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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigerati...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol...

2

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity AgencyCompany...

3

Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions ­ Outlook June 4, 2013 Steven Simmons CO2 Emission Outlook for the Pacific NW (ID-MT- OR-WA) Key Factors that determine Emissions Levels 1 Demand & Conservation 50 60 70 2 1. Demand

4

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to characterize carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from hydropower reservoirs in the US SoutheastGHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly understood, but recent studies have indicated that GHG emissions

5

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad estimate from Columbia University shows the size of a multi-well pad of Marcellus Shale averages 20

Jaramillo, Paulina

6

TECHNICAL REPORTS The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL REPORTS 1396 The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range of potential by composting and GHG emissions during composting. The primary carbon credits associated with composting are through CH4 avoidance when feedstocks are composted instead of landfilled (municipal solid waste

Brown, Sally

7

Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(milliontonsCO2) Petroleum + Pet Coke Natural Gas Coal 8 0.0 10.0 20.0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 and ½ Valmy coal plants) 2 #12;6/5/2013 2 GHG Emissions by Economic Sector in the Pacific Northwest (2010 Renewables 7 6%In 2011, the region 0.2% 6.4% Coal, 15.7% Nuclear, 2.0% 7.6%, g generated ~27,000 MWa ­ 68

8

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

Green, Donna

9

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating surface emissions. Until recently, dedicated research-grade instruments have been required  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG columns · Quantifying local to regional GHG enhancements for emissions inventory verificationAbstract Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating with another Cessna 210 over Central California quantified enhancements in CO2 and CH4 from urban

12

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from freight transport This guidance provides clear instructions on calculating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from freight and report your greenhouse gas emissions', by providing more specific information and examples relating

13

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

14

Pilot application of PalmGHG, the RSPO greenhouse gas calculator for oil palm products , Chase L.D.C.b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pilot application of PalmGHG, the RSPO greenhouse gas calculator for oil palm products Bessou C.1016/j.jclepro.2013.12.008 (Pre-proof version) ABSTRACT The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) is a non-profit association promoting sustainable palm oil through a voluntary certification scheme. Two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies are required to inventory and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change.

16

Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has ~35% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis Gas CT has ~50% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis 119 119 210 CCCT CT Colstrip 3/4 #12;6/5/2013 2 Avista CO2 Emissions Forecast Rising emissions overall

17

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O

19

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

OSullivan, Francis Martin

20

Federal Agency Progress Toward Greenhouse Gas Reduction Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Excel spreadsheet shows overall government and federal agency reductions in scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and in indirect scope 3 GHG emissions categories.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Federal Guidance Read the White House Council on Environmental Quality's...

23

Analysis of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Tax Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Congress is considering a set of bills designed to limit the nations greenhouse gas (GHG)

Metcalf, Gilbert E.

24

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey.

25

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Business travel is among the largest sources of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. For some agencies, business travel can represent up to 60% of Scope 3...

26

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

27

Biochar amendment and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of biochar amendment on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to elucidate the mechanisms behind these effects. I investigated the suppression of soil carbon dioxide ...

Case, Sean Daniel Charles

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Interagency Pilot of Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tools: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Tongass National Forest (Tongass) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct a pilot study of three greenhouse gas (GHG) inventorying tools.

Carpenter, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Kandt, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23...

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

30

II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed biofuels production. GHG policies18 that create a carbon price either through an emissions trading system or directly by taxing GHG emissions also generate increased demand for biofuels. They do so by raising

31

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. CO2 emissions sources. U.S. CO2 transportation emissions sources by mode. #12;Center% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCsTransportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge

32

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate...

33

Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

35

Chapter Four Assessing the Air Pollution, Greenhouse Gas, Air Quality, and Health Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many states and localities are exploring or implementing clean energy policies to achieve greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air pollutant1 emission reductions. Document map Chapter one

unknown authors

36

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section will help agencies to determine the most visible alternatives to single occupancy vehicle (SOV) commuting at the agencies major worksites establish the number of employees that may reasonably switch to non-SOV methods and estimate the resulting impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at their worksites. Learn how to: Identify relevant alternatives and supporting strategies Evaluate potential adoption of alternatives Estimate the GHG emission impact

37

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034014 Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas Mohan Jiang1 , W Michael Griffin2,3 , Chris greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the production of Marcellus shale natural gas and compares its emissions

Jaramillo, Paulina

38

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Learn about: Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases Federal...

39

Greenhouse Gas Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect."

40

A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy.

42

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated.

43

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2) emission reduction estimates were obtained for each of the measures. The package of measures the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions-makers will require estimates of both the potential emission reductions and the costs or benefits associated

44

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized.

46

Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

Nishimura, Eriko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

gas (GHG) perspective? *How do those results compare with natural gas sourced from Russia and delivered to the same European and Asian markets via pipeline? Life Cycle GHG...

48

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist...

50

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Agency Progress Toward Reduction Targets Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals FY 2011 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals FY 2010...

51

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade Proposals: Application of a Forward-Looking Computable General Equilibrium Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a forward-looking version of the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, and apply it to examine the economic implications of proposals in the U.S. Congress to limit greenhouse gas (GHG) ...

Gurgel, Angelo C.

53

Behavior-Based Transportation Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Under the Clean Development Mechanism Transport-Efficient Development in Nanchang, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a methodology, consistent with the Kyoto Protocol?s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction benefits of transport efficient development (TED). TED aims to reduce ...

Zegras, P. Christopher

54

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Idaho National Laboratory FY12 Greenhouse Gas Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

Kimberly Frerichs

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Idaho National Laboratory's FY11 Greenhouse Gas Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

Kimberly Frerichs

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V. [Inst. of Ecology, Tallinn (Estonia); Martins, A.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia); Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H. [Estonian Agricultural Univ., Tartu (Estonia)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks. #12;2 Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks for characterizing potential responses to greenhouse gas mitigation policies by the agriculture and forestry

McCarl, Bruce A.

60

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

Anderson, Diana

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet describes the federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources.

63

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program provides performance data illustrating federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by federal agencies.

64

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires...

65

Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid ghg emissions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas balances of cassava-based ethanol in Vietnam Loan T. Lea, Summary: . The Thailand case considered GHG emission credits assigned for the production process...

68

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Protection Agency, Danish Energy Authority and Danish Ministry of Finance. The consultancy reportDanish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4

69

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Consulting · Riitta Pipatti, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Dennis Rolston Agency · Fabian Wagner, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Wilfried Winiwarter

70

Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D. [Kazakh Scientific-Research Hydrometeorlogical Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article Correction to Carbon sequestration and greenhouseCor- rection to Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas1 ] In the paper Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advancing Development and Greenhouse Gas Reductions in Vietnam's Wind Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean energy development is a key component of Vietnam's Green Growth Strategy, which establishes a target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from domestic energy activities by 20-30 percent by 2030 relative to a business-as-usual scenario. Vietnam has significant wind energy resources, which, if developed, could help the country reach this target while providing ancillary economic, social, and environmental benefits. Given Vietnam's ambitious clean energy goals and the relatively nascent state of wind energy development in the country, this paper seeks to fulfill two primary objectives: to distill timely and useful information to provincial-level planners, analysts, and project developers as they evaluate opportunities to develop local wind resources; and, to provide insights to policymakers on how coordinated efforts may help advance large-scale wind development, deliver near-term GHG emission reductions, and promote national objectives in the context of a low emission development framework.

Bilello, D.; Katz, J.; Esterly, S.; Ogonowski, M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W been proposed as viable bioenergy crops because of their potential to yield harvest- able biomass-senescence harvests are a more effective means than maximizing yield potential. Keywords: bioenergy, feedstocks, GHG

DeLucia, Evan H.

74

IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE) Evaluation - ENERBIO Livrable D4.1 : GHG balances of bioenergy pathways Mars 2012 Nathalie GAGNAIRE, Benoît GABRIELLE sources by bioenergy mostly hinges on the uncertainty on the magnitude of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagricultures future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section sets state goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050.

77

Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas...

78

Water Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak, Bruce A. McCarl, Allan J. Sommer, Brian C. Murray, Timothy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greenhouse gas (GHG) emission offset strategies in U.S. agriculture by linking a national level agriculturalWater Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak sector model (ASMGHG) to a national level water quality model (NWPCAM). The simulated policy scenario

McCarl, Bruce A.

79

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for emissions from purchased electricity, transport or mobile sources, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References 1.0 1.1...

80

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References Retrieved from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2011 & 2012 Queen's University Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Activity levels are derived from reports documenting consumption for fuels and energy. These reports · Fugitive emissions from electrical switches, fire suppression equipment, lab chemicals, and refrigerants. Scope 2 includes all indirect emissions from the university's purchased energy, including

Abolmaesumi, Purang

82

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective Jump to: navigation, searchThe GermanThe

83

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective Jump to: navigation, searchThe GermanTheMobil

84

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place:InnovationFunds-Business GuideRoundtable Jump

85

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place:InnovationFunds-Business GuideRoundtable Jumpand Air

86

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

89

Fact #589: September 21, 2009 Proposed Fuel Economy and Greenhouse...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

national standards for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). The standards would apply to model year 2012 - 2016 passenger cars and light...

90

Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

91

Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant GHG reductions are possible by efficient WtE technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHP and high power-to-heat ratio provide significant GHG savings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O and coal mine type are important in LCA GHG emissions of FBC co-combustion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting coal and fuel oil by waste is beneficial in electricity and heat production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting natural gas by waste may not be reasonable in CHP generation. - Abstract: Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO{sub 2}-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved.

Vainikka, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.vainikka@vtt.fi [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilae, Kai [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FIN 20500 Turku (Finland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Novel Paradigm in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission [1, 2]. Moreover, water vapor is also a naturally occurring greenhouse gas and accounts for the largest percent- age of the greenhouse effect, between 36% and 66% in terms of radiation absorbance. Water). Yet the radiative importance of water vapor is less than that of CO2, CH4, and N2O, because

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

93

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -Results AtTechnicalGHG Information

94

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -Results AtTechnicalGHG

95

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With Climate Change legislation on the horizon, the need to integrate energy reduction initiatives with greenhouse gas reduction efforts is critical to manufactures competitiveness and financial strength going forward. MPC has developed...

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

99

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

Michalek, Jeremy J.

100

Idaho National Laboratory's FY13 Greenhouse Gas Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. This report details the methods behind quantifying INLs GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only the large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

Kimberly Frerichs

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing depots, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this range can be minimized through optimizing the siting of preprocessing depots where ample rail infrastructure exists to supply biomass commodity to a regional biorefinery supply system

Kara G. Cafferty; Erin M. Searcy; Long Nguyen; Sabrina Spatari

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/5/2013 1 Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas) · Simple, somewhat inflexible · Do not price emissions directly Carbon taxes · Use market forces Council June 4, 2013 Portland, OR 1 CO2 Chemistry 1 molecule of CO 1 atom carbon1 molecule of CO2 = 1 atom

103

Idaho National Laboratorys Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL's FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 113,049 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY08. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's baseline GHG inventory: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

Jennifer D. Morton

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG UNIVERSITYGHG Report - FY10 3 Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people Oil: Amber Sams · Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Davion Reese · First Student: Brian Maxwell · Good Company

Escher, Christine

107

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program #12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many - First Student: Brian Maxwell - Carson Oil: Gena Conner Government Organizations - Baker County: Jason

Escher, Christine

108

2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Princeton University Reports Contents 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Campus Energy was established in 2008, the University has invested $5.3 million in energy-savings projects, resulting in annual of a 5.2-megawatt solar collector field. · Audit the remaining 20 of the top 50 energy- consuming

109

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

Escher, Christine

110

[Page Intentionally Left Blank] Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................11 4.2 Conventional Jet Fuel from Crude Oil2 June #12;[Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Alternative .......................................5 3.1 Life cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Reuter, Martin

111

Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Fund, established by the Act to Amend Title 7 of the Delaware Code Relating to a...

112

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions University://www.atmos.utah.edu/) seeks multiple graduate students to study greenhouse gas emissions associated with urban development greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: · What can explain

Lin, John Chun-Han

113

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO and life cycle GHG emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the choice of coal over natural gas. External incentives such as low natural gas prices compared to coalImplications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO 2 , NO X of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG

Jaramillo, Paulina

114

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623Primary MetalsOrigin State Glossary

115

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2729 in T. Wirth, editor. Inventory of U.S. greenhouse gasfor national greenhouse gas inventories. Volume 2.National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme Task Force

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On reductions in GHG, and b) use analytical tools/methods to assess the emissions reductions possible through and prioritized based on factors such as cost effectiveness, potential for emission reductions, and applicability

117

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure options (e.g., Washington, DC, metropolitan area) Greatest proportion of total commute emissions Highest commuting emissions per person than agency average.

119

Improving UK greenhouse gas emission estimates using tall tower observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gases in the Earths atmosphere play an important role in regulating surface temperatures. The UK is signatory to international agreements that legally commit the UK to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, and ...

Howie, James Edward

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The RCP Greenhouse Gas Concentrations and their Extensions from 1765 to 2300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the greenhouse gas concentrations for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their extensions beyond 2100, the Extended Concentration Pathways (ECPs). These projections include all major anthropogenic greenhouse gases and are a result of a multi-year effort to produce new scenarios for climate change research. We first compiled a suite of observations and emissions estimates for greenhouse gases (GHGs) through the historical period (1750-2005). For the 21st century, we start from emissions projected by four different Integrated Assessment Models for 2005-2100. We harmonize these emissions to allow inter-comparability of scenarios and to achieve a smooth transition from historical data. These harmonized emissions are then used to derive future GHG concentrations. We also present the GHG concentrations for one supplementary extension, which illustrates the emissions implications of attempting to go back to ECP4.5 concentration levels after emissions in the 21st century followed RCP6. Corresponding radiative forcing values are also presented for the RCP and ECPs.

Meinshausen, Malte; Smith, Steven J.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Daniel, John S.; Kainuma, M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Matsumoto, Ken ichi; Montzka, S.; Raper, S.; Riahi, Keywan; Thomson, Allison M.; Velders, G.J.M; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of...

126

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy AgencyCompany Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land Topics:...

127

Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International Climate Agreements AgencyCompany Organization: Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Sector: Energy, Land...

128

Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Jet Fuels Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Secretary Chu Announces 100 Million for Advanced Research...

129

DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

greenhouse gas emissions - the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. approach to climate change. The technologies developed under the Climate Change Technology program...

130

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas...

131

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings AgencyCompany Organization...

132

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmenta...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goods Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods AgencyCompany...

133

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies...

134

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

135

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency...

136

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

138

Idaho National Laboratorys FY09 & FY10 Greenhouse Gas Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and 2010 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. In recent years, concern has grown about the environmental impact of GHGs. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of an inventory of the total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions. INL's GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries, but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated 103,590 and 102,413 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY09 and FY10, respectively. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's FY09 and FY10 GHG inventories: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

Jennifer D. Morton

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President, Energy Procurement 9/5/13 California Power Markets Symposium #12;1. PG&E Renewable Portfolio Standard 2. AB32 and Greenhouse Gas Legislation Outline #12;PG&E's Electric Generation Portfolio *Note: Other

142

Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations ABSTRACT This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types

143

INEEL Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Trend Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the INEEL GHG Inventory and Trend Analysis is to establish INEEL expertise in carbon management decision making and policy analysis. This FY-99 effort is the first step toward placing the INEEL in a leadership role within the DOE laboratories to support carbon management systems and analysis.

Shropshire, David Earl; Teel, Dale Milton

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcings Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 12 European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A System in Transition* Summary: European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A...

145

U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis, November 2012 U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis, November 2012 The report ranks...

146

U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis thumbenergyuselossemissionslg.gif How...

147

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked...

148

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to a low-carbon economy. We must also lead by example in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with our own operations and facilities. On October 5,2009, the...

149

Fiscal Year 2012 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Excel spreadsheet shows scope 1, 2, and 3 greenhouse gas inventories reported by federal agencies in fiscal year 2012. It includes emissions from sources not subject to the reduction targets.

150

Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Ph 61 2 6125 5905 Andrew.blakers@anu.edu.au Web: http

152

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Registry (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to establish a method for collecting emissions estimates from producers of greenhouse gases. Reporting is mandatory for some entities, and the...

154

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

156

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 7 #12;Domestic Natural Gas Consumption Sectoral Trends and Projections: 2010 Total Consumption = 23 Timothy J. Skone, P.E. Office of Strategic Energy Analysis and Planning May 12 2011May 12, 2011 Presented for reducing 2 GHG emissions? #12;Question #1: Who is NETL? 3 #12;National Energy Technology Laboratory MISSION

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

159

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NREL resourceEnergy Systems IntegrationGreenhouse

160

Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by President Bush, and subsequently authorized in EPAct2005, is responsible for preparing this report on behalf CCCSTI. This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals. It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application. Importantly, by documenting the hundreds of Federal policies, programs, regulations, incentives, and other activities that are in effect and operating today to address these barriers, it provides a broad context for evaluating the adequacy of current policy and the potential need, if any, for additional measures that might be undertaken by government or industry. Finally, it draws conclusions about the current situation, identifies gaps and opportunities, and suggests analytical principles that should be applied to assess and formulate policies and measures to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of these technologies.

Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the worlds roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the worlds roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the worlds roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Decision-Making to Reduce Manufacturing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to GHG/kWh of the USA electricity supply chain are coalGHG/kWh of electricity example based on USA. Distributionnuclear (USA) are different because of the electricity mix

Reich-Weiser, Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective and Research Associate, respectively, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. Seniority of Authorship is shared. This research was supported by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station through

McCarl, Bruce A.

164

Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

Turetsky, Merritt

165

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics Over the last thirty years, hundreds and utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. ~40 g CO2

166

An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai`i And University of Hawai`i Economic Research, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

167

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: How Do They Add Up?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulations, aimed, for instance, at altering electricity fuel choice, household energy use, and automotive California is implementing a broad portfolio of regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, many of these policies, if undertaken without the cooperation of neighboring states may result

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

168

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................37 3.5.1.1 Direct Carbon Emissions Through Fossil Fuel Use.....................38 3.5.1.2 Indirect.5.2.2 Production of Fossil Fuel Substitutes...........................................49 3.5.2.3 Conversion Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

McCarl, Bruce A.

169

Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen

Dabdub, Donald

170

Mexico joins the venture: Joint Implementation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joint Implementation (JI) and its pilot phase of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) are envisioned as an economic way of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper draws upon the Mexican experience with AIJ to identify Mexican concerns with AIJ/JI and proposed solutions to these. Three approved Mexican AIJ projects (Ilumex, Scolel Te, and Salicornia) are described in detail. The Ilurnex project promotes the use of compact fluorescent lamps in Mexican homes of the States of Jalisco and Nuevo Leon, to reduce electric demand. Scolel Te is a sustainable forest management project in Chiapas. Salicornia examines the potential for carbon sequestration with a Halophyte-based crop irrigated with saline waters in Sonora. These three projects are reviewed to clarify the issues and concerns that Mexico has with AIJ and JI and propose measures to deal with them. These initial Mexican AIJ projects show that there is a need for creation of standard project evaluation procedures, and criteria and institutions to oversee project design, selection, and implementation. Further JI development will be facilitated by national and international clarification of key issues such as additionality criteria, carbon-credit sharing, and valuation of non-GHG environmental and/or social benefits and impacts for AIJ projects. Mexico is concerned that JI funding could negatively impact official development assistance or that OECD countries will use JI to avoid taking significant GHG mitigation actions in their own countries. The lack of carbon credit trading in the AIJ stage must be removed to provide useful experience on how to share carbon credits. National or international guidelines are needed to ensure that a portion of the carbon credits is allocated to Mexico.

Imaz, M.; Gay, C.; Friedmann, R.; Goldberg, B.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

172

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

174

Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...

175

The Essential Role of State Enforcement in the Brave New World of Greenhouse Gas Emission Limits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greenhouse gas emissions trading market, the Regionalwith respect to emissions trading markets. 23 We must have a

Bogoshian, Matt; Alex, Ken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

GHG Considerations in Integrated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power System Symposium 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. June 4, 2013 GHG federal, economy-wide legislation by 2020. o Prior to 2020, assumes CO2 emissions abatement due to effects CO2 compliance 3 y p cost and coal and gas commodity prices. o Based on middle ground federal

178

Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

Schlesinger, M. E.

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators to Model Some Greenhouse Gas Molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Common greenhouse gas molecules SF{sub 6}, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} are modeled as harmonic oscillators whose potential and kinetic energies are derived. Using the Euler-Lagrange equation, their equations of motion are derived and their phase portraits are plotted. The authors use these data to attempt to explain the lifespan of these gases in the atmosphere.

Go, Clark Kendrick C.; Maquiling, Joel T. [Department of Physics, Ateneo de Manila University, Katipunan Avenue, Quezon City (Philippines)

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower complexes on large rivers in Eastern Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water bodies, such as freshwater lakes, are known to be net emitters of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). In recent years, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from tropical, boreal, and mid-latitude reservoirs have been reported. At a time when hydropower is increasing worldwide, better understanding of seasonal and regional variation in GHG emissions is needed in order to develop a predictive understanding of such fluxes within man-made impoundments. We examined power-producing dam complexes within xeric temperate locations in the northwestern United States. Sampling environments on the Snake (Lower Monumental Dam Complex) and Columbia Rivers (Priest Rapids Dam Complex) included tributary, mainstem, embayment, forebay, and tailrace areas during winter and summer 2012. At each sampling location, GHG measurement pathways included surface gas flux, degassing as water passed through dams during power generation, ebullition within littoral embayments, and direct sampling of hyporheic pore-water. Measurements were also carried out in a free-flowing reach of the Columbia River to estimate unaltered conditions. Surface flux resulted in very low emissions, with reservoirs acting as a sink for CO2 (up to 262 mg m-2 d-1, which is within the range previously reported for similarly located reservoirs). Surface flux of methane remained below 1 mg CH4 m-2d-1, a value well below fluxes reported previously for temperate reservoirs. Water passing through hydroelectric projects acted as a sink for CO2 during winter and a small source during summer, with mean degassing fluxes of 117 and 4.5 t CO2 d-1, respectively. Degassing of CH4 was minimal, with mean fluxes of 3.1 10-6 and 5.6 10-4 t CH4 d-1 during winter and summer, respectively. Gas flux due to ebullition was greater in coves located within reservoirs than in coves within the free flowing Hanford Reachand CH4 flux exceeded that of CO2. Methane emissions varied widely across sampling locations, ranging from 10.5 to 1039 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, with mean fluxes of 324 mg CH4 m-2 d-1in Lower Monumental Dam reservoir and 482 mg CH4 m-2d-1 in the Priest Rapids Dam reservoir. The magnitude of methane flux due to ebullition was unexpectedly high, and falls within the range recently reported for other temperate reservoirs around the world, further suggesting that this methane source should be considered in estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane flux from sediment pore-water within littoral embayments averaged 4.2 mg m-2 d-1 during winter and 8.1 mg m-2 d-1 during summer, with a peak flux of 19.8 mg m-2d-1 (at the same location where CH4 ebullition was also the greatest). Carbon dioxide flux from sediment pore-water averaged approximately 80 mg m-2d-1 with little difference between winter and summer. Similar to emissions from ebullition, flux from sediment pore-water was higher in reservoirs than in the free flowing reach.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Niehus, Sara E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Chapter 22 Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water vapor (the most abundant GHG) accounts for the largest percentage of the greenhouse effect. However, water vapor concentrations fluctuate regionally, and human activity...

183

Greenhouse Gas Concerns and Power Sector Planning (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Concerns about potential climate change driven by rising atmospheric concentrations of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) have grown over the past two decades, both domestically and abroad. In the United States, potential policies to limit or reduce GHG emissions are in various stages of development at the state, regional, and federal levels. In addition to ongoing uncertainty with respect to future growth in energy demand and the costs of fuel, labor, and new plant construction, U.S. electric power companies must consider the effects of potential policy changes to limit or reduce GHG emissions that would significantly alter their planning and operating decisions. The possibility of such changes may already be affecting planning decisions for new generating capacity.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coupling biophysical and micro-economic models to1 assess the effect of mitigation measures on greenhouse2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which relates farm-28 level GHG emissions to production factors. This resulted in a N2O efflux 20% lower.9 d: INRA, US 1106 INFOSOL, F-45166 Olivet, France.10 *: Corresponding author:11 Institut National greenhouse20 gas (GHG). Because N2O emissions strongly depend on soil type, climate, and crop manage-21 ment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, mobile combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References 1.0 1.1 "GHG...

186

Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Summary of Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading GHG Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 established new renewable fuel categories and eligibility requirements (EPA 2010). A significant aspect of the National Renewable Fuel Standard 2 (RFS2) program is the requirement that the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a qualifying renewable fuel be less than the life cycle GHG emissions of the 2005 baseline average gasoline or diesel fuel that it replaces. Four levels of reduction are required for the four renewable fuel standards. Table 1 lists these life cycle performance improvement thresholds. Table 1. Life Cycle GHG Thresholds Specified in EISA Fuel Type Percent Reduction from 2005 Baseline Renewable fuel 20% Advanced biofuel 50% Biomass-based diesel 50% Cellulosic biofuel 60% Notably, there is a specialized subset of advanced biofuels that are the cellulosic biofuels. The cellulosic biofuels are incentivized by the Cellulosic Biofuel Producer Tax Credit (26 USC 40) to stimulate market adoption of these fuels. EISA defines a cellulosic biofuel as follows (42 USC 7545(o)(1)(E)): The term cellulosic biofuel means renewable fuel derived from any cellulose, hemicellulose, or lignin that is derived from renewable biomass and that has lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the Administrator, that are at least 60 percent less than the baseline lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. As indicated, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sole responsibility for conducting the life cycle analysis (LCA) and making the final determination of whether a given fuel qualifies under these biofuel definitions. However, there appears to be a need within the LCA community to discuss and eventually reach consensus on discerning a 5059 % GHG reduction from a ? 60% GHG reduction for policy, market, and technology development. The level of specificity and agreement will require additional development of capabilities and time for the sustainability and analysis community, as illustrated by the rich dialogue and convergence around the energy content and GHG reduction of cellulosic ethanol (an example of these discussions can be found in Wang 2011). GHG analyses of fast pyrolysis technology routes are being developed and will require significant work to reach the levels of development and maturity of cellulosic ethanol models. This summary provides some of the first fast pyrolysis analyses and clarifies some of the reasons for differing results in an effort to begin the convergence on assumptions, discussion of quality of models, and harmonization.

Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Climate change : enhanced : recent reductions in China's greenhouse gas emissions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the most recent energy and other statistical data, we have estimated the annual trends in China's greenhouse gas emissions for the period 1990 to 2000. The authors of this Policy Forum calculate that CO2 emissions declined by 7.3% between 1996 and 2000, while CH4 emissions declined by 2.2% between 1997 and 2000. These reductions were due to a combination of energy reforms, economic restructuring, forestry policies, and economic slowdown. The effects of these emission changes on global mean temperatures are estimated and compared with the effects of concurrent changes in two aerosol species, sulfate and black carbon.

Streets, D. G.; Jiang, K.; Hu, X.; Sinton, J. E.; Zhang, X.-Q.; Xu, D.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Hansen, J. E.; Decision and Information Sciences; Energy Research Inst.; LBNL; Chinese Academy of Forestry; Stanford Univ.; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

Not Available

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

CO{sub 2} allowance allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the effect on electricity investors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an effort by nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states to develop a regional, mandatory, market-based cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector. The initiative is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the RGGI region and beyond. The implications of these changes for the value of electricity-generating assets and the market value of the firms that own them depends on the initial allocation of carbon dioxide allowances, the composition of generating assets owned by the firm, and the locations of those assets. Changes in asset values inside the RGGI region may be positive or negative, whereas changes outside of the RGGI region are almost always positive but nonetheless vary greatly. Viewing changes at the firm level aggregates and moderates both positive and negative effects on market value compared with what would be observed by looking at changes at individual facilities. Nonetheless, a particular firm's portfolio of assets is unlikely to reflect the overall composition of assets in the industry as a whole, and some firms are likely to do substantially better or worse than the industry average. 16 refs., 4 figs.

Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmerook

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimate 8. Price of coal energy: average delivered price toin gCO2e/liter Price of coal energy 0.0020 ($/MJ) Price of0.09 uses only coal based energy net GHG displacement if

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Life cycle analysis is carried out for 11 predicted configurations of pyrolysis biochar systems to determine greenhouse gas balance, using an original spreadsheet model. System (more)

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Investigation of greenhouse gas reduction strategies by industries : an enterprise systems architecting approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores an enterprise systems architecting approach to investigate the greenhouse gas reduction strategies followed by industries, especially for automotive industry and Information Technology industry. The ...

Tanthullu Athmaram, Kumaresh Babu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007....................................................................................................................4 Corporate vs. Geographic Inventories...........................................................................4 Inventory Protocol

Kaminsky, Werner

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - agroecosystem greenhouse gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Research and Demonstration Project Summary: rates of energy return, greater soil carbon sequestration, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions... and belowground pools and...

203

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

204

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inherently, natural gas combustion produces significantlygas turbines were fuel gas combustion devices and that theyof greenhouse gas emissions released during combustion. 5 0

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1988, Congress requested that DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity) and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiatively important gases. Topics discussed include: state of the science in estimating atmosphere/climate change relationships, the potential consequences of atmosphere/climate change, us greenhouse emissions past and present, an approach to analyzing the technical potential and cost of reducing US energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, current policy base and National Energy Strategy actions, fiscal instruments, regulatory instruments, combined strategies and instruments, macroeconomic impacts, carbon taxation and international trade, a comparison to other studies.

Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses involving coal. Greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use and methane releases at coal mines, fuel.5 million metric tons of methane emissions. Close to 95% of domestic coal was consumed by the electricityUncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal Aranya Venkatesh

Jaramillo, Paulina

207

enhancing greenhouse gas "sinks," such as forests). The report identifies strategies that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to limit greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., through energy efficiency and low carbon energy sources). At the current rate of U.S. emissions (roughly 7 Gt CO2-eq per year), the proposed budget would be "spent" well and natural ecosys- tems around the world. The largest overall source of greenhouse gas emissions

208

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gasEconomic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider emissions. However, subsidies are needed to make agricultural biofuel production economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

209

Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions constraint? Implications for energy and climate

210

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

211

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop 4493 g CO2 eq?m22 over 15 years of energy cane production. Cultivation of energy cane on former pasture Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop. PLoS ONE 8(8): e72019. doi

DeLucia, Evan H.

212

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

214

A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS. Present monitoring systems would be heavily relied on in any GHGIS implementation at the outset and would likely continue to provide valuable future contributions to GHGIS. However, present monitoring systems were developed to serve science/research purposes. This study concludes that no component or capability presently available is at the level of technological maturity and readiness required for implementation in an operational GHGIS today. However, purpose-designed and -built components could be developed and implemented in support of a future GHGIS. The study concludes that it is possible to develop and provide a capability-driven prototype GHGIS, as part of a Phase-1 effort, within three years from project-funding start, that would make use of and integrate existing sensing and system capabilities. As part of a Phase-2 effort, a requirem

Jonietz, Karl K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E [JPL/CAL TECH; Roman, Douglas A [LLNL; Walker, Bruce C [SNL

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-analysis of the costs of mitigating global GHG emissions over the period to 2100, with and without the effects trading allowances at a regional or global level. It reports a wide range of costs with confusing-analyses done by the World Resources Institute for the US economy, 1997, and the IPCC post-SRES models

Watson, Andrew

216

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

VOL 5, ISSUE 4 Greenhouse Gas Emmissions in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total emissions in the West is emphasized by examining emissions per capita or per dollar of GDP equivalent Emissions per $ million of GDP(constant $2007) 1 About 80% of the emissions are actually carbon). With their energy-intensive economies, Saskatchewan and Alberta together account for nearly one-half of the 2012 GHG

Peak, Derek

218

REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM DEFORESTATION IN DEVELOPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mitigation effort post-2012. Reducing GHG emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD)2 in developing of Environment of Mexico1 Esteve Corbera and Katrina Brown Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, UK School of Mexico or the Mexican Government. #12;ABSTRACT This paper provides a critical perspective to the debate

Watson, Andrew

219

Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To estimate the GHG impact of a business travel reduction program, a Federal agency or program should quantify the number of trips that could be avoided each year. If an agency has a large proportion of international travel, the agency may estimate changes in domestic and international trips separately because the associated savings in miles can be very different.

220

Most people now understand the necessity to reduce greenhouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Reducing your authority's per capita carbon emissions can require costly planning, engagement, recording in the community to pledge energy-saving actions to help them reach their carbon reduction ambition greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Action by Local Authorities will be criticalinachievingthe

Everest, Graham R

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Federal, state and utility roles in reducing new building greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will explore the role of implementation of building energy codes and standards in reducing US greenhouse gas emissions. It will discuss the role of utilities in supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency in improving the efficiency of new buildings. The paper will summarize Federal policies and programs that improve code compliance and increase overall greenhouse gas emission reductions. Finally, the paper will discuss the role of code compliance and the energy and greenhouse gas emission reductions that have been realized from various Federal, State and utility programs that enhance compliance.

Johnson, J.A.; Shankle, D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Boulin, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere of anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere such as CO2, CH4, N2O and CFCs. The CO2 emissions to reflect, adsorb and emit the solar energy. However, the continuous emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere

Montes-Hernandez, German

226

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

228

Carbon Prices and Automobile Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Extensive and Intensive Margins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transportation sector accounts for nearly one third of the United States' greenhouse gas emissions. While over the past number of decades, policy makers have avoided directly pricing the externalities from vehicles, ...

Knittel, Christopher Roland

229

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation as a Structural Change and Policies that Offset Its Depressing Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current economic modeling of emissions limitations does not embody economic features that are likely to be particularly important in the short term, yet the politics of limiting greenhouse gas emissions are often ...

Babiker, Mustafa H.M.

230

Title: Net Energy Ratio and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of a Biogas Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Biogas Power Plant Author: W. Bauer Author Affiliation: Department and greenhouse gas analysis for a 1.45 MW (0.71 MW electrical) biogas power plant

Bauer, Wolfgang

231

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to GHG/kWh of the USA electricity supply chain are coalTurbine Nuclear (USA) Coal 3.3 Electricity Marginal GHG/kWhNet GHG/kWh of Electricity example based on USA. Figure 2:

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Greenhouse gas emissions from contrasting beef production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture has been reported to contribute a significant amount of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere among other anthropogenic activities. With still more than 870 million people in the world suffering from under-nutrition ...

Ricci, Patricia

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'GrandUncertainty of GHG Emissions |

235

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced. Primary energy associated with coal products wasUse EJ China Residential Energy Use Gas Coal Oil Biomass GasUse EJ China Residential Energy Use Gas Coal Oil Gas Biomass

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Afforestation, Forest management, Biofuels, Ag soil, Animals, Fertilization, Rice, Grassland expansion, Manure of Biofuel strategies Examine the dynamics of mitigation strategies #12;PolicyPolicy ContextContext U

McCarl, Bruce A.

238

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all fuels including electricity and syngas will be used forGas Electricity Biomass Syngas Space Heating Coal Oil Gas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Coal-Fired Power Plants, Greenhouse Gases, and State Statutory Substantial Endangerment Provisions: Climate Change Comes to Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to climate change. Second, it provides regulatory context for KDHE?s decision denying a permit for the Sunflower project. It summarizes the status of federal regulation of greenhouse gas (?GHG?) emissions. It also describes state efforts to fill... of air quality permits for the Sunflower units is within KDHE?s authority to take actions to prevent the substantial endangerment to public health and the environment arising from GHG emissions. I reach this conclusion even though the denial was based...

Glicksman, Robert L.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

GHG emission factors developed for the recycling and composting of municipal waste in South African municipalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: GHG emission factors for local recycling of municipal waste are presented. GHG emission factors for two composting technologies for garden waste are included. Local GHG emission factors were compared to international ones and discussed. Uncertainties and limitations are presented and areas for new research highlighted. - Abstract: GHG (greenhouse gas) emission factors for waste management are increasingly used, but such factors are very scarce for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the recycling of glass, metals (Al and Fe), plastics and paper from municipal solid waste, as well as for the composting of garden refuse in South Africa. The emission factors developed for the different recyclables in the country show savings varying from ?290 kg CO{sub 2} e (glass) to ?19 111 kg CO{sub 2} e (metals Al) per tonne of recyclable. They also show that there is variability, with energy intensive materials like metals having higher GHG savings in South Africa as compared to other countries. This underlines the interrelation of the waste management system of a country/region with other systems, in particular with energy generation, which in South Africa, is heavily reliant on coal. This study also shows that composting of garden waste is a net GHG emitter, releasing 172 and 186 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet garden waste for aerated dome composting and turned windrow composting, respectively. The paper concludes that these emission factors are facilitating GHG emissions modelling for waste management in South Africa and enabling local municipalities to identify best practice in this regard.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za; Trois, Cristina

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009. Stephen P Holland. Emissions taxes versus intensityindustrys greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental Research2008. John CV Pezzey. Emission taxes and tradeable permits a

Rajagopal, Deepak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nations greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would ?free ride? and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of ?pro-green? votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representatives ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

Cragg, Michael; Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.; Kahn, Matthew

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6 | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermalGoGreen Engineering andGreenGreenhouse

247

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

holidays ICE: Internal combustion engine, GT: Gas turbine,indicate that internal combustion engines (ICE) with heatdominance of internal combustion engines with heat exchanger

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas plants to follow load as the more nimble,that annual load-growth in the five states follows the 10

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled? Mark Jaccard and Brad Griffin School greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 33% below their 2007 level by 2020. By 2050, it has committed to emissions to promote the exploitation of highly valuable provincial natural gas resources in spite of the challenges

Pedersen, Tom

251

Large Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a Temperate Peatland Pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a by product of the conversion of organic sediment into oil, so natural gas deposits usually are found is CO2. There are important other drivers: · methane (contributes to warming, one molecule of CH4 fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) to produce energy. Almost all energy on earth ultimately comes from

Kelly, Maggi

252

An issue of trust: state corruption, responsibility and greenhouse gas emissions This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact us My IOPscience #12;IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 5 (2010 uncontroversial, since the economic theory of externalities suggests that, given some level of external cost imposed by the anthropogenic release of greenhouse gases (GHG), some reduction of emissions 4 Author

Kammen, Daniel M.

253

Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management processes for municipalities - A comparative review focusing on Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted due to waste management in the cities of developing countries is predicted to rise considerably in the near future; however, these countries have a series of problems in accounting and reporting these gases. Some of these problems are related to the status quo of waste management in the developing world and some to the lack of a coherent framework for accounting and reporting of greenhouse gases from waste at municipal level. This review summarizes and compares GHG emissions from individual waste management processes which make up a municipal waste management system, with an emphasis on developing countries and, in particular, Africa. It should be seen as a first step towards developing a more holistic GHG accounting model for municipalities. The comparison between these emissions from developed and developing countries at process level, reveals that there is agreement on the magnitude of the emissions expected from each process (generation of waste, collection and transport, disposal and recycling). The highest GHG savings are achieved through recycling, and these savings would be even higher in developing countries which rely on coal for energy production (e.g. South Africa, India and China) and where non-motorized collection and transport is used. The highest emissions are due to the methane released by dumpsites and landfills, and these emissions are predicted to increase significantly, unless more of the methane is captured and either flared or used for energy generation. The clean development mechanism (CDM) projects implemented in the developing world have made some progress in this field; however, African countries lag behind.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or enginecost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or engine

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts from fossil fuels and other energy sources reported by IEA []. In all of these countries except Kenya

Kammen, Daniel M.

256

Response to Comment on "Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to Comment on "Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical, and properly (sustain- ably) designed biomass energy (e.g., see ref 3). This is rooted in the fact that wind production by 2022 following Japan's Fukushima nuclear accident. Despite a major, laudable expansion of wind

257

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment Katta G. Murty Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering University of Michigan, Ann to tremendous increases in the construction of huge airport facilities, the development of large jumbo

Murty, Katta G.

258

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas the single-family detached homes ana- lyzed. Figure A shows that the energy used on-site during the construction phase of a single story 1,500 ft2 home corresponds to 5.10% the total energy used in the life

Hall, Sharon J.

259

ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng Department of Civil Engineering University of Transportation Engineers to be held May 12-15, 2002 in Ottawa Ontario #12;1 Estimating the Impact of Demographics and Automotive Technologies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ryan McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng

Hellinga, Bruce

260

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass ha?1 yr?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

Zhuang, Qianlai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final abatement, using the first multi-party model to include both tax-versus-trading under uncertainties of an emissions tax over emissions (permit) trading in handling abatement-cost uncertainties, from that shown

Pezzey, Jack

262

Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C Malte Meinshausen1. Frame6,7 & Myles R. Allen7 More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 6C or below levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed

Imamoglu, Atac

263

The hydrogen energy economy: its long-term role in greenhouse gas reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrogen energy economy: its long-term role in greenhouse gas reduction Geoff Dutton, Abigail for Climate Change Research Technical Report 18 #12;The Hydrogen Energy Economy: its long term role 2005 This is the final report from Tyndall research project IT1.26 (The Hydrogen energy economy: its

Watson, Andrew

264

Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management climate. We examine scenarios of deforestation and postclearing land use to estimate the future (2006.8 to 15.9 Pg CO2-equivalents (CO2-e) from 2006 to 2050. Deforestation is the largest source of green

Vermont, University of

265

Quantitative analysis of factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions at institutions of higher education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, emissions from buildings comprise 40% of energy consumption and carbon emissions, not including to have 10 times more effect on emissions per square meter than space such as classroom and office, while to the institution's own greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy and water conservation, and other sustainability

Illinois at Chicago, University of

266

The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. · Coal Conversion Technologies. Coal-based power generation technologies were analyzed in detail1 The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1 , James Katzer1 1 M coal can make to the growing world energy demand during a period of increasing concern about global

267

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

268

Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

Columbia University

269

Economic Implications of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Abstract The world of biofuels. However, such options can be competitive with domestic food production. In a free trade arena of effects that would be observed due to the simplifying cost assumptions, indicate compliance causes supply

McCarl, Bruce A.

270

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implemented in Canada, what would be the response of the industrial sector in terms of energy consumptionHybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application for modeling industrial energy consumption, among them a series of environmental and security externalities

271

8 Prospects for Biological Carbon Sinks in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Prospects for Biological Carbon Sinks in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Systems John Reilly1. With emissions trading, emitters who found they could cheaply reduce their emissions might have allowances- ing Australia, Canada, Japan and Russia. This group also pushed strongly for inter- national emissions

272

A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERG/200806 A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and the differences between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a graphical technique. This paper presents a graphical technique for illustrating the relationship between energy security

Hughes, Larry

273

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RPS programs of states in the WECC is from The Database forRenewables Natural Gas Oil Coal AZ-NM OR-WA Rest of WECCTotal WECC % Total WECC Source: Platts Powerdat database.

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Impacts of Alternative Patterns of Urbanization on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Agricultural County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building emissions somewhat lower, and single- family detached homes producing 33% more GHG (as CO 2 equivalent) from energy

Wheeler, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 SpecialMaximizingResidential Buildings »CoilGas Reductions

277

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. ToGestionSolar Inc GTSGreenhouse Gas

278

The impact of municipal solid waste treatment methods on greenhouse gas emissions in Lahore, Pakistan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution of existing municipal solid waste management to emission of greenhouse gases and the alternative scenarios to reduce emissions were analyzed for Data Ganj Bukhsh Town (DGBT) in Lahore, Pakistan using the life cycle assessment methodology. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 people living in 232,024 dwellings. Total waste generated is 500,000 tons per year with an average per capita rate of 0.84 kg per day. Alternative scenarios were developed and evaluated according to the environmental, economic, and social atmosphere of the study area. Solid waste management options considered include the collection and transportation of waste, collection of recyclables with single and mixed material bank container systems (SMBCS, MMBCS), material recovery facilities (MRF), composting, biogasification and landfilling. A life cycle inventory (LCI) of the six scenarios along with the baseline scenario was completed; this helped to quantify the CO{sub 2} equivalents, emitted and avoided, for energy consumption, production, fuel consumption, and methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. LCI results showed that the contribution of the baseline scenario to the global warming potential as CO{sub 2} equivalents was a maximum of 838,116 tons. The sixth scenario had a maximum reduction of GHG emissions in terms of CO{sub 2} equivalents of -33,773 tons, but the most workable scenario for the current situation in the study area is scenario 5. It saves 25% in CO{sub 2} equivalents compared to the baseline scenario.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Chuadhry, Muhammad Nawaz [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse reliance on fossil fuels. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and wind power represent two practical Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canada by Brett Kerrigan B.Eng., Carleton University

Victoria, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European determinants of life cycle emissions of greenhouse gases linked to the life cycle of biodiesel from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans. For biodiesel from European rapeseed and for biodiesel from Brazilian

282

Renewable portfolio standards, Greenhouse gas reduction, and Long-Line transmission investments in the WECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New, long-distance transmission lines to remote areas with concentrations of high-quality renewable resources can help western states meet the challenges of increasing renewable energy procurement and reducing greenhouse gas emissions more cost-effectively than reliance on local resources alone. The approach applied here to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council is useful for an initial determination of the net benefits of long-line transmission between regions with heterogeneous resource quality. (author)

Olson, Arne; Orans, Ren; Allen, Doug; Moore, Jack; Woo, C.K.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, July 1, 1994--July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to assembly and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and validation of General Circulation Models. In addition to changes due to variations in anthropogenic forcing, including greenhouse gas and aerosol concentration changes, the global climate system exhibits a high degree of internally-generated and externally-forced natural variability. To detect the anthropogenic effect, its signal must be isolated from the ``noise`` of this natural climatic variability. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. To facilitate this, available land and marine data bases will be updated and expanded. The data will be analyzed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas and aerosol concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by a variety of models, from simple energy balance climate models to coupled atmosphere ocean General Circulation Models. These analyses are oriented towards obtaining early evidence of anthropogenic climatic change that would lead either to confirmation, rejection or modification of model projections, and towards the statistical validation of General Circulation Model control runs and perturbation experiments.

Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equivalent) Other 65 Mt/a Residential CHP 57 Mt/a Applicablefor GHG abatement. Residential CHP has been pursued inobvious challenges, residential scale CHP shows considerable

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending the EU Emissions Trading Scheme to Aviation.Air Transport Emissions Trading Scheme Workshop, UKaviation in its GHG emission trading system (i.e. , by

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Greenhouse Gas Dissonance: The History of EPA's Regulations and the Incongruity of Recent Legal Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

denial of the scientific data underpinning climate change.denial notice asserted that not regulating GHG emissions from motor vehicles dovetailed with President Bush's "comprehensive global climate change

Moreno, Robert B.; Zalzal, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US cities (McGuckin and Srinivasan Figures 5.3 through 5.5 present the change in total GHG emissions

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

Wang, M.Q.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

GHG emission factors developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South African municipalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? An average GHG emission factor for the collection and transport of municipal solid waste in South Africa is calculated. ? A range of GHG emission factors for different types of landfills (including dumps) in South Africa are calculated. ? These factors are compared internationally and their implications for South Africa and developing countries are discussed . ? Areas for new research are highlighted. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors are used with increased frequency for the accounting and reporting of GHG from waste management. However, these factors have been calculated for developed countries of the Northern Hemisphere and are lacking for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South Africa. As such it presents a model on how international results and methodology can be adapted and used to calculate country-specific GHG emission factors from waste. For the collection and transport of municipal waste in South Africa, the average diesel consumption is around 5 dm{sup 3} (litres) per tonne of wet waste and the associated GHG emissions are about 15 kg CO{sub 2} equivalents (CO{sub 2} e). Depending on the type of landfill, the GHG emissions from the landfilling of waste have been calculated to range from ?145 to 1016 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when taking into account carbon storage, and from 441 to 2532 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when carbon storage is left out. The highest emission factor per unit of wet waste is for landfill sites without landfill gas collection and these are the dominant waste disposal facilities in South Africa. However, cash strapped municipalities in Africa and the developing world will not be able to significantly upgrade these sites and reduce their GHG burdens if there is no equivalent replacement of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) resulting from the Kyoto agreement. Other low cost avenues need to be investigated to suit local conditions, in particular landfill covers which enhance methane oxidation.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

GHG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier,Jump to:Wilmette, Jump to:SOURCEGHD IncGHG

297

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG intensity among fossil fuels. We ?nd that the relativeunder a RFS while world fossil fuel price is the same orwith the more-polluting fossil fuels being consumed abroad

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management...

Baker, Justin Scott

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to pessimistic scenarios are used for system operation. Slow pyrolysis is compared to fast pyrolysis and biomass co-firing for GHG abatement and electricity production, using various scenarios for availability of indigenous Scottish feedstocks....

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus. Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimatesof crude oil under the tax, which is world price less thefuel price, GHG emissions and market share of non-crude oil

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Economic investigation of discount factors for agricultural greenhouse gas emission offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches to discount factors, estimation and incorporation of discount factors procedures are developed. Discount factors would be imposed by credit purchasers due to noncompliance with regulatory program of the credits with GHG program including...

Kim, Man-Keun

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Surcharge Revenues Oil Price Price elas= -0.1 elasEmissions Surcharge Revenues Oil Price Price elas= -0.1 elasQuantity Daily GhG Emissions Oil Price Price elas= -0.1 elas

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Investigating greenhouse gas emission pathways In selected OECD countries using a hybrid energy-economy approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This report outlines the development and analysis of CIMS OECD-EPM. CIMS OECD-EPM is a hybrid energy-economy model that forecasts energy consumption and GHG emissions in (more)

Goldberg, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Microbial communities and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the biodegradation of specified risk material in compost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Addition of feathers altered bacterial and fungal communities in compost. ? Microbial communities degrading SRM and compost matrix were distinct. ? Addition of feathers may enrich for microbial communities that degrade SRM. ? Inclusion of feather in compost increased both CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from compost. ? Density of methanogens and methanotrophs were weakly associated with CH{sub 4} emissions. - Abstract: Provided that infectious prions (PrP{sup Sc}) are inactivated, composting of specified risk material (SRM) may be a viable alternative to rendering and landfilling. In this study, bacterial and fungal communities as well as greenhouse gas emissions associated with the degradation of SRM were examined in laboratory composters over two 14 day composting cycles. Chicken feathers were mixed into compost to enrich for microbial communities involved in the degradation of keratin and other recalcitrant proteins such as prions. Feathers altered the composition of bacterial and fungal communities primarily during the first cycle. The bacterial genera Saccharomonospora, Thermobifida, Thermoactinomycetaceae, Thiohalospira, Pseudomonas, Actinomadura, and Enterobacter, and the fungal genera Dothideomycetes, Cladosporium, Chaetomium, and Trichaptum were identified as candidates involved in SRM degradation. Feathers increased (P < 0.05) headspace concentrations of CH{sub 4} primarily during the early stages of the first cycle and N{sub 2}O during the second. Although inclusion of feathers in compost increases greenhouse gas emissions, it may promote the establishment of microbial communities that are more adept at degrading SRM and recalcitrant proteins such as keratin and PrP{sup Sc}.

Xu, Shanwei [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5 (Canada); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1 (Canada); Reuter, Tim [Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4V6 (Canada); Gilroyed, Brandon H. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1 (Canada); Tymensen, Lisa [Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4V6 (Canada); Hao, Yongxin; Hao, Xiying [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1 (Canada); Belosevic, Miodrag [Department of Biological Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9 (Canada); Leonard, Jerry J. [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5 (Canada); McAllister, Tim A., E-mail: tim.mcallister@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Reliable Muddle: Transportation Scenarios for the 80% Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal for 2050 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation describing transportation scenarios for meeting the 2050 DOE goal of reducing greenhouse gases by 80%.

Melaina, M.; Webster, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a multiplicity of development pathways in which low energy sector emissions are not necessarily associated with low economic growth. However, changes in development pathways can rarely be imposed from the top. On this basis, examples of energy efficiency opportunities to change development pathways toward lower emissions are presented in this paper. We review opportunities at the sectoral and macro level. The potential for action on nonclimate policies that influence energy use and emissions are presented. Examples are drawn from policies already adopted and implemented in the energy sector. The paper discusses relationships between energy efficiency policies and their synergies and tradeoffs with sustainable development and greenhouse gas emissions. It points to ways that energy efficiency could be mainstreamed into devel?opment choices.

Alterra, Swart; Masanet, Eric; Lecocq, Franck; Najam, Adil; Schaeffer, Robert; Winkler, Harald; Sathaye, Jayant

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas;Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Uwe A. Schneider and Bruce A. McCarl Keywords Abatement Function, Agricultural Sector

McCarl, Bruce A.

310

Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis

Kammen, Daniel M.

311

State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector goal of comprehensive carbon pricing along with various other policies (LCFS) · Into this setting drops rate" and the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency in the rate targets and in compliance

California at Davis, University of

312

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into energy crop production will most likely carry this price through increased purchasing cost and all energy the production of energy crops and other agricultural mitigation strategies. This analysis estimates the economicGreenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian

McCarl, Bruce A.

313

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Note: PSAT included after-treatment thermal efficiency penalty to the diesel fuel economy · CD ElectricWell-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad engine vehicles (ICEVs) Regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs

314

Emissions trading to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States : the McCain-Lieberman Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 (S. 139) is the most detailed effort to date to design an economy-wide cap-and-trade system for US greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The Act caps sectors at their 2000 emissions in ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

315

Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol Anand R Gopal1,4,6 and Daniel M Kammen1,2,3,5 1 Energy supplying country for the production of sugarcane ethanol; fresh mill-pressed cane juice from a Brazilian

Kammen, Daniel M.

316

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

317

Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

Hall, Sharon J.

318

Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA resultsSimplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based performed by the IPCC [1]. Such result might lead policy makers to consider LCA as an inconclusive method [2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Julian Cleary, Nigel T. Roulet and Tim R. Moore Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) emissions from land use, fossil fuel combustion, and peat decomposition, contributes to Canada's net the rate of in situ decomposition through greater diffusion of oxygen, increasing CO2 emissions, manufacturing, use, and disposition (12, 13). GHG emissions, comprising carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4

Roulet, Nigel T.

320

ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by 2050, while energy consumption increases by 75%. The model forecasts that a GHG price starting in 2011 to the year 2000. Carbon capture and storage and fuel switching to electricity are significant mitigation ­ Government policy; Climatic changes ­ Economic aspects; Environmental policy ­ Economic aspects #12;iv

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or usage). The data at the left indicates a 6.9% decline in Harvard's overall GHG Emissions since Fiscal exclude growth. The graph below illustrates the following emissions: Direct (Scope 1) Emissions, including emissions from campus operations and energy sources owned by Harvard; and Indirect (Scope 2) Emissions

Prentiss, Mara

322

Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as deaths and emissions per unit electric energy generated, for relevant electricity sources (Table 1 Nuclear energy (and other low-carbon/carbon-free energy sources) could help to mitigate both deaths and GHG emissions, we start with data for global annual electricity generation by energy source

323

Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to short-rotation woody biomass crops (SRWC) for bioenergy in the Northern U.S. Lake States. GHG debts-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being in the Northern Lake States, USA Marin M. Palmer a, *, Jodi A. Forrester a , David E. Rothstein b , David J

Turner, Monica G.

324

LowCostGHG ReductionCARB 3/03 Low-Cost and Near-Term Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturers to focus on high fuel-economy cars. And Toyota Prius and Honda Civic Hybrid are wonderful, or oil resources. Nor would the anticipated 40 mpg Ford Escape hybrid in the "small SUV" class Cycle (UDC) for representative cars and light trucks.1 The horizontal axis shows measured emissions

Edwards, Paul N.

325

11 2011 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. 1:1120 (2011); DOI: 10.1002/ghg3 Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: climate change; geologic sequestration; numerical modeling; pressure attenuation; pressure build-up; storage capacity Introduction P ressure build-up caused by the injection of CO2 into deep brine through localized pathways into shallower groundwater resources; and (iii) cause induced seismicity

Zhou, Quanlin

326

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive city greenhouse-gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

noted earlier, the majority of aviation emissions... a significant impact on the greenhouse effect.29 Concern regarding ... Source: George Mason University, Center for Air...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual greenhouse gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory, bo Akademi University, Collection: Fossil Fuels ; Physics 49 THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Summary: . D. Keeling ICE CORES SIPLE STATION ANTARCTICA...

329

Transitional strategies for the reduction of "greenhouse gas" emission in the United States electric power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental issues have become increasingly important in the political arena, particularly with growing concern over the "greenhouse effect," a potential global climatic warming caused by increases in anthropogenic ...

Monroe, Burt L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

Jonietz, Karl K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E. [JPL/CAL Tech; Rotman, Douglas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Walker, Bruce C. [Sandia National Laboratory

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Agricultural Sector Analysis on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................ 14 2.2.2 Agriculture - A GHG Sequestering Sink............................................... 15 vi Page 2.2.2.1 Soil Sequestration ........................................................................ 15 2.2.2.2 Forest Sequestration... systems (Flach, Barnwell, and Crosson). Similarly, total forestland in the U.S. has been slightly increasing during the last decade (U.S. Forest Service). In countries with large rates of deforestation emissions are important. Houghton estimates...

Schneider, Uwe A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MW Reciprocating Engine 3 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW ReciprocatingEngine 5 MW Gas Turbine 3MW Gas Turbine 40 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW Reciprocating Engine

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

CO{sub 2} Allowance Allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the Effect on Electricity Investors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative among Northeastern states is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the region and beyond. In the RGGI region, changes in the value of electricity-generating assets may be positive or negative, while changes outside the Northeast are virtually always positive. For stakeholders in the industry, the change depends on the portfolio of assets held by affected firms. (author)

Burtraw, Dallas; Kahn, Danny; Palmer, Karen

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Putting policy in drive : coordinating measures to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenges of energy security and climate change have prompted efforts to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions in light-duty vehicles within the United States. Failures in the market for lower rates of fuel ...

Evans, Christopher W. (Christopher William)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

out that EPA used an emissions trading program to controlsuggested that an emissions trading system could qualify asTO MANAGE LIFECYCLE GHG emissions trading system would also

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. London: DEFRA.Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Setting Penaltiesthe European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and a lack of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

International Experiences with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse-Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examine air pollution (and other pollutant) control policypolicies to control non-GHG air pollutants. These studiesair pollutant emission reduction and ancillary carbon benefits of SO 2 control

Williams, Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Insights from EMF Associated Agricultural and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated assessment modeling (IAM) as employed by the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) generally involves a multi-sector appraisal of greenhouse gas emission (GHGE) mitigation alternatives and climate change effects typically at the global level. Such a multi-sector evaluation encompasses potential climate change effects and mitigative actions within the agricultural and forestry (AF) sectors. In comparison with many of the other sectors covered by IAM, the AF sectors may require somewhat different treatment due to their critical dependence upon spatially and temporally varying resource and climatic conditions. In particular, in large countries like the United States, forest production conditions vary dramatically across the landscape. For example, some areas in the southern US present conditions favorable to production of fast growing, heat tolerant pine species, while more northern regions often favor slower-growing hardwood and softwood species. Moreover, some lands are currently not suitable for forest production (e.g., the arid western plains). Similarly, in agriculture, the US has areas where citrus and cotton can be grown and other areas where barley and wheat are more suitable. This diversity across the landscape causes differential GHGE mitigation potential in the face of climatic changes and/or responses to policy or price incentives. It is difficult for a reasonably sized global IAM system to reflect the full range of sub-national geographic AF production possibilities alluded to above. AF response in the face of climate change altered temperature precipitation regimes or mitigation incentives will likely involve region-specific shifts in land use and agricultural/forest production. This chapter addresses AF sectoral responses in climate change mitigation analysis. Specifically, we draw upon US-based studies of AF GHGE mitigation possibilities that incorporate sub-national detail drawing largely on a body of studies done by the authors in association with EMF activities. We discuss characteristics of AF sectoral responses that could be incorporated in future IAM efforts in climate change policy.

McCarl, Bruce A.; Murray, Brian; Kim, Man-Keun; Lee, Heng-Chi; Sands, Ronald D.; Schneider, Uwe

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Achieving Californias Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policy at the US state level to decrease GHG emissions?ABU.S. has failed to adopt GHG reduction policies at the national levelU.S. has failed to adopt GHG reduction policies at the national level

Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Modeling & learning from the design recommendations for California's Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change has become a Major issue beginning with our generation. Governments the world over are now recognizing that industry cannot continue to pollute in a business-as-usual manner. Emitting Greenhouse gases has a ...

Fernandes, Chester, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Greenhouse gas emissions from cultivation of energy crops may affect the sustainability of biofuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Agro-biofuels are expected to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases because CO2 emitted during the combustion of the biofuels has recently been taken from the (more)

Ambus, Per

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Incentive-based approaches for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions : issues and prospects for India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a consequence of the flexibility mechanisms incorporated in the Kyoto Protocol, incentive-based policies such as emissions trading and the clean development mechanism are being widely discussed in the context of greenhouse ...

Gupta, Shreekant.

347

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shown in equation (2), (2) ) NR is the net revenue ($ per acre), TR is the total revenue ($ per acre), TVC is the total variable cost ($ per acre), and TFC is the total fixed cost ($ per acre). 21 3.1.2 Calculation of Breakeven Carbon Price (BCP...) The Breakeven Carbon price (BCP) is calculated according to equation (3). (3) BCPQGHGPDC =?? )( or (4) BCPQGHGQGHG NR base base = ? ? ) The GHG quantity in the denominator of equation (3) is the amount of net GHGE stored or emitted by each alternative...

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to changes due to variations in greenhouse gas concentrations, the global climate system exhibits a high degree of internally-generated and externally-forced natural variability. To detect the enhanced greenhouse effect, its signal must be isolated from the ``noise`` of this natural climatic variability. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. To facilitate this, available land and marine data bases will be updated and expanded. The data will be analyzed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by a variety of models, from simple energy balance climate models to ocean General Circulation Models. Appendices A--G contain the following seven papers: (A) Recent global warmth moderated by the effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption; (B) Recent warming in global temperature series; (C) Correlation methods in fingerprint detection studies; (D) Balancing the carbon budget. Implications for projections of future carbon dioxide concentration changes; (E) A simple model for estimating methane concentration and lifetime variations; (F) Implications for climate and sea level of revised IPCC emissions scenarios; and (G) Sulfate aerosol and climatic change.

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Implementing greenhouse gas emissions caps: A case study of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our almost forty-year experience with landmark federal environmental statutes, demonstrates unequivocally that implementing grand and noble environmental goals is an arduous and difficult experience. California is now embarking on a similar project: implementing the country's most ambitious greenhouse gas emissions limitations, including rolling back the state's emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. The state's leadership on climate change legislation deserves significant praise. But the hard work in actually achieving emissions limits is just beginning. In this Essay, Professor Ann Carlson provides a case study of the country's largest municipally owned utility - the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) - and the challenges it will face in holding its emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. The case study is particularly useful to anticipate challenges utilities across the country will face if the federal government also mandates greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The DWP's energy mix, with its heavy reliance on coal, looks quite similar to the energy mix of the country as a whole (and quite different from the rest of California's electricity market). The challenges are daunting. They include shifting rapidly to renewable energy sources in the face of labor pressures to have DWP own its own sources; building miles of transmission lines to bring the renewable energy to DWP's customer base; repowering natural gas facilities while attempting to comply with stringent Clean Water Act requirements; and eliminating the utility's reliance on coal over the next two decades. These efforts will raise complex environmental and other value clashes, pitting those concerned about jobs, water pollution, species protection, and aesthetic harms against a utility admirably committed to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions significantly. Whether and how we resolve these clashes remains an open and contested question.

Carlson, A.E. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School for Law

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as a feedstock for conversion

353

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1992--30 June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. The main research areas covered by this proposal are (b), First Detection and (c) Supporting Data. The project will also include work under area (a), Modeling: specifically, analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulating Models (GCMs).

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

Post Doctoral Research Fellowship Simulating the greenhouse gas emission from boreal region reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of greenhouse gases from northern boreal reservoirs as part of a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research modified the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the exchange of CO2 between boreal by the creation of reservoirs for the production of hydro-electricity. We have recently developed a water column

355

Project Information Form Project Title Working toward a policy framework for reducing greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provided (by each agency or organization) US DOT $37,874 Total Project Cost $37,874 Agency ID or ContractProject Information Form Project Title Working toward a policy framework for reducing greenhouse of Research Project This white paper is concerned with a preliminary investigation of the extent to which

California at Davis, University of

356

SMARTTool Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report Reporting Entity: University of Northern British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reporting Year: Calendar Year 2010 Greenhouse Gases in Tonnes Measure Quantity CO2 CH4 N2O tCO2e1 Scope 1.30 Emissions from Biomass Total Biomass Emissions 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.83 Total Emissions, Calendar Year 2010 5

Northern British Columbia, University of

357

Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Management Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19f Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Cogeneration Analysis System is an advanced technology for energy conservation and pollution prevention, Beaumont, TX 77710, hopperjr@hal.lamar.edu, yawscl@hal.lamar.edu Key words; Energy Conservation, Greenhouse

Pike, Ralph W.

358

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG emissions: Supplementary Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/MJ = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions at natural gas plant A in ERCOT: 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Annual = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh / 40% = 148 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions per MWh = 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Life cycle-level combustion emissions at fossil fuel plants in ERCOT, MISO and PJM. The red lines represent median values

Jaramillo, Paulina

359

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation: 50% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantsgeneration: 100% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantselectricity comes from central station natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the other half comes from natural-gas-fired single cycle plants.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

portation and Greenhouse Gas (MUNTAG) model is a macroscopic, highly aggregate model that works at the municipal level and solely  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identifies the following four sectors: buildings; trans- portation and land use; energy supply; and municipal GHG inventory. This work is part of a project to write a guide called Getting to Car- bon Neutral

Illinois at Chicago, University of

362

Using Section 111 of the Clean Air Act for Cap-and-Trade of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Obstacles and Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused nitro- gen oxide emissions-trading program for largeNSPS program could use emissions trading, including cap-and-regulations that allow emissions trading, to achieve GHG

Enion, Rhead M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

364

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal mining, petroleum extraction and refining, coking, andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking and

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such asmotivations of alternative energy technologies: mitigatingaddresses the goal of alternative energy technology

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Greenhouse gases andGreenhouse gases and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in gas turbinecombustion in gas turbine HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Effect of COEffect-depleting gases ·· COCO22 removal for gas purificationremoval for gas purification ·· COCO22 removal for greenhouse gas emissions reductionremoval for greenhouse gas emissions reduction ·· Other greenhouse gases

Zevenhoven, Ron

368

Author's personal copy International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 7 (2012) 2029  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in geological formations (such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep brine-filled permeable formations, coal for oil and gas exploration and production, gas permeable channels/faults in the caprocks (Annunziatellis et al., 2008), or geomechanical disruptions due to increased pressure in the reservoir, etc. (Gasda

Johnson, Peter D.

369

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

370

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

371

NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural Gas For Transportation or Electricity? Climate Change Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projections of increased domestic supply, low prices, reduced reliance on foreign oil, and low environmental impacts are supporting the increased use of natural gas in the transportation and electricity sectors. For instance, a tax credit bill (H.R. 1380) introduced in the House earlier this year encourages natural gas use for transportation and anticipates reductions in greenhouse gases (GHGs) when it displaces gasoline and diesel. However, in reality, the amount of GHG emissions that can be reduced with natural gas is uncertain and depends on the end use. If natural gas displaces coal for electricity generation, GHG emissions are reduced by at least 45 % per kWh. But when natural gas is used as a transportation fuel there is up to a 35 % chance that emissions will increase and only a 3 % chance that it will even meet the emissions reductions mandated by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) for corn ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic production, if one wants to be certain of reducing GHG emissions, then using natural gas to replace coalfired electricity is the best approach. Investigators at Carnegie Mellon University have conducted an analysis in the attached study (1) that highlights the following important findings. 1. High risk of policy failure: The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) instead of gasoline in cars and instead of diesel in buses does not lower GHG emissions significantly. In fact there is a 10-

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

372

The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that support more load following and peaking generation withfor natural gas- fired load following and peaking generationneeded less load- following and peaking generation. Growth

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China Electricity Council. partial load in the evening whenof coal units run at partial load would make gas attractivemonth that is run at partial load, while other generators

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to lower the carbon intensity of the power generationelectricity grid carbon-intensities are considered: importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewables, including large hydropower, by 2020. In 2009,coal mining and hydropower), iron and steel, machinery, andoil, and natural gas. Hydropower, nuclear, and wind energy

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the State, Regional and Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

house Gas Initiative (RGGI). Shortly thereafter, Westernof Northeast states for the RGGI and Western states for theperspective. .For example, the RGGI states have already ad-

Doyle, Jim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n g s , including Fluorocarbon Leakage: Study o f Thermalgreenhouse gas emissions o f fluorocarbon leakage associatedwarming Impact o f Fluorocarbons used i n Thermal Insulation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models marginal cost, as well as a smaller contribution from energy efficiency relative to other abatement of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development and application of the EPIC model for carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the EPIC model in relation to carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel applications. From its original capabilities and purpose (i.e., quantify the impacts or erosion on soil productivity), the EPIC model has evolved into a comprehensive terrestrial ecosystem model for simulating with more or less process-level detail many ecosystem processes such as weather, hydrology, plant growth and development, carbon cycle (including erosion), nutrient cycling, greenhouse-gas emissions, and the most complete set of manipulations that can be implemented on a parcel of land (e.g. tillage, harvest, fertilization, irrigation, drainage, liming, burning, pesticide application). The chapter also provides details and examples of the latest efforts in model development such as the coupled carbon-nitrogen model, a microbial denitrification model with feedback to the carbon decomposition model, updates on calculation of ecosystem carbon balances, and carbon emissions from fossil fuels. The chapter has included examples of applications of the EPIC model in soil carbon sequestration, net ecosystem carbon balance, and biofuel studies. Finally, the chapter provides the reader with an update on upcoming improvements in EPIC such as the additions of modules for simulating biochar amendments, sorption of soluble C in subsoil horizons, nitrification including the release of N2O, and the formation and consumption of methane in soils. Completion of these model development activities will render an EPIC model with one of the most complete representation of biogeochemical processes and capable of simulating the dynamic feedback of soils to climate and management in terms not only of transient processes (e.g., soil water content, heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions) but also of fundamental soil properties (e.g. soil depth, soil organic matter, soil bulk density, water limits).

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Mcgill, William B.; Williams, J.R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply and use, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency in British Columbia Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser University June 2012 Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers

Pedersen, Tom

383

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear, photovoltaic, nuclear, life cycle 1 #12;Introduction The production of energy by burning fossil fuels generates, it is envisioned that expanding generation technologies based on nuclear power and renewable energy sources would

384

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 In 1992, the United climate change. This inventory adheres to both (1) a comprehensive and detailed set of methodologies

Little, John B.

385

A methodology for assessing MIT's energy used and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) actions can be made to decrease losses and therefore increase plant efficiencies. As production efficiencies are maximized, fuel use and thus emissions are minimized. From fiscal year 1998 to 2003, the gas turbine ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for out-of-state coal generation, then clearly the GHGElectricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas Coal Natural Gascoal becomes the marginal fuel. Note that the marginal generation

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 18 (2013) 277284 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the atmosphere by large point sources such as fossil fuel power plants and cement opera- tions. The technology for carbon capture and storage already exists and is currently implemented by the oil and natural gas

Perfect, Ed

388

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (sails) Aviationand Policies the use of LNG will result in a small 2 percentbe a much greater potential to use LNG aboard most ships if

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change/stern_re- view_report.cfm. (2006). RGGI.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI): An Initia tive of theGreenhouse Gas Initia tive (RGGI). Currently, Connecticut,

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

1 Forecasting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Urban Regions: 2 Microsimulation of Land Use and Transport Patterns in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 rural demands for travel and energy.46 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA 2005 2030 household energy 26 demands and GHG emissions estimates are compared under five different land use the highest rates of increase. Average energy consumption per household is estimated to fall over 30 time (by

Kockelman, Kara M.

391

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools) Jump to:...

392

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of several pre-defined factors to changes in energy consumption and energy-related gas emissions (Ang appearing to be rising proportionally as a transportation mode. Federal government initiatives on the US the transportation sector (Office of Energy Efficiency, 2004); a rise of nearly 25% over 1990. The geographical

393

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the energy security bene?ts of reduced u.s. oil imports.security, namely, the share of alternatives to crude oil (oil such as o?-shore petroleum, and coal/gas based liquids, can be considered better for energy security (

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Challenge of Limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Activities implemented Jointly in Developing Countries: A Brazilian Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses, from the Brazilian perspective, the main problems with Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly (JI/AIJ) between industrialized (Annex I) and developing (non-Annex I) countries, as defined by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Four possible GHG emissions abatement measures are presented for Brazil: forest protection, reforestation projects for carbon sequestration or charcoal manufacturing, use of ethanol produced from sugar cane as a car fuel, and electrical energy conservation through an increase in end-use efficiencies. These four case studies form the basis of a discussion regarding the validity of developing countries' concerns about JI/AIJ. Recommendations are offered for overcoming the present shortcomings of JI/AIJ in developing countries. The primary conclusion is that Annex I countries' funding of JI/AIJ projects in developing countries in return for GHG emissions credits is not the best means to implement the UNFCCC. However, JI/AIJ projects can be a productive means of preventing global climate change if combined with other measures, including GHG emissions reduction targets for all countries involved in JI/AIJ projects and limits on the percentage of industrialized countries' emissions reductions that can be met through projects in developing countries.

La Rovere, E.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Using ArcGIS to extrapolate greenhouse gas emissions on the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using ArcGIS to extrapolate greenhouse gas emissions on the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China Lindsey MW Yasarer, PhD Candidate, University of Kansas Dr. Zhe Li, Associate Professor, Chongqing University Dr...D Student, Chongqing University Zhengyu Zhang and Xiao Yao, Masters Students, Chongqing University CSTEC: China Science and Technology Exchange Center NSF EAPSI Program The research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China...

Yasarer, Lindsey

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the demand for cooling energy, urban trees indirectly reducesurfaces and shade trees to reduce energy use and improvethe energy savings and GHG benefits of cool roofs and tree

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin, Ireland

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microsoft PowerPoint - FNC NEPA GHG Climate Slides -- 16Jan2015...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

REVISED DRAFT GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT REVIEWS HORST G GRECZMIEL ASSOCIATE...

400

E85, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and AB 1493 Integrating biofuels into California's vehicular greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E85, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and AB 1493 Integrating biofuels into California's vehicular greenhouse.................................................................................................. 5 1.1.3 CALIFORNIA CLEAN FUELS PROGRAM ....................................... 6 1.1.5 AB 1007: THE ALTERNATIVE FUELS PLAN

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a flue gas condenser with a steam boiler. ? Improvedsteam dryers by gas ? Dryers and filtration equipment ? Applied CHP ? Purchased flue gas condensers ?

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen (Natural Gas, pipeline) Hydrogen (Natural Gas,liquid H2 truck) Hydrogen (Coal, pipeline) Electricity (production? Hydrogen Production Mix Natural Gas, pipeline,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Anthropogenic Perturbation of Atmospheric CO2 and the Climate System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon dioxide (CO2), a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG), are redistributed within the climate system

Fortunat, Joos

404

MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulation and have gained attention recently within the context of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading

405

Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48258  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Trading Scheme (European Union) EU European Union GHG greenhouse gas ITC investment tax credit MWh

406

Can biofuels justify current transport policies?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with increasing GHG (greenhouse gas) intensity (tar sand, oil shale, etc.) · Biofuels increased consumption

407

International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

408

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

409

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on support of this project through data collection and review. School of Engineering Prof. Rudy Husar..........................................................2-3 2.2 Global Warming Potential and Carbon Dioxide Equivalents................................................................................................3-1 3.2 Intensity Ratio

Subramanian, Venkat

410

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the US pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the US (US EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the US This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the U.S. (U.S. EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the U.S. This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequestration MMt arising at an offset price giving $/tonne carbon equiv ·Many contributions ·DifferentInsights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University Presented at EPRI Workshop on Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Alexandria VA

McCarl, Bruce A.

413

Discounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arising at an offset price giving $/tonne carbon equiv ·Assumes offsets are perfect substitutes ·Different of Carbon Equivalents Biofuel Offsets Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting #12;PortfolioDiscounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor

McCarl, Bruce A.

414

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas emissions from conven- tional power sources like coal.total emissions from coal- or natural gas-fired power plantsemissions, the lifecycle for natural gas power production is more complicated than that of coal.

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Proposed Final Opinion on GHG Strategies in the Energy Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Proposed Final Opinion on GHG Strategies in the Energy Sectors Key Findings and Recommendations;3 Background and Context Energy Commission and PUC developing recommendations to ARB for reducing GHG emissions multi-sector cap-and-trade program for GHG emissions allowances #12;5 September 2008 Interim Opinion

416

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 12 (2013) 124135 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and depleted oil or gas reservoirs (Holloway, 1997; Wildenborg and Lokhorst, 2005) where physicochemical

Long, Bernard

417

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

panels, solar thermal equipment, and storage systems. Consequently, natural gas purchases for heating

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reprintedfrom GreenhouseGasControl Technologies.B. Eliasson,P. Riemer,andA. Wokaun,eds.,Pergamon,Amsterdam,1999. Proceedingsofthe~ International ConferenceonGHG Control Technologies.mterlaken,Switzerland,30Aug.-2 Sept.1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.- 2 Sept.1998 '" HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL AND COAL BED METHANE, USING BYPRODUCT CO2 FOR ENHANCED METHANE RECOVERY AND SEQUESTERING THE CO2 IN mE COAL BED RH Williams, Center for Energy and Environmental that are poorly endowed with conventional hydrocarbon resources but coal- and coal-bed-methane-rich would

419

1 2014 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. 4:127 (2014); DOI: 10.1002/ghg Received August 14, 2013; revised January 9, 2014; accepted January 10, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia University, Morganstown, WV, USA Abstract: Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from large point sources to study injection and post-injection periods of CO2 sequestration, a highly heterogeneous reservoir for such a reser- voir takes hours to run. Additionally, a thorough understanding of the CO2 sequestration process

Mohaghegh, Shahab

420

Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The environmental impacts of electricity production systems have been widely assessed over the past years with many published LCAs in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA results variability observed is very high, for example ranging from 2 to 81 g CO2eq/kWh in a literature review performed by the IPCC [1]. Such result might lead policy makers to consider

Pierryves Padey; Denis Le Boulch; Isabelle Blanc

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pyrolysis and gasification of meat-and-bone-meal: Energy balance and GHG accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: GHG savings are in the order of 6001000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated. Energy recovery differed in terms of energy products and efficiencies. The results were largely determined by use of the products for energy purposes. - Abstract: Meat-and-bone-meal (MBM) produced from animal waste has become an increasingly important residual fraction needing management. As biodegradable waste is routed away from landfills, thermo-chemical treatments of MBM are considered promising solution for the future. Pyrolysis and gasification of MBM were assessed based on data from three experimental lab and pilot-scale plants. Energy balances were established for the three technologies, providing different outcomes for energy recovery: bio-oil was the main product for the pyrolysis system, while syngas and a solid fraction of biochar were the main products in the gasification system. These products can be used eventually after upgrading for energy production, thereby offsetting energy production elsewhere in the system. Greenhouse gases (GHG) accounting of the technologies showed that all three options provided overall GHG savings in the order of 6001000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated, mainly as a consequence of avoided fossil fuel consumption in the energy sector. Local conditions influencing the environmental performance of the three systems were identified, together with critical factors to be considered during decision-making regarding MBM management.

Cascarosa, Esther [Thermochemical Processes Group, Aragn Institute for Engineering Research (I3A), Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering. Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, Thomas [Department of Environmental Engineering. Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas, 1996b (? ). Black Liquor gasification IntroductionBerglin, N. July, 1998. Black Liquor Gasifier/Gas TurbinePreliminary Economics of Black Liquor Gasification Combined

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety,ofOpening Presentation_Tech BarriersGHG

428

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathways Calculator JumpforPFAN) |GIZ-China GHG

429

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathways Calculator JumpforPFAN) |GIZ-China GHG-

430

Sandia National Laboratories: GHG emission reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at Explora MuseumFloatingFront EdgeCellsGENI ARPAe:GHG

431

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits...

432

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 9 (2012) 1023 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strata other than depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs (e.g. in saline aquifers), relatively little indefinitely in the pore space of the rock. Potential storage sites include saline brine reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, and coal seams. The technology

433

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with coal generation occur at the smokestack. Theassociated with coal-fired electricity generation by up toCoal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity Generation,

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

436

Greenhouse Gas Initiatives - Analysis of McCain-Lieberman Bill S.280 The ClimateStewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 Using the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and prices, and the technologies and market mechanisms that are likely to be employed to reduce CO2 emissions. The paper also reports on the results of analysis of GHG bills performed by SAIC using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS...

Ellsworth, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions emissions in the U.S. will likely result in coal plant retirement in the near-term. Life cycle assessment for electricity generation, by comparing systems that consist of individual natural gas and coal power plants

Jaramillo, Paulina

438

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 - 2010 Report Highlights John Nyboer and Maximilian Kniewasser Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser for Climate Solutions 1 HIGHLIGHTS The Energy and GHG Emissions in British

Pedersen, Tom

440

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Transportation Pathways in China://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Paul N. Kishimoto, Sergey Paltsev and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 231 September 2012 China Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Communication to the 10th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies (GHGT 10), Amsterdam, September 19-23, 2010.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inaugurated in 2010. Apart from enhanced oil recovery projects or projects where the captured CO2 is a fatal is then injected through a reworked existing well into the depleted natural gas field of Rousse 1 rock formation 4: The reservoir pressure, currently 30 bars, should be increased to 70 bars post injection, which remains well

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 16 (2013) 129144 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a coal-fed Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant. Net emissions were further reduced to 0 Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) plant, and 0.39 ± 0.03 t/bbl (63.3 ± 4.4 g/MJ) when using livestock manure

Jaramillo, Paulina

443

actor-partner interdependence models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sixth in the US for total GHG emissions. The agricultural a comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, which the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will develop over...

444

anemia mga1 region: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Plants Websites Summary: 652013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions - Outlook June 4, 2013...

445

Three Essays in Business Management, the Natural Environment, and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strength Resolutions CA RGGI RPS GHG Emissions GHG EmissionsGreenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI); or (3) has enactedthese variables, respectively: CA, RGGI, and RPS. We include

Nairn-Birch, Nicholas Simon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-???????­???¢???????Energy, Carbon-???????­Dioxide-???????­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC-based concrete with HFC in infrastructure we can reduce energy use in concrete production by 70%, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 98%; thus the potential to reduce the impact of building materials on global warming and climate change is highly significant. Low Temperature Solidification (LTS) is a breakthrough technology that enables the densification of inorganic materials via a hydrothermal process. The resulting product exhibits excellent control of chemistry and microstructure, to provide durability and mechanical performance that exceeds that of concrete or natural stone. The technology can be used in a wide range of applications including facade panels, interior tiles, roof tiles, countertops, and pre-cast concrete. Replacing traditional building materials and concrete in these applications will result in significant reduction in both energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions.

Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

Fischer, Marc

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

Knight, Denise

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

CORPORATE OVERVIEW W BOOK ONE AdidallhhB DEPARTMENT OKH-^^S~iFfj...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EIA has found that proposed legislative requirements to reduce Energy Related Greenhouse Gas greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could have significant impacts on Emissions energy...

453

Catalyst Paper No-Carb Strategy for GHG Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Catalyst Paper strategy to manage GHG exposure is a combination of energy reduction initiatives in manufacturing and the effective use of biomass and alternative fuels to produce mill steam and electricity from the powerhouse. The energy...

McClain, C.; Robinson, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urban buses 38 Table 30 - Fundamental Environmental Factors for Onroad Modes.. 39 Table 31 - Onroad energy inventory .. 40 Table 32 - Onroad GHG inventory ..

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of...

456

Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through a measurable reduction of energy intensity. Energy efficiency evaluations and initiatives are implemented on the...

457

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of a variety of vehicle, fuel, and technology choices. Overview Measures the petroleum displacement and greenhouse gas emissions of medium and heavy-duty vehicles and...

458

Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or are considering the regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission to mitigate the global warming effect. Because agriculture accounts for a large portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is necessary to establish a baseline measure of the GHG emission...

Rutland, Christopher T.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Opportunities for market-based programs worldwide that reduce greenhouse gas emissions: Initial Observations from Missions to the Philippines, South Africa, and Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, governments and industries are implementing innovative voluntary programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Often these programs encourage groups to use cost effective technologies that capture market-based forces. These programs are successful because they capitalize on existing opportunities where both the environment and the participants can benefit (i.e., win-win opportunities). This paper documents efforts to investigate these kinds of win-win opportunities in three developing countries: the Philippines, South Africa, and Mexico. Initial observations are provided as fresh information from the field, drawing on six missions during the last nine months. Utility costs, interest rates, and overall economic health appear to critically affect opportunities in each country. By contrast, details of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) design and local climate were often important differences between countries. These affect opportunities, for example, to achieve significant savings from cooling systems or not. Looking at the success of ESCOs was somewhat surprising. One might expect to see the most successful ESCO activity where utility costs are high and upgrade opportunities are plentiful (such as in the Philippines). This was not the case, however, as research in the Philippines did not reveal even one active ESCO contract yet. Design practices for new construction were in need of the same thing that helps US design teams do a better job of energy-efficient design, better communications between design team members. Finally, industrial firms were doing a variety of EE upgrades in each country, but this level of activity was relatively small compared to what should be cost effective.

Stanton-Hoyle, D.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

greenhouse gas inve green developmen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension faculty members develop and provide education to the public on energy and environmental issues. Through our research on renewable energy sources, sustainable agricultural practices and the effects the education and research carried out in our Institute for Sustainable Design and our Center for Sustaining

Collins, Gary S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA4. Nitrous

462

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA4. Nitrous1.

463

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA4. Nitrous1.A2.

464

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA4.

465

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicles with hydrogen (and fuel cells) and electricity,vehicles and hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles. Such

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Article published Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology DOI: 10.1002/ghg.1395  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for pipelines that are robust to a priori uncertainty in CO2 production from industrial sources and CO2 storage emissions from electric power plants that emit CO2 as a consequence of combusting fossil fuels (namely coal% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions,5 whereas steel production emitted approximately 2.7 GtCO2 in 2011.6 CO2 capture

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

467

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutantcontrols or integrated measures that simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutantcontrols or integrated measures that are defined as simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutant

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

An Assessment of Energy and Environmental Issues Related to the Use of Gas-to-Liquid Fuels in Transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO2 emissions produced during the conversion process.

Greene, D.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

Greene, D.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow April 1, 2009 - 11:35am Addthis The growth of...

473

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

What GHG Concentration Targets are Reachable in this Century?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We offer simulations that help to understand the relationship between GHG emissions and concentrations, and the relative role of long-lived (e.g., CO2) and short-lived (e.g., CH4) emissions. We show that, absent technologies ...

Paltsev, Sergey

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Current Activities of the GHG Scientific Advisory Group Ed Dlugokencky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Motivation High GWP gases Valuable in emissions trading Network of measurements likely to expand. This may be important as our observations are used to verify emission inventories under GHG emissions trading schemes. We also prepare documents that can be used by developing countries to assess

476

Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

Heath, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average peaking natural gas power plant (NGCT) supplies the13 categories. Natural gas- fired power plants comprise over= Combined heat and power; GHG = Greenhouse gas emissions;

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa, Mallorca: EnergySecondary EnergyGHG Emission

480

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: EnergytheInformationRoadmaps JumpToolIGES GHG

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ghg greenhouse gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Constitutional Implications of Regional CO2 Cap-and-Trade Programs: The Northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative as a Case in Point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the purchase of out-of- RGGI electricity generating CO 2CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF RGGI "(i) to study state andGas Initiative, About RGGI, http://www.rggi. org/about (last

Funk, William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

UNFCCC Individual Reviews of GHG Inventories | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump to:Development Reports JumpUNF Energyof GHG

484

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science, and technology for theAdvancedGHG Information

485

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science, and technology for theAdvancedGHG

486

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science, andPlansResources andPlansGHG

487

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHG Information This section

488

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHG Information This section-

489

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHGResultsGHG Information

490

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHGResultsGHG

491

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -Results At this time, given theGHG

492

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -ResultsLinks - EnergyLinks -ResultsGHG

493

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type.

494

The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks #12;Three Pillars Behind Climate Change! #12;1. Global. Greenhouse Gases have been on the increase. #12;3. The Greenhouse effect is a powerful theory that explains! natural greenhouse effect! · an empirical introduction #12;Moral of the story: The doubling of CO2 causes

495

Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacturing sector, about 26% is electricity, 58% is natural gas, 10% is coal (excluding coal coke and breeze) and the remainder is from liquid fuels. 1 AdaptedfromTableE6.4. EndUsesofFuelConsumption,1998(URL: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov/pub/consumption/industry/d98...FuelConsumptionbyEnd-UseforallMECSIndustries,1998,trillionBTU Electricity Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal (excluding Coal Cokeand Breeze) Total BoilerFuel 29 308 2,538 770 3,645 ProcessHeating 363 185 3,187 331 4,066 ProcessCoolingand Refrigeration 209 2 22 233 MachineDrive 1,881 25 99 7 2...

Sinha, P.; Wise, M.; Smith, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor EPA but with contributions from USDA and DOE. Presented at the EPRI Workshop on Terrestrial Carbon Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies that Might Influence IAM Modeling," that will appear in the book

McCarl, Bruce A.

497

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network infrastructures are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network on the overall power consumption and on the GHG emissions with just 25% of green energy sources. I. INTRODUCTION]. In the zero carbon approach, renewable (green) energy sources (e.g. sun, wind, tide) are employed and no GHGs

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

498

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions - Case Study, 2013 Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...

499

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

Walter, Frederick M.