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Sample records for ghana ke kenya

  1. Ghana-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  2. Kenya-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  3. Kenya: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kenya Population 38,610,097 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.21 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KE 3-letter ISO code KEN Numeric ISO...

  4. Kenya-GEF Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database1 GEF Climate Projects in Kenya 1780 Kenya Joint Geophysical Imaging (JGI) Methodology for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Climate Change UNEP Medium Size Project, GEF...

  5. Nairobi, Kenya: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre Registered Policy Organizations in Nairobi, Kenya International Center for Environmental, Social, and Policy Studies Registered Energy Companies in Nairobi, Kenya...

  6. Kenya-UNDP Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Kenya Kenya Sustainable Transport Development: "Road Bypass Constructions" on Major Urban Centres along the Northern Corridor in Kenya Regional Project Building capacity in...

  7. Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Initiatives Related to Climate Change in Ghana AgencyCompany...

  8. Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ghana Goes for Green Growth: National Engagement on...

  9. Ghana-NREL Rural Electrification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electrification project in Ghana in cooperation with UNDP and GEF. NREL also piloted a business model for providing energy services in rural areas of Ghana.1 References ...

  10. Ghana-REDD Readiness Requires Radical Reform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background analysis Resource Type Maps, Guidemanual, Training materials Website http:environment.yale.edutf Country Ghana UN Region Western Africa References Ghana-REDD...

  11. Kenya-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Kenya-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) Name Kenya-Developing Energy Enterprises Project...

  12. Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change(StARCK) (Redirected from Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change in Kenya (StARCK)) Jump to:...

  13. A=11F (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  14. A=11Ne (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  15. A=11O (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  16. Ghana Energy Development and Access Project (GEDAP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Access Project (GEDAP) Location of project Ghana Energy Services Lighting, Cooking and water heating, Information and communications Year initiated 2007 Organization World Bank...

  17. United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor

  18. Ghana-GTZ Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics Background analysis Website http:www.gtz.deenthemenum Country Ghana Western Africa References Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme...

  19. Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework (Redirected from CDKN-Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework) Jump to: navigation, search...

  20. Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network...

  1. Ghana-IAEA Energy Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IAEA project database1 IAEA is working with Ghana on Evaluating the Role of Nuclear Power in Future Options for Electricity Generation activities. References "IAEA...

  2. Ghana-REEEP Energy Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REEEP project database1 REEEP Energy Projects in Ghana Development of Financial Risk Management Instruments for supporting Energy Services in S Africa Geographic...

  3. Ghana-UNDP Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    plans Integrating climate change into the management of priority health risks in Ghana LPG Substitution for Wood fuel (Completed) National Action Programme to Mainstream Climate...

  4. Kenya-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Kenya on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  5. Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya-Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change(StARCK) Jump to: navigation, search Name Strengthening Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change in Kenya (StARCK)...

  6. Kenya-World Bank Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kengen, Kiambere, Tana, Eburru (2.77 M) Carbon Offset 1.4 Kenya KenGen Carbon Finance umbrella, Carbon Offset 1.5 Western Kenya Integrated Ecosystem Management Project (4.1M)...

  7. A=11He (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) 11He has not been reported: see (1980AJ01). The ground state of 11He is predicted to have Jπ = 1/2+ (1993PO11). Also see

  8. Ghana-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ghana on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  9. Ghana-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and to help transition Ghana to a low-carbon economy through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions'. The additional financing will scale-up the scope and impact of the...

  10. A=11C (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (See Table Prev. Table 11.38 preview 11.38 (in PDF or PS), Table Prev. Table 11.39 preview 11.39 (in PDF or PS) and Energy Level Diagram for 11C and Isobar Diagram) ...

  11. Kenya-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program AgencyCompany Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre...

  12. Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Affecting Electricity Policy through a Community Micro Hydro Project...

  13. Kenya-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Low Carbon Growth Planning Support AgencyCompany Organization ClimateWorks, Project...

  14. A=11N (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012KE01) (See Table Prev. Table 11.45 preview 11.45 (in PDF or PS) and Energy Level Diagram for 11N and Isobar Diagram ) Experimental evidence supporting states in 11N have produced a generally consistent picture of the 11N structure. However, sizeable inconsistencies persist amongst measured values for the ground state energy (mass excess) and the widths of states. There are essentially three high resolution measurements of the 11N ground state mass. They do not have overlap in their

  15. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern...

  16. Kenya Becoming a Geothermal Powerhouse | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Powerhouse Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Kenya Becoming a Geothermal Powerhouse Abstract NA Author theGrio Published...

  17. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  18. Guangdong ZhongKe Tianyuan Regeneration Engineering Co Ltd ZKTY...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    equipment in China to assist firms with the production of ethanol, edible alcohol and acetic acid. References: Guangdong ZhongKe Tianyuan Regeneration Engineering Co. Ltd...

  19. File:DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:DIA Kenya 0906 lw (2).pdf Size of this preview: 800 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  20. Hazard categorization of 105-KE basin debris removal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meichle, R.H.

    1996-01-25

    This supporting document provides the hazard categorization for 105-KE Basin Debris Removal Project activities planned in the K east Basin. All activities are categorized as less than Hazard Category 3.

  1. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA); Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  2. Kenya geothermal private power project: A prefeasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Twenty-eight geothermal areas in Kenya were evaluated and prioritized for development. The prioritization was based on the potential size, resource temperature, level of exploration risk, location, and exploration/development costs for each geothermal area. Suswa, Eburru and Arus are found to offer the best short-term prospects for successful private power development. It was found that cost per kill developed are significantly lower for the larger (50MW) than for smaller-sized (10 or 20 NW) projects. In addition to plant size, the cost per kill developed is seen to be a function of resource temperature, generation mode (binary or flash cycle) and transmission distance.

  3. Kenya Hourly DNI, GHI and Diffuse Solar Data - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya Hourly DNI, GHI and Diffuse Solar Data Abstract Each data file is a set of hourly values of solar radiation (DNI, GHI and diffuse) and meteorological elements for a 1-year...

  4. Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums As multi-keV x-ray sources, plastic hohlraums with inner walls coated with titanium, copper, and germanium have been fired on Omega in September 2009. For all the targets, the measured and calculated multi-keV x-ray power time histories are in a good qualitative agreement. In the same irradiation

  5. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

  6. LEDS GP Success Story: Fostering Coordinated LEDS Support in Kenya (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) strives to advance climate-resilient, low-emission development through catalyzing collaboration, information exchange, and action on the ground. The Government of Kenya is a key LEDS GP member and offers an inspiring example of how LEDS GP is having an impact globally. The 2012 LEDS Collaboration in Action workshop in London provided an interactive space for members to share experiences on cross-ministerial LEDS leadership and to learn about concrete development impacts of LEDS around the world. Inspired by these stories, the Kenya's Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 (MPND) began to collaborate closely with the Ministry of Environment and Mineral Resources to create strong links between climate change action and development in the country, culminating in the integration of Kenya's National Climate Change Action Plan and the country's Medium Term Development Plan.

  7. Public participation in and learning through SEA in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Heidi; Sinclair, A. John; Spaling, Harry

    2014-02-15

    Meaningful public engagement is a challenging, but promising, feature of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) due to its potential for integrating sustainability principles into policies, plans and programs in developing countries such as Kenya. This research examined two selected SEA case studies to identify the extent of participation, learning outcomes attributable to participation, and if any learning outcomes led to social action for sustainability at the community level. Strengths across the two cases were the inclusion of marginalized populations and consideration of socio-economic concerns. Consistent weaknesses included inadequate notice, document inaccessibility, lack of feedback and communication, and late analysis of alternatives. Despite some learning conditions being unfulfilled, examples of instrumental, communicative, and transformative learning were identified through a focus group and semi-structured interviews with community participants and public officials. Some of these learning outcomes led to individual and social actions that contribute to sustainability. -- Highlights: • The strengths and weaknesses of Kenyan SEA public participation processes were identified. • Multiple deficiencies in the SEA process likely frustrate meaningful public engagement. • Participant learning was observed despite process weaknesses. • Participant learning can lead to action for sustainability at the community level.

  8. Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell ...

  9. Origin of the 871-keV gamma ray and the ``oxide'' attribute ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Originally it was believed that the presence of oxide could be ascertained by measurement of the 871-keV line in a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrum. However, recent work has ...

  10. Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-12-16

    Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.

  11. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation study of 3-5 ...

  12. Measurement of the - 3 keV Resonance in the Reaction C 13...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the - 3 keV Resonance in the Reaction C 13 ( , n ) O 16 of Importance in ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional ...

  13. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Jacquet, L.; Babonneau, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    As multi-keV x-ray radiators, hohlraums and halfraums with inner walls coated with metallic materials (called liner) have been tested for the first time with laser as the energy drive. For titanium, conversion efficiencies (CEs) are up to {approx}14% for emission into 4{pi}, integrating between 4.6 and 6.5 keV when a large diameter hohlraum is used. Germanium CE is {approx}0.8% into 4{pi} between 9 and 13 keV. The highest CEs have been obtained with a 1 ns squared pulse and phase plates giving laser absorption near 99%. These high CEs are due to long-lasting, good plasma conditions for multi-keV x-ray production maintained by plasma confinement inside the plastic cylinder and plasma collision leading to a burst of x rays at a time that depends on target size. As photon emitters at 4.7 keV, titanium-lined hohlraums are the most efficient solid targets and data are close to CEs for gas targets, which are considered as the upper limit for x-ray yields since their low density allows good laser absorption and low kinetics losses. As 10.3 keV x-ray emitters, exploded germanium foils give best results one order of magnitude more efficient than thick targets; doped aerogels and lined hohlraums give similar yields, about three times lower than those from exploded foils.

  14. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  15. Microsoft Word - 2002_WREC_SWERA_full_paper.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data from geostationary satellites we provide solar irradiance data for Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Brazil, Ghana, Ethiopia, Kenya, China, Sri Lanka,...

  16. Mali-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  17. Namibia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  18. UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  19. Indonesia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  20. Senegal-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  1. South Korea-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  2. Rwanda-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  3. Egypt-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  4. Morocco-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  5. Barbados-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  6. Peru-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  7. Armenia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  8. Serbia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  9. Philippines-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  10. Moldova-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  11. Burkina Faso-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  12. Mexico-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  13. Russian-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  14. Mongolia-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  15. Jordan-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  16. Nepal-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  17. Ukraine-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  18. Montenegro-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  19. National Action Programmes on Desertification | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho,...

  20. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  1. 3.55 keV line in minimal decaying dark matter scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the possibility of reproducing the recently reported 3.55 keV line in some simple decaying dark matter scenarios. In all cases a keV scale decaying DM is coupled with a scalar field charged under SM gauge interactions and thus capable of pair production at the LHC. We will investigate how the demand of a DM lifetime compatible with the observed signal, combined with the requirement of the correct DM relic density through the freeze-in mechanism, impacts the prospects of observation at the LHC of the decays of the scalar field.

  2. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV X-ray

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiators (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV X-ray radiators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV X-ray radiators Authors: Girard, F ; Primout, M ; Fournier, K B ; Villette, B ; Stemmler, P ; Jacquet, L ; Babonneau, D Publication Date: 2009-05-06 OSTI Identifier: 956852 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-413391 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type:

  3. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  4. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density...

  5. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57 with CUORE crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of...

  6. Atomic ionization by keV-scale pseudoscalar dark-matter particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Pospelov, M.

    2010-05-15

    Using the relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation, we calculate the rates of atomic ionization by absorption of pseudoscalar particles in the mass range from 10 to {approx}50 keV. We present numerical results for atoms relevant for the direct dark-matter searches (e.g. Ar, Ge, I and Xe), as well as the analytical formula which fits numerical calculations with few per cent accuracy and may be used for multielectron atoms, molecules and condensed matter systems.

  7. Criticality safety evaluation report for the 100 KE Basin sandfilter backwash pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This analysis presents the technical basis for establishing a safe mass limit for continued operations of the KE Basin sandfilter backwash pit. The main analysis is based on a very conservative UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system using the measured isotopic concentrations of uranium and plutonium in the sludge. Appendix C contains analyses of the sandfilter backwash pit utilizing all verified materials presently in the pit, and gives new limits based on assumptions made.

  8. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uraniums and uranium carbides surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U??Ga??, (UC)??Ga?? and U??Cs?, (UC)??Cs??, respectively.

  9. Assessment of the KE Basin Sand Filter Inventory In Support of Hazard Categorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Young, Jonathan

    2005-09-28

    In 1978, the water cleaning system for the KE Basin was upgraded by adding a sand filter and ion exchange columns. Basin water containing finely divided solids is collected by three surface skimmers and pumped to the sand filter. Filtrate from the sand filter is further treated in the ion exchange modules. The suspended solids accumulate in the sand until the pressure drop across the filter reaches established operating limits, at which time the sand filter is backwashed. The backwash is collected in the NLOP, where the solids are allowed to settle as sludge. Figure 2-1 shows a basic piping and instrumentation diagram depicting the relationship among the basin skimmers, sand filter, and NLOP. During the course of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of the K-Basins, the sand filter and its media will need to be dispositioned. The isotopic distribution of the sludge in the sand filter has been estimated in KE Basin Sand Filter Monolith DQO (KBC-24705). This document estimates the sand filter contribution to the KE hazard categorization using the data from the DQO.

  10. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and foil-lined cavity targets (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were

  11. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for

  12. Application for Approval of Modification for the 105-KE Basin Encapsulation Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This application is being submitted to US EPA pursuant to Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61.07, amended. The encapsulation activity will consist of the activities necessary to complete encapsulation of the fuel elements and sludge in 105-KE basin, a storage basin for irradiated N Reactor fuel in Hanford 100-K Area; it currently stores 1,150 MTU of N Reactor irradiated fuel elements transferred to the basin from 1975 through 1989. The application presents the chemical and physical processes relating to the encapsulation activity, source term, expected annual emissions, radionuclide control and monitoring equipment, and projected dose to the maximally exposed individual.

  13. Calibration of SIOM-5FW film in the range of 0.1-4 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Reverdin, C.; Ioannou, I.

    2006-06-15

    The SIOM-5FW film produced for the sub-keV x-ray detection range was calibrated here in a wide energy range (0.1-4 keV). A single set of parameters valid in the whole measured energy range was determined for the calibration of the Shangai 5F (SIOM-5FW) film from a parametric fit of the data. The sensitivity of the SIOM-5FW film was measured to be four times lower than that of the Kodak DEF film at 2.5 keV photon energy. Modeling of the DEF and SIOM-5FW films provides a good comparison of their sensitivity in the 0.1-10 keV range.

  14. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr Kalpha source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. ...

  15. Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility Authors: Fournier, K B ; May, M J ; Colvin, J D ; Barrios, M A ; Patterson, J R ; Regan, ...

  16. 3.55 keV line from exciting dark matter without a hidden sector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berlin, Asher; DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-04-24

    In this study, models in which dark matter particles can scatter into a slightly heavier state which promptly decays to the lighter state and a photon (known as eXciting Dark Matter, or XDM) have been shown to be capable of generating the 3.55 keV line observed from galaxy clusters, while suppressing the flux of such a line from smaller halos, including dwarf galaxies. In most of the XDM models discussed in the literature, this up-scattering is mediated by a new light particle, and dark matter annihilations proceed into pairs of this same light state. In these models, the dark matter andmore » the mediator effectively reside within a hidden sector, without sizable couplings to the Standard Model. In this paper, we explore a model of XDM that does not include a hidden sector. Instead, the dark matter both up-scatters and annihilates through the near resonant exchange of an O(102) GeV pseudoscalar with large Yukawa couplings to the dark matter and smaller, but non-neglibile, couplings to Standard Model fermions. The dark matter and the mediator are each mixtures of Standard Model singlets and SU(2)W doublets. We identify parameter space in which this model can simultaneously generate the 3.55 keV line and the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic center, without conflicting with constraints from colliders, direct detection experiments, or observations of dwarf galaxies.« less

  17. Improving accuracy and reliability of 186-keV measurements for unattended enrichment monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moss, Calvin E; Goda, Joetta M; Favalli, Andrea; Lombardi, Marcie; Paffett, Mark T; Hill, Thomas R; MacArthur, Duncan W; Smith, Morag K

    2010-04-13

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs), whilst reducing the inspection effort, is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One aspect of this measurement is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from {sup 235}U. (The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe. This can be obtained by transmission measurements or pressure measurements). In this paper we describe our research efforts towards such a passive measurement system. The system includes redundant measurements of the 186-keV line from the gas and separately from the wall deposits. The design also includes measures to reduce the effect of the potentially important background. Such an approach would practically eliminate false alarms and can maintain the operation of the system even with a hardware malfunction in one of the channels. The work involves Monte Carlo modeling and the construction of a proof-of-principle prototype. We will carry out experimental tests with UF{sub 6} gas in pipes with and without deposits in order to demonstrate the deposit correction.

  18. Bosonic super-WIMPs as keV-scale dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam; Voloshin, Mikhail

    2008-12-01

    We consider models of light superweakly interacting cold dark matter, with O(10-100) keV mass, focusing on bosonic candidates such as pseudoscalars and vectors. We analyze the cosmological abundance, the {gamma} background created by particle decays, the impact on stellar processes due to cooling, and the direct-detection capabilities in order to identify classes of models that pass all the constraints. In certain models, variants of photoelectric (or axioelectric) absorption of dark matter in direct-detection experiments can provide a sensitivity to the superweak couplings to the standard model which is superior to all existing indirect constraints. In all models studied, the annual modulation of the direct-detection signal is at the currently unobservable level of O(10{sup -5})

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of 30 and 2 keV Ga in Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannuzzi, Lucille A.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-09-15

    Focused Ga{sup +} ion beams are routinely used at high incident angles for specimen preparation. Molecular dynamics simulations of 2 and 30 keV Ga bombardment of Si(011) at a grazing angle of 88 deg. were conducted to assess sputtering characteristics and damage depth. The bombardment of atomically flat surfaces and surfaces with vacancies shows little energy transfer yielding ion reflection. The bombardment of surfaces with adatoms allows for the coupling of the energy of motion parallel to the surface into the substrate resulting in sputtering. The adatom and one other Si atom eject, and motion in the substrate occurs down to a depth of 13 A. Experimental evidence shows that sputtering is a reality, suggesting that an atomically flat surface is never achieved.

  20. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  1. Life-cycle cost and impacts: alternatives for managing KE basin sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderman, C.J.

    1997-06-27

    This document presents the results of a life-cycle cost and impacts evaluation of alternatives for managing sludge that will be removed from the K Basins. The two basins are located in the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site. This evaluation was conducted by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and its subcontractors to support decisions regarding the ultimate disposition of the sludge. The long-range plan for the Hanford Site calls for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), sludge, debris, and water to be removed from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. This activity will be conducted as a removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The scope of the CERCLA action will be limited to removing the SNF, sludge, debris, and water from the basins and transferring them to authorized facilities for interim storage and/or treatment and disposal. The scope includes treating the sludge and water in the 100-K Area prior to the transfer. Alternatives for the removal action are evaluated in a CERCLA engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) and include different methods for managing sludge from the KE Basins. The scope of the removal action does not include storing, treating, or disposing of the sludge once it is transferred to the receiving facility and the EE/CA does not evaluate those downstream activities. This life-cycle evaluation goes beyond the EE/CA and considers the full life-cycle costs and impacts of dispositioning sludge.

  2. keV sterile neutrino dark matter from singlet scalar decays: basic concepts and subtle features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merle, Alexander; Totzauer, Maximilian

    2015-06-08

    We perform a detailed and illustrative study of the production of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) by decays of singlet scalars in the early Universe. In the current study we focus on providing a clear and general overview of this production mechanism. For the first time we study all regimes possible on the level of momentum distribution functions, which we obtain by solving a system of Boltzmann equations. These quantities contain the full information about the production process, which allows us to not only track the evolution of the DM generation but to also take into account all bounds related to the spectrum, such as constraints from structure formation or from avoiding too much dark radiation. In particular we show that this simple production mechanism can, depending on the regime, lead to strongly non-thermal DM spectra which may even feature more than one peak in the momentum distribution. These cases could have particularly interesting consequences for cosmological structure formation, as their analysis requires more refined tools than the simplistic estimate using the free-streaming horizon. Here we present the mechanism including all concepts and subtleties involved, for now using the assumption that the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom is constant during DM production, which is applicable in a significant fraction of the parameter space. This allows us to derive analytical results to back up our detailed numerical computations, thus leading to the most comprehensive picture of keV sterile neutrino DM production by singlet scalar decays that exists up to now.

  3. Low-energy X-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipe, N.E.; Chatterji, S.; Fasso, A.; Kase, K.R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti-0.4 mm thick), MCP-N(LiF:Mg, Cu, P-0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6--16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both types of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within {+-}4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  4. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipe, N. E.; Chatterji, S.; Fasso, A.; Kase, K. R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti- 0.4 mm thick), MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P - 0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6-16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both type of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within {+-}4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  5. Quality and Performance of LED Flashlights in Kenya: Common End User Preferences and Complaints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jenny; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2009-09-14

    Flashlights that use LED technology have quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya. While flashlights do not normally provide a substitute for kerosene and other highly inefficient fuels, they are an important early manifestation of LED lighting in the developing world that can serve as a platform - or deterrent - to the diffusion of the technology into the broader off-grid lighting market. The lead acid batteries embedded in flashlights also represent an important source of hazardous waste, and flashlight durability is thus an important determinant of the rate of waste disposal. Low-cost LED flashlights with prices from $1 to $4 are now widely available in shops and markets throughout Kenya. The increased penetration of LED technology in the flashlight market is significant, as over half of all Kenyan households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). While this shift from conventional incandescent technology to modern LEDs may appear to be a promising development, end users that our research team interviewed expressed a number of complaints about the quality and performance of these new flashlights. This raises concerns about the interests of low-income flashlight users, and it may also indicate the onset of a broader market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007). The quality of low-cost LED flashlights can contribute to market spoiling because these products appear to represent the first contact that most Kenyans have with LED technology. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their experiences, perceptions, and preferences. We focus especially on highlighting common complaints from respondents about the flashlights that they have used, as well as on noting the features that they indicated were important when evaluating the quality of a flashlight. In previous laboratory tests, researchers from our team found a wide range of quality and performance among battery powered LED lights (Granderson, et al. 2008).

  6. Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro S. Cox and J. Katz National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Laura Würtenberger Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-58391 January 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report

  7. Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility Authors: Fournier, K B ; May, M J ; Colvin, J D ; Barrios, M A ; Patterson, J R ; Regan, S P Publication Date: 2013-05-29 OSTI Identifier: 1095970 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-638276 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48

  8. Characteristics of KE Basin Sludge Samples Archived in the RPL - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2011-11-22

    Samples of sludge were collected from the K East fuel storage basin (KE Basin) floor, contiguous pits (Weasel Pit, North Load Out Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, and Tech View Pit), and fuel storage canisters between 1995 and 2003 for chemical and radionuclide concentration analysis, physical property determination, and chemical process testing work. Because of the value of the sludge in this testing and because of the cost of obtaining additional fresh samples, an ongoing program of sludge preservation has taken place with the goals to track the sludge identities and preserve, as well as possible, the sludge composition by keeping the sludge in sealed jars and maintaining water coverage on the sludge consistent with the controlling Fluor Hanford (FH) Sampling and Analysis plans and FH contracts with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was originally initiated to provide material for planned hydrothermal treatment testing in accordance with the test plan for the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) corrosion process chemistry follow on testing (Delegard et al. 2007). Although most of the planned hydrothermal testing was canceled in July 2007 (as described in the forward of Delegard et al. 2007), sample consolidation and characterization was continued to identify a set of well-characterized sludge samples that are suited to support evolving STP initiatives. The work described in the letter was performed by the PNNL under the direction of the Sludge Treatment Project, managed by Fluor Hanford.

  9. LUCIA - a new 1-7 keV {mu}-XAS Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janousch, M.; Schmidt, Th.; Wetter, R.; Grolimund, G.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Cauchon, G.; Bac, S.; Dubuisson, J.M.

    2004-05-12

    LURE-SOLEIL (France) and the Swiss Light Source (SLS) are building together a new micro focused beamline for micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro imaging. This line is designed to deliver a photon flux of the order of 1012 ph/sec on a 1 x 1 {mu}m spot within the energy domain of 0.8 to 7 keV. This beam line is being installed on the X07M straight section of SLS. The source is an APPLE II undulator with a period of 54 mm. The main advantage of this device lies in the delivery of any degree of polarization, linear or circular, over the whole energy range, without the need of a sample-position change. The monochromator will be a fixed exit double crystal equipped with 5 sets of crystals, thanks to the very narrow photon beam from the undulator ( Beryl, KTP, YB66, InSb(111), Si(111) ). The optics includes a first horizontal focusing mirror (spherical), which produces an intermediate source for the horizontal mirror of a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) system. The vertical mirror of the KB directly images the source. Finally, a low-pass double mirror filter insures a proper harmonic rejection.

  10. 3.55 keV photon lines from axion to photon conversion in the Milky Way and M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V. E-mail: francesca.day@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We further explore a scenario in which the recently observed 3.55 keV photon line arises from dark matter decay to an axion-like particle (ALP) of energy 3.55 keV, which then converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. This ALP scenario is well-motivated by the observed morphology of the 3.55 keV flux. For this scenario we study the expected flux from dark matter decay in the galactic halos of both the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31). The Milky Way magnetic field is asymmetric about the galactic centre, and so the resulting 3.55 keV flux morphology differs significantly from the case of direct dark matter decay to photons. However the Milky Way magnetic field is not large enough to generate an observable signal, even with ASTRO-H. In contrast, M31 has optimal conditions for a → γ conversion and the intrinsic signal from M31 becomes two orders of magnitude larger than for the Milky Way, comparable to that from clusters and consistent with observations.

  11. Observational consistency and future predictions for a 3.5 keV ALP to photon line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V.; Marsh, M.C. David; Rummel, Markus

    2015-04-09

    Motivated by the possibility of explaining the 3.5 keV line through dark matter decaying to axion-like particles that subsequently convert to photons, we study ALP-photon conversion for sightlines passing within 50 pc of the galactic centre. Conversion depends on the galactic centre magnetic field which is highly uncertain. For fields at low or mid-range of observational estimates (10–100 μG), no observable signal is possible. For fields at the high range of observational estimates (a pervasive poloidal mG field over the central 150 pc) it is possible to generate sufficient signal to explain recent observations of a 3.5 keV line in the galactic centre. In this scenario, the galactic centre line signal comes predominantly from the region with z>20pc, reconciling the results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes. The dark matter to ALP to photon scenario also naturally predicts the non-observation of the 3.5 keV line in stacked galaxy spectra. We further explore predictions for the line flux in galaxies and suggest a set of galaxies that is optimised for observing the 3.5 keV line in this model.

  12. Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-02-16

    Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007) a better understanding of flashlight use-patterns is crucial (Tracy et al., 2009). In addition, the economic implications faced by rural flashlight end-users provide further incentive for a move toward higher quality low-cost flashlights. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their use patterns and costs associated with owning and operating flashlight products. While flashlights used in their portable mode typically do not represent a substitute for kerosene or other forms of fuel-based lighting, at times they are used in stationary applications in place of a fuel-based lamp. In either case, these products often represent end users first exposure to LED technology and rechargeable dry cell batteries, and thus stand to either provide a positive or negative impression of these technologies for a diversity of lighting applications.

  13. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P; Le Flanchec, V.; Negre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-19

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications and Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 {mu}m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  14. TRACKING DOWN THE SOURCE POPULATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE UNRESOLVED COSMIC 6-8 keV BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Y. Q.; Wang, S. X.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Schneider, D. P.; Young, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Lehmer, B. D.; Vignali, C.

    2012-10-20

    Using the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey, we have identified a sample of 6845 X-ray-undetected galaxies that dominates the unresolved Almost-Equal-To 20%-25% of the 6-8 keV cosmic X-ray background (XRB). This sample was constructed by applying mass and color cuts to sources from a parent catalog based on GOODS-South Hubble Space Telescope z-band imaging of the central 6'radius area of the 4 Ms CDF-S. The stacked 6-8 keV detection is significant at the 3.9{sigma} level, but the stacked emission was not detected in the 4-6 keV band, which indicates the existence of an underlying population of highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Further examinations of these 6845 galaxies indicate that the galaxies on the top of the blue cloud and with redshifts of 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 3, magnitudes of 25 {approx}< z {sub 850} {approx}< 28, and stellar masses of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} {approx}< M {sub *}/M {sub Sun} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} make the majority contributions to the unresolved 6-8 keV XRB. Such a population is seemingly surprising given that the majority of the X-ray-detected AGNs reside in massive ({approx}> 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }) galaxies. We discuss constraints upon this underlying AGN population, supporting evidence for relatively low mass galaxies hosting highly obscured AGNs, and prospects for further boosting the stacked signal.

  15. TIME-RESOLVED 1-10 keV CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR THE Z MACHINE AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. V. Morgan; S. Gardner; R. Liljestrand; M. Madlener; S. Slavin; M. Wu

    2003-06-01

    We have designed, fabricated, calibrated, and fielded a fast, time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer to observe the evolution of wire pinch spectra at the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. The instrument has two convex cylindrical crystals (PET and KAP). Both crystals Bragg reflect x-rays into an array of ten silicon diodes, providing continuous spectral coverage in twenty channels from 1.0 to 10 keV. The spectral response of the instrument has been calibrated from 1.0 to 6.3 keV at beamline X8A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The time response of the 1-mm2 silicon detectors was measured with the Pulsed X-ray Source at Bechtel Nevada's Los Alamos Operations, where 2-nanosecond full-width half-maximum (FWHM) waveforms with 700-picosecond rise times typically were observed. The spectrometer has been fielded recently on several experimental runs at the Z Machine. In this paper, we present the time-resolved spectra resulting from the implosions of double-nested tungsten wire arrays onto 5-mm diameter foam cylinders. We also show the results obtained for a double-nested stainless steel wire array with no target cylinder. The spectrometer was located at the end of a 7.1-meter beamline on line-of sight (LOS)21/22, at an angle 12{sup o} above the equatorial plane, and was protected from the debris field by a customized dual-slit fast valve. The soft detector channels below 2.0 keV recorded large signals at pinch time coinciding with signals recorded on vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs). On experiment Z993, the spectrometer channels recorded a second pulse with a hard x-ray emission spectrum several nanoseconds after pinch time.

  16. Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.; Katz, J.; Wurtenberger, L.

    2014-01-01

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate economy-wide policies and implementation plans designed to enable a country to meet its long-term development objectives while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A development impact assessment tool was developed to inform an analytically robust and transparent prioritization of LEDS actions based on their economic, social, and environmental impacts. The graphical tool helps policymakers communicate the development impacts of LEDS options and identify actions that help meet both emissions reduction and development goals. This paper summarizes the adaptation and piloting of the tool in Kenya and Montenegro. The paper highlights strengths of the tool and discusses key needs for improving it.

  17. Decaying vector dark matter as an explanation for the 3.5 keV line from galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Akbarieh, Amin Rezaei E-mail: am_rezaei@physics.sharif.ir

    2014-11-01

    We present a Vector Dark Matter (VDM) model that explains the 3.5 keV line recently observed in the XMM-Newton observatory data from galaxy clusters. In this model, dark matter is composed of two vector bosons, V and V', which couple to the photon through an effective generalized Chern-Simons coupling, g{sub V}. V' is slightly heavier than V with a mass splitting m{sub V'}m{sub V}?3.5 keV. The decay of V' to V and a photon gives rise to the 3.5 keV line. The production of V and V' takes place in the early universe within the freeze-in framework through the effective g{sub V} coupling when m{sub V'}

  18. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajello, M.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Reimer, O.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; ,

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  19. Composting, anaerobic digestion and biochar production in Ghana. Environmental–economic assessment in the context of voluntary carbon markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galgani, Pietro; Voet, Ester van der; Korevaar, Gijsbert

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Economic–environmental assessment of combining composting with biogas and biochar in Ghana. • These technologies can save greenhouse gas emissions for up to 0.57 t CO{sub 2} eq/t of waste treated. • Labor intensive, small-scale organic waste management is not viable without financial support. • Carbon markets would make these technologies viable with carbon prices in the range of 30–84 EUR/t. - Abstract: In some areas of Sub-Saharan Africa appropriate organic waste management technology could address development issues such as soil degradation, unemployment and energy scarcity, while at the same time reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper investigates the role that carbon markets could have in facilitating the implementation of composting, anaerobic digestion and biochar production, in the city of Tamale, in the North of Ghana. Through a life cycle assessment of implementation scenarios for low-tech, small scale variants of the above mentioned three technologies, the potential contribution they could give to climate change mitigation was assessed. Furthermore an economic assessment was carried out to study their viability and the impact thereon of accessing carbon markets. It was found that substantial climate benefits can be achieved by avoiding landfilling of organic waste, producing electricity and substituting the use of chemical fertilizer. Biochar production could result in a net carbon sequestration. These technologies were however found not to be economically viable without external subsidies, and access to carbon markets at the considered carbon price of 7 EUR/ton of carbon would not change the situation significantly. Carbon markets could help the realization of the considered composting and anaerobic digestion systems only if the carbon price will rise above 75–84 EUR/t of carbon (respectively for anaerobic digestion and composting). Biochar production could achieve large climate benefits and, if approved as a land based climate mitigation mechanism in carbon markets, it would become economically viable at the lower carbon price of 30 EUR/t of carbon.

  20. Facile synthesis of highly stable a-Si by ion implantation of low-keV H isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Goesele, U.; Terreault, B.

    2009-06-15

    It is experimentally shown that silicon is 'easily' amorphized by low-keV H ions at the relatively high temperature of 150 K and for an ion fluence equivalent to <1 DPA (displacement per atom). The a-Si layer is much more stable against recrystallization than a-Si produced by other ions and more stable against chemical modification than c-Si that is H-implanted at room temperature. These results are unexplained by the current atomic collision theory, including molecular-dynamics simulations, but they demonstrate the stabilizing effect of dangling bond passivation by H atoms in postulated, metastable, amorphous droplets.

  1. Simulations of Microchannel Plate Sensitivity to <20 keV X-rays as a Function of Energy and Incident Angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruschwitz, Craig; Wu, M.; Rochau, G. A.

    2013-06-13

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP) response to x-rays in the 250 eV to 20 keV energy range as a function of both x-ray energy and impact angle. The model is based on the model presented in Rochau et al. (2006). However, while the Rochau et al. (2006) model was two-dimensional, and their results only went to 5 keV, our results have been expanded to 20 keV, and our model has been incorporated into a three-dimensional Monte Carlo MCP model that we have developed over the past several years (Kruschwitz et al. 2011). X-ray penetration through multiple MCP pore walls is increasingly important above 5 keV. The effect of x-ray penetration through multiple pores on MCP performance was studied and is presented.

  2. Operation and Development of the 500-keV Negative-Ion-Based Neutral Beam Injection System for JT-60U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuriyama, M.; Akino, N.; Ebisawa, N.; Grisham, L.; Honda, A.; Itoh, T.; Kawai, M.; Kazawa, M.; Mogaki, K.; Ohara, Y.; Ohga, T.; Okumura, Y.; Oohara, H.; Umeda, N.; Usui, K.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2002-09-15

    The 500-keV negative-ion based neutral beam injector for JT-60U started operation in 1996. The beam power has been increased gradually through optimizing operation parameters of the ion sources and conquering many troubles in the ion source and power supplies caused by a high voltage break-down in the accelerator. However, some issues remain to be solved concerning the ion source for increasing further the beam power and the beam energy. The most serious issue of them is non-uniformity of source plasma in the arc chamber. Various countermeasures have been implemented to improve the non-uniformity. Some of those countermeasures have been found to be partially effective in reducing the non-uniformity of the source plasma, and as the result the ion source, so far, has accelerated negative-ion beams of 17.4A at 403keV with deuterium and 20A at 360keV with hydrogen against the goal of 22A at 500keV. The neutral beam injection power into the plasma has reached 5.8MW at 400keV with deuterium. Further efforts to reach the target of 10MW at 500keV have been continued.

  3. Effect of 200 keV Ar{sup +} implantation on optical and electrical properties of polyethyleneterepthalate (PET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rajiv Goyal, Meetika Sharma, Ambika; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper we have discussed the effect of 200 keV Ar{sup +} ions on the electrical and optical properties of PET samples. PET samples were implanted with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ions to various doses ranging from 1×10{sup 15} to 1×10{sup 17} Ar{sup +} cm{sup 2}. The changes in the electrical and optical properties of pristine and implanted PET specimens have been studied by using Keithley electrometer and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity has found to be increased with increasing ion dose. The optical studies have revealed the drastic alterations in optical band gap from 3.63 eV to 1.48 eV and also increase in number of carbon atoms per cluster from 215 to 537. Further, the change in the electrical conductivity and optical band gap has also been correlated with the formation of conductive islands in the implanted layers of PET.

  4. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (?100 keV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (?100?keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% 4% at 40?keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup ?1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% 4% at 20 keV and 6% 4% at about 40?keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The EBT3 film prototype with 7.5% Si shows a significant improvement in the energy response at very low energies compared to the commercial EBT3 films with 4% Cl. It shows under response of 15% 5% at about 20 keV to 2% 5% at about 40?keV. However, according to the manufacturer, the addition of 7.5% Si as SiO{sub 2} adversely affected the viscosity of the active fluid and therefore affected the potential use in commercial machine coating. The latest commercial EBT3 film model with 7% Al as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows an overall improvement in S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) compared to previous commercial EBT3 films. It shows under response at all energies <100 keV, varying from 20% 4% at 20 keV to 6% 4% at 40?keV. Conclusions: The energy response of films in the energy range <100 keV can be improved by adjusting the active layer chemical composition. Removing bromine eliminated the over response at about 40?keV. The under response at energies ?30 keV is improved by adding 7% Al to the active layer in the latest commercial EBT3 film models.

  5. Compact femtosecond electron diffractometer with 100 keV electron bunches approaching the single-electron pulse duration limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldecker, Lutz Bertoni, Roman; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2015-01-28

    We present the design and implementation of a highly compact femtosecond electron diffractometer working at electron energies up to 100 keV. We use a multi-body particle tracing code to simulate electron bunch propagation through the setup and to calculate pulse durations at the sample position. Our simulations show that electron bunches containing few thousands of electrons per bunch are only weakly broadened by space-charge effects and their pulse duration is thus close to the one of a single-electron wavepacket. With our compact setup, we can create electron bunches containing up to 5000 electrons with a pulse duration below 100 fs on the sample. We use the diffractometer to track the energy transfer from photoexcited electrons to the lattice in a thin film of titanium. This process takes place on the timescale of few-hundred femtoseconds and a fully equilibrated state is reached within 1 ps.

  6. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis to metal hydride film characterization at the GEND 200 KeV accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malbrough, D.J.; Becker, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is a quantitative analytical technique that usually involves the use of MeV ion beams and resonant nuclear reactions to non-destructively probe materials for elemental content and depth profiles. Low energy, non-resonant nuclear reactions can also be exploited for NRA and procedures have been developed for using the GEND 200-KeV accelerator to characterize neutron generator components by that technique. The procedures involve the detection and analysis of fusion reaction products generated by the interactions of deuteron beams with light elements in metal hydride films. A description of the accelerator system is presented along with some of the unique NRA procedures that have recently been developed for its use. The system is used to measure neutron output efficiencies of metal deuterides and tritides by the associated particle technique (APT) and accurate neutron yield measurements have been made for a number of materials for which data was formerly not available.

  7. Improvement of voltage holding capability in the 500 keV negative ion source for JT-60SA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.; Akino, N.; Shimizu, T.; Ohshima, K.; Inoue, T.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H.; Grisham, L. R.; Collaboration: JT-60 NBI Group

    2010-02-15

    Voltage holding capability of JT-60 negative ion source that has a large electrostatic negative ion accelerator with 45 cmx1.1 m acceleration grids was experimentally examined and improved to realize 500 keV, 22 A, and 100 s D{sup -} ion beams for JT-60 Super Advanced. The gap lengths in the acceleration stages were extended to reduce electric fields in a gap between the large grids and at the corner of the support flanges from the original 4-5 to 3-4 kV/mm. As a result, the voltage holding capability without beam acceleration has been successfully improved from 400 to 500 kV. The pulse duration to hold 500 kV reached 40 s of the power supply limitation.

  8. Compact focusing spectrometer: Visible (1 eV) to hard x-rays (200 keV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baronova, E. O.; Stepanenko, A. M.; Pereira, N. R.

    2014-11-15

    A low-cost spectrometer that covers a wide range of photon energies can be useful to teach spectroscopy, and for simple, rapid measurements of the photon spectrum produced by small plasma devices. The spectrometer here achieves its wide range, nominally from 1 eV to 200 keV, with a series of spherically and cylindrically bent gratings or crystals that all have the same shape and the same radius of curvature; they are complemented by matching apertures and diagnostics on the Rowland circle that serves as the circular part of the spectrometer's vacuum vessel. Spectral lines are easily identified with software that finds their positions from the dispersion of each diffractive element and the known energies of the lines.

  9. Performance of the 100 keV chopper/buncher system of the NBS-Los Alamos RTM injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, M.A.; Cutler, R.I.; Mohr, D.L.; Penner, S.; Young, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the chopper/buncher system for the RTM injector is to chop a 100 keV 5 mA dc electron beam into 60/sup 0/-long pulses at 2380 MHz and then bunch these beam pulses to 10/sup 0/ at insertion into the 5 MeV injector linac. These beam manipulations must contribute a minimum increase in the phase space of the beam such that, at the entrance to the injector linac, the transverse emittance is less than 5..pi.. mm-mrad. Phase-shift measurements on the chopped beam indicate that the bunching fields are sufficient to achieve the required longitudinal compression. Beam envelope measurements, using wire scanners on the chopped and bunched beam, show that the emittance remains within design goals.

  10. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 ; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Miao, Wen-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-15

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  11. The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Chandra: a Fully Compton-Thick AGN (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Chandra: a Fully Compton-Thick AGN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Chandra: a Fully Compton-Thick AGN Authors: Arevalo, P. ; /Chile U., Catolica /Valparaiso U. ; Bauer, F. E. ; /Chile U., Catolica /Space Sci. Inst., Boulder ; Puccetti, S. ; /Rome

  12. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  13. Acceleration of 500 keV Negative Ion Beams By Tuning Vacuum Insulation Distance On JT-60 Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Tobari, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2011-09-26

    Acceleration of a 500 keV beam up to 2.8 A has been achieved on a JT-60U negative ion source with a three-stage accelerator by overcoming low voltage holding which is one of the critical issues for realization of the JT-60SA ion source. In order to improve the voltage holding, preliminary voltage holding tests with small-size grids with uniform and locally intense electric fields were carried out, and suggested that the voltage holding was degraded by both the size and local electric field effects. Therefore, the local electric field was reduced by tuning gap lengths between the large size grids and grid support structures of the accelerator. Moreover, a beam radiation shield which limited extension of the minimum gap length was also optimized so as to reduce the local electric field while maintaining the shielding effect. These modifications were based on the experiment results, and significantly increased the voltage holding from <150 kV/stage for the original configuration to 200 kV/stage. These techniques for improvement of voltage holding should also be applicable to other large ion sources accelerators such as those for ITER.

  14. Bent-crystal Laue spectrograph for measuring x-ray spectra (15keV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, B. H.; Wong, S.; Riordan, J. C.; Hudson, L. T.; O'Brien, C. M.; Seltzer, S. M.; Seiler, S.; Pressley, L.; Lojewski, D. Y.

    2006-10-15

    A bent-crystal Laue {l_brace}or Cauchois [J. Phys. Radium 3, 320 (1932)] geometry{r_brace} spectrograph is a good compromise between sensitivity and spectral resolution for measuring x-ray spectra (15keV) from large area x-ray sources because source-size spectral broadening is mitigated. We have designed, built, and tested such a spectrograph for measuring the spectra from electron-beam x-ray sources with diameters as large as 30 cm. The same spectrograph geometry has also been used to diagnose (with higher spectral resolution) smaller sources, such as x-ray tubes for mammography and laser-driven inertial fusion targets. We review our spectrograph design and describe the performance of different components. We have compared the reflectivity and spectral resolution of LiF, and Ge diffracting crystals. We have also measured the differences in sensitivity and spectral resolution using different x-ray to light converters (plastic scintillator, CsI, and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) fiber optically coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device camera. We have also coupled scintillating fibers to photomultiplier tubes to obtain temporal records for discrete energy channels.

  15. Laboratory-based x-ray reflectometer for multilayer characterization in the 15150 keV energy band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windt, David L.

    2015-04-15

    A laboratory-based X-ray reflectometer has been developed to measure the performance of hard X-ray multilayer coatings at their operational X-ray energies and incidence angles. The instrument uses a sealed-tube X-ray source with a tungsten anode that can operate up to 160 kV to provide usable radiation in the 15150 keV energy band. Two sets of adjustable tungsten carbide slit assemblies, spaced 4.1 m apart, are used to produce a low-divergence white beam, typically set to 40 ?m 800 ?m in size at the sample. Multilayer coatings under test are held flat using a vacuum chuck and are mounted at the center of a high-resolution goniometer used for precise angular positioning of the sample and detector; additionally, motorized linear stages provide both vertical and horizontal adjustments of the sample position relative to the incident beam. A CdTe energy-sensitive detector, located behind a third adjustable slit, is used in conjunction with pulse-shaping electronics and a multi-channel analyzer to capture both the incident and reflected spectra; the absolute reflectance of the coating under test is computed as the ratio of the two spectra. The instruments design, construction, and operation are described in detail, and example results are presented obtained with both periodic, narrow-band and depth-graded, wide-band hard X-ray multilayer coatings.

  16. Capture of a neutron to excited states of a {sup 9}Be nucleus taking into account resonance at 622 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-10-15

    Radiative capture of a neutron to the ground and excited states of the 9Be nucleus is considered using the potential cluster model with forbidden states and with classification of cluster states by the Young schemes taking into account resonance at 622 keV for thermal and astrophysical energies.

  17. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. ); Richert, J.P. )

    1994-07-01

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  18. Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-K-55:1 and 100-K-56:1 Pipelines and the 116-KW-4 and 116-KE-5 Heat Recovery Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2005-09-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-K-55:1 and 100-K-56:1 reactor cooling effluent underground pipelines and for the 116-KW-4 and 116-KE-5 heat recovery stations. The 100-K-55 and 100-K-56 sites consisted of those process effluent pipelines that serviced the 105-KW and 105-KE Reactors.

  19. Characterization of a hybrid target multi-keV x-ray source by a multi-parameter statistical analysis of titanium K-shell emission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Primout, M.; Babonneau, D.; Jacquet, L.; Gilleron, F.; Peyrusse, O.; Fournier, K. B.; Marrs, R.; May, M. J.; Heeter, R. F.; Wallace, R. J.

    2015-11-10

    We studied the titanium K-shell emission spectra from multi-keV x-ray source experiments with hybrid targets on the OMEGA laser facility. Using the collisional-radiative TRANSPEC code, dedicated to K-shell spectroscopy, we reproduced the main features of the detailed spectra measured with the time-resolved MSPEC spectrometer. We developed a general method to infer the Ne, Te and Ti characteristics of the target plasma from the spectral analysis (ratio of integrated Lyman-α to Helium-α in-band emission and the peak amplitude of individual line ratios) of the multi-keV x-ray emission. Finally, these thermodynamic conditions are compared to those calculated independently by the radiation-hydrodynamics transportmore » code FCI2.« less

  20. Characterization of a hybrid target multi-keV x-ray source by a multi-parameter statistical analysis of titanium K-shell emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primout, M.; Babonneau, D.; Jacquet, L.; Gilleron, F.; Peyrusse, O.; Fournier, K. B.; Marrs, R.; May, M. J.; Heeter, R. F.; Wallace, R. J.

    2015-11-10

    We studied the titanium K-shell emission spectra from multi-keV x-ray source experiments with hybrid targets on the OMEGA laser facility. Using the collisional-radiative TRANSPEC code, dedicated to K-shell spectroscopy, we reproduced the main features of the detailed spectra measured with the time-resolved MSPEC spectrometer. We developed a general method to infer the Ne, Te and Ti characteristics of the target plasma from the spectral analysis (ratio of integrated Lyman-α to Helium-α in-band emission and the peak amplitude of individual line ratios) of the multi-keV x-ray emission. Finally, these thermodynamic conditions are compared to those calculated independently by the radiation-hydrodynamics transport code FCI2.

  1. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  2. Neutron physics of the Re/Os clock. II. The (n,n{sup '}) cross section of {sup 187}Os at 30 keV neutron energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2010-07-15

    The inelastic neutron-scattering cross section of {sup 187}Os has been determined in a time-of-flight experiment at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. An almost monoenergetic beam of 30-keV neutrons was produced at the threshold of the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Information on the inelastic channel is required for reliable calculations of the so-called stellar enhancement factor, by which the laboratory cross section of {sup 187}Os must be corrected in order to account for the thermal population of low-lying excited states at the temperatures of s-process nucleosynthesis, in particular of the important state at 9.75 keV. This correction represents a crucial step in the interpretation of the {sup 187}Os/{sup 187}Re pair as a cosmochronometer.

  3. Evaluated Mean Values and Covariances for the Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, Denise

    2014-07-10

    This document provides the numerical values of the evaluated prompt fission neutron spectrum for 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV as well as relative uncertainties and correlations. This document also contains a short description how these data were obtained and shows plots comparing the evaluated results to experimental information as well as the corresponding ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  4. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L

    2006-10-15

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si(Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3 keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3 keV ({approx}50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  5. Angular scattering of 150 keV ions through graphene and thin carbon foils: Potential applications for space plasma instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, Robert W.; Allegrini, Frdric; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Nicolaou, Georgios; Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 ; Bedworth, Peter; Sinton, Steve; Trattner, Karlheinz J.; Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303

    2014-03-15

    We present experimental results for the angular scattering of ?150 keV H, He, C, O, N, Ne, and Ar ions transiting through graphene foils and compare them with scattering through nominal ?0.5 ?g?cm{sup ?2} carbon foils. Thin carbon foils play a critical role in time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers and energetic neutral atom sensors in space. These instruments take advantage of the charge exchange and secondary electron emission produced as ions or neutral atoms transit these foils. This interaction also produces angular scattering and energy straggling for the incident ion or neutral atom that acts to decrease the performance of a given instrument. Our results show that the angular scattering of ions through graphene is less pronounced than through the state-of-the-art 0.5 ?g?cm{sup ?2} carbon foils used in space-based particle detectors. At energies less than 50 keV, the scattering angle half width at half maximum, ?{sub 1/2}, for ?35 atoms thick graphene is up to a factor of 3.5 smaller than for 0.5 ?g?cm{sup ?2} (?20 atoms thick) carbon foils. Thus, graphene foils have the potential to improve the performance of space-based plasma instruments for energies below ?50 keV.

  6. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Satcher, J. H. Jr.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Sorce, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm{sup 3}) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 {mu}m). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%). The aerogel targets produced T{sub e}=2 to 3 keV, n{sub e}=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%-60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%-3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced T{sub e}{approx} 2 keV, n{sub e}{approx} 0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%-75% conversion efficiency (1.6%-2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  7. Measurement of the keV-neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectrum of isotopes around N=82 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki

    2012-11-12

    The keV-neutron capture cross section and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of nuclides with a neutron magic number N= 82, {sup 139}La and {sup 142}Nd, were newly measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture {gamma}-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The results were provided with our previous measurements of other nuclides around N= 82, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 143}Nd and {sup 145}Nd.

  8. Determination of the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi (n, {gamma}) {sup 210}Bi reaction from 500 eV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Berthomieux, E.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gunsing, F.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. M.; Milazzo, P. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.; Terlizzi, R.; Wynants, R.

    2006-07-01

    Energy differential neutron capture cross section measurements have been performed to determine the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi(n, {gamma}) reaction. The measurements were carried out at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (Belgium). The capture measurements were performed at a 12 m flight path using three High-Purity Germanium detectors. The experimental set-up was optimized to reduce the prompt background due to scattered neutrons. Several {gamma}-ray spectra corresponding to the {sup 209}Bi + n resonances up to 20 keV were deduced. The results of a preliminary data analysis are given in this paper. (authors)

  9. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

    2009-02-11

    The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

  10. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2015-05-26

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  11. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high source luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.

  12. Cross calibration of new x-ray films against direct exposure film from 1 to 8 keV using the X-pinch x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.M.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Knauer, J.P.

    2005-11-15

    A cross calibration of readily available x-ray sensitive films has been carried out against the calibrated direct exposure film (DEF) which is no longer being manufactured by Kodak. Four-wire X pinches made from various metal wires were used as x-ray sources for this purpose. Tests were carried out for the Kodak films Biomax MS, Biomax XAR, M100, Technical Pan, and T-Max over the energy range of 1-8 keV (12.4-1.5 A wavelength). The same hand-development procedures as described by Henke et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 3, 1540 (1986)] were followed for all films in every test. Sensitivity curves as a function of wavelength for these films relative DEF are presented. These relative calibrations show that Biomax MS is likely to be the best replacement film for DEF for most purposes over the energy range tested here.

  13. Absolute Calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS Film Response to X Rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F.J.; Knauer, J.P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B.L.

    2006-09-28

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory e-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si(Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations.

  14. {sup 147}Sm(n,{alpha}) cross section measurements from 3 eV to 500 keV: Implications for explosive nucleosynthesis reaction rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gledenov, Yu. M.; Koehler, P. E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Guber, K. H.; Rauscher, T.

    2000-10-01

    We have measured the {sup 147}Sm(n,{alpha}) cross section from 3 eV to 500 keV. These data were used to test nuclear statistical models which must be relied on to calculate the rates for as yet unmeasurable reactions occurring in explosive nucleosynthesis scenarios. It was found that our data are in reasonably good agreement with the reaction rate predicted by an older model but that the rates predicted by two very recent models are roughly a factor of 3 different from the data (in opposite directions). A detailed analysis indicates the strong dependence on the employed optical {alpha} potentials. These results, together with counting rate estimates for future experiments indicate that (n,{alpha}) measurements will be useful for improving reaction rate predictions across the global range of masses needed for explosive nucleosynthesis calculations.

  15. 1-to 10-keV x-ray backlighting of annular wire arrays on the Sandia Z-machine using bent-crystal imaging techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambo, Patrick K.; Wenger, David Franklin; Bennett, Guy R.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Smith, Ian Craig; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Anderson, Jessica E.

    2003-07-01

    Annular wire array implosions on the Sandia Z-machine can produce >200 TW and 1-2 MJ of soft x rays in the 0.1-10 keV range. The x-ray flux and debris in this environment present significant challenges for radiographic diagnostics. X-ray backlighting diagnostics at 1865 and 6181 eV using spherically-bent crystals have been fielded on the Z-machine, each with a {approx}0.6 eVspectral bandpass, 10 {micro}m spatial resolution, and a 4 mm by 20mm field of view. The Z-Beamlet laser, a 2-TW, 2-kJ Nd:glass laser({lambda} = 527 nm), is used to produce 0.1-1 J x-ray sources for radiography. The design, calibration, and performance of these diagnostics is presented.

  16. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  17. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyanarayana, N.; Rajawat, R. K.; Basu, Shibaji; Rao, A. Durga Prasad; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-09-15

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed flowering of the anode tip and pitting of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO{sub 4} (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage in CaCd{sub 6} quasicrystal cubic approximant up to 10 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P. H.; Avchachov, K.; Nordlund, K.; Pussi, K.

    2013-06-21

    Due to the peculiar nature of the atomic order in quasicrystals, examining phase transitions in this class of materials is of particular interest. Energetic particle irradiation can provide a way to modify the structure locally in a quasicrystal. To examine irradiation-induced phase transitions in quasicrystals on the atomic scale, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades in CaCd{sub 6} quasicrystal cubic approximant with energies up to 10 keV at 0 and 300 K. The results show that the threshold energies depend surprisingly strongly on the local coordination environments. The energy dependence of stable defect formation exhibits a power-law dependence on cascade energy, and surviving defects are dominated by Cd interstitials and vacancies. Only a modest effect of temperature is observed on defect survival, while irradiation temperature increases lead to a slight increase in the average size of both vacancy clusters and interstitial clusters.

  19. Characteristics of STP Pre-2004 Archived KE Basin Sludge Samples Before and After Re-Jarring in the RPL - April 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2012-09-28

    This report describes results of work performed in the Shielded Analytical Laboratory (SAL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) with archive K East (KE) Basin sludge samples obtained before the year 2004, with some of them composited and initially characterized five years ago (Delegard et al. 2011). The previously performed testing included the physical properties determinations for selected samples (settled and particle densities, water and solids concentrations), the pH, as well as identification of crystalline phases by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for selected samples. Another objective of the previous characterization and testing campaign was to transfer some sludge composites and individual samples into new storage containers to overcome the embrittlement effect which develops in original glass containers as a result of extended exposure to high radiation fields and which increases probability of sample loss.

  20. A 3.55 keV line from DM ?a??: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J., E-mail: j.conlon1@physics.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: andrew.powell2@physics.ox.ac.uk [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  1. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high sourcemore » luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.« less

  2. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  3. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau interferometer as refraction diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas at energies below 10 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2014-07-15

    The highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments can be characterized by x-ray phase-contrast imaging in addition to conventional attenuation radiography. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau grating interferometer setup is an attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity to refraction induced phase shifts. We report on the adaptation of such a system for operation in the sub-10 keV range by using a combination of free standing and ultrathin Talbot gratings. This new x-ray energy explored matches well the current x-ray backlighters used for HED experiments, while also enhancing phase effects at lower electron densities. We studied the performance of the high magnification, low energy Talbot-Lau interferometer, for single image phase retrieval using Moiré fringe deflectometry. Our laboratory and simulation studies indicate that such a device is able to retrieve object electron densities from phase shift measurements. Using laboratory x-ray sources from 7 to 15 μm size we obtained accurate simultaneous measurements of refraction and attenuation for both sharp and mild electron density gradients.

  4. Hidden axion dark matter decaying through mixing with QCD axion and the 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kitajima@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Hidden axions may be coupled to the standard model particles through a kinetic or mass mixing with QCD axion. We study a scenario in which a hidden axion constitutes a part of or the whole of dark matter and decays into photons through the mixing, explaining the 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. Interestingly, the required long lifetime of the hidden axion dark matter can be realized for the QCD axion decay constant at an intermediate scale, if the mixing is sufficiently small. In such a two component dark matter scenario, the primordial density perturbations of the hidden axion can be highly non-Gaussian, leading to a possible dispersion in the X-ray line strength from various galaxy clusters and near-by galaxies. We also discuss how the parallel and orthogonal alignment of two axions affects their couplings to gauge fields. In particular, the QCD axion decay constant can be much larger than the actual Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking.

  5. {sup 7}Li(n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li reaction and the S{sub 17} factor at E{sub c.m.}>500 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Y.; Shima, T.; Tomyo, A.; Igashira, M.; Takaoka, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Mengoni, A.; Otsuka, T.

    2005-05-01

    The partial cross sections from the neutron capture state to the ground and first excited states in {sup 8}Li have been separately determined for the first time at stellar neutron energy. The direct and weak cascade {gamma} rays from the capture and first excited states to the ground state were measured by means of anti-Compton NaI(Tl) and anti-Compton HPGe spectrometers, respectively. The {gamma}-ray branching ratio and the cross sections thus determined agree with that for thermal neutrons assuming a 1/v neutron velocity dependence. By comparing the cross sections with calculations based on the nonresonant direct capture mechanism it is shown that the cross sections are sensitive to the interaction potential of the incident neutron with the {sup 7}Li target nucleus. This analysis confirms the possibility of deriving the parameters necessary for the calculation of the astrophysical S factor S{sub 17}(E) for the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B reaction in the upper energy range above 500 keV.

  6. Learning to Apply Metrology Principles to the Measurement of X-ray Intensities in the 500 eV to 110 keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.; Pond, T.; Silbernagel, C.; Torres, P.; Marlett, K.; Goldin, F.; Cyr, S.

    2011-02-08

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Livermore Operations, has two optical radiation calibration laboratories accredited by “the National Voluntary Laboratories Accreditation Program (NVLAP) which is the accrediting body of” the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and is now working towards accreditation for its X-ray laboratories. NSTec operates several laboratories with X-ray sources that generate X-rays in the energy range from 50 eV to 115 keV. These X-ray sources are used to characterize and calibrate diagnostics and diagnostic components used by the various national laboratories, particularly for plasma analysis on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). Because X-ray photon flux measurement methods that can be accredited, i.e., traceable to NIST, have not been developed for sources operating in these energy ranges, NSTec, NIST, and the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP) together have defined a path toward the development and validation of accredited metrology methods for X-ray energies. The methodology developed for the high energy X-ray (HEX) Laboratory was NSTec’s starting point for X-ray metrology accreditation and will be the basis for the accredited processes in the other X-ray laboratories. This paper will serve as a teaching tool, by way of this example using the NSTec X-ray sources, for the process and methods used in developing an accredited traceable metrology.

  7. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted valuesmore » and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.« less

  8. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted values and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.

  9. IonCCD for direct position-sensitive charged-particle detection: from electrons and keV ions to hyperthermal biomolecular ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjar, Omar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Kibelka, Gottfried; Shill, Scott M.; Kuhn, Ken; Cameron, Chad; Kassan, Scott

    2011-04-01

    A novel charged-particle sensitive, pixel based detector array is described and its usage is demonstrated for a variety of applications, from detection of elemental particles (electrons) to hyper-thermal large biomolecular positive and negative ions including keV light atomic and molecular ions. The array detector is a modified light-sensitive charged coupled device (CCD). The IonCCDTM was engineered for direct charged particle detection by replacing the semi-conductor part of the CCD pixel by a conductor1. In contrast with the CCD, where the semi-conductive pixel is responsible for electron-hole pair formation upon photon bombardment, the IonCCD uses a capacitor coupled to the conductive electrode for direct charge integration. The detector can be operated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum since no high voltages are needed. The IonCCD, presented in this work is an array of 2126 active pixels with 21 um pixel width and 3 um pixel gap. The detection area is 1.5x51mm2 where 1.5 mm and 51 mm are pixel and detector array length, respectively. The result is a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector with 24 um spatial resolution and 88 % pixel area ratio (PAR). In this work we demonstrate the capabilities and the performance of the detector. For the first time we show the direct detection of 250 eV electrons providing linearity response and detection efficiency of the IonCCD as function of electron beam current. Using positive ions from and electron impact source (E-I), we demonstrate that the detection efficiency of the IonCCD is virtually independent of particle energy [250 eV, 1250 eV], particle impact angle [45o, 90o] and particle flux. By combining the IonCCD with a double focusing sector field of Mattauch-Herzog geometry (M-H), we demonstrate fast acquisition of mass spectra in direct air sniffing mode. A first step towards fast in vivo breath analysis is presented. Detection of hyper-thermal biomolecular ions produced using an electrospray ionization source (ESI) is presented. The IonCCD was used as beam profiler to characterize the beam shape and intensity of 15 eV protonated and deprotonated biomolecular ions at the exit of an RF only collisional quadrupole. We present simultaneous detection of 140 eV doubly protonated biomolecular ions when the IonCCD is combined with the M-H analyzer. The latter, demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous separation and micro-array deposition of biological material using a miniature sector field.

  10. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, G. E. Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  11. On the possibility of the generation of high harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV upon interaction of intense mid-IR radiation with neutral gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelina, A S; Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2014-05-30

    Based on the analytical quantum-mechanical description in the framework of the modified strong-field approximation, we have investigated high harmonic generation of mid-IR laser radiation in neutral gases taking into account the depletion of bound atomic levels of the working medium and the electron magnetic drift in a high-intensity laser field. The possibility is shown to generate high-order harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV under irradiation of helium atoms by intense femtosecond laser pulses with a centre wavelength of 8 – 10.6 μm. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  12. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  13. Internal electron conversion of the isomeric {sup 57}Fe nucleus state with an energy of 14.4 keV excited by the radiation of the plasma of a high-power femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovin, G V; Savel'ev-Trofimov, Andrei B; Uryupina, D S; Volkov, Roman V

    2011-03-31

    We recorded the spectrum of delayed secondary electrons ejected from the target, which was coated with a layer of iron enriched with the {sup 57}Fe isotope to 98%, under its irradiation by fluxes of broadband X-ray radiation and fast electrons from the plasma produced by a femtosecond laser pulse at an intensity of 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}. Maxima were identified at energies of 5.6, 7.2, and 13.6 keV in the spectrum obtained for a delay of 90 - 120 ns. The two last-listed maxima owe their origin to the internal electron conversion of the isomeric level with an energy of 14.4 keV and a lifetime of 98 ns to the K and L shells of atomic iron, respectively; the first-named level arises from a cascade K - L{sub 2}L{sub 3} Auger process. Photoexcitaion by the X-ray plasma radiation is shown to be the principal channel of the isomeric level excitation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. Fragmentation of doubly charged HDO, H{sub 2}O, and D{sub 2}O molecules induced by proton and monocharged fluorine beam impact at 3 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.; Chen, L.; Brdy, R.; Bernard, J.; Cassimi, A.

    2015-03-07

    Doubly charged ions HDO{sup 2+}, H{sub 2}O{sup 2+}, and D{sub 2}O{sup 2+} were prepared selectively to triplet or singlet excited states in collisions with F{sup +} or H{sup +} projectiles at 3 keV. Excitation energies of dications following two-body or three-body dissociation channels were measured and compared with recent calculations using ab initio multi-reference configuration interaction method [Gervais et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 024302 (2009)]. For HDO{sup 2+}, preferential cleavage of OH rather than OD bond has been observed and the ratio between the populations of the fragmentation channels OD{sup +}-H{sup +} and OH{sup +}-D{sup +} were measured. The kinetic energy release has been measured and compared with previous experiments.

  15. Measurement of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) cross section from 20 meV to 500 keV with a high efficiency, highly segmented 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Glover, S. E.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Mertz, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, A. M.; Hatarik, R.

    2008-03-15

    The {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np cross section has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 500 keV using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new facility allows experiments with submilligram samples and is therefore well suited to investigate isotopes with half-lives as low as a few hundred days. In this benchmark measurement, only 0.42 mg of {sup 237}Np was sufficient to determine differential cross sections relative to the well-known resonance at 0.5 eV. The thermal cross section was measured to {sigma}{sub 2200m/s}=177{+-}5 barn, {sigma}{sub kT=25.3meV}=167{+-}4 barn and the resonance integral to RI=693{+-}6 barn.

  16. 200-keV He sup + -ion irradiation effects on the properties of pulsed-laser-deposited YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadlamannati, S. ); England, P.; Stoffel, N.G. Bellcore, Red Bank, New Jersey 07701 ); Findikoglu, A.; Li, Q. ); Venkatesan, T. Bellcore, Red Bank, New Jersey 07701 ); McLean, W.L. )

    1991-03-01

    We report the effects of 200-keV He{sup +}-ion irradiation on the properties of high-quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} thin films made {ital in} {ital situ} by pulsed-laser deposition. There is no significant change in {ital T}{sub {ital c}} or the normal-state resistivity for fluences up to 1{times}10{sup 14} He{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. There is only a small increase in the critical current density {ital J}{sub {ital c}} measured at 60 K for fluences up to 3{times}10{sup 13} He{sup +}/cm{sup 2} and in nonzero magnetic fields. At fluences above 1{times}10{sup 14} He{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, the induced changes are more rapid and have a deleterious effect on the superconducting properties.

  17. A=11Be (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.8. The data related to states involved in neutron emission have ambiguous interpretation connected with uncertainty in placement of neutron decay branches; the observed...

  18. A=11Li (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E(11Li) 246 MeVA, analysis of a complete three-body kinematical measurement of 11Li breakup on a 12C target indicates the reaction mechanism is 11Li inelastic scattering to...

  19. A=11B (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 13.7 MeV 7Li beam impinged on a thick 4He gas filled chamber and the spectrum of ... The neutron spectrum and neutron-to--ray radiation yield of Li-241Am2O3 and Li-238PuO2 ...

  20. State-selective laser photoionization of neutral benzene molecules ejected from keV ion bombarded C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/Ag{l_brace}111{r_brace}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meserole, C. A.; Vandeweert, E.; Chatterjee, R.; Chakraborty, B. R.; Garrison, B. J.; Winograd, N.; Postawa, Z.

    1998-12-16

    One-color two-photon ionization spectroscopy was used to probe state-selectively neutral benzene molecules desorbed from a benzene overlayer physisorbed on a Ag{l_brace}111{r_brace} surface upon 8 keV Ar{sup +} bombardment. Time distributions were measured for benzene molecules ejected in the zero level of the molecular ground state and in the first state of the {nu}{sub 6} ' vibration. These distributions are found to show a strong dependence both on the internal energy of the ejected molecules and the degree of coverage of the Ag surface. Up to monolayer coverages, benzene molecules are ejected by direct collisions with Ag particles sputtered from the underlying substrate. Molecules with higher internal energy leave the surface with a distribution shifted towards lower flight times. At multilayer coverages, a second, thermal-like ejection mechanism gains significance. It is suggested that only molecules excited near the benzene-vacuum interface, survive the ejection process without being deexcited.

  1. Characterization and cross calibration of Agfa D4, D7, and D8 and Kodak SR45 x-ray films against direct exposure film at 4.0-5.5 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanier, N.E.; Cowan, J.S.; Workman, J.

    2006-04-15

    Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) [B. L. Henke et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 3, 1540 (1986)] has been the standard for moderate energy (1-10 keV) x-ray diagnostic applications among the high-energy-density and inertial confinement fusion research communities. However, market forces have prompted Kodak to discontinue production of DEF, leaving these specialized communities searching for a replacement. We have conducted cross-calibration experiments and film characterizations on five possible substitutes for Kodak DEF. The film types studied were Kodak's Biomax MR (BMR) and SR45 along with Agfa's D8, D7, and D4sc. None of the films tested matched the speed of DEF. BMR and D8 were closest but D8 exhibited lower noise, with superior resolution and dynamic range. Agfa D7, Agfa D4sc, and Kodak SR45 were significantly less sensitive than BMR and D8, however, the improvements they yielded in resolution and dynamic range warrant their use if experimental constraints allow.

  2. Ghana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (KITE) Add an Organization 3 Clean Energy Companies Toyola Chamca Holdings M38 Add a Clean Energy Company 1 Research Institutions Kumasi Institute of Technology and Environment...

  3. Ghana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 73 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 22,650,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 76 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  4. Kenya SWERA-Country Report.pdf

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    plenty of room to play a significant role in national energy matrix. National Energy Consumption in Tonnes of Oil Equivalent, 2006 lpg 1% Petroleum fuels 24% Coal and coke 1% Solar...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - KE EIA21.ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA 2008 Energy Conference Washington D.C., 7 th April 2008 The energy challenge * Population growth * Economic growth * More affluent society * End of 'easy oil' * Resource ...

  6. Attachment_8_105KE_DOE-FactSheet.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have called upon BDS, considered their services, especially in the area of improvement of business management, to be very useful." Further information can be accessed at the...

  8. Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    six to eight developing countries to strengthen their national low carbon development strategies and get a "quick start" on NAMAs. The focus will be on reducing emissions of...

  9. Ghana-Paving the Way for Low Carbon Development Strategies |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overview The projects has three main goals: to provide input for a general methodology for developing Low Carbon Development Strategies to contribute to knowledge, mutual...

  10. Ghana-Supporting Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (KITE) Sector Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission...

  11. Ghana-Supporting Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Technology and Environment (KITE) Sector Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection,...

  12. Ghana-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE),...

  13. Ghana-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    support from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). The Programme will prepare developing countries to effectively and...

  14. Ghana-Ecobank DCA Guarantee | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    manufacturing, agriculture, agricultural processing, salt miningproduction, fisheries, tourism, wood products, textiles and garments, and other potential growth industry sectors...

  15. Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development (IFAD). The purpose was to identify constraints to agricultural growth and poverty reduction that might be eased through better policy, both domestically and...

  16. Ghana-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can benefit poor farmers and to understand trade-offs among different dimensions of poverty and different groups of the poor (including between men and women). Special attention...

  17. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 5x5 km. Figure 1: The solar irradiance data is derived from Meteosat a 0 (red circle) and at 63 East (orange circle). The brightened area marks the quantitatively...

  18. Ghana-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and poverty reduction opportunities. FIP investments also mainstream climate resilience considerations and contribute to multiple co-benefits such as biodiversity...

  19. Microsoft Word - ghana-document_de-dh.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    throughout the world. Meteorological parameters such as wind speed, wind direction, temperature, pressure and altimeter setting are used to create statistical summaries of...

  20. Kenya-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    illustrates the U.S. perspective on LEDS: Integrated development goals and objectives, national greenhouse gas inventory, and economic and resource data Long-term projections of...

  1. Kenya-LEDS Tier I Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for GHG inventories and decision making and a general need for raising awareness of climate change activities. References "Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development...

  2. Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE),...

  3. Kenya-Action Plan for National Climate Change Response Strategy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the National CC Task Force, HTSPE, IDLA, LTS International ACCLIMATISE, IISD, Adam Smith International +subcontractors Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis,...

  4. Kenya-Danish Government Baseline Workstream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Government Partner Danish Ministry for Climate, Energy, and Building; The Danish Energy Agency Sector Energy Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning Program...

  5. Kenya-Action Plan for National Climate Change Response Strategy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    these proceedings, CDKN is managing a procurement process to identify potential suppliers who may be interested in delivering this exciting and challenging Action Plan with...

  6. Kenya-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can benefit poor farmers and to understand trade-offs among different dimensions of poverty and different groups of the poor (including between men and women). Special attention...

  7. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 5x5 km. Figure 1: The solar irradiance data is derived from Meteosat a 0 (red circle) and at 63 East (orange circle). The brightened area marks the quantitatively...

  8. Kenya-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and...

  9. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  10. Evaluation of structural issues related to isolation of the 100-KE/100-KW discharge chute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkel, B.V.; Hyde, L.L.

    1995-03-10

    The issue of excessive post-seismic leakage in the discharge chute of the K East and K West fuel storage basins was resolved by designing isolation barriers to maintain basin water levels if the discharge chute should drain. This report addresses the structural issues associated with isolation of the discharge chute. The report demonstrates the structural adequacy of the components associated with chute isolation for normal and seismic loading. Associated issues, such as hardware drop accidents and seismic slosh heights are also addressed.

  11. Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Perez, F ; Kay, J J ; Patterson, R ; Kane, J ; Villette, B ; Girard, F ; Reverdin, C ; May, M ; Emig, J ; Sorce, C ; Colvin, J ; Gammon, S ; Jaquez, J ; Satcher, J ; ...

  12. Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These comparisons provide an attractive way to explain the discrepancies between experimental and calculated quantitative results. Authors: Jacquet, L. ; Girard, F. ; Primout, M. ; ...

  13. Estimation of k-e parameters using surrogate models and jet-in-crossflow data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Dechant, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a Bayesian method that can be used to calibrate computationally expensive 3D RANS (Reynolds Av- eraged Navier Stokes) models with complex response surfaces. Such calibrations, conditioned on experimental data, can yield turbulence model parameters as probability density functions (PDF), concisely capturing the uncertainty in the parameter estimates. Methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimate the PDF by sampling, with each sample requiring a run of the RANS model. Consequently a quick-running surrogate is used instead to the RANS simulator. The surrogate can be very difficult to design if the model's response i.e., the dependence of the calibration variable (the observable) on the parameter being estimated is complex. We show how the training data used to construct the surrogate can be employed to isolate a promising and physically realistic part of the parameter space, within which the response is well-behaved and easily modeled. We design a classifier, based on treed linear models, to model the "well-behaved region". This classifier serves as a prior in a Bayesian calibration study aimed at estimating 3 k [?] e parameters ( C u , C e 2 , C e 1 ) from experimental data of a transonic jet-in-crossflow interaction. The robustness of the calibration is investigated by checking its predictions of variables not included in the cal- ibration data. We also check the limit of applicability of the calibration by testing at off-calibration flow regimes. We find that calibration yield turbulence model parameters which predict the flowfield far better than when the nomi- nal values of the parameters are used. Substantial improvements are still obtained when we use the calibrated RANS model to predict jet-in-crossflow at Mach numbers and jet strengths quite different from those used to generate the ex- perimental (calibration) data. Thus the primary reason for poor predictive skill of RANS, when using nominal values of the turbulence model parameters, was parametric uncertainty, which was rectified by calibration. Post-calibration, the dominant contribution to model inaccuraries are due to the structural errors in RANS.

  14. Origin of the 871-keV gamma ray and the ``oxide'' attribute ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interest for the characterization of stored plutonium. ... and plutonium alpha-particle decay for the production ... Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View ...

  15. Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C; Colvin, J; Gammon, S; Jaquez, J; Satcher, J; Fournier, K B 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION Abstract not provided Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA...

  16. GuangZhou ZhongKe HengYuan Energy Tenchnology Co Ltd ZKenergy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Province, China Zip: 510640 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: A high-tech industrialization enterprise dedicated to research, development, manufacture and marketing of...

  17. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  18. AN EXTREME GRAVITATIONALLY REDSHIFTED IRON LINE AT 4.8 KeV IN Mrk 876

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottacini, Eugenio; Orlando, Elena; Moskalenko, Igor [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University (United States); Greiner, Jochen [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ajello, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Persic, Massimo, E-mail: eugenio.bottacini@stanford.edu [INAF-Trieste, via G.B.Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectral lines at unforeseen energies are important because they can shed light on the extreme physical conditions of the environment around the supermassive black holes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Mrk 876 displays such a line at 4.80{sub ?0.04}{sup +0.05} rest-frame energy. A possible interpretation of its origin can be found in the hotspot scenario. In this scenario, the primary radiation from a flare in the hot corona of an AGN illuminates a limited portion of the accretion disk that emits by fluorescence. In this context, the line can represent an extreme gravitationally redshifted Fe line originating on the accretion disk below six gravitational radii from a rotating supermassive black hole. The correct estimate of the line significance requires a dedicated approach. Based on an existing rigorous approach, we have performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We determine that the line is a real feature at a ?99% confidence level.

  19. Ghana-Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Want, which recognizes the green economy as a vehicle for sustainable development and poverty eradication. PAGE will support 30 countries over the next seven years in building...

  20. Market Trial: Selling Off-Grid Lighting Products in Rural Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Alstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-06-21

    In this study, we performed a market trial of off-grid LED lighting products in Maai Mahiu, arural Kenyan town. Our goals were to assess consumer demand and consumer preferences with respect to off-grid lighting systems and to gain feedback from off-grid lighting users at the point of purchase and after they have used to products for some time.

  1. Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    number of low income countries for energy efficiency, renewable energy and access to modern sustainable energy. The SREP stimulates economic growth through the scaled-up...

  2. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  3. Kenya-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS,...

  4. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Perez, F. ; Kay, J. J. ; Patterson, J. R. ; Kane, J. ; May, M. ; Emig, J. ; Colvin, J. ; Gammon, S. ; Satcher, J. H. Jr. ; Fournier, K. B. 1 ; Villette, B. ; Girard, F. ...

  5. The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    College Park Caltech, JPL ESA, Madrid Concepcion U. Yale Ctr. Astron. Astrophys. NASA, Goddard less Publication Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1165906 Report...

  6. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K. M. ; Huang, H. Z. ; Kadel, R. ; Kazkaz, K. ; Keppel, G. ; Kogler, L. ; Kolomensky, Yu. G. ; Lenz, D. ; Li, Y. L. ; Ligi, C. ; Liu, X. ; Ma, Y. G. ; Maiano, C. ; Maino, M. ;...

  7. The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Park, IGC ; Brightman, M. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Christensen, F. E. ; Denmark Tech U. ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. more ; Craig, W. W. ; Space Sci. ...

  8. The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inst., Boulder LLNL, Livermore ; Fuerst, F. ; Caltech ; Gandhi, P. ; Durham U. ; Grefenstette, B. W. ; Caltech ; Hailey, C. J. ; Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. ; Harrison, F. ...

  9. GeoWells International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: GeoWells International Place: Nairobi, Kenya Sector: Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product: Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs...

  10. Electrogen Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Place: Nairobi, Kenya Sector: Solar Product: A Kenyan firm who sets up a solar panel joint venture with a Chinese firm in Kenya. Coordinates: -1.277298,...

  11. Pan African Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Pan African Technologies Place: Nairobi, Kenya Sector: Solar Product: A Kenya-based solar panel manufacturer Coordinates: -1.277298, 36.806261 Show Map Loading map......

  12. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  13. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Toyola | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    company based in Ghana. "Toyola manufactures and sells energy efficient cook stoves in urban and rural Ghana. The stoves use standard charcoal but are 40% more efficient than the...

  15. M38 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects1 M38 is a company based in Ghana. "M38 sells liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in Accra, Ghana. A woman-owned business that began as an informal door-to-door supply...

  16. Property:EnergyAccessYearInitiated | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Burkina Faso Energy Access Project + 2007 + E Ethiopia Energy Access Project + 2005 + G Ghana Energy Development and Access Project (GEDAP) + 2007 + M Mongolia Renewable Energy...

  17. REDD+ Country Readiness Preparation Proposals | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    getting-ready Country: Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Suriname, Panama Middle Africa, Western Africa, South America,...

  18. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Nepal, Nicaragua, Oaxaca, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Turkey Cost: Free Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia, South America, Eastern Asia,...

  19. LEDSGP/about/steering-committee | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (CDKN) ClimateWorks Foundation (CWF) Energy Center, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Ghana European Climate Foundation (ECF) European Commission...

  20. LEDSGP/events/2013workshop/participants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Planning ) Awafo, Edward (Ghana Energy Center of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology) Bahadur KC, Lava (Nepal Ministry of Science, Technology and...

  1. File:Ghanametst 222.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Related Technologies Meteorology Extent International Countries Ghana UN Region Western Africa Coordinates 7.946527, -1.023194 File history Click on a datetime to view the...

  2. WWS_LorrieC157L_0915

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cameroon Canada Chile China Colombia Congo Cote d'lvoire Cuba Czech Republic Denmark Egypt Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Finland France Germany Ghana Greece Honduras India Indonesia...

  3. Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the European Member States Add Tool Programs Africa - CCS capacity building Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa Ghana-Paving the Way for Low Carbon Development...

  4. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Options for Increasing the Use of Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development Egypt National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) Ghana-Assessing Policy Options for...

  5. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    submitted by Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Panama and Suriname can be accessed online at: http:www.wri.orggfi ." To access...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Welcomes the United Kingdom as 21st...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Australia, Bulgaria, Ghana, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and the Ukraine. "The UK shares in the vision of improved non-proliferation ...

  7. United States Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena

  8. Chile-Danish Government Baseline Workstream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya, Mexico, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam), to share practices on setting national greenhouse gas emissions baseline scenarios. The aim of the workstream is to...

  9. James Madison University: Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a proposal to distribute the prototype wind turbine to those living in energy poverty. ... Energy poverty remains a significant p roblem across Kenya, even though individuals own ...

  10. Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  11. Create a workplan for how to complete the LEDS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing and Transition Countries Kenya-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partner to Org. 6821, International Nuclear Threat Reduction. "I went to Qatar, Egypt, and Kenya," he says. "It was an eye-opening experience and really enjoyable working...

  13. File:Kenyametst 229.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Creation Date 20050901 Extent International Countries Kenya UN Region Eastern Africa Coordinates -0.023559, 37.906193 File history Click on a datetime to view the...

  14. Nvision.Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    solar power plants in Bulgaria and currently has operations in Bulgaria, Kenya and Pakistan Phone number +442081448366 Website http:www.nvision.energy Coordinates...

  15. Analysis of Technology Transfer in CDM Projects | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    countries, including Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam and significantly lower...

  16. Technology Innovations to Improve Biomass Cookstoves to Meet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * U.S. EPA * Colorado State University * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partners ... five "Tier 4" prototypes to consumers in Peru, China, Senegal, Kenya, Nepal, and India. ...

  17. International Center for Environmental, Social, and Policy Studies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: International Center for Environmental, Social, and Policy Studies Address: PO BOX 79246 Place: Nairobi, Kenya Phone Number: +254-02-252969 Website: www.icesps.org...

  18. An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  19. Project Catalyst | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Support Kenya-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Malaysia-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Mexico-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support...

  20. Olkaria III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Single Flash Owner Ormat Technologies, Inc. Developer Ormat Technologies, Inc. Energy Purchaser Kenya Power and Lighting Company Limited Commercial Online Date 2014...

  1. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  2. Category:Economic Community of West African States | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15 pages are in this category, out of 15 total. B Benin Burkina Faso C Cape Verde G Gambia Ghana G cont. Guinea Guinea-Bissau I Ivory Coast L Liberia M Mali N Niger Nigeria...

  3. Argonne, NNSA collaborate with China to convert micro-reactor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne, NNSA collaborate with China to convert micro-reactor By Greg Cunningham * April ... The Chinese MNSR reactor is a type of small reactor used in six countries - China, Ghana, ...

  4. XRLM Beamlines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'White' light mode 'White' spectrum, no optics, 2 Beryllium windows, 1st window, 100 m thick , 2nd window 120 m thick transmitted bandpass spectrum: 2.0 keV 7 keV (10 keV @ ...

  5. LEDSGP/AnnualEvent2014 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this extraordinary situation. We would also like to express our deepest gratitude to Stephen King'Uyu and the Government of Kenya for offering to host this workshop and for...

  6. Solar Cookers International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Cookers International Jump to: navigation, search CooKit Each group of items costs 75 Kenya Shillings (about US1) as does the pile of charcoal shown. By using a CooKit or...

  7. A=11N (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (Not illustrated) See (GO60P, KE66C

  8. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na from ENSDF (unpublished, September 2015) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. ( 5 2 + ) < 40 keV p 0.120 ± 10 ( 3 2 + ) p 0.745 ± 12 1 2 + 101 ± 3 keV p 2.459 ± 32 ( 5 2 , 3 2 ) + 105 ± 10 keV p 2.769 ± 61 ( 3 2 , 5 2 + ) 250 ± 50 keV p 4.371 ± 10 3 2 - 30 ± 10 keV p 4.903 ± 10 3 2 - 50 ± 10 keV p 5.585 ± 32 695 ± 72 keV p 5.809 ± 76 0.46 ± 0.22 MeV p 5.815 ± 17 141 ± 18 keV p

  9. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  10. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bourkina (Upper Volta), Brazil, Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields, Appendix II, Phytomass Files, and References.

  11. 11N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 11N Adopted value: 830 ± 30 keV (2012KE01) Measured Mass Excess for 11N Adopted value: 24477 ± 60 keV (2012KE01) Deduced value: 24303 ± 46 keV (2011AUZZ) 24300 ± 50 keV (2003AU02) 24618 ± 50 keV (2000OL01) 25230 ± 100 keV (1974BE20) Measurements 1973BEVC: 14N(3He, 6He); measured σ(E). 11N deduced levels. 1974BE20: 14N(3He, 6He), E = 70 MeV. 11N deduced levels. 1974BEZN: 14N(3He, 6He), E = 70 MeV; measured Q, deduced mass

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the energy range from sub-keV to approx 15 keV. They have studied the targets X-ray yields with variation in target size, aerogel density, laser pulse length and laser intensity. ...

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF (unpublished, April 2015) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. 0 + 800 ± 200 n

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ); ( 3 2 ) 801 ± 20 p

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. 0 + ; 2 230 ± 50 p, (α)

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F from ENSDF (unpublished, June 2014) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. 2 - ; 2 910 ± 100 keV p 0.540 ± 180 1 - ≈ 1 MeV p 1.490 ± 72 3 - 210 ± 40 keV p 2.790 ± 110 4 - 550 ± 100 keV p

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. (0 - ) < 100 a n 2.320 ≈ 150 (6.020) a From (2009LE02). In that measurement the resolution was ≈ 100 keV; a fit to the spectrum, convoluted with the resolution, uses Γ ≈ 0.5 keV.

  18. A=12O (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (Not illustrated) See (GO60P, GO65I, GO66J, KE66C

  19. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAD) Beamline Energy Range Operator Sector 17 17-BM-B 15-18 keV XSD 17-ID-B 6-20 keV IMCA-CAT Sector 19 19-BM-D 6-13.5 keV SBC-CAT 19-ID-D 6.5-19.5 keV SBC-CAT Sector 22 22-BM-D...

  20. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS.PPT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GNEP Partners and Observers GNEP Partners (As of September 16, 2007) 1. Australia 2. Bulgaria 3. China 4. France 5. Ghana 6. Hungary 7. Japan 8. Jordan 9. Kazakhstan 10. Lithuania 11. Poland 12. Romania 13. Russia 14. Slovenia 15. Ukraine 16. United States GNEP Observers 1. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) 2. Generation IV International Forum (GIF) 3. Euratom Attending Candidate Partner and Observer Countries 1. Argentina 2. Belgium 3. Brazil 4. Canada 5. Czech 6. Egypt 7. Finland 8.

  2. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transformation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation | Department of Energy Steering Group Members Approve Transformation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve Transformation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation June 18, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group met in Accra, Ghana on June 16-17, 2010 and approved

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyls in coastal tropical ecosystems: Distribution, fate and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, D.K.; Essumang, D.K.; Jonathan, J.W.A.; Bentum, J.K.

    2012-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) though banned still find use in most developing countries including Ghana. PCB congener residues in sediments in the coastal regions of Ghana were determined. Sediment samples (n=80) were collected between June 2008 and March 2009, extracted by the continuous soxhlet extraction using (1:1) hexane-acetone mixture for 24 h and analyzed with a CP 3800 gas chromatogram equipped with {sup 65}Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and a mixed PCBs standard of the ICES 7 as marker, after clean-up. Validation of the efficiency and precision of the extraction and analytical methods were done by extracting samples spiked with 2 ppm ICES PCB standard and a certified reference material 1941b for marine sediments from NIST, USA, and analyzed alongside the samples. Total PCBs detected in sediments during the dry and wet seasons were, respectively, 127 and 112 {mu}g/kg dry weight (dw), with a mean concentration of 120 {mu}g/kg (dw). The composition of PCB homologues in the sediments were dominated by tri-, penta- and tetra-PCBs. There was no correlation between organic carbon (OC) of the sediments and total PCBs content. Risk assessments conducted on the levels indicated that PCB levels in sediments along the coastal region of Ghana poses no significant health risk to humans.

  4. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  5. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 14 +6 -5 β -

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 130 ± 7 β -

  7. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 Decay g.s.

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Liu, Chang ; Zhang, Liguo ; Zhao, Dongyang ; Jiang, Gaoyuan ; Zhang, Shou-Cheng ; He, Ke ; et al September 2015, American Physical Society Prev Select page number Go to page:...

  9. Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented. less Authors: Peppler, RA ; Kehoe, KE ; Sonntag, KL ; Bahrmann, CP ; Richardson, SJ ; Christensen, SW ; ...

  10. Ripples Ruffle Primordial Plasma | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Additional measurements are planned to test the chiral magnetic wave interpretation of the data. Contact Hongwei Ke Brookhaven National Laboratory kehw@bnl.gov Aihong Tang ...

  11. Breathitt County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Breathitt County, Kentucky Jackson, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBreathittCounty,Ke...

  12. MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 GeV KE protons from Fermilab Booster Accelerator 1.7 beryllium target (HARP results coming soon) horn focusses + sign mesons and K Can reverse...

  13. Contract DE-AC06-08RL14788

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were completed. Initial review of the conceptual design began in November. Continued sediment load-out of 183.2KE Basin. Continued with erecting, scaffolding and demolition...

  14. Crittenden County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Crittenden County, Kentucky Marion, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCrittendenCounty,Ke...

  15. Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    junior Jules Henry (Electrical EngineeringComputer Science) and sophomore KeAndra Goodman (Electrical EngineeringPhysics). Winners Announced for the NNSA Grand Challenge...

  16. Radiolysis to knock-on damage transition in zeolites under electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugurlu, O.; Haus, J.; Gunawan, A. A.; Maheshwari, S.; Tsapatsis, M.; Mkhoyan, K. A.; Thomas, M. G.

    2011-03-15

    The electron-beam-induced damage in a zeolite under 60-200 keV energy beam irradiation has both radiolitic and knock-on components and can be described by linear superposition of these two processes. Theoretical predictions supported by experiments at 60 keV suggest that for electron beam energies smaller than 70 keV, the damage to the specimen follows a radiolitic path. For energies larger than 200 keV, knock-on based sputtering of the material will dominate, while considerable radiolitic movement of the atoms will still be present.

  17. Diagnosis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pulse height analysis is performed on detector arrays to determine the 5-200 keV spectrum. ...0723.00 ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM DIAGNOSTICS One of the principle ...

  18. Beamline 7.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: 17 keV transmission though...

  19. Beamline 3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 1-2 keV transmission through...

  20. Suzaku monitoring of hard X-ray emission from ? Carinae over a single binary orbital cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Yuasa, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu; Pittard, Julian M.; Russell, Christopher M. P.

    2014-11-10

    The Suzaku X-ray observatory monitored the supermassive binary system ? Carinae 10 times during the whole 5.5 yr orbital cycle between 2005 and 2011. This series of observations presents the first long-term monitoring of this enigmatic system in the extremely hard X-ray band between 15 and 40 keV. During most of the orbit, the 15-25 keV emission varied similarly to the 2-10 keV emission, indicating an origin in the hard energy tail of the kT ? 4 keV wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma. However, the 15-25 keV emission declined only by a factor of three around periastron when the 2-10 keV emission dropped by two orders of magnitude due probably to an eclipse of the WWC plasma. The observed minimum in the 15-25 keV emission occurred after the 2-10 keV flux had already recovered by a factor of ?3. This may mean that the WWC activity was strong, but hidden behind the thick primary stellar wind during the eclipse. The 25-40 keV flux was rather constant through the orbital cycle, at the level measured with INTEGRAL in 2004. This result may suggest a connection of this flux component to the ?-ray source detected in this field. The helium-like Fe K? line complex at ?6.7 keV became strongly distorted toward periastron as seen in the previous cycle. The 5-9 keV spectra can be reproduced well with a two-component spectral model, which includes plasma in collision equilibrium and a plasma in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) with ? ? 10{sup 11} cm{sup 3} s{sup 1}. The NEI plasma increases in importance toward periastron.

  1. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  2. NREL: International Activities - Bilateral Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version Bilateral Partnerships NREL partners with more than 50 countries around the world to advance development and use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: Angola Argentina Australia Bangladesh Brazil Canada Chile China Colombia Costa Rica Gabon Haiti India Indonesia Japan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Mexico North America Philippines Saudi Arabia U.S. Pacific Territories United Arab Emirates Vietnam Asia Bangladesh Under sponsorship from the U.S. Agency for International

  3. Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Reading List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geophysical Experience Reading List Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Reading List A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Keller, R., Khan, M. A., Morgan, P., et al., 1991, A Comparative Study of the Rio Grande and Kenya rifts, Tectonophys.,

  4. The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay Leentvaar, Jan

    2011-04-15

    This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

  5. 16_32_1993.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 from (1993TI07): Energy levels of 16 Ne E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions 0 0 + ; 2 122 ± 37 p 1, 2 1.69 ± 0.07 (2 + ); 2 (p) 2

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne from ENSDF (unpublished, June 2014) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ); 5 2 0.59 MeV 2p 1.900 ± 80 ( 5 2 - ) < 100 keV

  7. A=19Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass excess of 12.928 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 320 13 keV. An excited state at Ex 120 10 keV is also...

  8. A=19Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass excess of 12.929 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 321 13 keV. An excited state at Ex 120 10 keV is also...

  9. A=19Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass excess of 12.929 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 321 13 keV. An excited state at Ex 120 10 keV is also...

  10. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving...

  11. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5.4 from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 15 N a E x J ; T m or Decay Reactions (MeV keV) c.m. (keV) 0 1 2 - ; 1 2 - stable 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25,...

  12. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09/12/2011 1994KI02 13C(p, γ): γ-ray yield, calculated S(E) 120 - 950 keV X4 09/12/2011 2008HE11 13C(p, γ): reaction yield at the resonance 448.5-keV for a fresh target and after an integrated charge of 1C 435 - 470 keV σ X4 11/07/2011 1991BR19 13C(p, γ): reaction yield near the resonance 0.44 - 0.6 483.3-keV, 0.55-MeV X4 11/07/2011

  13. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2012KE01): Energy Levels of 11 Li E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T T 1 2 or Γ Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 5 2 T 1 2 = 8.75 ± 0.14 ms β - 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 1.220 ± 40 Γ = 0.53 ± 0.15 MeV n 2, 6, 7, 9, 10 2.420 ± 50 Γ = 1.26 ± 0.30 MeV n 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10 3.700 ± 130 Γ < 200 keV n 7 4.860 ± 60 Γ < 100 keV n 2, 4, 9 6.230 ± 60 Γ < 100 keV n 2, 4, 9 11.300 n 2 1

  14. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  15. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ 0.0 ± 25 a (1 - , 2 - ); 2 0.210 ± 40 b 1 + 100 ± 70 keV 0.470 ± 30 c 360 ± 20 keV 0.670 ± 200 d (2 - ) 0.1 ± 0.1 MeV 1.370 ± 80 b (2 - , 1 - ) 200 ± 70 keV ≈ 1.6 MeV e 2.330 ± 100 b (1 + , 3 + ) 1.2 ± 0.4 MeV 2.820 ± 70 b (1 - , 2 + ) 0.3 ± 0.2 MeV 4.160 ± 100 b 120 ± 80 keV 4.600 ± 100 b (3 - , 2 + ) 0.2 ± 0.1 MeV 5.2 ± 200 f ≈ 0.4 MeV 5.7 ± 100 b 200 ± 100 keV a Ground state is at E rel ( 9 Li + n) = 25 keV (2003AU03); %n =

  17. 55-Gallon Drum Attenuation Corrections for Waste Assay Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V.R.

    2002-04-03

    The present study shows how the percent attenuation for low-level waste (LLW), carbon-steel 55-gallon drums (44 and 46 mil) and for transuranic (TRU) DOT Type 7A 55-gallon drums (approximately 61 mil) changes with gamma energy from 60 keV to 1400 keV. Attenuation for these drums is in the range of 5 to 15 percent at energies from 400 to 1400 keV and from 15 to 35 percent at energies from 120 to 400 keV. At 60 keV, these drums attenuate 70-80 percent of the gamma rays. Correction factors were determined in order to correct for gamma attenuation of a TRU drum if a calibration is performed with a LLW drum. These correction factors increase the activities of the TRU drum by from 10 percent to 2 percent in the energy range of 165 to 1400 keV, with an increase of about 50 percent at 60 keV. Correction factors for TRU drums and for analyses without a drum were used to adjust the percent yield for frequently measured gamma rays, so that the assay libraries could be modified to provide the drum attenuation corrections.

  18. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troussel, Ph.; Villette, B.; Oudot, G.; Tassin, V.; Bridou, F.; Delmotte, F.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-15

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  19. Fermi Site Office CX Determinations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Observations of GRB 090510: a Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: a Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies Authors: Ackermann, M. ; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.

  20. Erratum: ''Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-keV x-ray radiators'' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 052704 (2009)] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Erratum: ''Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators'' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 052704 (2009)] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Erratum: ''Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators'' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 052704 (2009)] No abstract prepared. Authors: Girard, F. ; Primout, M. ; Villette, B. ; Stemmler, Ph. ; Jacquet,

  1. Image plate characterization and absolute calibration to low kilo-electron-volt electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busold, S.; Philipp, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.

    2014-11-15

    We report on the characterization of an image plate and its absolute calibration to electrons in the low keV energy range (130 keV). In our case, an Agfa MD4.0 without protection layer was used in combination with a Fuji FLA7000 scanner. The calibration data are compared to other published data and a consistent picture of the sensitivity of image plates to electrons is obtained, which suggests a validity of the obtained calibration up to 100 keV.

  2. Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline Scientific Applications SAXS/WAXS Solution Scattering Fiber diffraction Anomalous SAXS Source characteristics Bending Magnet Port 6A Electron Beam energy 1.3 GeV Dipole field 1.48 T Characteristic energy 1.66 keV Optics LNLS double crystal monochromator Si 111 and Ge 220 crystals Practical energy range from 3 to 14 keV Distance from source Acceptance 2 mrad Energy resolution dE/E Flux before pinholes = 7 x 109 @ 8keV Flux at sample = Experimental setup 2D control for sample alignment

  3. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  4. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  5. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  6. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  7. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  8. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  9. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  10. LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Parameters Update The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has demonstrated FEL operations over the energy range 280 eV to 11.2 keV using the fundamental with pulse energies of at least 1-3 mJ depending on the pulse duration and photon energy (please note that operation above 10 keV requires special accelerator conditions that may not be available at all times). Third harmonic radiation is available up to 25 keV at about 1% of the fundamental pulse energy. The pulse length can be varied from

  11. The R and D progress of 4 MW EAST-NBI high current ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yahong Hu, Chundong; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Xie, Yuanlai; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao; Liu, Zhimin

    2014-02-15

    A high current ion source, which consists of the multi-cusp bucket plasma generator and tetrode accelerator with multi-slot apertures, is developed and tested for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injector. Three ion sources are tested on the test bed with arc power of 80 kW, beam voltage of 80 keV, and beam power of 4 MW. The arc regulation technology with Langmuir probes is employed for the long pulse operation of ion source, and the long pulse beam of 50 keV @ 15.5 A @ 100 s and 80 keV @ 52A @ 1s are extracted, respectively.

  12. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to 30 at 12 keV Endstations Large hutch with

  13. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: a Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Observations of GRB 090510: a Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: a Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 KeV to GeV Energies Authors: Ackermann, M. ; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.

  14. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  15. Observation of excited states in /sup 128/Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Zhi-zheng; Guo Ying-xiang; Pan Zong-you; Xiao Jian-min; Lei Xiang-guo; Liu Hong-ye; Sun Xi-jun

    1987-01-01

    Excited states in /sup 128/Ba have been investigated via the /sup 120/Sn (/sup 12/C, 4n..gamma..) /sup 128/Ba reaction by means of in-beam gamma spectroscopy. A 12/sup +/ state other than the previously reported one is observed according to the properties of the 935.0 keV ..gamma..-ray. It does not belong to the ground-state band. Two new interband transitions, 224.8 keV and 632.7 keV, are observed and assigned to sidefeeding between the negative-parity band and ground-state band.

  16. The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    keV range: The high energy x-ray source and some applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10 keV range: The high energy x-ray source and some applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10 keV range: The high energy x-ray source and some applications The laser integration line (LIL) located at CEA-CESTA is equipped with x-ray

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10 keV range: The high energy x-ray source and some applications Hubert, S. ; Dubois, J. L. ; Gontier, D. ; ...

  18. PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO HADRONIC CASCADES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A fraction of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit distinct spectral features in their prompt emission below few tens of keV that exceed simple extrapolations of the low-energy ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... exhibit distinct spectral features in their prompt emission below few tens of keV that exceed simple extrapolations of the low-energy power-law portion of the Band spectral model. ...

  20. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the electron beam.28 A given 300-keV electron passing through the electrolyte may lose tens to hundreds of eV with an average loss per collision of about 20 eV (see the Supporting ...

  1. Section 59

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tropospheric sulfate, J. Geophys. Res. Chuang, C.C., J.E. Penner, K.E. Taylor, A.S. Grossman, and J.J. Walton, Accepted: An assessment of the radiative effects of anthropogenic...

  2. A novel zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    imager consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal operating at 15.7 keV photon energy. ... plasmas generated by a high intensity short pulse laser interacting with Zr solid targets. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - STIP 11732.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... At the energy range of about 200 to 300 keV, the simulated sum spectrum and the measured spectrum fully agree in shape and intensity. Below this range, the overall shapes appear to ...

  4. Erratum: ''Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Erratum: ''Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators'' Phys. Plasmas 16, 052704 (2009) No abstract prepared. Authors: Girard, F. ; ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets Perez, F ; Kay, J J ; Patterson, R ; Kane, J ; Villette, B ; Girard, F ; ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets Perez, F ; Kay, J J ; Patterson, R ; Kane, J ; Villette, B ; Girard, F ; ...

  7. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV X-ray radiators Authors: Girard, F ; Primout, M ; Fournier, K B ; Villette, B ; Stemmler, P ; Jacquet, L ; ...

  8. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil ... Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 42 > Land use and energy Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; ...

  9. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil ... Jones, L.L. (1994) 27 > Land use and energy Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; ...

  10. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. not observed p 0.84 ± 400 (1 + ) 2.3 ± 1.6

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 O from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. 0 + ; 2 ≈ 0.40 ± 0.25 (p)

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 0 + 4.35 ± 0.17 β -

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 9.93 ± 0.07 β -

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. ( 5 2 + ) 0.58 ± 0.20 n

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ) 5.08 ± 0.05 β -

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 193 ± 13 β - 0.295 ± 10

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 1 2 - ; 3 2 109.2 ± 0.6 β +

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. (2 - ) n

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mg from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 0 + 93 ± 5 β + 1.598 ± 10 2 + ; 2 γ

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. (2 - ); 2 1.6 ± 0.4

  1. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At this beam energy and a background electron density of about 1x10 19 m -3 and temperature 1keV, roughly 90% of the injected power is deposited within the plasma. Initial ...

  2. Stn1?Ten1 is an Rpa2?Rpa3-like complex at telomeres (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sun, Jia ; Yu, Eun Young ; Yang, Yuting ; Confer, Laura A. ; Sun, Steven H. ; Wan, Ke ; Lue, Neal F. ; Lei, Ming 1 + Show Author Affiliations Michigan-Med Publication Date:...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Bunting, Bruce G" Sort by Relevance ... Filter by Author Bunting, Bruce G (25) Bunting, Bruce G ORNL (9) Nguyen, Ke (8) Toops, ...

  4. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV X-ray radiators Citation ... You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This ...

  5. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal,...

  6. Beamline 8.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (1.9 GeV, 4.37 tesla) Energy range 6-46 keV ML mode Monochromator None or two ML or two Si(111) Flux (1.9...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kehoe, KE (1) Lijegren, JC (1) Long, CN (1) Macduff, MC (1) Mather, JH (1) McCord, RA (1) Moore, ST (1) Nitschke, DL (1) Orr, BW (1) Peppler, RA (1) Perez, RC (1) Save Results Save ...

  8. NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy Zone.'

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 The Natural Energy Laboratory of The Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawai Hawai ' ' i Authority i Authority Ke-ahole Point 2 2 3 3 NELHA MISSION STATEMENT: NELHA MISSION STATEMENT: ...

  9. Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator (SCPO)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Ke Liu, Gregg Deluga, Lanny Schmidt, and Ted Krause at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  10. Structural Science (XSD-SRS) | Advanced Photon Source

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    Science (XSD-SRS) 11-BM 11-BM 11-BM is dedicated to high-resolution powder diffraction measurements.The instrument operates over the energy range 25-35 keV, and combines...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... January 1964 CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE THEORY OF SHELL CORRECTIONS Fano, U. ; Turner, ... Results are shown for electron energies between 100 eV and 10 keV and for cell sizes ...

  12. 2015 > Publications > Research > The Energy Materials Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid and Efficient Redox Processes within 2D Covalent Organic Framework Thin Films CR DeBlase, K Hernndez-Burgos, KE Silberstein, GG Rodrguez-Calero, RP Bisbey, HD Abrua, ...

  13. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We study the populations of X ray sources in the Milky Way in the keV band using a deep survey with the BAT instrument aboard the Swift observatory We present the logN logS...

  14. Beamline 7.2

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    Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: 17 keV transmission though Mo filters Port 2: IR-visible from large-angle...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The 2-79 keV X-ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Chandra: a Fully Compton-Thick AGN Arevalo, P. ; Chile U., Catolica Valparaiso U. ; Bauer, F. E. ; ...

  16. Photovoltaics and Electricity - Energy Explained, Your Guide...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...index.cfm?tg%20solar Photovoltaics video - http:www.youtube.comwatch?v0elhIcPVtKE&listSPACD8E92715335CB2&index5&featureplppvideo Last reviewed: October 26, 2015 ...

  17. ABSTRACT Bayarbadrakh, Baramsai. Neutron Capture Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the incident neutrons energy range from 1 eV to 10 keV. ... with the nuclear data library ENDFB-VII.0 and with a ... The "Analyzer" requires large amount of memory and CPU usage ...

  18. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BW at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In...

  19. Two photon decay of neutral scalars below 1.5 GeV in a chiral model for qq and qqqq states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Simon; Napsuciale, Mauro

    2005-04-01

    We study the two photon decay of neutral scalars below 1.5 GeV in the context of a recently proposed chiral model for qq and qqqq states. We find good agreement with experimental results for the a{sub 0}(980){yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay. Our calculations for f{sub 0}(980){yields}{gamma}{gamma} shows that further work is necessary in order to understand the structure of this meson. The model predicts {gamma}(a{sub 0}(1450){yields}{gamma}{gamma})=0.16{+-}0.10 KeV, {gamma}({sigma}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(0-1.13) KeV, {gamma}(f{sub 0}(1370){yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(0-0.22) KeV, {gamma}(f{sub 0}(1500){yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(0-1.51) KeV.

  20. Tailoring the physical properties of Ni-based single-phase equiatomic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Jin, Ke 1 ; Sales, Brian C 1 ; Stocks, George Malcolm 1 ; Samolyuk, German D. 1 ; Daene, Markus 2 ; Weber, William J. 3 ; Zhang, Yanwen 3 ; Bei, Hongbin 1 ...

  1. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficient laser-induced 6 - 8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets","Perez, F; Kay, J J; Patterson, R; Kane, J; Villette, B; Girard, F;...

  2. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bend Diagnostic beamline Note: This beamline is NOT open to general users. 1-2 keV W. Byrne (510) 486-7517 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need...

  3. MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An x-ray free electron laser at up to 42-keV fundamental energy and with photon pulses down to sub-nanosecond spacing, MaRIE 1.0 is designed to meet the challenges of ...

  4. Cross-Section Measurements of Star Configurations in Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The three particle energies were then calculated in 100-keV steps along the S-curve. The products of the two neutron transmissions and detector efficien- cies were computed for ...

  5. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In second order the integrated reflectivity decreases from 1.3 mrad at 12.6 keV to ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; ...

  6. Simulation, Modeling, and Crystal Growth of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-quality, large (10 cm long and 2.5 cm diameter), nuclear spectrometer grade Cdsub ... 241Am and sup 137Cs clearly detected 59.6 and 662 keV energies with energy resolution ...

  7. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray energies up to 22 keV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lowe, Larry E ORNL (3) Nandwana, Peeyush (3) Peter, William H ORNL (3) Watkins, Thomas R (3) Watkins, Thomas R. (3) Yamamoto, Yukinori (3) An, Ke (2) Blue, Craig A. (2) Save ...

  9. D0208002Rev1print.pdf

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    Fact Sheet Public Comment U.S. Department of Energy - Washington State Department of Ecology - U.S. Environmental Pr otection Agency 300 Are a 10 0- B,C 1 00- KW & KE 1 00- N 1 00-...

  10. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  11. Experimental Station 14-3a | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...

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    material, and geological samples in the X-ray photon energy range 2.1-5.0 keV. BL14-3 is the only beamline at SSRL capable of obtaining spectroscopy data at the phosphorous edge. ...

  12. July 20

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    July 20 PDSF Users Meeting 72010 Attending: Eric, Iwona and Jay from PDSF and users Andrei, Jeff P., Tom, Ke Han, Jeff A. Cluster status: Utilization has been moderate. Outages:...

  13. Beamline 3.3.2

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    3.3.2 Print General x-ray testing station GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 4-20 keV Monochromator...

  14. Beamline 3.1

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    Beamline 3.1 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 1-2 keV transmission...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility Fournier, K B ; May, M J ; Colvin, J D ; Barrios, M A ; Patterson, J R ; Regan, S P Full Text ...

  16. September 28

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    Attending: Eric and Jay from PDSF and users Ke Han, Joanna, Marjorie, Thomas, Shane. Cluster status: Cluster has been pretty full last few weeks, mostly STAR and ALICE. There are...

  17. SREL Reprint #3115

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    of meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) populations in central Appalachian wetlands K.E. Francl1, T.C. Glenn2,3, S.B. Castleberry4, and W.M. Ford5 1Department of...

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. (1) - < 0.2 MeV p 0.3 ± 110 2 - 5 ± 3 p 0.59 ± 120 0 - 300 ± 100 p 0.78 ± 110 1 - 900 ± 100 p 0.83 ± 110 3 - 42 ± 10 p

  19. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  20. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  1. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  2. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  3. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  4. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  5. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  6. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  7. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  8. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  9. Astrophysical S factors of radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He, {sup 3}H{sup 4}He, and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2010-09-15

    The possibility of describing the astrophysical S factors for radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He capture at energies of up to 15 keV and radiative {sup 3}H{sup 4}He and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture at energies of up 5 keV is considered on the basis of the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  10. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  11. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Determination of the displacement energy of O, Si and Zr under electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Philip D; Weber, William J; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2012-01-01

    The response of nanocrystalline, stabilizer-free cubic zirconia thin films on a Si substrate to electron beam irradiation with energies of 4, 110 and 200 keV and fluences up to {approx}1.5 x 10{sup 22} e m{sup -2} has been studied to determine the displacement energies. The 110 and 200 keV irradiations were performed in situ using a transmission electron microscope; the 4 keV irradiations were performed ex situ using an electron gun. In all three irradiations, no structural modification of the zirconia was observed, despite the high fluxes and fluences. However the Si substrate on which the zirconia film was deposited was amorphized under the 200 keV electron irradiation. Examination of the electron-solid interactions reveals that the kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the silicon lattice is sufficient to cause atomic displacements, resulting in amorphization. The kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the oxygen sub-lattice of the zirconia may be sufficient to induce defect production, however, no evidence of defect production was observed. The displacement cross-section value of Zr was found to be {approx}400 times greater than that of O indicating that the O atoms are effectively screened from the electrons by the Zr atoms, and, therefore, the displacement of O is inefficient.

  13. Determination of the Displacement Energies of O, Si and Zr Under Electron Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Weber, William J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2012-03-01

    The response of nanocrystalline, stabilizer-free cubic zirconia thin films on a Si substrate to electron beam irradiation with energies of 4, 110 and 200 keV and fluences up to ~1.5 x 10e m has been studied to determine the displacement energies. The 110 and 200 keV irradiations were performed in situ using a transmission electron microscope; the 4 keV irradiations were performed ex situ using an electron gun. In all three irradiations, no structural modification of the zirconia was observed, despite the high fluxes and fluences. However the Si substrate on which the zirconia film was deposited was amorphized under the 200 keV electron irradiation. Examination of the electronsolid interactions reveals that the kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the silicon lattice is sufficient to cause atomic displacements, resulting in amorphization. The kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the oxygen sub-lattice of the zirconia may be sufficient to induce defect production, however, no evidence of defect production was observed. The displacement cross-section value of Zr was found to be ~400 times greater than that of O indicating that the O atoms are effectively screened from the electrons by the Zr atoms, and, therefore, the displacement of O is inefficient.

  14. Imaging the heliosphere using neutral atoms from solar wind energy down to 15 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Möbius, E.

    2014-11-20

    We study the spatial and temporal distribution of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the heliosheath observed with the IBEX-Lo sensor of the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) from solar wind energies down to the lowest available energy (15 eV). All available IBEX-Lo data from 2009 January until 2013 June were included. The sky regions imaged when the spacecraft was outside of Earth's magnetosphere and when the Earth was moving toward the direction of observation offer a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio even at very low energies. We find that the ENA ribbon—a 20° wide region of high ENA intensities—is most prominent at solar wind energies whereas it fades at lower energies. The maximum emission in the ribbon is located near the poles for 2 keV and closer to the ecliptic plane for energies below 1 keV. This shift is an evidence that the ENA ribbon originates from the solar wind. Below 0.1 keV, the ribbon can no longer be identified against the globally distributed ENA signal. The ENA measurements in the downwind direction are affected by magnetospheric contamination below 0.5 keV, but a region of very low ENA intensities can be identified from 0.1 keV to 2 keV. The energy spectra of heliospheric ENAs follow a uniform power law down to 0.1 keV. Below this energy, they seem to become flatter, which is consistent with predictions. Due to the subtraction of local background, the ENA intensities measured with IBEX agree with the upper limit derived from Lyα observations.

  15. X-ray Spectral Measurements and Collisional Radiative Modeling of Hot, Gold Plasmas at the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, M J; Schneider, M B; Hansen, S B; Chung, H; Hinkel, D E; Baldis, H A; Constantin, C

    2008-07-02

    M-Band and L-Band Gold spectra between 3 to 5 keV and 8 to 13 keV, respectively, have been recorded by a photometrically calibrated crystal spectrometer. The spectra were emitted from the plasma in the laser deposition region of a 'hot hohlraum'. This is a reduced-scale hohlraum heated with {approx} 9 kJ of 351 nm light in a 1 ns square pulse at the OMEGA laser. The space- and time-integrated spectra included L-Band line emission from Co-like to Ne-like gold. The three L-Band line features were identified to be the 3s {yields} 2p, 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} {yields} 2p{sub 1/2} transitions at {approx}9 keV, {approx}10 keV and {approx}13 keV, respectively. M-Band 5f {yields} 3d, 4d {yields} 3p, and 4p {yields} 3s transition features from Fe-like to P-like gold were also recorded between 3 to 5 keV. Modeling from the radiation-hydrodynamics code LASNEX, the collisional-radiative codes FLYCHK and SCRAM, and the atomic structure code FAC were used to model the plasma and generate simulated spectra for comparison with the recorded spectra. Through these comparisons, we have determined the average electron temperature of the emitting plasma to be between 6.0 and 6.5 keV. The electron temperatures predicted by LASNEX appear to be too large by a factor of about 1.5.

  16. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth; Bryan, Hobson C.

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  17. Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

    2011-04-11

    Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

  18. Opportunities in African power generation: A business briefing for industry and investment executives. Held in Baltimore, Maryland, June 21-22, 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-21

    The report, prepared by the Institute of International Education, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The information contained in the report was compiled in part for a power generation conference held in Baltimore, Maryland. The focus of the report is the market created by electric power projects financed by multilateral development banks. The study contains country information and project profiles related to the energy sector for eleven countries: Benin, Botswana, Cote D`Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Morocoo, Senegal, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The report also outlines the range of service opportunities in the region such as consulting, engineering, construction and project management, and equipment procurement. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Agenda/Program; (2) African Energy Sector Overview; (3) Project Profiles; (4) Country Information; and (5) Attendees.

  19. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  20. Low energy neutral atoms from the heliosheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M.; Lewis, W.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: fallegrini@swri.edu E-mail: mdesai@swri.edu E-mail: george.livadiotis@swri.org; and others

    2014-04-01

    In the heliosheath beyond the termination shock, low energy (<0.5 keV) neutral atoms are created by charge exchange with interstellar neutrals. Detecting these neutrals from Earth's orbit is difficult because their flux is reduced substantially by ionization losses as they propagate from about 100 to 1 AU and because there are a variety of other signals and backgrounds that compete with this weak signal. Observations from IBEX-Lo and -Hi from two opposing vantage points in Earth's orbit established a lower energy limit of about 0.1 keV on measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the heliosphere and the form of the energy spectrum from about 0.1 to 6 keV in two directions in the sky. Below 0.1 keV, the detailed ENA spectrum is not known, and IBEX provides only upper limits on the fluxes. However, using some assumptions and taking constraints on the spectrum into account, we find indications that the spectrum turns over at an energy between 0.1 and 0.2 keV.

  1. Hard X-ray emission and {sup 44}Ti line features of the Tycho supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Zhuo, E-mail: wangwei@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-10

    A deep hard X-ray survey of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite has detected for the first time non-thermal emission up to 90 keV in the Tycho supernova (SN) remnant. Its 3-100 keV spectrum is fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of kT ? 0.81 0.45 keV plus a power-law model of ? ? 3.01 0.16. Based on diffusive shock acceleration theory, this non-thermal emission, together with radio measurements, implies that the Tycho remnant may not accelerate protons up to >PeV but to hundreds TeV. Only heavier nuclei may be accelerated to the cosmic ray spectral 'knee'. In addition, using INTEGRAL, we search for soft gamma-ray lines at 67.9 and 78.4 keV that come from the decay of radioactive {sup 44}Ti in the Tycho remnant. A bump feature in the 60-90 keV energy band, potentially associated with the {sup 44}Ti line emission, is found with a marginal significance level of ?2.6?. The corresponding 3? upper limit on the {sup 44}Ti line flux amounts to 1.5 10{sup 5} photon cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}. Implications on the progenitor of the Tycho SN, considered to be a Type Ia SN prototype, are discussed.

  2. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, α), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01/23/2013 1973SI27 9Be(p, α), (p, d): σ 30 - 700 keV X4 01/24/2013 1992CE02 9Be(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012 1995ZA04 9Be(p, γ): deduced σ 75 - 1800 keV X4 01/23/2013 1994LI51 9Be(p, p): σ at θ = 170° 0.15- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1973SZ07 9Be(p, γ): σ 200 - 750 keV X4 01/09/2013 1972RE07 9Be(p, γ): σ 0.20 - 0.85 X4

  3. 10_31_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 10 C E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ or Γ cm (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 0 + ; 1 τ 1/2 = 19.290 ± 0.012 sec β + 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 3.3536 ± 0.7 2 + τ m = 155 ± 25 fsec γ 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 5.22 ± 40 a Γ = 225 ± 45 keV 6, 8, 9, 11 5.38 ± 70 a 300 ± 60 6, 8, 9, 11 6.580 ± 20 (2 + ) 190 ± 35 6, 8, 9, 11 ≈ 9 8 ≈ 10 8 ≈ 16.5 (2 + ) b 8 c a One of these two states is presumably a 2 + state. b Presumed analog of 10 B*(18.80) (1993WA06). c

  4. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  5. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, γ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05/06/2013 1990WA10 14N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2005CO16, 2006BE50 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors, resonance strength 70 - 228 keV X4 05/08/2013 2006LE13 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors 70 - 228 keV X4 05/30/2013 2005BR04, 2005BR15 14N(p, γ): astrophysical S-factors ~ 0.1 - 2.5 1 08/15/2013 2004FO02,

  6. 18B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 18B Adopted value: < 26 ns (2003AU02) Measured Mass Excess for 18B Adopted value: 51852 ± 170 keV † (2010SP02) † value and uncertainty derived from 18B unbound by < 10 keV and ΔM(17B) = 43771 keV 170 and ΔM(n) = 8071. Assumes 17B is populated in its ground state. Measurements Neutron Unbound 1984MU27: Not observed in fragmentation of 56Fe on 9Be. 2010SP02: 9Be(19C, 18B → 17B + n), unbound resonance observed

  7. Natural radioactivity concentration of peanuts in Osmaniye-Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir; Mavi, Betuel; Kara, Ayhan

    2012-09-06

    The peanut is grown in Osmaniye where located in southern Turkey. Due to it is grown underground, the measurements of natural radioactivity of peanuts become important. For this reason some peanut samples have been collected from different places of Osmaniye and the measurements of natural activity concentrations for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in some peanuts samples have been carried out using a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. Activity of {sup 40}K was measured from its intensive line at 1460 keV, for {sup 226}Ra activity peak from {sup 214}Bi at 1760 keV and {sup 232}Th activity, peak from {sup 208}Tl at energy of 2610 keV was used.

  8. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leviner, L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ahmed, M. W.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Boswell, M.; De Braeckeleer, L.; Brudanin, V.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Elliott, Steven R.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kephart, Jeremy; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.; Lesko, Kevin; Li, Jingyi; Mei, Dongming; Mikhailov, S.; Miley, Harry S.; Radford, D. C.; Reeves, James H.; Sandukovsky, Viatcheslav; Umatov, Valdimir; Underwood, T. A.; Tornow, W.; Wu, Y. K.; Young, A.

    2014-01-21

    We present data characterizing the performance of the _rst segmented, N- type Ge detector, isotopically enriched to 85% 76Ge. This detector, based on the Ortec PT6x2 design and referred to as SEGA (Segmented, Enriched Germanium Assembly), was developed as a possible prototype for neutrinoless double beta-decay measurements by the Majorana collaboration. We present some of the general characteristics (including bias potential, efficiency, leakage current, and integral cross-talk) for this detector in its temporary cryostat. We also present an analysis of the resolution of the detector, and demonstrate that for all but two segments there is at least one channel that reaches the Majorana resolution goal below 4 keV FWHM at 2039 keV, and all channels are below 4.5 keV FWHM.

  9. COSMOLOGICAL TIME DILATION IN DURATIONS OF SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fu-Wen; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain ObservatoryChinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Shao, Lang [Department of Space Science and AstronomyHebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2013-11-20

    Cosmological time dilation is a fundamental phenomenon in an expanding universe, which stresses that both the duration and wavelength of the emitted light from a distant object at the redshift z will be dilated by a factor of 1 + z at the observer. By using a sample of 139 Swift long gamma-ray bursts with known redshift (z ? 8.2), we measure the observed duration (T {sub 90}) in the observed energy range between 140/(1 + z)keV and 350/(1 + z)keV, corresponding to a fixed energy range of 140-350keV in the rest frame. We obtain a significant correlation between the duration and the factor 1 + z, i.e., T {sub 90} = 10.5(1 + z){sup 0.94} {sup } {sup 0.26}, which is consistent with that expected from the cosmological time dilation effect.

  10. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  11. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 from (2012KE01): Energy levels of 11 Be E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T T 1 2 or Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions 0 1 2 + ; 3 2 T 1 2 = 13.76 ± 0.07 s β - 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32 0.32004 ± 0.1 1 2 - T 1 2 = 115 ± 10 fs γ 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 26, 28, 29, 30, 33 1.783 ± 4 5 2 + Γ = 100 ± 10 n 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 14, 23, 26, 28 2.654 ± 10 3 2 - a 206 ± 8 n 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 29 3.40 ± 6 ( 3 2 - ,

  12. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 from (2012KE01): Energy levels of 11 B E x J π ; T Γ cm (keV) Decay Reactions (MeV ± keV) 0 3 2 - ; 1 2 stable 2, 3, 7, 8, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74 2.124693 ± 0.027 1 2 - 0.117 ± 0.004 eV γ 2, 7, 8, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 26, 27, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 42, 44, 51, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, 67, 68, 69,

  13. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  14. 9B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 9B Adopted value: 0.54 ± 0.21 keV (2004TI06) Measured Mass Excess for 9B Adopted value: 12415.7 ± 1.0 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1955AL57: 7Li(3He, p), E not given; measured Ep. 10B(3He, α), 6Li(3He, α), E not given; measured Eα. 9B deduced excited state energy. 1960KE07: 9Be(p, n)9B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960SA03: 9Be(p, n)9B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960SP08:

  15. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  16. Energy optimization of a regular macromolecular crystallography beamline for ultra-high-resolution crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Ginell, Stephan L.; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a practical method for operating existing undulator synchrotron beamlines at photon energies considerably higher than their standard operating range is described and applied at beamline 19-ID of the Structural Biology Center at the Advanced Photon Source enabling operation at 30 keV. Adjustments to the undulator spectrum were critical to enhance the 30 keV flux while reducing the lower- and higher-energy harmonic contamination. A Pd-coated mirror and Al attenuators acted as effective low- and high-bandpass filters. The resulting flux at 30 keV, although significantly lower than with X-ray optics designed and optimized for this energy, allowed for accuratemore » data collection on crystals of the small protein crambin to 0.38 Å resolution.« less

  17. A=6Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Mass of 6Be: From the Q-value of the 6Li(p, n)6Be reaction (BO57I), and using the Wapstra masses (WA55C) for 6Li, 1H and n, the mass excess (M - A) of 6Be is 20.3 ± 0.2 MeV (see also (55AJ61)). 1. (a) 3He(3He, 2p)4He Qm = 12.858 Eb = 10.4 (b) 3He(3He, p)5Li Qm = 11.062 The total cross section shows a monotonic increase for E(3He) = 100 to 800 keV. At E(3He) = 200 keV, it is at least 2.5 μb. Below E(3He) = 350 keV, the cross section fits the simple Gamow exponential

  18. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  19. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  20. System for phase-contrast x-ray radiography using X pinch radiation and a method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Katherine; Chelkovenko, Tatiana; Hammer, David; Pikuz, Sergei; Sinars, Daniel; Song, Byungmoo

    2007-11-06

    A radiograph system with an anode plate, a cathode plate, and a power source coupled to said anode plate and the cathode plate. At least two wires coupled between the anode plate and the cathode plate provide a configuration to form an X-pinch having a photon source size of less than five microns at energies above 2.5 keV. Material at the configuration forming the X-pinch vaporizes upon application of a suitable current to the wires forming a dense hot plasma and emitting a single x-ray pulse with sufficient photons having energies in the range of from about 2.5 keV to about 20 keV to provide a phase contrast image of an object in the path of the photons. Multiple simultaneous images may be formed of a plurality of objects. Suitable filters and x-ray detectors are provided.

  1. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  2. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  3. Results of LEBT/MEBT reconfiguration at BNL 200 MeV LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raparia,D.; Alessi, J.; Briscoe, B.; Fite, J.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lo Destro, V.; Okamura, M.; Ritter, J.

    2009-05-04

    The low energy (35 keV) and medium energy (750 keV) transport lines for both polarized and unpolarized H{sup -} have been reconfigured to reduce the beam emittance and beam losses out of the 200 MeV Linac. The medium energy line in the original layout was 7 m long, and had ten quadrupoles, two beam choppers, and three bunchers. The bunchers were necessary to keep the beam bunched at the entrance of the Linac. About 35% beam loss occurred, and the emittance growth was several fold. In the new layout, the 750 keV line is only 0.7 m long, with three quads and one buncher. We will present the experimental result of the upgrade.

  4. State-selective electron capture in {sup 3}He{sup 2+} + He collisions at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, M.; Otranto, S.; Focke, P.

    2011-01-15

    In this work we have measured single-electron capture in collisions of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} projectiles incident on a helium target for energies of 13.3-100 keV/amu with the cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy setup implemented at the Centro Atomico Bariloche. State-selective single-capture cross sections were measured as a function of the impact energy. They were found to agree with previous existing data from the Frankfurt group, starting at the impact energy of 60 keV/amu; as well as with recent data, at 7.5 keV/amu, from the Lanzhou group. The present experimental results are also contrasted to the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method with dynamical screening.

  5. Desludging of N Reactor fuel canisters: Analysis, Test, and data requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The N Reactor fuel is currently stored in canisters in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. In KE, the canisters have open tops; in KW, the cans have sealed lids, but are vented to release gases. Corrosion products have formed on exposed uranium metal fuel, on carbon steel basin component surfaces, and on aluminum alloy canister surfaces. Much of the corrosion product is retained on the corroding surfaces; however, large inventories of particulates have been released. Some of the corrosion product particulates form sludge on the basin floors; some particulates are retained within the canisters. The floor sludge inventories are much greater in the KE Basin than in the KW Basin because KE Basin operated longer and its water chemistry was less controlled. Another important factor is the absence of lids on the KE canisters, allowing uranium corrosion products to escape and water-borne species, principally iron oxides, to settle in the canisters. The inventories of corrosion products, including those released as particulates inside the canisters, are only beginning to be characterized for the closed canisters in KW Basin. The dominant species in the KE floor sludge are oxides of aluminum, iron, and uranium. A large fraction of the aluminum and uranium floor sludge particulates may have been released during a major fuel segregation campaign in the 1980s, when fuel was emptied from 4990 canisters. Handling and jarring of the fuel and aluminum canisters seems likely to have released particulates from the heavily corroded surfaces. Four candidate methods are discussed for dealing with canister sludge emerged in the N Reactor fuel path forward: place fuel in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) without desludging; drill holes in canisters and drain; drill holes in canisters and flush with water; and remove sludge and repackage the fuel.

  6. Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Rolland, G.

    2012-12-15

    We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

  7. THE INTEGRAL HIGH-ENERGY CUT-OFF DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.

    2014-02-20

    In this Letter we present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index Γ, and the high-energy cut-off E {sub c} of 41 type-1 Seyfert galaxies extracted from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We performed broadband (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by simultaneously fitting the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT, respectively, in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters, in particular their distribution and mean values. We find a mean photon index of 1.73 with a standard deviation of 0.17 and a mean high-energy cut-off of 128 keV with a standard deviation of 46 keV for the whole sample. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in such a large number of AGNs. We have 26 measurements of the cut-off, which corresponds to 63% of the entire sample, distributed between 50 and 200 keV. There are a further 11 lower limits mostly below 300 keV. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we have been able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region, i.e., the plasma temperature kT {sub e} from 20 to 100 keV and the optical depth τ < 4. Finally, with the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGNs, allowing the determination of more physical models and thus better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  8. SPATIALLY RESOLVING A STARBURST GALAXY AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES: NuSTAR, CHANDRA, AND VLBA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wik, D. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Venters, T.; Zhang, W. W.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Argo, M. K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Craig, W.; Krivonos, R.; Christensen, F.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Maccarone, T. J.; Stern, D.

    2014-12-20

    Prior to the launch of NuSTAR, it was not feasible to spatially resolve the hard (E > 10 keV) emission from galaxies beyond the Local Group. The combined NuSTAR data set, comprised of three ?165 ks observations, allows spatial characterization of the hard X-ray emission in the galaxy NGC253 for the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Very Long Baseline Array monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC253. Above ?10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated within 100'' of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxydominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, which are also likely ULXsfalls steeply (photon index ? 3) above 10 keV, consistent with other NuSTAR-observed ULXs, and no significant excess above the background is detected at E > 40 keV. We report upper limits on diffuse inverse Compton emission for a range of spatial models. For the most extended morphologies considered, these hard X-ray constraints disfavor a dominant inverse Compton component to explain the ?-ray emission detected with Fermi and H.E.S.S. If NGC253 is typical of starburst galaxies at higher redshift, their contribution to the E > 10 keV cosmic X-ray background is <1%.

  9. 14F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 14F Adopted value: 910 ± 100 keV (2010GO16) Measured Mass Excess for 14F Adopted value: 31960 ± 50 keV (2012WA38) Measurements 2010GO16: 1H(13O, X)14F, E = 31 MeV/nucleon; measured reaction products, proton spectra; deduced σ(θ), J, π, level scheme, resonances. Comparison with shell model calculations. 2012GO11: 1H(13O, 13O), E ≈ 11 MeV/nucleon; measured thick target charged reaction products. 14F deduced levels, widths,

  10. 16_02_1993.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 from (1993TI07): Energy Levels of 16 C E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (sec) or Γ (keV) Decay Reactions 0 0 + ; 2 τ 1/2 = 0.747 ± 0.008 β - 1, 2 1.766 ± 10 2 + γ 2 3.027 ± 12 (0 + ) (γ) 2 3.986 ± 7 2 γ 2 4.088 ± 7 3 (+) γ 2 4.142 ± 7 4 + γ 2 6.109 ± 15 (2 + , 3 - , 4 + ) Γ ≤ 25 2

  11. Influence of irradiation upon few-layered graphene using electron-beams and gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Feng, Yi, E-mail: fyhfut@163.com; Mo, Fei; Qian, Gang; Chen, Yangming; Yu, Dongbo; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuebin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Few-layered graphene (FLG) is irradiated by electron beams and gamma rays. After 100?keV electron irradiation, the edges of FLG start bending, shrinking, and finally generate gaps and carbon onions due to sputtering and knock-on damage mechanism. When the electron beam energy is increased further to 200?keV, FLG suffers rapid and catastrophic destruction. Unlike electron irradiation, Compton effect is the dominant damage mechanism in gamma irradiation. The irradiation results indicate the crystallinity of FLG decreases first, then restores as increasing irradiation doses, additionally, the ratio (O/C) of FLG surface and the relative content of oxygen groups increases after irradiation.

  12. Gamma-ray shielding properties of some travertines in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir

    2012-09-06

    The radiation is an essential phenomenon in daily life. There are various amounts of radioactivite substances in the underground and the earth was irradiated by this substances. Humans are exposed to various kind of radiation from these sources. The travertines are usually used as a coating material in buildings. In this study, the photon attenuation coefficients of some travertines have been measured using a gamma spectroscopy with NaI(Tl) detector. The measurements have been performed using {sup 60}Co source which gives 1173 and 1332 keV energies gamma rays and {sup 137}Cs source which gives 662 keV energy gamma rays and the results will be discussed.

  13. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  14. Beamline 10.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 10.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:14 X-ray fluorescence microprobe Scientific disciplines: Environmental science, detector development, low-dose radiation effects in cells GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 3-20 keV Monochromator White light, multilayer mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3 x 1010 photons/s at 12.5 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) White light to

  15. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  16. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  17. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE)

  18. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE)

  19. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE)

  20. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10.3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE)

  1. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE)

  2. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  3. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  4. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  5. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  6. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  7. Beamline 10.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Environmental and Materials Science, Micro X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (µXAS, µEXAFS) Scientific disciplines: Earth and environmental science, material science GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet (beamline optics collect 0.166 horizontal mrad) Energy range 2.5-17 keV Monochromator Monochromatic, with Si(111) two-crystal, constant-exit monochromator Measured flux 9 x 109 photons/s into 16 x 7 µm2 spot at 6 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  8. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  9. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  10. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker

  11. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker

  12. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  13. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  14. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.3.1 Beamline 11.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:22 Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and

  15. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Beamline 11.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:22 Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford

  16. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  17. Beamline 11.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Small-molecule crystallography Beamline 11.3.1 web site Scientific disciplines: Structural chemistry, magnetic materials, microporous materials. GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 6-17 keV Monochromator Channel-cut Si(111) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1x1011 photons/s/0.01%BW at 10 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 1000 Endstations Medium sized hutch with Bruker AXS D8 diffractometer and Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream Plus Detectors Bruker AXS

  18. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  19. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  20. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  1. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  2. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  3. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  4. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  5. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2.2 Beamline 12.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:31 High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused:

  6. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  7. Beamline 12.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.2 Print High-Pressure Endstations: High-pressure single-crystal diffraction(in development, February 2015) High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications

  8. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.2 Beamline 12.3.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:34 Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  9. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  10. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  11. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  12. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  13. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  14. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  15. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.3.2 Beamline 12.3.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:34 Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000

  16. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  17. Beamline 12.3.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Microdiffraction Scientific disciplines: Materials, earth and environmental sciences GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Now Source characteristics Superbend magnet Energy range 6-22 keV Frequency range 2.1-0.56 Ångström wavelength Monochromator White light and monochromatic [four-bounce Si(111)] Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) Typically 8.5 keV: 1 x 109 photons/s/µm2/3x10-4BW (1 x 1 µm spot) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Detectors Dectris Pilatus 1M Pixel detector, Silicon

  18. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  19. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  20. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving