMD-NJ) 2 ; Weill-Med) ...

  7. Macro-Industrial Working Group: meeting 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay Smith, Russ Tarver, Elizabeth Sendich and Vipin Arora Briefing on Macroeconomic Reference Case for the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Macroeconomic/Industrial Working Group Meeting Presentation Goals * The Reference Case presented is the GI May Long-term Trend forecast. Due to the comprehensive revision of the GDP accounts, released at the end of July, we will not update the macro projection to an August baseline in order to keep on the AEO2014 schedule. The GI August

  8. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  9. A=20N (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.770 ± 0.050 MeV (1995AU04). It has been observed in heavy-ion transfer (1989OR03) and projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1988DUZT, 1988MU08, 1990MU06, 1991OR01) and in target fragmentation reactions (1988WO09, 1991RE02, 1993WOZZ). See also the review (1988VI1D). Mass measurements were reported in (1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1989OR03, 1991OR01, 1993WOZZ). Nuclear matter rms radii have been derived from

  10. Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries NREL Commercialization & Tech Transfer Webinar March 27, 2011 Gi-Heon Kim gi-heon.kim@nrel.gov John Ireland, Kyu-Jin Lee, Ahmad Pesaran Kandler Smith kandler.smith@nrel.gov Source: A123 Source: GM NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Challenges for Large LIB Systems 2 * Li-ion batteries are flammable, require expensive manufacturing to reduce defects * Small-cell protection devices do not work for large systems * Difficult to detect

  11. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FORM (1) Document Number: RPP-46765 (2) Revision Number: 0 I(3) Effective Date: 06/07/2010 I (4) Document Type: o Digital Image o Hard copy (a) Number of pages (including the ORF) or 16 I [gI PDF D Video number of digital images (5) Release Type [gi, New D Cancel D Page Change o Complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Natural Systems Working Session (7) Change/Release Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description:

  12. Attachment G

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    G CLOSURE PLAN Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit February 2014 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit February 2014 PERMIT ATTACHMENT G Page G-i ATTACHMENT G CLOSURE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1 G-1 Closure Plan

  13. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F.; Siah, N. J.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  14. CrayQuatlerly_20120725_Cray_Compiler_ZhengjiZhao.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    y ( %) Intel ---6% Cray, G NU 0% PGI default VASP w ith C ray c ompiler r uns a t t he s ame s peed a s P GI c ompiler for t he h ybrid j obs 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 48 72 96...

  15. A=14Be (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 14Be) 14Be has been observed in the 14C(-, +)14B reaction (1984GI09), in the interaction of 30 MeVA 18O ions with 181Ta (1986CU01) and in the spallation of thorium by 800...

  16. A=10Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would then be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV: see (1979AJ01). See also (1986GI10, 1987AB15),...

  17. Microsoft Word - Section G _Rev 01-23-2006_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 M014 G-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES.............................................................................................1 G.2 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION .......................................................................................................1 G.3 BILLING INSTRUCTIONS

  18. A=12C (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 12.6 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977ME05, 1978RA1B, 1979HA59, 1979IN05, 1980CA12, 1980GI05,...

  19. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n=7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n=2), pancreatic injury (n=1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n=1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.57.3 to 2.91.4mmHg after the procedure (P<0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 334)months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  20. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ?0.5 baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ?2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ?2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ?3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ?2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.

  1. A=19C (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19C) 19C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09) and in the fragmentation of 60 MeV/A argon ions (1987GI1E). The mass excess is 32.30 ± 0.24 MeV (1986VI09), 32.95 ± 0.42 MeV (1987GI1E): the weighted mean is 32.46 ± 0.21 MeV. 19C is then stable with respect to decay into 18C + n by 0.53 MeV and into 17C + 2n by 4.72 MeV. The calculated half-life of 19C is 1.2 × 10-2 sec (1984KL06). See also (1978AJ03, 1985WA02, 1986AN07,

  2. A=19C (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19C) 19C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeV/A argon ions (1987GI05) and in 44 MeV/A 22Ne on 181Ta, and in 112 MeV/A 20Ne on 12C (1994RAZW, 1995OZ02). The mass excess adopted by (1993AU05) is 32.23 ± 0.11 MeV. See also (1986VI09, 1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1991OR01). 19C is then stable with respect to decay into 18C + n by 0.16 MeV and into 17C + 2n by 4.35 MeV. The half-life was

  3. A=20N (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.64 ± 0.26 MeV (1986VI09), 22.20 ± 0.36 MeV (1986GI10), 21.62 ± 0.14 MeV (1987GI1E). We adopt 21.62 ± 0.14 MeV. 20N is then stable with respect to 19N + n by 2.32 MeV (see 19N). The half-life of 20N is 100+30-20 msec, Pn ~ 61% (1987MU1J; prelim.). See also (1984KL06; theor.). See also (1985PIZZ, 1986PI09), (1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1986AN07, 1986GU1D) and (1983ANZQ; theor.

  4. "Omics of the mammalian gut new insights into function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamendella, Regina; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    To understand the role of gut microbes in host health, it is imperative to probe their genetic potential, expression, and ecological status. The current high-throughput sequencing revolution, in addition to advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have recently enabled deep access to these complex environments, and are revealing important insights into the roles of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in host physiology and health. This review discusses examples of how the integration of cutting-edge meta-omics technologies are providing new knowledge about the relationships between host health status in mammals and the microbes inhabiting the GI tract. In addition, we address some promises that these techniques hold for future therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  5. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Development of A Small Instrument To Investigate Airborne Aerosols Catherine F. Cahill Associate Professor Geophysical Institute and Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry University of Alaska Fairbanks Phone: 907-474-6905 Email: ffcfc@uaf.edu October 16, 2008 Gregory W. Walker Manager Poker Flat Research Range Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks Phone: 907-455-2102 Email: Gregory.Walker@gi.alaska.edu In support of the US Army Research Laboratory Conducting Marine Mammal

  7. Resources for Veterans | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources for Veterans Resources for Veterans The America's Veterans to Tennessee Engineers STEM initiative is the most recent addition to a list of valuable resources Tennessee provides to our nation's veterans. Check out some of the other resources Tennessee offers. Anderson County, Tennessee, Veterans Office Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs Student Veterans of America Tennessee Lottery Tuition Support Program National Resource Directory Today's GI Bill website Wall Street Warfighters

  8. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jingya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  9. Microsoft Word - Attachment G1G 10-1-2012.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    G1 APPENDIX G TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS PANEL CLOSURE SYSTEM WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 1, 2012 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 1, 2012 PERMIT ATTACHMENT G1G Page G1G-i ATTACHMENT G1 APPENDIX G TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS PANEL CLOSURE SYSTEM WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO TABLE OF CONTENTS DIVISION 1 - GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

  10. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-}) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR{sub Gi}) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T{sub final}) with Fe{sup 3+} ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK{sub a} = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR{sub Gi} reacts with O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-} with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k{sub 1} = 1.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T{sub 1}; this in turn rapidly decays to the T{sub final} state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR{sub Gi} is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  11. Shane Canon! Group Leader for Technology Integration Biosciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Canon! Group Leader for Technology Integration Biosciences Computing and Storage for JGI --- 1 --- February 1 2, 2 013 Why Biology in DOE * Biofuels - Engineering b e+er p lants f or biofuels - Engineering m icrobes t o c onvert cellulose i nto e thanol * Bioremedia6on a nd R estora6on - Finding m icrobes t o a id i n c leanup * Restora6on a nd C arbon C ycle - Role o f M icrobes i n r estora<on a nd impact o n c arbon s equestra<on --- 2 --- History and Motivation * NERSC a nd J GI f

  12. 06-DataManagement-Gerhardt.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New User Training! July 15, 2014 Data Management at NERSC Where Do I Put My Data? --- 2 --- * Overview o f N ERSC fi le s ystems - Local v s. G lobal - Permanent v s. P urged * HPSS A rchive S ystem - What i s i t a nd h ow t o u se i t * Data S haring NERSC File Systems --- 3 --- The compute and storage systems 2014 Produc<on C lusters Carver, P DSF, J GI, MatComp, Planck /global/ scratch 4 PB /project 5 PB /home 250 TB 65 PB stored, 240 PB capacity, 4 0 y ears o f community d ata HPSS 16 x

  13. Enhancement of [alpha]-Helix Mimicry by an [alpha/beta]-Peptide Foldamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    via Incorporation of a Dense Ionic Side-Chain Array (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhancement of [alpha]-Helix Mimicry by an [alpha/beta]-Peptide Foldamer via Incorporation of a Dense Ionic Side-Chain Array Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhancement of [alpha]-Helix Mimicry by an [alpha/beta]-Peptide Foldamer via Incorporation of a Dense Ionic Side-Chain Array Authors: Johnson, Lisa M. ; Mortenson, David E. ; Yun, Hyun Gi ; Horne, W. Seth ; Ketas, Thomas J. ; Lu, Min ;

  14. Full Report.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    376(2013) July 2015 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2013 2013 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Prices and Expenditures 3 Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2013 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - nsa_shippingforminstructions.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipping Form Instructions * How to get there * Login * New entry/time saving alternative * Submitting Entry * Searching for records Jeff Zirzow, SNLA, 11-2-07 To get to shipping form http://agvik.gi.alaska.edu/fmi/iwp/res/iwp_auth.html New form or look for info on the site: Click guest account and press enter on your keyboard or click the Login button Editing an existing record (change data or add receive information) requires a login with username and password. At this point in time, we will

  16. Joint Facilities User Forum on Data Intensive Computing Lessons Learned

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    User Forum on Data Intensive Computing Lessons Learned - NERSC/JGI Partnership Kjiersten Fagnan, NERSC User Services/JGI --- 1 --- June 1 7, 2 013 Outline * Overview o f N ERSC/JGI P artnership - DOE J GI b ackground - Team o verview - Compute r esources * CompuBng S trategic P lan - JGI G oals - NERSC G oals * Lessons Learned --- 2 --- DOE Joint Genome Institute 3 DOE JGI, Serving as a genomic user facility in support of the DOE missions: * Walnut Creek, CA facility opened in 1999 * 250

  17. Fuel Cell Freeze Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents Fuel Cell Freeze Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents Presentation by Ahmad Pesaran, Tony Markel, Gi-Heon Kim, Keith Wipke to DOE's Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop held February 1-5, 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon 12_pesaran_landscape.pdf More Documents & Publications Stationary Applications and Freeze/Thaw Challenges DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives Startup of PEFC Stacks From Sub-Freezing

  18. Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 DERIVATION OF I,]RANIUM RESIDUAL RADIOACTTVE I\{ATERIAL GI]IDELINES FOR THE ALIQIJIPPA FORGE SITE by F. Monette, L. Jones, and C. Yu Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division September 1992 work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy DOE Field Office Forrner Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTEI{TS SUMMARY 1 INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF HISTORY 1.1 Site Description and Setting 1.2 Site History 1.3

  19. JJ'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ^x .,.,..,,, .,_...,,, .~, .~~ ,.,_,. _ . . ^..~ .,.-....-.. ~.~ .,,_,_ I-.~ ___:-._ ,,_ I --,,,,-.I I -... "I _-_,, i ,,,, (__. ..-;.mss,.r^-' . :' _.' i' . ' . r*911;&& --- _. JJ' 4)&-] " ]+-ic 7-g &Lc u.4 u - 7 S' JJ-- ,C- iki?rdC~L\T $' Y' IEThLS COP?O~,~TION d - I8 4.1 INROAD STREET (In ciuplicste) Xovezber 30, 1942. The I)ist?ict Eng~Gi U. S. EZi<i3eef Office, 2Zi%XttZ?l Cistrict, ? . 0 . z,ox 42, CL',t'~~'.' -~-~: ~,'y:-y;, :.yz --'- -- Station F., ,y: r:

  20. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' a 7 > 3gI, q OH.I-r7.-I (jt' , ""7 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: ' 'Y OIL&i cz ,,,',, -------we- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: _____ CITY:-AQY&- --------------e----e-- OWNER(S) Owner contacted n yes =urr="t: ----- -Llz2-:---,-- -----___ &,&/4$- '1 :) ' if yes, data contacted ------------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- a Research t Development lti- Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Manufacturing 5 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored

  1. PROGRAMFOR DEVEZOPING URANIUM FABRICATION PROCESSES WGtfORD

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    m-23269 nJ Y 2 # 1. WK Woods f 3'. fl pylough - JA wes # 4: Jw REh*s f 2. gi&~$.iol - MJ Sanderson - ZI Bach # 7: -WM Mathis #ll. WT Kattner a443. AEC-HO0 #I&. 700 Files .#15. 300 Files #16. Pink copy ~docunented #17. Yellow Copy cope". Srrie* _ January 16, 1952 PROGRAMFOR DEVEZOPING URANIUM FABRICATION PROCESSES WGtfORD I. ROLLrNGDEvELOPMENTPROCRAM Introduction Evaluation of rods used in the program for the development of a rolling process for Fernald has re-emphasized the

  2. STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE: ,i; .; .c. sgmbo1: PPS:W:mjf .. ,i. -'. ~ i:.. :: (PPS447-53) I ~..-:;..c. ' .~.I-!,-.. .~ i .,,. " :, ,, .T.~ . Confirming the c&versatioti b? March 6, 1953,'bheen Gi Hughes Ii. Sturza, please cut a four'(h)-inch length of l$ inch norm& uranium rod (approximately3.3 pounds) and ship immediately to t following address: ,NavalRese'arch Laboratory Nuclconics Division Washington 25, D.C. Attn: Dr. F. N. D. Kurie

  3. The relationship between leaf area growth and biomass accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M.; Chen, Jin; Anozie, Fransisca C.; Morales, Alejandro; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    2015-04-09

    Leaf area growth determines the light interception capacity of a crop and is often used as a surrogate for plant growth in high-throughput phenotyping systems. The relationship between leaf area growth and growth in terms of mass will depend on how carbon is partitioned among new leaf area, leaf mass, root mass, reproduction, and respiration. A model of leaf area growth in terms of photosynthetic rate and carbon partitioning to different plant organs was developed and tested with Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. ecotype Columbia (Col-0) and a mutant line, gigantea-2 (gi-2), which develops very large rosettes. Data obtained from growthmore » analysis and gas exchange measurements was used to train a genetic programming algorithm to parameterize and test the above model. The relationship between leaf area and plant biomass was found to be non-linear and variable depending on carbon partitioning. The model output was sensitive to the rate of photosynthesis but more sensitive to the amount of carbon partitioned to growing thicker leaves. The large rosette size of gi-2 relative to that of Col-0 resulted from relatively small differences in partitioning to new leaf area vs. leaf thickness.« less

  4. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-05-28

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs.more » disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.« less

  5. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  6. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  7. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Sante Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  8. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-11-09

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  9. The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

    2010-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

  10. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1994WR01 9Be(α, n): σ, thick target yield, deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.16 - 1.87 S(E) X4 01/24/2012 2011GI05 9Be(α, nγ): σ for n1 0.3 - 7.9 linear scale, log scale 06/18/2012 1968DA05 9Be(α, n): excitation function at θ = 0° 0.34 - 0.68 n0, n1 X4 07/19/2011 1994HA32 9Be(α, n): excitation function 480- 740 keV 1 01/24/2012 1994LE18 9Be(α, α): σ at θ = 170.5° 0.5- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1996KU07

  11. A=12Be (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 12Be) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special reactions: (1965GI10, 1969AR13, 1971AR02, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D). General review: (1974CE1A). Theoretical papers: (1971DO1F, 1972ST1C, 1973WI15, 1974IR04, 1974MA1E). Mass of 12Be: The Q-value of the 14C(18O, 20Ne)12Be reaction [-15.77 ± 0.05 MeV] (1974BA15) leads to an atomic mass excess of 25.05 ± 0.05 MeV; that for the 7Li(7Li, 2p)12Be reaction [Q = -9.71 ±

  12. A=12Be (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12Be) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 12.1 preview 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. General theoretical papers: (1984FR13, 1985AN28, 1985BA51, 1985WI1B, 1986WI04, 1987BL18, 1987GI1C, 1987SA15, 1987YA16, 1988RU01, SU88C, 1989BE03). Hypernuclei: (1984IW1B, 1984YA04, 1985BE31, 1985GA1C, 1985IK1A, 1985WA1N, 1985YA01, 1985YA07, 1986BA1W, 1986BI1G, 1986DO1B, 1986GA14, 1986GA33, 1986GA1H, 1986HA26, 1986MA1J, 1986ME1F, 1986MI1N,

  13. A=12C (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1967SV1A, 1968BA1L, 1968DR1B, 1968FA1B, 1968FU1B, 1968GO01, 1968GU1C, 1968HA11, 1968RO1G, 1969GU1E, 1969GU03, 1969IK1A, 1969LA26, 1969MO1F, 1969SA1A, 1969SV1A, 1969WA06, 1969WO05, 1970AR21, 1970BE26, 1970BO33, 1970BO1J, 1970CO1H, 1970DE1F, 1970DO1A, 1970EI06, 1970GI11, 1970GU11, 1970KH01, 1970KO04, 1970KR1D, 1970LO1C, 1970RE1G, 1970RU1A, 1970RY1A,

  14. A=14Be (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 14Be) 14Be has been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of uranium [see (1976AJ04)], in the bombardment of 232Th by 145 MeV 15N ions (1982OG02; forward differential cross section is 4 × 10-5 mb/sr) and in the 14C(π-, π+)14Be reaction (1984GI09; Eπ- = 164 MeV, θ = 5° It has not been observed in the 48Ca(14C, 14Be)48Ti reaction (E(14C) = 87.4 MeV, θ = 4° - 8° (1981NA1H). A group in the (π-, π+) reaction is observed at Q = -37.08 ± 0.13 MeV

  15. A=14N (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 14N) GENERAL: See also Table 14.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (AD55, OT55A, EL56B, FR56B, BA57, GR57D, VI57, FA58, MA58C, MO58, SK58, WA59). 1. 9Be(6Li, n)14N Qm = 14.503 See (NO57A). 2. 10B(α, n)13N Qm = 1.065 Eb = 11.615 Resonances are reported at Eα = 1.51, 1.64, 2.16, 2.26, 2.95, 4.53, 4.85, and 5.36 MeV: see Table 14.6 (in PDF or PS) (SH53B, SH55C, BO56D, MA58G, GI59). Angular distributions have been measured at Eα = 1.51

  16. A=15O (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See Table 15.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(TA60H, TA60L, CO63B, KU63I, AL64P, AM64, BR64Z, RI64B, CO65I, GI65D, GR65E, GU65A, HU65D, BO66J, EL66B, RI66G, SO66A, BO67B, EL67C, DE68K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WO68D, ZH68, ZU68, DE69M, EL69B, GU69, SA69). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, FA67A, NE67B, BI68C). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, PO66F, RO66C, WA66D, KU67J, PO67G, WA67I, BI68C,

  17. A=20C (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (Not illustrated) 20C has been observed in the fragmentation of 60 MeV/A argon ions: its mass excess is 37.20 ± 1.13 MeV (1987GI1E). It is then stable with respect to 19C + n and 18C + 2n by 3.3 and 3.9 MeV, respectively. See also (1978AJ03, 1983AJ01). The half-life of 20C is calculated to be 9.3 × 10-3 sec (1984KL06). See also (1985AN1B, 1985LA03, 1986AN07, 1986GU1D) and (1982AV1A, 1983ANZQ, 1987SA15

  18. A=7Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 7.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1974KA11). Astrophysical question: (1973BA1H, 1973IB1A, 1973SM1A, 1973TR1C, 1973WE1D, 1974KO1C, 1974PA10, 1974RA09, 1974SH1D, 1975HO1C, 1975KI14, 1975SC1H, 1976BE1C, 1976BO1E, 1976CL1A, 1976CO1B, 1976FU1B, 1976GI1C, 1976HE15, 1976PE1A, 1976RA1C, 1976SI1C, 1976VI1A, 1977AU1B, 1977BA1V, 1977BI1E, 1977GA1C, 1977HA1L, 1977KO1J, 1977MO1E, 1977SC1D, 1977SI1D,

  19. A=7He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7He) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Hypernuclei: (1982KA1D, 1983FE07, 1984AS1D, 1985KO1G, 1986DA1B, 1986DO01, 1986ME1F). Other topics: (1983ANZQ, 1984FR13, 1984VA06, 1986GI10, 1986SH1L, 1987BO40, 1987GOZN, 1987PE1C). Mass of 7He: The atomic mass excess of 7He is 26.11 ± 0.03 MeV: 7He is then unbound with respect to decay into 6He + n by 0.44 MeV: see (1984AJ01). The ground state is calculated to have Jπ =

  20. A=9He (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He is predicted to be particle unstable: its calculated mass excess > 40.17 MeV (1970WA1G, 1972WA07), = 43.54 MeV (1972TH13). Particle instability with respect to 8He + n, 7He + 2n and 6He + 3n implies atomic mass excesses greater than 39.7, 42.25 and 41.812 MeV, respectively. See also (1968CE1A). 9He has not been observed in a pion experiment [9Be(π-, π+)9He] (1965GI10) nor in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf (1967CO1K

  1. Research News TEMPLATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealing Secrets Locked in the Ice page 3 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY From NETL's Office of Research & Development - October 2014, Issue 1 Researchnews Science & Engineering To Power Our Future 2 FE AT U RE ST O RY : R e v e a li n g S e c re ts L o c k e d in th e Ic e pa ge 3 Fr om NE TL 's O ffi ce of Re se ar ch & De ve lo pm en t - O ct ob er 20 14 , Iss ue 1 R e s e a r c h n e w s Sc ien ce & En gi ne er in g To Po we r Ou r Fu tu re Contents

  2. Cryogenic expansion machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pallaver, Carl B. (Woodridge, IL); Morgan, Michael W. (Palos Park, IL)

    1978-01-01

    A cryogenic expansion engine includes intake and exhaust poppet valves each controlled by a cam having adjustable dwell, the valve seats for the valves being threaded inserts in the valve block. Each cam includes a cam base and a ring-shaped cam insert disposed at an exterior corner of the cam base, the cam base and cam insert being generally circular but including an enlarged cam dwell, the circumferential configuration of the cam base and cam dwell being identical, the cam insert being rotatable with respect to the cam base. GI CONTRACTUAL ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION.

  3. NERSC Climate PIs Telecon!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Systems Update NERSC Systems Early 2015 2 x 10 Gb 1 x 100 Gb So#ware D efined N etworking Data---Intensive S ystems Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Vis & A naly3cs D ata T ransfer N odes Adv. A rch. Testbeds S cience G ateways Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 2 0 years o f community d ata HPSS 80 GB/s 50 GB/s 5 GB/s 12 GB/s 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 PB Local Scratch 70 G B/s Hopper: 1

  4. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices and Expenditures 10 Table E8. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2013 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 1,731.6 3,091.3 4,003.6 294.8 251.9 8,443.0 90.5 682.0 13,765.8 352.0 438.7 19,379.5 -3,125.3 7,901.4 24,155.6

  5. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2013 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.06 5.38 27.54 22.30 22.38 27.14 13.04 21.51 26.50 0.83 2.86 8.65 2.48 26.47 18.90 Alaska 4.90 6.78 28.73 22.33 26.07 34.80 20.54 36.56

  6. Jason Hick! Storage Systems Group NERSC User Group Storage Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC User Group Storage Update Feb 2 6, 2 014 The compute and storage systems 2014 Sponsored C ompute S ystems Carver, P DSF, J GI, K BASE, H EP 8 x F DR I B /global/ scratch 4 PB /project 5 PB /home 250 TB 45 P B s tored, 2 40 P B capacity, 4 0 y ears o f community d ata HPSS 48 GB/s 2.2 P B L ocal Scratch 70 GB/s 6.4 P B L ocal Scratch 140 GB/s 80 GB/s Ethernet & I B F abric Science F riendly S ecurity ProducKon M onitoring Power E fficiency WAN 2 x 10 Gb 1 x 100 Gb Science D ata N etwork

  7. Jason Hick! Storage Systems Group! NERSC User Group Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group! ! NERSC User Group Meeting! February 6, 2014 Storage Systems: 2014 and beyond The compute and storage systems 2013 Produc(on C lusters Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 3 5 years o f community d ata HPSS 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 P B L ocal Scratch 70 GB/s 6.4 P B L ocal Scratch 140 GB/s 16 x F DR I B Ethernet & I B F abric Science F riendly S ecurity

  8. NUG2013UserSurvey.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 NERSC User Survey Results --- 1 --- NUG 2 013 2 Response Profile 481 r espondents ( + 7 1 J GI o nly) * 6 7.6% " big u ser" r esponse r ate * 3 6.2% " medium u ser" r esponse r ate * 1 1.8% o verall r esponse r ate BER HEP Respondants b y R ole Pis --- 2 5.4% Proxies --- 15.2% Users --- 59.5% Respondants b y O ffice ASCR --- 7 .9% BER --- 2 0.6% BES --- 34.5% FES --- 1 3.5% HEP --- 1 4.6% NP --- 8 .3% BES FES NP ASCR HEP BER PIs Users Proxies 2012 Survey Question &

  9. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  10. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.2 1.3 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. With the heart inside the radiation field, the mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. The optimal leaf margins were ?1.0 0.6 mm for both beams. Dmax to the spinal cord showed no clear trend for changes in leaf margin. Conclusions: The differences in doses to OARs between FFF and FF beams were negligible. Conformity index, modified GI, MLD, lung V20 Gy, lung V5 Gy, and mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. There were no significant differences in optimal leaf margins to minimize these parameters between both FFF and FF beams. The authors results suggest that a leaf margin of ?1 mm achieves high conformity and minimizes doses to OARs for both FFF and FF beams.

  11. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :::, pL' /Z 1 ~etaIturgital Xalboratorp a* -9- g-/i c> ylr3' w - .yuc- bl# 7-L c/"v. tP cq \ 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O! sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah uwmud y.::::: .:..... ,.>:. I C~.4SS~F!Ct4T@N CHANGED f %H=slwffn;lDc1 &4-e-- :: . IRKED TO EE UNCLASSIFIED UTHORITY: DOE-~PP DECLASSIFIED huthority PruD z?3OL7 BY hR-m ,I(ARqD& Il/lr/X'

  12. SU-E-T-548: How To Decrease Spine Dose In Patients Who Underwent Sterotactic Spine Radiosurgery?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acar, H; Altinok, A; Kucukmorkoc, E; Kucuk, N; Caglar, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery for spine metastases involves irradiation using a single high dose fraction. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare stereotactic spine radiosurgery(SRS) plans using a recently new volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) technique against fix-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Plans were evaluated for target conformity and spinal cord sparing. Methods: Fifteen previously treated patients were replanned using the Eclipse 10.1 TPS AAA calculation algorithm. IMRT plans with 7 fields were generated. The arc plans used 2 full arc configurations. Arc and IMRT plans were normalized and prescribed to deliver 16.0 Gy in a single fraction to 90% of the planning target volume(PTV). PTVs consisted of the vertebral body expanded by 3mm, excluding the PRV-cord, where the cord was expanded by 2mm.RTOG 0631 recommendations were applied for treatment planning. Partial spinal cord volume was defined as 5mm above and below the radiosurgery target volume. Plans were compared for conformity and gradient index as well as spinal cord sparing. Results: The conformity index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 1. Conformity index values for 2 full arc planning (average CI=0.84) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average CI=0.79). The gradient index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 2. Gradient index values for 2 full arc planning (average GI=3.58) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average GI=2.82).The spinal cord doses of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 3. D0.35cc, D0.03cc and partial spinal cord D10% values in 2 full arc plannings (average D0.35cc=819.3cGy, D0.03cc=965.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=718.1cGy) were lower than IMRT plannings (average D0.35cc=877.4cGy, D0.03c=1071.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=805.1cGy). Conclusions: The two arc VMAT technique is superior to 7 field IMRT technique in terms of both spinal cord sparing and better conformity and gradient indexes.

  13. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

  14. Structural Evidence for a Sequential Release Mechanism for Activation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Menon, Santosh T.; Chauhan, Radha; Sachdev, Pallavi; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-12

    Heptahelical G-protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors couple to heterotrimeric G proteins to relay extracellular signals to intracellular signaling networks, but the molecular mechanism underlying guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) release by the G protein {alpha}-subunit is not well understood. Amino acid substitutions in the conserved {alpha}5 helix of Gi, which extends from the C-terminal region to the nucleotide-binding pocket, cause dramatic increases in basal (receptor-independent) GDP release rates. For example, mutant G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A shows an 18-fold increase in basal GDP release rate and, when expressed in culture, it causes a significant decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The crystal structure of G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A {center_dot} GDP shows substantial conformational rearrangement of the switch I region and additional striking alterations of side chains lining the catalytic pocket that disrupt the Mg{sup +2} coordination sphere and dislodge bound Mg{sup +2}. We propose a 'sequential release' mechanism whereby a transient conformational change in the {alpha}5 helix alters switch I to induce GDP release. Interestingly, this mechanistic model for heterotrimeric G protein activation is similar to that suggested for the activation of the plant small G protein Rop4 by RopGEF8.

  15. Handbook of synfuels technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book explores various methods of producing synthetic fuels. Topics considered include coal liquefaction, Exxon Donor Solvent Coal Liquefaction Process, the H-Coal Process, the SRC-I Coal Liquefaction Process, the coal hydrogenation plant at Bottrop, production of liquid fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas, the Sasol plant, the ICI low pressure methanol process, Mobil Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process, the Lurgi low pressure methanol process, coal gasification the Texaco Coal Gasification Process, the Shell Coal Gasification Process, the Combustion Engineering Coal Gasification Process, British Gas/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, KBW Coal Gasification, fluidized-bed coal gasification process (type Winkler), Lurgi coal gasification (dry bottom gasifier), Foster Wheeler Stoic Process, the WD-GI two stage coal gasifier, the Saarberg/Otto Coal Gasification Process, Allis-Chalmers KILnGAS Process, the purification of gases derived from coal, shale oil, Lurgi-Ruhrgas Process, the Tosco II Process, Paraho oil shale retorting processes, Occidental Modified In-Situ (MIS) Process, the geokinetics in-situ retorting process, oil shale pre-beneficiation, additional oil shale technologies, oil from oil sand, Suncor Hot Water Process, emerging technologies for oil from oil sands, synfuels upgrading and refining, Exxon fluid coking/flexicoking processes for synfuels upgrading applications, H-Oil processes, LC-Fining Process, and The Modified Litol Process for benzene production.

  16. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, V.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

  17. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore » Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  18. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  19. J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    j', J o R o - 8 5 0 R E V I S I O N 1 ' . , 1 ) L C r i l - i € v r . : i e n { L , - T h ' r , - , . , - ' C l . r : : ' ; f * ? ' $lFSr,\Y[ urt, ottC l - _ l 4-gi R E M E D I A L A C T I O N W O R K P L A N F'OR THE M A Y W O O D S I T E A P R I L 1 9 8 5 U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y O A K R I D G E O P E R A T I O N S T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S 1 . 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n a n d O b j e c t i v e s P a g e I 1 1 3 4 4 5 8 1 0 I 2 I 2 1 5 1 6 1 8 1 8 1 8 1

  20. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the shape and peak frequency of the noise power spectrum better than commercial smoothing kernels, and indicate that the spatial resolution at low contrast levels is not significantly degraded. Both the subjective evaluation using the ACR phantom and the objective evaluation on a low-contrast detection task using a CHO model observer demonstrate an improvement on low-contrast performance. The GPU implementation can process and transfer 300 slice images within 5 min. On patient data, the adaptive NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume than standard NLM, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. After a two week pilot study of lower dose CT urography and CT enterography exams, both GI and GU radiology groups elected to proceed with permanent implementation of adaptive NLM in their GI and GU CT practices. Conclusions: This work describes and validates a computationally efficient technique for noise map estimation directly from CT images, and an adaptive NLM filtering based on this noise map, on phantom and patient data. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with clinical workflow. The adaptive NLM algorithm provides effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose.

  1. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "??non-targeted"? responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

  2. Neurotoxicological effects of cinnabar (a Chinese mineral medicine, HgS) in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.-F.; Liu, S.-H.; Lin-Shiau, S.-Y.

    2007-10-15

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in combination with traditional Chinese medicine as a sedative for more than 2000 years. Up to date, its pharmacological and toxicological effects are still unclear, especially in clinical low-dose and long-term use. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the effects of cinnabar on the time course of changes in locomotor activities, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor equilibrium performance and neurobiochemical activities in mice during 3- to 11-week administration at a clinical dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The results showed that cinnabar was significantly absorbed by gastrointestinal (G-I) tract and transported to brain tissues. The spontaneous locomotor activities of male mice but not female mice were preferentially suppressed. Moreover, frequencies of jump and stereotype-1 episodes were progressively decreased after 3-week oral administration in male and female mice. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was prolonged and the retention time on a rotating rod (60 rpm) was reduced after treatment with cinnabar for 6 weeks and then progressively to a greater extent until the 11-week experiment. In addition, the biochemical changes in blood and brain tissues were studied; the inhibition of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activities, increased production of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were found with a greater extent in male mice than those in female mice, which were apparently correlated with their differences in the neurological responses observed. In conclusion, these findings, for the first time, provide evidence of the pharmacological and toxicological basis for understanding the sedative and neurotoxic effects of cinnabar used as a Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years.

  3. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not inmore » an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan LuxR-type receptors and do not produce AHLs, sensing them from other bacteria. We solved three structures of the E. coli SdiA orphan, in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA with no AHL is not in an apo state but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL). OCL is ubiquitously found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and is a phospholipid precursor for membrane biogenesis and a signaling molecule. While AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA-binding affinity, OCL functions as a chemical chaperone placeholder, stabilizing SdiA and allowing for basal activity. Our studies provide crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of SdiA activity.« less

  4. SU-E-T-629: Feasibility Study of Treating Multiple Brain Tumors with Large Number of Noncoplanar IMRT Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, P; Ma, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of treating multiple brain tumors withlarge number of noncoplanar IMRT beams. Methods: Thirty beams are selected from 390 deliverable beams separated by six degree in 4pi space. Beam selection optimization is based on a column generation algorithm. MLC leaf size is 2 mm. Dose matrices are calculated with collapsed cone convolution and superposition method in a 2 mm by 2mm by 2 mm grid. Twelve brain tumors of various shapes, sizes and locations are used to generate four plans treating 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumors. The radiation dose was 20 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose Volume Histograms for tumor and brain were compared. Results: All results are based on a 2 mm by 2 mm by 2 mm CT grid. For 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumor plans, minimum tumor doses are all 20 Gy. Mean tumor dose are 20.0, 20.1, 20.1 and 20.1 Gy. Maximum tumor dose are 23.3, 23.6, 25.4 and 25.4 Gy. Mean ventricles dose are 0.7, 1.7, 2.4 and 3.1 Gy.Mean subventricular zone dose are 0.8, 1.3, 2.2 and 3.2 Gy. Average Equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values for tumor are 20.1, 20.1, 20.2 and 20.2 Gy. The conformity index (CI) values are close to 1 for all 4 plans. The gradient index (GI) values are 2.50, 2.05, 2.09 and 2.19. Conclusion: Compared with published Gamma Knife treatment studies, noncoplanar IMRT treatment plan is superior in terms of dose conformity. Due to maximum limit of beams per plan, Gamma knife has to treat multiple tumors separately in different plans. Noncoplanar IMRT plans theoretically can be delivered in a single plan on any modern linac with an automated couch and image guidance. This warrants further study of using noncoplanar IMRT as a viable treatment solution for multiple brain tumors.

  5. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia P. Tuttle

    2012-01-31

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

  6. Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

    2009-02-06

    The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project are due to: i) a reduced number of process shutdowns to change hardware or lining material, ii) reduced need to produce new hardware or lining material, iii) improved product quality leads to reduced need to remake product or manufacturing of new product, iv) reduction in contamination of melt from degradation of refractory and metallic components, v) elimination of worn hardware will increase efficiency of process, vi) reduced refractory lining deterioration or formation of a less insulating phase, would result in decreased heat loss through the walls. Projected 2015 benefits for the U.S. aluminum industry, assuming 21% market penetration of improved refractory materials, are energy savings of approximately 0.2 trillion BTU/year, cost savings of $2.3 billion/year and carbon reductions of approximately 1.4 billion tons/year. The carbon reduction benefit of the project for the hot-dip galvanize and aluminum industries combined is projected to be approximately 2.2 billion tons/year in 2015. Pathways from research to commercialization were based on structure of the projects industrial partnerships. These partnerships included suppliers, industrial associations, and end users. All parties were involved in conducting the project including planning and critiquing the trials. Supplier companies such as Pyrotech Metaullics, Stoody, and Duraloy have commercialized products and processes developed on the project.

  7. CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the project’s subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

  8. Overview of the design, construction, and operation of interstate liquid petroleum pipelines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pharris, T. C.; Kolpa, R. L.

    2008-01-31

    The U.S. liquid petroleum pipeline industry is large, diverse, and vital to the nation's economy. Comprised of approximately 200,000 miles of pipe in all fifty states, liquid petroleum pipelines carried more than 40 million barrels per day, or 4 trillion barrel-miles, of crude oil and refined products during 2001. That represents about 17% of all freight transported in the United States, yet the cost of doing so amounted to only 2% of the nation's freight bill. Approximately 66% of domestic petroleum transport (by ton-mile) occurs by pipeline, with marine movements accounting for 28% and rail and truck transport making up the balance. In 2004, the movement of crude petroleum by domestic federally regulated pipelines amounted to 599.6 billion tonmiles, while that of petroleum products amounted to 315.9 billion ton-miles (AOPL 2006). As an illustration of the low cost of pipeline transportation, the cost to move a barrel of gasoline from Houston, Texas, to New York Harbor is only 3 cents per gallon, which is a small fraction of the cost of gasoline to consumers. Pipelines may be small or large, up to 48 inches in diameter. Nearly all of the mainline pipe is buried, but other pipeline components such as pump stations are above ground. Some lines are as short as a mile, while others may extend 1,000 miles or more. Some are very simple, connecting a single source to a single destination, while others are very complex, having many sources, destinations, and interconnections. Many pipelines cross one or more state boundaries (interstate), while some are located within a single state (intrastate), and still others operate on the Outer Continental Shelf and may or may not extend into one or more states. U.S. pipelines are located in coastal plains, deserts, Arctic tundra, mountains, and more than a mile beneath the water's surface of the Gulf of Mexico (Rabinow 2004; AOPL 2006). The network of crude oil pipelines in the United States is extensive. There are approximately 55,000 miles of crude oil trunk lines (usually 8 to 24 inches in diameter) in the United States that connect regional markets. The United States also has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 miles of small gathering lines (usually 2 to 6 inches in diameter) located primarily in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Wyoming, with small systems in a number of other oil producing states. These small lines gather the oil from many wells, both onshore and offshore, and connect to larger trunk lines measuring 8 to 24 inches in diameter. There are approximately 95,000 miles of refined products pipelines nationwide. Refined products pipelines are found in almost every state in the United States, with the exception of some New England states. These refined product pipelines vary in size from relatively small, 8- to 12-inch-diameter lines, to up to 42 inches in diameter. The overview of pipeline design, installation, and operation provided in the following sections is only a cursory treatment. Readers interested in more detailed discussions are invited to consult the myriad engineering publications available that provide such details. The two primary publications on which the following discussions are based are: Oil and Gas Pipeline Fundamentals (Kennedy 1993) and the Pipeline Rules of Thumb Handbook (McAllister 2002). Both are recommended references for additional reading for those requiring additional details. Websites maintained by various pipeline operators also can provide much useful information, as well as links to other sources of information. In particular, the website maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) (http://www.eia.doe.gov) is recommended. An excellent bibliography on pipeline standards and practices, including special considerations for pipelines in Arctic climates, has been published jointly by librarians for the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (operators of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System [TAPS]) and the Geophysical Institute/International Arctic Research Center, both located in Fairbanks (Barboza and Trebelhorn 2001), available electronically at http://www.gi.alaska.edu/services/library/pipeline.html codes. The Association of Oil Pipe Lines (AOPL) and the American Petroleum Institute (API) jointly provide an overview covering the life cycle of design, construction, operations, maintenance, economic regulation, and deactivation of liquid pipelines (AOPL/API 2007).