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1

ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde1mace  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byProductsbsrncalcbsrncalc Documentation Data ManagementProductsmergesondemergesonde1mace Documentation

2

ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde2mace  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byProductsbsrncalcbsrncalc Documentation Data ManagementProductsmergesondemergesonde1mace

3

Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

KP solitons in shallow water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of the paper is to provide a survey of our recent studies on soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation. The classification is based on the far-field patterns of the solutions which consist of a finite number of line-solitons. Each soliton solution is then defined by a point of the totally non-negative Grassmann variety which can be parametrized by a unique derangement of the symmetric group of permutations. Our study also includes certain numerical stability problems of those soliton solutions. Numerical simulations of the initial value problems indicate that certain class of initial waves asymptotically approach to these exact solutions of the KP equation. We then discuss an application of our theory to the Mach reflection problem in shallow water. This problem describes the resonant interaction of solitary waves appearing in the reflection of an obliquely incident wave onto a vertical wall, and it predicts an extra-ordinary four-fold amplification of the wave at the wall. There are several numerical studies confirming the prediction, but all indicate disagreements with the KP theory. Contrary to those previous numerical studies, we find that the KP theory actually provides an excellent model to describe the Mach reflection phenomena when the higher order corrections are included to the quasi-two dimensional approximation. We also present laboratory experiments of the Mach reflection recently carried out by Yeh and his colleagues, and show how precisely the KP theory predicts this wave behavior.

Yuji Kodama

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

XXZ scalar products and KP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a Jacobi-Trudi-type identity, we show that the scalar product of a general state and a Bethe eigenstate in a finite-length XXZ spin-1/2 chain is (a restriction of) a KP tau function. This leads to a correspondence between the eigenstates and points on Sato's Grassmannian. Each of these points is a function of the rapidities of the corresponding eigenstate, the inhomogeneity variables of the spin chain and the crossing parameter.

O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Central Invariants of the Constrained KP Hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the central invariants of the bihamiltonian structures of the constrained KP hierarchies, and show that these integrable hierarchies are topological deformations of their hydrodynamic limits.

Si-Qi Liu; Youjin Zhang; Xu Zhou

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

8

Weakly nonassociative algebras, Riccati and KP hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has recently been observed that certain nonassociative algebras (called "weakly nonassociative", WNA) determine, via a universal hierarchy of ordinary differential equations, solutions of the KP hierarchy with dependent variable in an associative subalgebra (the middle nucleus). We recall central results and consider a class of WNA algebras for which the hierarchy of ODEs reduces to a matrix Riccati hierarchy, which can be easily solved. The resulting solutions of a matrix KP hierarchy then determine (under a rank 1 condition) solutions of the scalar KP hierarchy. We extend these results to the discrete KP hierarchy. Moreover, we build a bridge from the WNA framework to the Gelfand-Dickey formulation of the KP hierarchy.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

q-Deformed KP Hierarchy and q-Deformed Constrained KP Hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the determinant representation of gauge transformation operator, we have shown that the general form of $\\tau$ function of the $q$-KP hierarchy is a q-deformed generalized Wronskian, which includes the q-deformed Wronskian as a special case. On the basis of these, we study the q-deformed constrained KP ($q$-cKP) hierarchy, i.e. $l$-constraints of $q$-KP hierarchy. Similar to the ordinary constrained KP (cKP) hierarchy, a large class of solutions of $q$-cKP hierarchy can be represented by q-deformed Wronskian determinant of functions satisfying a set of linear $q$-partial differential equations with constant coefficients. We obtained additional conditions for these functions imposed by the constraints. In particular, the effects of $q$-deformation ($q$-effects) in single $q$-soliton from the simplest $\\tau$ function of the $q$-KP hierarchy and in multi-$q$-soliton from one-component $q$-cKP hierarchy, and their dependence of $x$ and $q$, were also presented. Finally, we observe that $q$-soliton tends to the usual soliton of the KP equation when $x\\to 0$ and $q\\to 1$, simultaneously.

Jingsong He; Yinghua Li; Yi Cheng

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Two dimensional KP systems and their solvability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we introduce new various generalizations of the classical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy in the case of operators in several variables. These generalizations are the candidates for systems that should play the role, analogous to the role of the KP hierarchy in the classical KP theory, in a generalized KP theory. In particular, they should describe flows of some generalized geometric datas, including those described by A.N.Parshin, for certain initial conditions. The unique solvability of the initial value problem for the generalized KP hierarchies is established. The connection of these systems with universal families of isospectral deformations of certain pairs of commuting differential operators is opened. To prove the solvability of the systems we generalize several results from the works of M.Mulase and A.N.Parshin.

Alexander Zheglov

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measurements of Delta G/G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our present information on the gluon polarisation Delta g/g is reviewed. The data from fixed-target lepton-nucleon experiments are in context with the recent data from the RHIC polarised pp collider. The main tools to study Delta g/g in lepton-nucleon scattering are scaling violations of the g_1 structure functions and longitudinal spin asymmetries in hadron production. Results from high-p_T hadron pairs, inclusive hadrons as well as open-charm production are discussed. At RHIC the most precise data presently came from inclusive pi^0 and jet production. All data indicate that the gluon polarisation is small compared to earlier expectations, but still can make a major contribution to the nucleon spin.

G. K. Mallot

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

On rational solutions of multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive some rational solutions for the multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies generalising an approach by Wilson. Connections with the multicomponent version of the KP/CM correspondence are discussed.

Alberto Tacchella

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Domain wall partition functions and KP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Random matrices with external source and KP $?$ functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we prove that the partition function in the random matrix model with external source is a KP $\\tau$ function.

Dong Wang

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

BKP and CKP revisited: The odd KP system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restricting a linear system for the KP hierarchy to those independent variables t\\_n with odd n, its compatibility (Zakharov-Shabat conditions) leads to the "odd KP hierarchy". The latter consists of pairs of equations for two dependent variables, taking values in a (typically noncommutative) associative algebra. If the algebra is commutative, the odd KP hierarchy is known to admit reductions to the BKP and the CKP hierarchy. We approach the odd KP hierarchy and its relation to BKP and CKP in different ways, and address the question whether noncommutative versions of the BKP and the CKP equation (and some of their reductions) exist. In particular, we derive a functional representation of a linear system for the odd KP hierarchy, which in the commutative case produces functional representations of the BKP and CKP hierarchies in terms of a tau function. Furthermore, we consider a functional representation of the KP hierarchy that involves a second (auxiliary) dependent variable and features the odd KP hierarchy directly as a subhierarchy. A method to generate large classes of exact solutions to the KP hierarchy from solutions to a linear matrix ODE system, via a hierarchy of matrix Riccati equations, then also applies to the odd KP hierarchy, and this in turn can be exploited, in particular, to obtain solutions to the BKP and CKP hierarchies.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Algebraic identities associated with KP and AKNS hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit KP and AKNS hierarchy equations can be constructed from a certain set of algebraic identities involving a quasi-shuffle product.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

Elliptic (N,N^\\prime)-Soliton Solutions of the lattice KP Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elliptic soliton solutions, i.e., a hierarchy of functions based on an elliptic seed solution, are constructed using an elliptic Cauchy kernel, for integrable lattice equations of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) type. This comprises the lattice KP, modified KP (mKP) and Schwarzian KP (SKP) equations as well as Hirota's bilinear KP equation, and their successive continuum limits. The reduction to the elliptic soliton solutions of KdV type lattice equations is also discussed.

Sikarin Yoo-Kong; Frank Nijhoff

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

XXZ scalar products, Miwa variables and discrete KP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the quantum/classical integrable model correspondence in the context of inhomogeneous finite length XXZ spin-1/2 chains with periodic boundary conditions and show that the Bethe scalar product of an arbitrary state and a Bethe eigenstate is a discrete KP tau-function. The continuous Miwa variables of discrete KP are the rapidities of the arbitrary state.

O. Foda; G. Schrader

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Multicomponent KP Hierarchy: Differential Fay Identities and Lax Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we show that four sets of differential Fay identities of an $N$-component KP hierarchy derived from the bilinear relation satisfied by the tau function of the hierarchy are sufficient to derive the auxiliary linear equations for the wave functions. From this, we derive the Lax representation for the $N$-component KP hierarchy, which are equations satisfied by some pseudodifferential operators with matrix coefficients. Besides the Lax equations with respect to the time variables proposed in \\cite{2}, we also obtain a set of equations relating different charge sectors, which can be considered as a generalization of the modified KP hierarchy proposed in \\cite{3}.

Lee-Peng Teo

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A new approach to deformation equations of noncommutative KP hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partly inspired by Sato's theory of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy, we start with a quite general hierarchy of linear ordinary differential equations in a space of matrices and derive from it a matrix Riccati hierarchy. The latter is then shown to exhibit an underlying 'weakly nonassociative' (WNA) algebra structure, from which we can conclude, refering to previous work, that any solution of the Riccati system also solves the potential KP hierarchy (in the corresponding matrix algebra). We then turn to the case where the components of the matrices are multiplied using a (generalized) star product. Associated with the deformation parameters, there are additional symmetries (flow equations) which enlarge the respective KP hierarchy. They have a compact formulation in terms of the WNA structure. We also present a formulation of the KP hierarchy equations themselves as deformation flow equations.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Rise of Kp Total Cross Section and Universality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increase of the measured hadronic total cross sections at the highest energies is empirically described by squared log of center-of-mass energy sqrt s as sigma(tot)= B (log s)2, consistent with the energy dependence of the Froissart unitarity bound. The coefficient B is argued to have a universal value, but this is not proved directly from QCD. In the previous tests of this universality, the p(pbar)p, pi p, and K p forward scatterings were analyzed independently and found to be consistent with B(pp) = B(pip) = B(Kp), although the determined value of B(Kp) had large uncertainty. In the present work, we have further analyzed forward Kp scattering to obtain a more exact value of B(Kp). Making use of continuous moment sum rules(CMSR) we have fully exploited the information of low-energy scattering data to predict the high-energy behavior of the amplitude hrough duality. The estimation of B(Kp) is improved remarkably, and our result strongly supports the universality of B.

Muneyuki Ishida; Vernon Barger

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Page 1 of 1 GG 301 Mineralogy Fall 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 1 GG 301 Mineralogy Fall 2009 Course Description and Syllabus Welcome to Mineralogy on mineral composition, the fourth presents optical mineralogy, the fifth introduces us to major rock some of the analytical tools of modern mineralogy. Course Information Credits: 4 Semester: Fall 2009

Hammer, Julia Eve

24

Linearisation of the (M,K)-reduced non-autonomous discrete periodic KP equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The (M,K)-reduced non-autonomous discrete KP equation is linearised on the Picard group of an algebraic curve. As an application, we construct theta function solutions to the initial value problem of some special discrete KP equation.

Shinsuke Iwao

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Discrete KP equation with self-consistent sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation with sources obtained recently by the "source generalization" method can be incorporated into the squared eigenfunction symmetry extension procedure. Moreover, using the known correspondence between Darboux-type transformations and additional independent variables, we demonstrate that the equation with sources can be derived from Hirota's discrete KP equations but in a space of higher dimension. In this way we uncover the origin of the source terms as coming from multidimensional consistency of the Hirota system itself.

Adam Doliwa; Runliang Lin

2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Quasi-symmetric functions and the KP hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasi-symmetric functions show up in an approach to solve the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy. This moreover features a new nonassociative product of quasi-symmetric functions that satisfies simple relations with the ordinary product and the outer coproduct. In particular, supplied with this new product and the outer coproduct, the algebra of quasi-symmetric functions becomes an infinitesimal bialgebra. Using these results we derive a sequence of identities in the algebra of quasi-symmetric functions that are in formal correspondence with the equations of the KP hierarchy.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2009-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kaonic hydrogen versus the $K^{-}p$ low energy data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an exact solution to the $K^{-}$-proton bound state problem formulated in the momentum space. The 1s level characteristics of the kaonic hydrogen are computed simultaneously with the available low energy $K^{-}p$ data. In the strong interaction sector the meson-baryon interactions are described by means of an effective (chirally motivated) separable potential and its parameters are fitted to the experimental data.

A. Cieply; J. Smejkal

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

On the construction of the KP line-solitons and their interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The line-soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev--Petviashvili (KP) equation are investigated in this article using the tau-function formalism. In particular, the Wronskian and the Grammian forms of the tau-function are discussed, and the equivalence of these two forms are established. Furthermore, the interaction properties of two special types of 2-soliton solutions of the KP equation are studied in details.

Sarbarish Chakravarty; Tim Lewkow; Ken-ichi Maruno

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

mace-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV7 Cirrus

30

Stationary IPA Estimates for Non-Smooth G/G/1/ Functionals via Palm Inversion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stationary IPA Estimates for Non-Smooth G/G/1/ Functionals via Palm Inversion and Level, the derivative of J with respect to . To this end, we use Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA), a method on IPA. Alternative methods have been used to estimate derivatives, namely Smooth Perturbation Analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

Kauer, Nikolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic Rennes, UMR 6226, 35042 Rennes, France KeywordsPerovskite, photovoltaic, first-principles calculations, k these hybrid semiconductor photovoltaic cells(HSPC) maydiffer from the one of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

Universal Whitham hierarchy, dispersionless Hirota equations and multi-component KP hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this paper is to identify the universal Whitham hierarchy of genus zero with a dispersionless limit of the multi-component KP hierarchy. To this end, the multi-component KP hierarchy is (re)formulated to depend on several discrete variables called ``charges''. These discrete variables play the role of lattice coordinates in underlying Toda field equations. A multi-component version of the so called differential Fay identity are derived from the Hirota equations of the $\\tau$-function of this ``charged'' multi-component KP hierarchy. These multi-component differential Fay identities have a well-defined dispersionless limit (the dispersionless Hirota equations). The dispersionless Hirota equations turn out to be equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the $S$-functions of the universal Whitham hierarchy. The differential Fay identities themselves are shown to be a generating functional expression of auxiliary linear equations for scalar-valued wave functions of the multi-component KP hierarchy.

Kanehisa Takasaki; Takashi Takebe

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hiding a Higgs width enhancement from off-shell gg (--> h*) --> ZZ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the off-shell Higgs boson production cross section in gg (--> h*) --> ZZ have recently been used by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations to indirectly constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. I point out that the interpretation of these measurements as a Higgs width constraint can be invalidated if additional neutral Higgs boson(s) are present with masses below about 350 GeV.

Heather E. Logan

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Quantum transport in crystals: effective-mass theorem and k.p Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper the effective mass approximation and k.p multi-band models, describing quantum evolution of electrons in a crystal lattice, are discussed. Electrons are assumed to move in both a periodic potential and a macroscopic one. The typical period of the periodic potential is assumed to be very small, while the macroscopic potential acts on a much bigger length scale. Such homogenization asymptotic is investigated by using the envelope-function decomposition of the electron wave function. If the external potential is smooth enough, the k.p and effective mass models, well known in solid-state physics, are proved to be close (in strong sense) to the exact dynamics. Moreover, the position density of the electrons is proved to converge weakly to its effective mass approximation.

Luigi Barletti; Naoufel Ben Abdallah

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

With a Cole-Hopf transformation to solutions of the noncommutative KP hierarchy in terms of Wronski matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In case of the KP hierarchy where the dependent variable takes values in an (arbitrary) associative algebra A, it is known that there are solutions which can be expressed in terms of quasideterminants of a Wronski matrix which solves the linear heat hierarchy. We obtain these solutions without the help of quasideterminants in a simple way via solutions of matrix KP hierarchies (over A) and by use of a Cole-Hopf transformation. For this class of exact solutions we work out a correspondence with 'weakly nonassociative' algebras.

Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with high heat transfer coefficients.1 Other uses as load-supporting electrochemical storage structures alsoElectrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley Department to represent an open-cell aluminum foam and a simplified electrical resistor network derived to model low

Wadley, Haydn

38

Measurement of the KS->gg branching ratio using a pure KS beam with the KLOE detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have searched for the decay KS->gg in a sample of 2x10^9 phi->KS KL decays collected at DAPHNE with an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb^{-1}. KS are tagged by the KL interaction in the calorimeter. Two prompt photons must also be detected. Kinematic constraints reduce the initial 6x10^5 events to 2740 candidates, from which a signal of 711\\pm 35 events is extracted. By normalizing to the KS->2pi^0 decays counted in the same sample, we measure BR(KS->gg)= (2.26\\pm0.12_{stat}\\pm0.06_{syst})x10^{-6}, in agreement with O(p^4) Chiral Perturbation Theory predictions.

The KLOE collaboration

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

Search for Theta+ via K+p -> pi+X reaction with a 1.2 GeV/c K+ beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Theta+ was searched for via the K+p -> pi+X reaction using the 1.2 GeV/c K+ beam at the K6 beam line of the KEK-PS 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron. In the missing mass spectrum of the K+p -> pi+X reaction, no clear peak structure was observed. Therefore a 90 % C.L. upper limit of 3.5 ub/sr was derived for the differential cross section averaged over 2degree to 22degree in the laboratory frame of the K+p -> pi+Theta+ reaction. This upper limit is much smaller than the theoretical calculation for the t-channel process where a K0* is exchanged. From the present result, either the t-channel process is excluded or the coupling constant of g_{K*N\\Theta} is quite small.

K. Miwa; S. Dairaku; D. Nakajima; for the KEK-PS E559 Collaboration

2008-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vapor deposition of platinum alloyed nickel aluminide coatings Z. Yu , K.P. Dharmasena, D.D. Hass, H.N.G. Wadley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor deposition of platinum alloyed nickel aluminide coatings Z. Yu , K.P. Dharmasena, D.D. Hass at high temperature. It requires the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum on a nickel rich superalloy substrate that has been pre-coated with several microns of electrodeposited platinum. Here, we show

Wadley, Haydn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stationary IPA Estimates for NonSmooth G/G/1/1 Functionals via Palm Inversion and LevelCrossing Analysis. \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stationary IPA Estimates for Non­Smooth G/G/1/1 Functionals via Palm Inversion and Level Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA), a method first introduced by Ho and Cao [13] and further developed and Cao [14] summarize and review most previous results on IPA. Alternative methods have been used

Lasgouttes, Jean-Marc

42

Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

43

version 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg H W +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,82 D. Brown ,22 E. Brubaker ,83 X.B. Bu ,8 D. Buchholz ,86 J. Budagov ,53 H.S. Budd ,115 S. Budd ,87. Campanelli ,68 M. Campbell ,104 F. Canelli ,82, 83 A. Canepa ,123 B. Carls ,87 D. Carlsmith ,134 R. Carosiversion 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg

Fermilab

44

Experimental confirmation of the Lambda(1405) Ansatz from resonant formation of a K-p quasi-bound state in K- absorption by 3He and 4He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sigma-pi invariant-mass spectra in the resonant capture of K- at rest in 4He, 3He and d are calculated by a coupled-channel procedure for a K-p quasi-bound state of an arbitrary chosen mass (M) and width (Gamma). A chi2 analysis of old 4He bubble chamber data shows a dominance of the s-orbit absorption, and yielded M = 1405.5 ^(+1.4)_(-1) MeV/c2 and Gamma = 26 ^(+4)_(-3) MeV, where a possible population of Sigma0(1385) and also a small p-orbit capture contribution are taken into account. This result confirms the Lambda(1405) ansatz, whereas recent chiral-SU(3) predictions (M ~ 1420 MeV/c2) are excluded. A more stringent test by using a 3He target is proposed .

Jafar Esmaili; Yoshinori Akaishi; Toshimitsu Yamazaki

2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels. Citation: Marchand RT, JM Haynes, GG Mace, TP Ackerman, and GL Stephens.2009."A Comparison of Simulated...

46

A convenient approach to $10^{-12}~g/g$ ICP-MS limits for Th and U in Aurubis electrolytic NA-ESN brand copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy is a powerful technique for measuring trace levels of radioactive contaminants, specifically Th and U, in materials for use in construction of low-background rare-event detectors such as double beta decay and dark matter detectors. I describe here a technique for measuring Th and U contamination in copper using direct acid digestion and dilution, without further chemical processing, achieving results comparable to previous work which utilized more complex chemical pre-concentration techniques. A convenient research-oriented analysis environment is described as well. Results are presented for measurements of three samples from the production line of electrolytically-purified, LME (London Metal Exchange) grade A, NA-ESN Aurubis copper. Purified samples showed levels consistent with zero contamination for both elements, while weak but inconclusive indications of contamination were present for the un-purified anode copper. The best limits achieved are near $1\\cdot 10^{-12}$~g/g (95% CL) for both Th and U measured for copper from the cathode of the purification process.

D. S. Leonard

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4 Abstract A soil erosion risk map was developed for the State of New Mexico using for New Mexico was developed showing that erosion risk varied between 0.05 and 0.87 on a scale of 0

Cal, Mark P.

48

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Energy Dependence of $K/?$, $p/?$, and $K/p$ Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions from $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy-ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$, and $K/p$ fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0-5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable $\\rm \

STAR Collaboration; N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; R. Esha; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING Berthold K.P. Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ziock, and Lorenzo Fabris. #12;Coded Aperture Imaging · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays · Pinhole Principle #12;Decoding Method Rationale #12;Coded Aperture Imaging · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays Squares Match in FT #12;Polystyrene Micro Beads (1µm) #12;#12;(2) CODED APERTURE IMAGING · Can't refract

Treuille, Adrien

51

KP Renewables Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation,andEnergija JumpK CKP

52

Approaches to defining a planetary boundary for biodiversity Georgina M. Mace a,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extinction rate and species richness are weak metrics for this purpose, and they do not scale well from local current rates of extinction put the Earth system furthest outside the safe operating space. Here we review the evidence to support a boundary based on extinction rates and identify weaknesses with this metric and its

53

THE CORRENTROPY MACE FILTER FOR IMAGE RECOGNITION Kyu-Hwa Jeong, Jose C. Principe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation fil- ters are the synthetic discriminant function (SDF) [5] and its This work was supported. In the conventional SDF approach, the filter is mat- ched to a composite image that is a linear combination in the sa- me class. The shortcomings of the conventional SDF are that the SDF does not consider any input

Slatton, Clint

54

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mace_Poster_ARM-ATrain_Comparison [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S. CommercialIn thisRepresentativeness of

55

JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005) |JMalucelli Energia Place:Living Buildings Jump

56

The influence of N-dimethyl amino succinamic acid on the growth and development of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Poellnitz cv. 'Mace'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+or, inhibits the mer'istematic activity in all regiors of the plan t and herice int rferes with every aspect of plant development iriclud- irig f lowe', initiatiori. Cathey (3) described 8-Iline as heir g uniqu" in chemical stru tu! e as a growth retardant...

Warminski, Norman Charles

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

Brooks, Benjamin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

Potter, Katherine Ellison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Study of charmonium resonances in the gg -> K0SK pi- and gg -> K K-pi pi-pi0 processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports the analysis of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} final state is known to show a clear signal from the {eta}{sub c}(2S) particle. This c{bar c} state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the {eta}{sub c}(2S) properties is obtained in the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}{sub c}(2S) and other charmonium states to the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

Biassoni, Pietro; /U. Milan, Dept. Phys.

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

AXIONS AND OTHER SIMILAR PARTICLES Revised March 2012 by G.G. Raffelt (MPI Physics, Munich)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bosons is that their coupling to Standard-Model particles is suppressed by the energy scale symmetry-breaking scale vweak = ( 2GF)-1/2 = 247 GeV. However, the associated "standard" and "variant, fA is the quantity that enters all low-energy phenomena [7]. Non- perturbative effects induce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Adequate bases of phase space master integrals for $gg \\to h$ at NNLO and beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study master integrals needed to compute the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion in the infinite top quark mass limit, using a canonical form of differential equations for master integrals, recently identified by Henn, which makes their solution possible in a straightforward algebraic way. We apply the known criteria to derive such a suitable basis for all the phase space master integrals in afore mentioned process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and demonstrate that the method is applicable to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order as well by solving a non-planar topology. Furthermore, we discuss in great detail how to find an adequate basis using practical examples. Special emphasis is devoted to master integrals which are coupled by their differential equations.

Maik Hschele; Jens Hoff; Takahiro Ueda

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

On the Input-Output Map of a G=G=1 Queue Cheng-Shang Chang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extensively studied, e.g. Daley [6], Whitt [12], Berman and Westcott [5], Bambos and Walrand [4], Anantharam [1, 2] and many others. Daley [6] examined departure processes from GI=M=1 queue. Berman and Westcott

Chang, Cheng-Shang

63

FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system emerged from this interaction. Joule enables the chief financial officer and senior DOE management to track annual performance on a quarterly basis. Joule scores are reported as success, goal met (green light in PART), mixed results, goal partially met (yellow light in PART), and unsatisfactory, goal not met (red light in PART). Joule links the DOE strategic plan to the underlying base program targets.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Roche, Kenneth J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Use of high-resolution ichnological and stable isotope data for assessing completeness of a KP boundary section, Agost, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­P boundary section, Agost, Spain Francisco J. Rodri´guez-Tovar a,*, Francisca Marti´nez-Ruiz b , Stefano M. Bernasconi c a Departamento de Estratigrafi´a y Paleontologi´a, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain b Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra CSIC-Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain c

Gilli, Adrian

65

Observations of PKiKP///PcP amplitude ratios and implications for Earth structure at the boundaries of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reached that the solid inner core must contain a significant fraction of light element as well [Jephcoat Monitoring System has resulted in hundreds of new observations of precritical reflections from Earth's inner about 0.45 g/cm3 . These values can be reconciled with the higher estimates from normal mode constraints

Koper, Keith D.

66

Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 7: Appendices K--P  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Search For Charmless Dihadron Decays of Neutral b-Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plots for the Kir, Kp, and pir mass assignments. Plots a, c,the A mass for the Kp and pir combinations. Plots a, c, andused for the Kir, Kp, and pir final state. The use of two

Misawa, Shigeki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Interrelation of structural and electronic properties in InxGa1-xN/GaN quantum dots using an eight-band kp model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is crucial for improving the performance of optical and optoelectronic devices.1­6 In this regard, AR the performance of optical and optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic systems and light-emitting diodes

70

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Programs: Eskil and Mace * Engineering: Boyer and Callahan * COTRs: Rose and C. Weber * Marketing: Lewis * PlanningEvaluation: Gage and Tidwell Lots of time, effort...

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - anvil cirrus parameterization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2007 Cirrus in convective Summary: detrained anvils. 1 Introduction15 Upper tropospheric ice clouds in the tropics (tropical cirrus) have... with the conclusions of Mace et al....

72

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Solar Water Heater Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans...

73

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy #12;May 20, 2013 Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy Louis, 2013 AgendA 8 a.m. Registration 8:30 a.m. Welcome Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy

California at Davis, University of

74

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future May 20, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Afternoon kick off and MC: Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy of the day and closing (4:45 ­ 5:15) Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy Davis Policy Institute for Energy, the Environment and the Economy Ron Gastelum, Member, Board

California at Davis, University of

75

BB UU LL GG AA RR II AA NN AA CC AA DD EE MM YY OO FF SS CC II EE NN CC EE SS IINNSSTTIITTUUTTEE OOFF IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN AANNDD CCOOMMMMUUNNIICCAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGIIEESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library (ITIL) ­ essence development, open problems Abstract: This article aims to give an overview over the ITIL framework objective. It is going to explain the rapidly growing IT business needs which had caused the development of this library. We are also going to follow the ITIL evolution history and find the circumstances

Mustakerov, Ivan

76

COBIOT-854; NO. OF PAGES 8 Please cite this article in press as: Lovley DR, Nevin KP. A shift in the current: New applications and concepts for microbe-electrode electron exchange, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2011), doi:10.1016/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- trical power with microbial fuel cells over the last decade, some of the early optimism for power in aquatic sediments with benthic microbial fuel cells continues to be a promising application [5­8]. However, after some of the rather obvious design flaws in early microbial fuel cells were rectified, there has

Lovley, Derek

77

I.V. Ptashnik and K.P. Shine Vol. 16, No. 3 /March 2003/ Atmos. Oceanic Opt. 251 0235-6880/03/03 251-05 $02.00 2003 Institute of Atmospheric Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academy of Science, Russia Received January 13, 2003 Line-by-line calculations in the spectral region 2 remains an important concern for global climate modeling. It was shown more then 10 years ago in Ref. 1 in the different models. This factor has become more important recently as significant changes have taken place

Hogan, Robin

78

Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik Version: August 2012 Name Matr.-Nr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intelligente eingebettete Systeme BS Bildgebende Systeme Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LZF Note LM 1 LM 2 LM 3 LM 4 Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LZF Note LM 1 LM 2 LM 3 LM 4 LM 5 LM 6 LM 7 LM 8 Summe KP 3. Wahlpflichtmodul im Bereich Fachübergreifende Kompetenzen Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LM 1 4. Zusätzliche LM, die im Diploma Suppl

Lübeck, Universität zu

79

Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use additional performance indicators (e.g. , consumption ofto calculate the key performance indicators (KP|s). This

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

82

Global budgets of oceanic and atmospheric methyl iodide: development of methyl iodide as a tracer for marine convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), wetlands (7 Gg yr \\Gamma1 ) and wood fuel (3 Gg yr \\Gamma1 ) are also included in the model. A global

Jacob, Daniel J.

83

Generalized Cauchy matrix approach for non-autonomous discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we investigate the non-autonomous discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) system in terms of generalized Cauchy matrix approach. These equations include non-autonomous bilinear lattice KP equation, non-autonomous lattice potential KP equation, non-autonomous lattice potential modified KP equation, non-autonomous asymmetric lattice potential modified KP equation, non-autonomous lattice Schwarzian KP equation and non-autonomous lattice KP-type Nijhoff-Quispel-Capel equation. By introducing point transformations, all the equations are described as simplified forms, where the lattice parameters are absorbed. Several kinds of solutions more than multi-soliton solutions to these equations are derived by solving determining equation set. Lax representations for these equations are also discussed.

Songlin Zhao; Wei Feng; Shoufeng Shen; Jun Zhang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hans Muster Zrich, den XX.9.2013 Wehntalerstrasse 600  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrastruktursysteme Pflichtfcher HS LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 1.Sem. 101-0467-01L Verkehrssysteme 4 6 103-0347-00L LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 1.Semester 103-0377-00L Introduction to the Data Analysis Software R 1 1 103 MSc RE&IS FS LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 2.Semester 751-2700-00L Bodenmarkt und Bodenpolitik 2 2 101-0428-00L

Giger, Christine

85

androgen deprivation effect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Early Monocular Deprivation on Visual Input to Cat Superior Colliculus K-P. HOFFMANN deprived (MD), and binocularly deprived (BD) cats have dem- onstrated that cells of...

86

ORNL/CDIAC-160 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers, Boulder, CO 80309 Prepared by Alex Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National KP 12 04 01 0 and KP 12 02 03 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE

87

ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UniversityNDP 001a ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

88

ORNL/CDIAC-128 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center 1 Energy, Environment of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP#12;ORNL/CDIAC-128 NDP-075 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE R

89

genomic DNA was isolated from these centrifuged cell pellets and used for am-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genomic DNA was isolated from these centrifuged cell pellets and used for am- plification of either changes in ruminal bacterial popula- tions. J Wood1, KP Scott,1, G Avgutin2,J Wood1 KP Scott, G of this group from rumen- extracted DNA. Restriction enzyme cleav- age of the PCR product yields profiles

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

The MUSE-4 Experiment: Prompt Reactivity and Delayed Neutron Measurements A.Billebaud, J.Vollaire, R.Brissot, D.Heuer, C.Le Brun, E.Liatard,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MUSE-4 Experiment: Prompt Reactivity and Delayed Neutron Measurements A.Billebaud, J the prompt multiplication factor kp and the delayed neutron fraction eff . kp values are obtained from time to experimental rates, the determination of the prompt multiplication factor is done. The delayed neutron fraction

Boyer, Edmond

91

0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Fig. 3 Variation of the ratio of O/U1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thickness and volume are inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity k or to k/p {p is the density proportional to the 1/3 power of k or k/p. To illustrate our method we take, for comparison purposes to consult any graphs. In addition, the results presented in Fig. 3 can be used to estimate the fin's thermal

Zhang, Yuwen

92

Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Mai 2010 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Mai 2010 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik-Nr.^+ KP LZF Note PR Programmierung LM 1 VI Verteilte Informationssysteme LM 2 PV Parallele und Vert. Systemarchitekturen LM 3 OC Organic Computing LM 4 IE Intelligente eingebettete Systeme Summe KP SB Signal- und

Lübeck, Universität zu

93

Respondent-driven sampling shows successful initiation of prevention services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reported receiving targeted KP prevention services using RDS Analysis Tool (RDSAT), adjusted for non at risk for HIV in Zanzibar A. Ussi1, A. Khamis1, M. Kimwaga2, F. Khalid1, J. Ward3, J. Tiberio4, S utilization by KP is important in informing policy and program decisions. In 2008, the Zanzibar AIDS Control

Klein, Ophir

94

On the classi cation of nuclear C -algebras Marius Dadarlat S ren Eilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1991. [24] G.G. Kasparov, Hilbert C #3; -modules: Theorems of Stinespring and Voiculescu, J. Operator

Eilers, Søren

95

Asymptotic unitary equivalence in KK-theory Marius Dadarlat S ren Eilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Comm. Math. Phys. 4 (1967), 32{63. [7] G.G. Kasparov, Hilbert C #3; -modules: Theorems of Stinespring

Eilers, Søren

96

Supporting Information Wetzel et al. 10.1073/pnas.1219266110  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the packed graphite (denoted in Table S2 as dried graphite in run products). Experiments GG-11, GG-14, GG-19 scattered FeO coating on the Fe-foil after the annealing process. Individual experimental samples were. The graphite in the capsule also serves as the source of C and H during the experimental runs. One set

Jacobsen, Steven D.

97

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, suppl6ment au n09, Tome 48, septembre 1987  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINIUM-LITHIUM AT PECHINEY G. LE ROY, R. MACE, D. MARCHIVE* , P. MEYER* * , R. NOSSENT outlined. INTRODUCTION : Aluminium-Lithium raises a deep interest among aircraft manufacturers a s this new fatigue 2214-T6 : medium strength and fatigue resistance 7075-T73 : stress-corrosion resistance (ST

Boyer, Edmond

98

THE CLOUDSAT MISSION AND THE A-TRAIN A New Dimension of Space-Based Observations of Clouds and Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the wind fields (e.g., Menzel 2001). These large cloud systems are not mere passive tracers of wide. Clouds also dominate the energy budget of the planet. They tend to cool the earth by reflecting sunlight, California; MACE, SASSEN, AND WANG-- Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

99

Parameter Estimation Using Dual Fractional Power Filters Jason M. Kinser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discriminant functions (SDF) which are reviewed in ref. 9. Unlike the previous methods, the SDF class of the SDF class. These filters are Fractional Power Filters (FPFs) which will be reviewed in Section 2 is a superset of two standard SDF-class filters: the SDF and the MACE filter. This section will review the SDF

Kinser, Jason M.

100

Voting scheme nonlinearity-based binary composite filter Farid Ahmed, Mohammad A. Karimt and Fahmida Rahman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discriminant function (SDF) filters, like minimum average correlation energy (MACE), minimum variance SDF (MVSDF) ,and optimal tradeoff SDF (OTSDF) have been proposed recently for the distortion in three different ways. In the synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filter approach,"2 a number

Ahmed, Farid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Statistical mechanical analysis of the dynamics of learning in perceptrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with constant learning rate 2.5. Theory versus simulations 3. On-line learning: complete training setsStatistical mechanical analysis of the dynamics of learning in perceptrons C. W. H. MACE and A. C to analyse the dynamics of various classes of supervised learning rules in perceptrons. The character

Coolen, ACC "Ton"

102

On compensation of systematic manufacturing variations in physical design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. P. Gupta, F. -L. Heng, M. Lavin, Merits of CellwiseManufacturing, 2004. F. -L. Heng, P. Gupta, R. L. Gordon, K.P. Gupta and F. -L. Heng, Toward a Systematic-Variation

Gupta, Puneet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ranks of Elliptic Curves via Class Groups of Number Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state-of-the art methods to compute the rank assuming there is no rational point of order ... p /? S of K, we have valuation ordp : K ?? Kp ? Z ? {?}. If L is a...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Max-min separability: incremental approach and application to ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[9] Bennet, K.P. and Mangasarian, O.L. (1993), Bilinear separation of two sets in n-space,. Computational Optimization and Applications, 2(3), pp. 207-227.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimon och ett Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

var ett folkmord, utan en sanitr insats mot mnsklig ohyra. HH fick nu ta hand om Vim och skrev ett... flesta artiklar kopplat sig till ett stort ml och varje kp blev en...

106

TORCH: Time-of-flight detector for low-momentum PID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a proposed particle identification system to achieve positive ?/K/p separation at a ?3? level in the momentum range below 10 GeV/c

Castillo Garca, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A study of the Fnr-1 transcription regulator in Geobacter sulfurreducens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A.E. and K.P. Nevin, Microbial Fuel Cells, A Current Review.current production in microbial fuel cells. Biosensors andSchematic of a microbial fuel cell with an anode acting as

Abate, Elisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

the french LOFAR consortium M. Tagger, P. Zarka + 30 participants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but clear decision to go-ahead #12;science · very strong interest in most topics adressed by LOFAR: EOR collaboration: #12;EoR · agreement between the EoR KP and french Planck scientists for collaboration

Demoulin, Pascal

109

Algebraic K-Theory and Topological Spaces Michael Paluch (mike@math.ist.utl.pt)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-p-q(X) and Hp(X; Kp) CHp(X), where CHp(X) is the Chow group of codimension p-cycles on X. For p = 1 the sheaf K1

110

assessment problem solving: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at most p, then there are nondeterministic BPs of size O(kp) solving the heigh... Wehr, Dustin 2010-01-01 319 Effects of age, instructions, and problem content on everyday...

111

Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.010.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - arteriosclerosis obliterans aso Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: arteriosclerosis obliterans aso Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Academic Services Office Mechanical Engineering Dept. Room 2206 GG Brown Summary: Academic Services...

113

Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

document effects Slide 5 of 20 V2GG2V Demonstration - Complete field demonstration of smart meter communication with remaining utility partners Battery Software Improvements -...

114

Storngen Sderkping- en visualisering av blivande garlgenheter p Storngen i Sderkping.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? P Storngen i Sderkping bygger Bygg GG i Norrkping i samarbete med G Gunnarsons Fastighets AB ett hus innehllande 14 garlgenheter. D frsljningen av (more)

Jennergren, Johan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - ad libitum smoking Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H. ESSENHIGH The Pennsylvania State University... fuel concentration (gg) E activation energy (calmol) F s smoke flow rate (glsec) f gasification... to the smoke generator...

116

PUBLISHED VERSION The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Nuclear Fusion, Tritium, Confinement, Scaling Law, Alpha Particle, PACS: 52.55.Fa, 89.30.Gg, 52.55.-s, 52

117

Reduced insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor-1signaling and dietary...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a DR&8208;specific characteristic. Citation: Depuydt GG, F Xie, VA Petyuk, N Shanmugam, A Smolders, I Dhondt, HM Brewer, DG Camp, II, RD Smith, and BP...

118

EMBEDDINGS OF NUCLEARLY EMBEDDABLE C*-ALGEBRAS 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preprint 1999. [Kas1]. G.G. Kasparov, Hilbert C?-modules: Theorems of Stinespring and Voiculescu, J. Operator Theory 4 (1980), no. 1, 133150.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

Universittsmedizin Gttingen Publikationen und Hochschulschriften 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Gelpi E, Giaccone G, Graeber MB, Ince P, Kamphorst W, King A, Korkolopoulou P, Kovács GG, Larionov S

Gollisch, Tim

120

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Language of the Mozarabic jarchas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Florence: Le Monnier. o Sola-Sffl, J.M. 1966. Review ofGG (Garcia Gomez 1975 SS (Sola-sole 1973) iYa fatin, XLVI,second specimen I take from Sola-Sole (1973:127; = GG SS

Craddock, Jerry R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

Hu, Lei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was significant for all traits and SEX was significant for all traits excluding FG. Birth year and birth season were significant effects for WW, GG, FG, and SW. Classes set according to industry standards were BW (4 kg increments), WW (50 kg increments), GG (40 kg...

Cleere, Jason James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dynamical mass generation in unquenched QED using the Dyson-Schwinger equations  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present a comprehensive numerical study of dynamical mass generation for unquenched QED in four dimensions, in the absence of four-fermion interactions, using the Dyson-Schwinger approach. We begin with an overview of previous investigations of criticality in the quenched approximation. To this we add an analysis using a new fermion-antifermion-boson interaction ansatz, the Kizilersu-Pennington (KP) vertex, developed for an unquenched treatment. After surveying criticality in previous unquenched studies, we investigate the performance of the KP vertex in dynamical mass generation using a renormalized fully unquenched system of equations. This we compare with the results for two hybrid vertices incorporating the Curtis-Pennington vertex in the fermion equation. We conclude that the KP vertex is as yet incomplete, and its relative gauge-variance is due to its lack of massive transverse components in its design.

Kizilersu, Ayse; Sizer, Tom; Pennington, Michael R.; Williams, Anthony G.; Williams, Richard

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Factors involved in the seasonal and geographical regulation of diapause in the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS INVOLVED IN 'ZHE SEASONAL AND GEOGEAPNICAL EMQULATION OF DIAPAUSE Ill ttlL BOLL itl' 'VIL I~it&I UNOiliUG OtOtBDIB BOtlIIiBB A thesis by Ninfield Linsoln Sterling Submitted to the Qraduate College of Texas AM Universe. tp in Fartial... under tsy water in wxuc-bottom disseotion dishes. Elgtrae and hind wings were removed and disseotions maCe un4ex' a miorosooye at S0s image. Gne ohaxeoter used fox' the determination of 4iayause was Che hyyertroyhS of Che abdominal fat body...

Sterling, W. L

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unit*year) Heavy Metals to Water Heavy Metals to Water mg NiMatter Emissions (Water) Heavy Metals mg Hg/20 /unit*yearMatter Mg/year Emissions (Water) Heavy Metals Gg Hg/20 /year

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Keywords Matrix Factorizations and Updates, Block Structured ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 11, 2010 ... T i Di ?ggT = Ai ?DT i Di ?ddT = VT i Vi ?ddT. (72) with a vector d = 1 ?n. (DT i v?

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

alpha beta gamma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the decoupling limit, M2A0 gg M2Z, the heavy CP-even, CP-odd and charged Higgs boson masses are nearly degenerate, sin(beta-alpha) approaches 1, and the...

130

I Will be VIP!: The Cultural and Political Strategies of Peripheral Abidjanais Men  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hop musicians and perfume vendors whom I paid a small salaryFriends in low places 7. Vendors, respected and respectabletotal: 9 total: 27 One-day vendors AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH

Matlon, Jordanna Chris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Approximate unitary equivalence and the topology of Ext(A, B)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 5, 1999 ... Phys. 4 (1967), 3263. [Kas1]. G.G. Kasparov, Hilbert C?-modules: Theorems of Stinespring and Voiculescu, J. Operator Theory 4 (1980), no.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

One-Parameter Continuous Fields of Kirchberg Algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 4, 2010 ... J. Math. 10(3), 301326. (1999). 13. Kasparov, G.G.: Hilbert C?-modules: Theorems of Stinespring and Voiculescu. J. Op. Theory 4, 133150.

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Acknowledgements We would like to thank Chris Galletti for his intellectual contributions and recent enthusiasm for this project. This work has been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Cordell et al. 2009). In the CAP system, wastewater recycling to agriculture is the largest recycled flow-residential soil 0.6 Pets (cat & dogs) 0.1 B. Largest flows (2005) Gg P /year Fertilizer to agr

Hall, Sharon J.

134

John SCOTT (MA 223 - Section 0015 - 1:30pm) Name Row Seat ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

34, Emily, Dewitt, GG, 105, Aisle 4, Scott. 35, Eric, Prechtel ... 44, Jacob, Thompson, HH, 117, Aisle 3, Scott. 45, Jake, Baldwin, HH, 121, Aisle 3, Scott. 46, James...

135

CONES OF HILBERT FUNCTIONS MATS BOIJ AND GREGORY G. SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONES OF HILBERT FUNCTIONS MATS BOIJ AND GREGORY G. SMITH ABSTRACT. We study the closed convex hull #12;2 M. BOIJ AND G.G. SMITH linear conditions are frequently more useful despite not providing

Smith, Gregory G.

136

Technical Note Solution of periodic heating problems by the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.R. Barber * Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2250 GG Brown Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann in sliding solids [2], regenerative heat exchangers [3], solar heating systems [4] and heat con- duction

Barber, James R.

137

arXiv:1104.0081v2[math.CO]4Apr2011 CAYLEY GRAPHS OF ORDER 16p ARE HAMILTONIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is prime. We show that if S is any generating set of G, then there is a hamiltonian cycle.2(1) of [10]. Namely, several of the main results of that paper combine to show: Every connected Cayley graph on G has a hamiltonian cycle if |G| = kp, where p is prime, 1 k

Morris, Joy

138

Annales Geophysicae (2004) 22: 41334142 SRef-ID: 1432-0576/ag/2004-22-4133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Kp index, the AE index, the Akasofu epsilon parameter and the solar wind kinetic energy flux Research, Helsinki, Finland 3Alfv´en Laboratory, Royal Institute of Techology, Stockholm, Sweden Received months of Astrid-2/EMMA electric and magnetic field data during 1999 (solar maximum year

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

ORNL/CDIAC-34 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4777's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER

140

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ORNL/CDIAC-64 Proceedings of RIHMI-WDC,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 05 00 00 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Compiled by Marvel D. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Oak for the #12;Global Change Research Program Environmental Sciences Division Office of Health and Environmental

142

DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp061 ORNL/CDIAC-107  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

89512 Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

143

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological

144

Publications of Prof. ANURAG KUMAR 1. Anurag Kumar, D. Manjunath, and Joy Kuri, Communication Networking: An Analyti-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Wireless Sensor Networks," submitted. 1 #12;2. Arpan Chattopadhyay, Abhishek Sinha, Marceaux Coupechoux Wireless Sensor Networks," submitted. 4. Abhishek Sinha, Arpan Chattopadhyay, K.P. Naveen, Prasenjit Mondal Altman, Anurag Kumar, and Rajesh Sundaresan, "Opti- mal Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks

Kumar, Anurag

145

Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR ELECTRICAL ENERGY STORAGE $200,000 RSD 57392 ACLAND, GREGORY M BAKER INST OPTIGEN GENETIC TEST FOR HERIDITARY SURVEILLANCE $57,500 KP 50076 AKEY, BRUCE POPULATION MED AGAVE ANTE-MORTEM TSE DIAGNOSIS BY ELECTRIC CELL COUNTRIES $99,997 CMA 53239 BARRETT, CHRISTOPHER CCSF CARE DEVELOPING A MARKET ANALYSIS AND DECISION TREE

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

146

ARQ 510002: INSTRUMENTAO PARA A TESE Coordenadores da disciplina: Prof. Ayrton Portilho Bueno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

em Pesquisa Científica, Usuário & Ambiente, Paisagem & Sustentabilidade e Fronteiras da Inovação em://www.dropbox.com/sh/7ib3x2kh7ghpfrw/kpVvdze8ZF M?DULO 3 PAISAGEM & SUSTENTABILIDADE (15h) Prof. Roberto Verdum (http

Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

147

Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Oktober 2012 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Oktober 2012 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Komplexität Modul-Nr. Name (Kurzform) KP Note PR Programmierung LM 1 VI Verteilte Informationssysteme LM 2 PV Parallele und Vert. Systemarchitekturen LM 3 OC Organic Computing LM 4 IE Intelligente eingebettete Systeme

Lübeck, Universität zu

148

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplkment au no 10, Tome 32, Octobre 1971, page C4-214 ELECTRON INTERACTION IN X-RAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relatives ont kt6 calculQs dans une approximation ((frozen-orbital )) pour la transition d'un Btat K normal subshells. Introduction. -The K p satellite is an X-ray satellite which appears on the low energy side, proposed that the KP' structure originates from the interaction between a hole and the incomplete 3 d shell

Boyer, Edmond

149

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September 05 Enriched Background Isotope, BER (KP 12 02 02 0) EBIS takes advantage of a low-level1999 14C-release to the Oak Ridge Reservation agency and institution cooperation #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September

150

1 A selection of Technical Publications produced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

woodland 3 Homegrown timber in use in the building industry 21 3 #12;57 Appendix 1 Forestry Commission. 37 Environmental monitoring in British forests, by D. Durrant. Inventory Reports National Inventory­1615. [Beckett, K.P.,] Freer-Smith, P.H. [and Taylor, G.] (2000) The capture of particulate pollution by trees

151

[PRESENTATION TITLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0,00. 0,50. 1,00. 1,50. 2,00. 2,50. 0. 0,1. 0,2. 0,3. 0,4. 0,5. 0,6. 0,7. 0,8. Cap illary Pressu re (kP a). CO2 Saturation. Pce=1kPa...

Nancy Desai

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

152

A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.3133/of2007-1047.kp06 A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late...

Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Cramer, B. S.; Wade, Bridget S.; Mizintseva, S. F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Structure of yeast Argonaute with guide RNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RNA-induced silencing complex, comprising Argonaute and guide RNA, mediates RNA interference. Here we report the 3.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of Kluyveromyces polysporus Argonaute (KpAGO) fortuitously complexed with guide RNA originating from small-RNA duplexes autonomously loaded and processed by recombinant KpAGO. Despite their diverse sequences, guide-RNA nucleotides 1-8 are positioned similarly, with sequence-independent contacts to bases, phosphates and 2{prime}-hydroxyl groups pre-organizing the backbone of nucleotides 2-8 in a near-A-form conformation. Compared with prokaryotic Argonautes, KpAGO has numerous surface-exposed insertion segments, with a cluster of conserved insertions repositioning the N domain to enable full propagation of guide-target pairing. Compared with Argonautes in inactive conformations, KpAGO has a hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes an expanded and repositioned loop, which inserts an invariant glutamate into the catalytic pocket. Mutation analyses and analogies to ribonuclease H indicate that insertion of this glutamate finger completes a universally conserved catalytic tetrad, thereby activating Argonaute for RNA cleavage.

Nakanishi, Kotaro; Weinberg, David E.; Bartel, David P.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (Whitehead); (MSKCC)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

154

Specification of >2 MeV geosynchronous electrons based on solar wind measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the solar wind. Statistical asynchronous regression (SAR), a statistical method recently use measurements directly from the solar wind, instead of the Kp index, and the SAR method when they pass through these local times. We cross calibrate the electron measurements from the five

Li, Xinlin

155

Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in November 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-S TEXAS MILK MRKT MILK TESTING METHODOLOGY IMPROVEMENT & STANDARDIZATION $161,548 MBF 15366 BIRMAN FUNCTION $61,928 KP 47556 COOL, TERRILL A AEP DOE (DOE GERMANTOWN) FLAME-SAMPLING PHOTOIONIZATION MASS Department Sponsor Project Title Amount GCO OSP Number COOL, TERRILL A AEP DOD (ARMY-ARO) QUANTITATIVE STUDY

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

156

Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Holley, H.O. Back, T.J. Bowles, L.J. Broussard, R. Carr, S. Clayton, S. Currie, B.W. Filippone, A. Garcia, P. Geltenbort, K.P. Hickerson, J. Hoagland, G.E. Hogan, B. Hona, T.M....

158

ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boissevain, T.J. Bowles, L.J. Broussard, R. Carr, D.J. Clark, S. Currie, S. Du, B.W. Filippone, P. Geltenbort, A. Garca, A. Hawari, K.P. Hickerson,5 R. Hill, M. Hino, S.A....

159

Notes 10. The dynamic vibration absorber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Luis San Andres (c) 2008 MEEN 363 - 617 THE VIBRATION ABSORBER Preamble - A NEED arises: Consider the periodic forced response of a primary system (Kp-Mp) defined by X p (t) K p F(t) M P M p 10 3 lb?:= K p 110 5 ? lbf in ?:= Its natural frequency is...

San Andres, Luis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Donggao Zhao REFEREED PAPERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iron fragment with human living material and its effect on human health. Earth Science Frontier, vol and fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling in China. Applied and Environmental Microbiology-ceramic nuclear waste form for weapon plutonium. Eds. K.P. Hart and G.R. Lumpkin, Proceedings of the Materials

Yang, Zong-Liang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems, and Supersaturated Graphs Mikl´os Simonovits´an-type extremal problem. The graphs attaining the maximum will be called extremal and their family will be denoted and multi- ple edges. In 1940, P. Tur´an posed and solved the extremal problem of Kp+1, the complete graph

Simonovits, Miklós

162

Williams et al. Reply (to the Comment by Dumin on "Progress in Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of Relativistic Gravity")  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A decreasing gravitational constant, G, coupled with angular momentum conservation is expected to increrase a planetary semimajor axis, a, as \\dot a/a=-\\dot G/G. Analysis of lunar laser ranging data strongly limits such temporal variations and constrains a local (~1 AU) scale expansion of the solar system as \\dot a/a=-\\dot G/G =-(4\\pm9)\\times10^{-13} yr^{-1}, including that due to cosmological effects.

James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

images/logoetsf ELS Micro-Macro Connection Schematic Overview Importance of theory Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eiq(r-r ) Im-1 (r, r , ) Plane-waves approach to Energy Loss Spectroscopy Francesco Sottile #12;ELS scattering: R(q, ) = q2 4 drdr eiq(r-r ) Im-1 (r, r , ) Plane-waves approach to Energy Loss Spectroscopy, r , )= GG dqd (2)4 -1 GG (q, )ei(q+G) ·r e-i(q+G ) ·r Plane-waves approach to Energy Loss

Botti, Silvana

164

Recent Highlights from the HERMES Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.) ± 0,011 (theory) ± 0,028 (evol.) High-pT hadrons at HERMES: G/G = 0.071 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.010 (sys,011 (theory) ± 0,028 (evol.) High-pT hadrons at HERMES: G/G = 0.071 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.010 (sys-exp) (sys-acceptance spectrometer 40mradID efficiency and purity excellent hadron ID thanks to dual

165

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular materials, a phenomenon called dilatancy. We have aready described a geometrical interpretation of elastic dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we complement this work in the regime of less dry 2D GG foams. In particular, we highlight the relatively strong dilatancy effects expected in the regime where we have predicted rapid Plateau border variations.

Franois Molino; Pierre Rognon; Cyprien Gay

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Information media used by cotton farmers in producing cotton in a ten-county area of North Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~/%M~(~ ~ . , gP'Z'1$'+19'f. . W~jF ' ' ~Q. , "f Q9&'1+~ , gp @P '~ 8p ~~AC/. 9g"55!, QP y'4~3'6~ @1+ $4~ Q4~ f~'. t$, QM~gg8Z Z$;, '3'TOKgQg ppj7 8&, ", ~ Otp gC Q2~ Slp89p&Q, ~Q C$ pRH@p%Q~~ 1 ': ' I I l '$ '~CP1&p 4' . ~", I t 'C Fi... ' . 4~$AJ"1~9"~3'i7~ . . KK W:~1ivjg' ~ ~gg:yg grq-'gg~g gg +'~ ~~ y? ~g gg~' ~0@ @gal g~ QlfCL@CQ @AQ, ~'ALVJQ9 ~, QQS g1'~gi~i+1 5$ a J+S $+QgfQq ~~7$+Vl:g ( 'Vx'pi~i~('f8 &M~ ~':~'g8CM 4O ~M~ ~ 4i 3s K~-;JAy A"w&i?8POV 88%. p R &~lC 4'W~ Wo RQL...

Anwarul Karim, A. M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

On Primitivity and the Unital Full Free Product of Finite Dimensional C*-algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= kp1 and k2 = kp2 Assume B is {isomorphic to Ll j=1Mnj . To prove the result it is enough to show there are positive integers (m(1); : : :m(l)) such that n1m(1) + + nlm(l) = k: Let (B1; B) = [m1(1); : : : ;m1(l)]; (B2; u Bu) = [m2...(1); : : : ;m2(l)]: Since (MN ; B1) (B1; B) = (MN ; B2) (B2; u Bu) we deduce thatm1m1(j) = m2m2(j) for all 1 j l. Multiplying by k and using N = m1k1 = m2k2 we conclude N p1 m1(j) = km1m1(j) = km2m2(j) = N p2 m2(j); so p2m1(j) = p1m2(j). Since gcd...

Torres Ayala, Francisco

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Salt index of potassium phosphate fertilizers and its relation to germination and early plant growth of field crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), ammoniated potassium phosphate (AKP-1 and AKP-2) and potassium phosphate (KP). These vere typical samples prepared in a pilot plant. Scottish Industries was the source of potassium metaphosphate (KMP) and Tennessee Valley Authority for ammonium Table 2.... Fertilizer materials used in study. Fertilizer Potassium polyphosphate Desi nation Fertilizer Source Pennzoil United N-P205-K20 Anal sis %%d 0-50-40 Polyphosphate S ecies Yes Ammoniated potassium phosphate AKP-1 Ammoniated potassium phosphate...

Freeouf, Jerry Allen

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mammalian community structure in lowland, tropical Peru, as determined by removal trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 1 19. Duellman WE, Koechlin JE. 1991. The Reserva Cuzco Amazonico, Peru: Biological investigations, conservation, and ecotourism. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural History, Hie University of Kansas 142: 1 38...-271. White GC, Anderson DR, Burnham KP, Otis DL. 1982. Capture-recapture and removal methods for sampling closed populations. Los Alamos, New Mexico: Los Alamos National Laboratory, 235 pp. Wilson EO (ed.). 1988. Biodiversity. Washington, DC: National...

Woodman, Neal; Slade, Norman A.; Timm, Robert M.; Schmidt, Cheryl A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37 (2004) R86R108 PII: S0022-3727(04)61469-0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity of the particle (W m-1 K-1 ) p thermal diffusivity of particle (p = Kp/(p · c p p)) (m2 s-1 April 2004 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/37/R86 DOI: 10.1088/0022-3727/37/9/R02 Abstract This article of plasma sprayed finely structured coatings. (Some figures in this article are in colour only

Gleixner, Stacy

176

A Comparison of Least-Squares Finite Element Models with the Conventional Finite Element Models of Problems in Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disadvantage of classical variational methods is the difficulty in constructing the approximate functions for arbitrary domains. 1.4. Review of Weighted-Residual Methods Weighted-residual methods are those in which we seek approximate solutions using a... functions. The pth order interpolation function is given by )48.2( 1 2 1 1 2 1 221 2 21 T pp npp p kp g g g f f f...

Nellie Rajarova,

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

1989 1:100,000 1992 1:100,000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taiwan, based on smaller Foraminifera: II. Northern Part. Proc. Geol. Soc. China 11, p.19-33. Chen, W.S, eastern Taiwan. Proc. Geol. Soc. China, no.34, p.43-56. Chen, W.S., Yen, I.C., Fengler, K.P., Rubin, C., Huang, M.T. and Liu, T.k. (1991) Neotectonic significance of the Chimei fault in the coastal range

Chen, Wen-Shan

178

Slum upgrading in India and Kenya: investigating the sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I Government of India HUDCO Housing and Urban Development Corporation Limited IoG Institute of Governance JNNURM Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission KP Kamgar Putla LDCs Least Developed Countries MASHAL Maharashtra Area Social... -up approaches. The case studies are of varying ages and were implemented via partnerships with differing agents including government, NGO, CBO, private developer and donors. The influence and design of the delivery model upon the upgrading sustainability...

Cronin, Victoria Louise Molly

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Fatigue Resistance in Alaskan Sled Dogs Through Exercise Induced Myocyte Gene Expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projects Agency, who made this project possible through their funding (Award# W911NF0710552). vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ???????????????????????????. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ????????????????????? v...., Inactivation of fatty acid transport protein 1 prevents fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. J Clin Invest, 113(5): p. 756-763, 2004. 18. Porubsky, P.R., K.P. Battaile, and E.E. Scott , Human cytochrome P450 2E1 structures with fatty acid...

Salazar, Natacha Maria

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Advanced structure-borne sound Wave mobilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^p e j(v -p ) · Wave mobilities © Prof. B.A.T. Petersson Advanced structure-borne sound · Decomposed1 Advanced structure-borne sound p(kx) v(kx) v = p Y = ^ve- jkx x ejv ^pe- jkx x e jp = ^v ^p = ^v;2 Advanced structure-borne sound · Interface mobilities s C kp = 2p C kq = 2q C ; p = 0 ±1 ±2 ±3... ; q = 0

Berlin,Technische Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of Multi-Quantum Well Electroabsorption Joachim Piprek, Yi-Jen Chiu, and John E. Bowers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fabricated InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum well EAMs with a bandwidth of 25 GHz and a drive voltage of 1.2 V for 20 previously fabricated InGaAsP/InP MQW EAMs with a bandwidth of 25 GHz and a drive voltage of 1.2 V for 20d model to analyze our EAMs. The model self-consistently combines kp bandstructure and absorption

Bowers, John

182

Strangeness production in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering EPS Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ruiz Tabasco CINVESTAV M´erida On behalf of H1 Collaboration · Introduction · Measurement of K0 s and · Measurement of K± · Summary Julia Ruiz Tabasco (DESY-CINVESTAV) Strangeness production EPS conference 1 / 15) e + (k') Q2 = -q2 = -(k - k )2, y = qP kP , xBj = Q2 2qP Julia Ruiz Tabasco (DESY

183

A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

Aminikashani, Mohammadreza; Kavehrad, Mohsen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

Mohammadreza Aminikashani; Murat Uysal; Mohsen Kavehrad

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geology of the Pontotoc North-Northwest area San Saba County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X6ogaag aqvag~g gofeg Zest ~sW RQ5tRXW 'gC! 8gageM $o saWap sr& ~g skusms~nbsz a~ go guouq;yygyny ~y~d anzac, go aGaygay ysayuaqasg pun gegx~ynoyg&y . a~ go g~g Sqsnyal~ s~ oq ps'q, qygqng uyAnaqg, ~g note'g sgsa~ 8VRKTi XiTigOQD 'Qgf 8 f?8...[gg ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ l49$8Eg Ue'fO jAGPIQ ~ ~ eg SU~SQQfgg QCpg UL. 8 6C IICglleg Spell $88+ +CJOY ~ ~ ~ ~ tIaqurag auoqse~g geeIg UaSIog ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ' ~ Iecpag ouoyepu 9 Seger' Ze o ~ ~ ~ t t t t t UO'pMIGg SUIS@gg ez 9z ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Iacyusg ouoqspu. -s...

Chauvin, Aaron Lawrence

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Production of K+K? pairs in proton-proton collisions below the ? meson threshold  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The pp?ppK+K? reaction was measured below the ? threshold at a beam energy of 2.568 GeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. By assuming that the four-body phase space is distorted only by the product of two-body final-state interactions, fits to a variety of one-dimensional distributions permit the evaluation of differential and total cross sections. The shapes of the distributions in the Kp and Kpp invariant masses are reproduced only if the K?p interaction is even stronger than that found at higher energy. The cusp effect in the K+K? distribution at the K0K{bar}0 threshold is much more clear and some evidence is also found for coupling between the K?p and K?0n channels. However, the energy dependence of the total cross section cannot be reproduced by considering only a simple product of such pairwise final-state interactions.

Ye, Q. J.; Hartmann, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gao, H.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Lorentz, B.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Polyanskiy, A.; Serdyuk, V.; Stein, H. J.; Strher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Wstner, P.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recent Highlights of the HERMES Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

target = 0,330 ± 0,025 (exp.) ± 0,011 (theory) ± 0,028 (evol.) High-pT hadrons G/G = 0.071 ± 0.034(stat,025 (exp.) ± 0,011 (theory) ± 0,028 (evol.) High-pT hadrons G/G = 0.071 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.010 (sys-acceptance spectrometer 40mradID efficiency and purity excellent hadron ID thanks to dual

189

Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.60.3)10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)B(A??gg or ss) ranging from 10?? to 10? for A? masses in the range 0.59.0 GeV/c.

Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Grnberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Vo, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Studies on the natural control of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in grain sorghum on the High Plains of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and larvae of chrysopids belonging to the genus ~chf . H t ?f th d t peed tl f H. ~*gg was qualitative. On 3 of 46 observations, either nymphs or adults of 0. insidiosus and. 0. tristieolor were observed feeding on eggs of H. ~. 11 1 a of bd b tl, &t t I...

Kirby, Ronald Dale

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

One-loop Single Real Emission Contributions to Inclusive Higgs Production at NNNLO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the contributions of the one-loop single-real-emission amplitudes, $gg\\to H g$, $qg\\to H q$, etc. to inclusive Higgs boson production through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in the strong coupling.

William B. Kilgore

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peer Reviewed Title: Synchrony in dynamics of giant kelp forests is driven by both local recruitment://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7vw6c5gg Keywords: giant kelp, Landsat, Macrocystis pyrifera, Moran effect, population dynamics kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) canopy biomass to examine population synchrony in southern California kelp

Cavanaugh, Kyle

193

Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education, OISE, UT Order of Canada Award  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education, OISE, UT Order of Canada of Canada at a ceremony in Ottawa on November 15, 2013. Alison received the award in recognition of her-deserved recognition, Alison! See ceremony at: http://photos.gg.ca/Media/22112013-MEDIA-Order-of-Canada. Please credit

Sokolowski, Marla

194

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13, PAGES 2637-2640, JULY 1, 2001 Ocean release of fossil fuel CO2: A case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a 220 MW gas power plant, it is found that the volume of the near-source water with a pH-reduction 0 are 200, 400 and 800 Gg-CO2, corresponding to CO2 emissions from conventional 55-220 MW gas power plants], a local 3-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) code (

Drange, Helge

195

[The name of the series, for example/namnet p serien t.ex: Linkping University Medical Dissertation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gärna vill framföra min stora tacksamhet till. Professor Marie Clark Nelson, ISAK, för goda råd, förslag Harvardsystemet, Lisbeth Hägg, Inger Nyberg; IEI samt Anders Lindeborg och Dennis Netzell, LiU-Tryck) som grans

Zhao, Yuxiao

196

Phoenix-UrbanNon-Sacramentorural.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ecosystem has yet to be fully constructed. Goals 1. To understand the drivers of carbon dynamics in urban. Vegetation (Trees and Shrubs) Storage and NPP Tree and Shrub Total NPP: 172 Gg C / Year Tree and Shrub Total on a per area basis, but there is more storage in trees and less in shrubs · NPP in urban mesic plots

Hall, Sharon J.

197

Gell-Mann - Low Function for QCD in the strong-coupling limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gell-Mann - Low function \\beta(g) in QCD (g=g0^2/16\\pi^2 where g0 is the coupling constant in the Lagrangian) is shown to behave in the strong-coupling region as \\beta_\\infty g^\\alpha with \\alpha\\approx -13, \\beta_\\infty\\sim 10^5.

I. M. Suslov

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

Can CP-violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the -term GG locally violating CP- invariance (D. Kharzeev et al., PRL 81, 512 (1998)). To search investigated experimentally (STAR Collaboration, PRL 103, 251601 (2009)). In the case when particles a and b., PRL 81, 512 (1998); Zhitnitsky, Buckley et al., PRL 84, 4814 (2000); Millo and Shuryak, ar

199

Carbonate diagenesis and biostratigraphy of the anahuac formation at Damon Mound, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPgraiia (Fig. 9), ~2~2Lium (Fig. 10), lit)Lgh)(11L)m (Fig ?). and (Fig. 12). Unit 5 is a massive ~t facies which contains large heads of in addition to finger coral ~ ggLLyjJJgj. , extending from 34 feet to 30 feet in the depth of the Dresser core. Other...

Woo, Kyung Sik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Rsultat de l'appel propositions 2010 Jeunes quipes associes l'IRD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convention dans les semaines qui viennent. Les financements, qui dans certains cas correspondent à des Correspondant IRD : Jean Louis RAJOT Nom de l'équipe : Analyse littorales, océaniques et climatiques au Nord du Golfe de Guinée (ALOC-GG) Responsable : Yves Kouassi KOUADIO Pays : Côte d'Ivoire, Bénin Unité

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Topology 39 (2000) 525}530 Robinson}Whitehouse complex and stable homotopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( n, 1). For any arrow g : nPm and i3m one denotes by gG : nGP1 the component of g at i. Here n : nPm has a unique extension as a pointed map [n]P[m]. By abuse of notation we still denote this map

Richter, Birgit

202

December 2006 409NEW BIOLOGICAL BOOKS serves as an engrossing guide to both what is and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environments GG2012 TO BE DETERMINED Arts Tropical Savannas: Ecology Management EN1106 TO BE DETERMINED Arts Learning and Memory PSY1021 PSY3103 Science Conservation Biology BS3060 BIO3115 Science Behavioural Ecology Social Sciences Sensation and Perception PS1061 PSY3108 Sciences sociales Social Sciences The Politics

McGraw, Kevin J.

203

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplement au Journal de Physique HI, Volume 4, septembre 1994 C8-183  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the parameters in Table 1. As in [1], all data for initial density p0, bulk sound speed CQ, and shear modulus GgHugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of 12 GPa. These data are compared in Fig. 1 with hydrocode simulations using

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

204

Europhys. Lett., 60 (5), pp. 656662 (2002) EUROPHYSICS LETTERS 1 December 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Israel 2 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Cambridge, MA 02138, USA mechanics. PACS. 05.60.Gg ­ Quantum transport. Abstract. ­ A theory for dynamical correlations in quantum is derived. Next, following the guidelines of mode-coupling theory [9,20], we introduce approximations

Rabani, Eran

205

Interactive Genetic Algorithms for use as Creativity Enhancement Tools Jarod Kelly and Panos Y. Papalambros  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive Genetic Algorithms for use as Creativity Enhancement Tools Jarod Kelly and Panos Y. Papalambros Dept. of Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan 2250 GG Brown Building 2350 Hayward St Ann Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1109 Abstract It is proposed that creativity can be enhanced through the use

Papalambros, Panos

206

CONTINUITY OF HOMOMORPHISMS ON PRONILPOTENT ALGEBRAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUITY OF HOMOMORPHISMS ON PRO­NILPOTENT ALGEBRAS GEORGE M. BERGMAN Abstract. Let V://math.berkeley.edu/ ~ gbergman/papers/ . 1 #12; 2 GEORGE M. BERGMAN closed. (To see the analogy, note that G/(G p [G, G.Zelmanov for helpful answers to questions I sent them, to the referee for some useful suggestions, and to Andreas Gross

Bergman, George Mark

207

Physical Mapping of Chromosomes: A Combinatorial Problem in Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nucleotides from the set fA; T ; C;Gg. The nucleotides A and T are complementary to each other, as are the nucleotides C and G. Each nucleotide on one strand is bound to a complementary nucleotide on the other strand will cleave a DNA molecule at every site where a certain short sequence of nucleotides occurs. A separation

Alizadeh, Farid

208

Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for the decay ?(1S)??A[superscript 0], A[superscript 0]?gg or ss? , where A[superscript 0] is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

209

Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to tau tau using 7.8 fb^-1 of pp collisions at 1.96 TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one...

Elagin, Andrey

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

211

A. E. K. Ris Ris-M-GHZ Title and authors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1. The ten-shell section fuel model IS 3.2. The two-point fuel model 16 t. The primary circuit with heat. Program listing and analog connections for the ten- shell section fuel model gg H. Program listing

212

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 1996 155 histograms needed to arithmetic encode the quantizer indexes. Such  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.6 s. This does not include the time needed to fit GG models. The second pass that performs actualIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 1996 155 histograms needed by arithmetic coding in our simulations. The possible advantage of an adaptive arithmetic code needs

Zeevi, Yehoshua Y. "Josh"

213

The Astrophysical Journal, 521:L63--L66, 1999 August 10 # 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars, using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared for the warm gas seen in H 2 are discussed in terms of photon and wind­shock heating mechanisms --- infrared: ISM: lines and bands --- ISM: molecules --- molecular processes --- stars: individual (GG Tauri

Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

214

Interferometry with independent Bose-Einstein condensates: parity as an EPR/Bell quantum variable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interferometry with independent Bose-Einstein condensates: parity as an EPR/Bell quantum variable F arrangements. PACS numbers: 03.65.Ud, 03.75.Gg, 42.50.Xa The original Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) argument [1 called "orthodox"), the notion of reality introduced by EPR is inappropriate. Later, Bell extended

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Supplementary Text S1. KD was calculated for binding of HMGB1a to CP-and OX-DNA in the TGGA, AGGC and CGGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in relaxation MD and 2 ps in production MD; constant temperature, using weak-coupling algorithm, at 300 K, heat of the atoms. Besides the atomic partial charges, other force field parameters of the Pt-GG adducts were referenced from AMBER parm99 force field parameters or from previous work by Yao et al(2). and Scheeff et al

Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

216

Lars Junghans, PhD Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:30pm - 4:00pm 2355 GG Brown Sustainable Building Optimization The introduced approach proposes a cross-disciplinary research work in the field of sustainable building science. The seminar illustrates research work in three areas. Past work: A main focus lies in the illustration of a Sustainable Design Tool for Archi

Kamat, Vineet R.

217

A global inventory of ecosystem sources of methyl bromide, an ozone destroying gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and anthropogenically produced. Biomass burning, salt marsh and agriculture are reported as the largest natural sources. However, there exists a need for a global inventory as current budget estimates are uncertain, based on limited data and show a 45Gg yr-1 discrepancy...

Fenney, Gareth

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preprint 0 (2001) ?--? 1 Development of a new experimental method for studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate the MWPCs with #­ and #­ sources. The chambers were tested in a vessel filled with clean hydrogen. Schmidt c , G.G. Semenchuk a , M. Soroka a , A.A. Vorobyov a , N.I. Voropaev a a Petersburg Nuclear These studies were conducted by our collaboration since 1997 [2]. A special test setup was constructed at PNPI

Kammel, Peter

219

COMPACT DOMINATION FOR GROUPS DEFINABLE IN LINEAR O-MINIMAL STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the canonical homomorphism : G G/G00 is a kind of intrinsic `standard part map'. Recall the following of an ordered field, standard part maps have already appeared in the following two situations, among others. In [BO2, Definition 4.1], a standard part map is defined from the `finite part' Fin(Mn ) of Mn onto Rn

Eleftheriou, Pantelis E.

220

The effects of certain factors influencing diapause and development of laboratory cultures of the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella Saund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in these rooms rarely exceeded gg. ArM- fioial light wss used in all but one test snd of course could ba regulated 68 dssireda Henceforth in the following discussionsx absolute values wed. bc indicated for temporatuxm end relative hmidihy wivh...

Bull, Don Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS A: MATHEMATICAL AND THEORETICAL J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 (2010) 305001 (7pp) doi:10.1088/1751-8113/43/30/305001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS A: MATHEMATICAL AND THEORETICAL J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 (2010 Physique Theorique, CNRS, Luminy Case 907, 13288 Marseille, Cedex 9, France 4 Institute for Information. PACS number: 05.20.Gg 1. Introduction Consider a physical system consisting of a large number

Radin, Charles

222

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 15, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 15, 2012 2315 GG treatment evaluating disposal options in the U. S. and Bangladesh" Arsenic contamination of drinking water threatens the health of millions of people around the world, most acutely in Bangladesh, where a massive

Kamat, Vineet R.

223

Rev 11/25/2013 FY2014 Snow Removal & Deicing Routes by Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science & Tech Beal Contractor Plow and Deice NC60 Lurie Engineering Bldg Beal Contractor Plow and Deice NC14 Cooley Lab Dock Beal Contractor Plow and Deice NC55 PML Doc / Media Union Bonisteel Contractor Plow and Deice NC20 GG Brown Hayward UNDER CONSTRUCTION NC12 EWRE Dock Beal 1 Contractor Plow and Deice

Kirschner, Denise

224

Aitken, CGG. Zadora, G & Lucy, D. (2007) A Two-Level Model for Evidence Evaluation. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 52(2); 412-419.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Forensic Sciences. 52(2); 412-419. A Two-Level Model for Evidence Evaluation Colin G.G. Aitken,1 Ph for Forensic Statistics and Legal Rea- soning, The King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ 2 Institute of Forensic Research, Westerplatte 9, PL-31-033, Krakow, Poland. 3 Department

Lucy, David

225

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glassglass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass­glass liquid foams Fran?cois Molino: October 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

Recanati, Catherine

226

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Fran¸cois Molino 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes subjected to permanent ground displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes and Environmental Engineering, 2340 G.G. Brown Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States c Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kingston, RI 02881

Lynch, Jerome P.

228

An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to contain the sample for the flow rate measurement. 1. Air Supply 2 ~ Vacuun Line 3. Waste Line 4 ~ Surge Tank 5. Water Reservoir 6. Oil Reservoir Test Specinsn 8. Pressure Regulator Valve SATURATION APPARATUS FCR SATURATI?l SARDSTONR TXSP... the system can be described by' the one h dimensional form of Fouriers dT Equation: Q ~ -!:. A ? . ds The quantity of heat flowing through the oil and water in the pore dT space is OCk! ~ K A& ( ? ) + Kp AC (~)C ~ Based on the unidirectional W & d...

Dunn, James Elliott

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Threshold voltage extraction circuit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=Vos* (point of inflection in t/In-V&s), the drain current flowing in M2 and Ml would correspond to the square-law current equation of In; ? (kp/2);(W/L)i (Vcs; ? Vr) . (17) Thus, 4Im = Im and t/Inz/VIm ? 0. 5. By plotting the graph of ratio t... can also be expressed as VGS2 VGS/ slope = ~ (4) Let 4~ = I then t//t ? 2I, then by equating (3) and (4), Vr can be obtained with a simple expression as Vr = 2Vost ? Vcr. Linear Extrapolation Method This method is similar...

Hoon, Siew Kuok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Determination of the linkage relationships and the gene-centromere genetic distances for endopeptidase structural genes in hexaploid wheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The linkage relationships for the (EP) structural gene are shown below. centromere 42. 17 ~E -Blv 13. 04 7AL ~E-Ale 6. 67 ~E-Al 3. 90 10. 67 ACKNOMLF. DGT'KNT S Sincere gratitude is extended to all members of my graduate committee for. their guidance..., or KP-BlZ and their chromosome constitut on Linkage relationships for three (EP) structural genes on 7AL Chi square test for independence of EP-Aj. y and ~E-Alx Chi square testing the hypothesis that two independently segregating genes in FI...

McMillin, David Edwin

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geodesic Distance in Planar Graphs: An Integrable Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the enumeration of planar graphs using bijections with suitably decorated trees, which allow for keeping track of the geodesic distances between faces of the graph. The corresponding generating functions obey non-linear recursion relations on the geodesic distance. These are solved by use of stationary multi-soliton tau-functions of suitable reductions of the KP hierarchy. We obtain a unified formulation of the (multi-) critical continuum limit describing large graphs with marked points at large geodesic distances, and obtain integrable differential equations for the corresponding scaling functions. This provides a continuum formulation of two-dimensional quantum gravity, in terms of the geodesic distance.

P. Di Francesco

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

Computer vision determination of the stem/root joint on processing carrots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Emerson Electric Company, 1982). Camera, Lens, and Field of View The vision sensor used in this research was a non-interlaced, solid state. black and white television camera. This Hitachi CCTV - MOB Camera Model KP-1 20U had a resolution of 320 (H... in the camera's field of view (FOV) (Hitachi, 1985). A 12. 5-75 mm f1:1. 8 Computer TV zoom lens was selected for use with the television camera. The zoom feature of this lens and its short minimum focal length were appropriate for this application...

Batchelor, Matthew McMahon

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Newsfront 10-16 September 2007, Issue 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an active non-corporate media. (Saadi is a climate change expert.) actionFLOOD S h as h an k a S a ad i Floods in South Asian countries are a major setback for the regional and national economy. Directly and indirectly affected poor and middle income... a truly democratic set-up." He said Nepal's transition needs a safe landing which is possible only through unity and reconciliation. In a Gandhian spirit, he said, "politics of hatred and denial dictated by undemocratic desire of revenge KP...

Ghimire, Yubaraj

234

Modeling of temperature and excitation dependences of efficiency in an InGaN light-emitting diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The changes in excitation dependence of efficiency with temperature is modeled for a wurtzite InGaN light-emitting diode. The model incorporates bandstructure changes with carrier density arising from screening of quantum-confined Stark effect. Bandstructure is computed by solving Poisson and k.p equations in the envelop approximation. The information is used in a dynamical model for populations in momentum-resolved electron and hole states. Application of the approach shows the interplay of quantum-well and barrier emissions giving rise to shape changes in efficiency versus current density with changing temperature, as observed in some experiments.

Chow, Weng W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on kp approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun, E-mail: tongjun@pku.edu.cn; Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1 APPENDIX

237

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1

238

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1

239

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1

240

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-11

242

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-111

243

The evaluation and design of aeration systems for the storage of cottonseed in Muskogee type houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minute at 12 inches negative pressure (water) to a mass of 4, 000 tons seed 60 to 70 feet deep (37). Most of the earlier seed cooling systems were designed with the floor laterals spaced on approximately 10 foot centers and in some cases with small.... It is convenient in this work to substitute a pseudo permeability, K, for the quantity k/p (16). Equation 2 becomes: vL = g -K dP A dL where vL feet/minute Q ~ cubic feet/minute A ~ square feet dp dL inches of water/foot (sq. ft. )/(min. ) (inches water...

Rundt, Ronald James

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Determination of iridium in industrial concentrates by controlled-potential coulometry with a glassy-carbon electrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a coulometric method for determining iridium without separating nonferrous and noble metals using a glassy-carbon (GC) crucible instead of the expensive platinum electrode. The crucible also serves as the electrochemical cell for the coulometric determination and as a vessel in which an aliquot weight of the analyzed solution is taken. The KP-3 concentrate contains several metals that accompany iridium. The main metals which interfere in the electrochemical determination of iridium with the use of a platinum electrode are iron and ruthenium. This paper describes the authors' proposed procedure for determining iridium in hydrochloric acid solutions with the GC crucible-electrode.

Stril'chenko, T.G.; Kabanova, O.L.; Danilova, F.I.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Estimation of the spontaneous mutation rate in Heliconius melpomene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be produced for most species. Sequencing parents and their offspring and searching for de novo mutations in the offspring is more generally applicable, but to date experiments have only been carried out in humans (Roach et al. 2010; Conrad et al. 2011... 1454. Roach JC, Glusman G, Smit AFA, Huff CD, Hubley R, Shannon PT, Rowen L, Pant KP, Goodman N, Bamshad M. 2010. Analysis of genetic inheritance in a family quartet by whole-genome sequencing. Science 328: 636-639. Schrider, DR, Houle D, Lynch M, Hahn MW...

Keightley, Peter D.; Pinharanda, Ana; Ness, Rob W.; Simpson, Fraser; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Mallet, James; Davey, John W.; Jiggins, Chris D.

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effective model for in-medium $\\bar{K}N$ interactions including the $L=1$ partial wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled channels model of meson-baryon interactions based on the effective chiral Lagrangian is extended to account explicitly for the $\\Sigma(1385)$ resonance that dominates the $P$-wave $\\bar{K}N$ and $\\pi\\Sigma$ interactions at energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. The presented model aims at a uniform treatment of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ and $\\Sigma(1385)$ dynamics in the nuclear medium. We demonstrate the applicability of the model by confronting its predictions with the vacuum scattering data, then we follow with discussing the impact of nuclear matter on the $\\pi\\Sigma$ mass spectrum and on the energy dependence of the $K^{-}p$ branching ratios.

Ciepl, Ale

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effective model for in-medium $\\bar{K}N$ interactions including the $L=1$ partial wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled channels model of meson-baryon interactions based on the effective chiral Lagrangian is extended to account explicitly for the $\\Sigma(1385)$ resonance that dominates the $P$-wave $\\bar{K}N$ and $\\pi\\Sigma$ interactions at energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. The presented model aims at a uniform treatment of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ and $\\Sigma(1385)$ dynamics in the nuclear medium. We demonstrate the applicability of the model by confronting its predictions with the vacuum scattering data, then we follow with discussing the impact of nuclear matter on the $\\pi\\Sigma$ mass spectrum and on the energy dependence of the $K^{-}p$ branching ratios.

Ale Ciepl; Vojt?ch Krej?i?k

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

Microsoft Word - KCP SEC J_Appendix P - Special Financial Agreement  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of the Yucca0 National Nuclear Security2 Issue 1920K,P,

249

The effect of methyl silicone upon feedlot performance digestibility of nutrients and prevention of bloat in beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&& . ~, Go5 l, m &~5 ~4, ape ~eh 4m 39y9'+ Spy ' ?y97'9 . Sy@R ' ' "-7%9 . Wp'Q40 ' 849. , ' V'F ~~""' @Su ~WO~ 41. +~4@ 3cLS~& 2$ ~Vlf'~'5~ ' c~, Xt~ g~ $~'~', 6&~+~ X~Xe yM~ Sex' ~be . ~+iWx~&, "~34 5~ x eg~' ~'&~ zedAc$pM '@M C4. @ ~ i@ p~, ~ 4W.... 4128 CACCIA'f@% 54MgpXt x9X' fd6liy, 'PPA~p ?~, ~$4+ '. . WXBNl '~Xg98 'iM@k~eC bg- ~gee~'Za~ . 3a %ha -myveh?~, k&~ %~5886 ~X' CGQtr C@gg@, ~~38'$8y. , RR6jj ~~8% gg. '~ "~A~ p@ ~4@. @ ~:wd~;~~ i@+'x4" ~ ', ~. -~ i~:, ~, "~8 ~+; - ", X@l:9R~~W 4...

Wythe, Landon Douglas

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Public sentiment in the United States towards the tariff, 1816-1828  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBuC 8ENTLWNT Xg THK UNITED STATKS TQMARDS TBE TA'!D'F ~ lgl6-3. 828 John Fxencie Matthew 8ubeitted to the Graduate College of the T~e k&l Univereity in partial fulfQLeent of' the requireesnte for the degree of k Thesis Appal'oved ss co scy1...?d correspond?no?and papers oi P?4rrison Gray Qtisy Thomas Cooperg Joiu) Taylor' Flu us King, Henry Clay, daniel debater, John C ~ 6&boun, 4. 'c, olhcrs? J. M3LQMg&bla bits Qf !)pinion wore collected from the ~ gg ~~ ~nd the ~~~ gg, ~D +~~/@ provided tha...

Matthews, John Francis

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Inclusive J/{psi} Production in {Upsilon} Decay Via Color-Singlet Mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the recent works about the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay. Our results show that until now the color-singlet (CS) contribution which includes leading order ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}){Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-barg process and {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg(4g) process as well as {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2{alpha}2} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg processes can not explain the experimental data yet. A preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc} (B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21}, which is much larger than color-octet (CO) prediction, is also given as a good quantity to discriminate the CS and color-octet mechanism.

He Zhiguo [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China); Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal, 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Wang Jianxiong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

Drops on soft solids: Free energy and double transition of contact angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equilibrium shape of liquid drops on elastic substrates is determined by minimising elastic and capillary free energies, focusing on thick incompressible substrates. The problem is governed by three length scales: the size of the drop $R$, the molecular size $a$, and the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus $\\gamma/E$. We show that the contact angles undergo two transitions upon changing the substrates from rigid to soft. The microscopic wetting angles deviate from Young's law when $\\gamma/Ea \\gg 1$, while the apparent macroscopic angle only changes in the very soft limit $\\gamma/ER \\gg 1$. The elastic deformations are worked out in the simplifying case where the solid surface energy is assumed constant. The total free energy turns out lower on softer substrates, consistent with recent experiments.

Luuk A. Lubbers; Joost H. Weijs; Lorenzo Botto; Siddhartha Das; Bruno Andreotti; Jacco H. Snoeijer

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 11, 8 March 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR DETAILS AND IMMEDIATE WORK OPPORTUNITIES: 136- 89 ROOSEVELT AVE. #303, FLUSHING, NY 11354 PHONE: 718- 762- 4001 7Nepali Aawaz | Falgun 25.2062 Politics 6f9f /x]sfn] cfGbf]ngn] lng' kg]{ htL ultL lng g;s]sf] o'jf g]tf uug yfkf atfp5g . k|:t't 5, nf]s tfl... Gg] sfdgf ug'{ Aoy{ x'G5 . pgLx?sf] s'/f ;'Gg' k5{ / xfd|f] s'/f a'fpg'k5{ . clxn] eO{/x]sf] cfGbf]ng klg o'jfx?n] g} l6sfO{ /x]sf5g, c of] lgl:qmo ;d'xnfO{ ;lqmo kfg]{ xf] eg] s:tf] utL lnG5 lnG5 . clxn] klg cf...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

254

A cytogenetic study of the Gossypium arboreum L. Gossypium hirsutum L. ring-of-six chromosomes and some plant characters isolated from a three-species hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IIIooot of tbe regaimwesio Sow ibo SoSgeo af +4~4 ~ . 4@i~ l$~. pg 'i l h } 'c 4 'o- t l CTI'QQQSfXC IflST CF SR ggQgg JQg@gg L, {ggggg g gpss L. KR lf - SQ CSIQCNCIOS Ivaa Xieekas TiragA1 ee te ~ eaateat +s i, r 'I 4 I i ' \\ ff P ( 1 8VCGP8...' C. i se. "?'P' '~ '(9::~. IVY rkk' . ~lb A' t. 1 1'' ' I The besLawreu of tLN P1 te glabrous eegregatei iato bairp es4 glabsoas elaeew ?s ?syeoied bF tho bppotbuie state4 slxeeL bowler, the ratiu derialsd sigaifieeatLF Aoa 1&1 (Table 5), Tbe...

Tiranti, Ivan Nicolas

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the prediction of far field computational aeroacoustics of advanced propellers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the following expressions: 10 4. P, (?, t) = ? J' . drd. cI f p a V? at Jt=o It sin vR g=g (4) 4 P, '(, , t) = ? J, dl'd + J, dpd (5) f lR f a lR ot Jt=o RsinvR Jt=o fir sin vR O=O g=g where r is the source time, t, is the observer time and vR is the angle.... : r)P e ? = ? 7' P. cits p (28) This equation describes the propagation of small amplitude pressure waves. By comparing Equation (28) to the wave equation in terms of 4, it is noted that the equations are analogous if a = e/p. This will be true...

Jaeger, Stephen Mark

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

OTA based active filter design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the circuit of Fig, 17 (p, 29) was ')bown in bq. (4. $'6) to be gml gm A = 2 s ClC2 sClgmZ gm gm 1 2 (4. 40) 42 The fourth-order system shown in 1'ig. 24 has the function A gm1gm2 CIC2 gm2 gm1gm2 L '" c'CC 2 1 2 gm&gm4 CI 2 (4. 41) I... and low pass filter using the circuit of Fig. 6 Thc t&an&i pass transfer function was of tne for? Khls Ar s +(a+b-KhZ)s+ab (2 4) K = n C where G = GZ+G3 G 1 (2. 5) a = (Gy+G) / C] (2. 6) b = GG4 / C(G+G4) (2. 7) h] = GZ/g where g = G+G4 w...

Ferrell, John Steven

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nonresonant hyper?Raman and hyper?Rayleigh scattering in benzene and pyridine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is discussed in Sec. III, and results and discussion are presented in Sec. IV, The HRS spectra of benzene and pyr- a) ACS-PRF Summer Research Fellow. Current address: Carroll College, Waukesha, WI 53186. b) Author to whom correspondence should be addressed...I(c)lI(a) + GG'rG'JrJI rIG (OJIi,GO -OJ\\)(OJJJ,GO -OJ\\ +OJs ) + GG'rG'JrJI rIG h a lI(b)lI(a)lI(c) ] (OJIi,GO + OJs )(OJJj,GO - OJ\\ + OJs ) (glQa li) vii) (l10) } X , b - b, where f..Lg'J = (G I (OIf..La IJ(O, etc. (7) The A term is the Condon...

Neddersen, John P.; Mounter, Sarah A.; Bostick, James M.; Johnson, Carey K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Some perturbation methods for the study of unstable systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

201 I~l ~ N DG 200 J=lpN Blip-J)=0. 0 B(lpl)=1o0 DG 501 I=lpN A(N+lpI)~I 00 502 K=lpH KP1=K+1 KNICK-I IF (K-N) 525p 516 ~ 516 DO 503 I=KpH A(I NP2) ABSF(A(I K)) DG 504 J=KPlpN IF (A( lpN+2) ABSF(A( lp J) ) ) 505p504p 504 At I p M+2)p... SEARCH COLUHN A(lpN+3) I='lpH ? SHIFT HOLD COLUNN 8(lpJ) Ip J=lpN SITE FGR CONSTRUCTIOH GF INVERSE DIHENSION A()03pl04) p 8(101p IO?3 CGHHGN ApBpNpOETNTpALEHpBUHPpFKRp IPASpNPASpHGDE DETNT=I+0 NPI=H+I NP2=N+2 NP3=N+3 A(NP2 ~ NP3)~0 NH1 = N-1 DO...

Nash, James Mosely

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Theoretical studies of optical gain tuning by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to describe theoretically the tuning of the optical gain by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), the optical gain calculations within kp approach were developed and applied for N-containing and N-free QWs. The electronic band structure and the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW were calculated within the 10-band kp model which takes into account the interaction of electron levels in the QW with the nitrogen resonant level in GaInNAs. It has been shown that this interaction increases with the hydrostatic pressure and as a result the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW decreases by about 40% and 80% for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively, for the hydrostatic pressure change from 0 to 40 kilobars. Such an effect is not observed for N-free QWs where the dispersion of electron and hole energies remains unchanged with the hydrostatic pressure. This is due to the fact that the conduction and valence band potentials in GaInAs/GaAs QW scale linearly with the hydrostatic pressure.

Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Effects of Insecticidal Treatments on Beneficial Insect and Spider Population Cotton Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ ggggggf Gloverz appeezed after calcim arsenate was applied to cotton. ldditionsl applications of ths insecticide did not reduce the infestations to any great extent, hicotine dusts applied with the calcine arssnats 4id not give satisfactory oontrol.... Fletcher (1929) reported that cotton plants dusted with celciuRL arsenats becane infested with cotton aphids which cov- ered tbe leaves with honeydew. Me believed that an uneven 4is- tribution of @gg$~ ggg (peddle) on cotton ma dus to the at- traction...

Morrison, Eston Odell

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 56175638, 2014 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/acp-14-5617-2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Industry Combustion Coal/Boiler, Kilns Liu et al. (2008), 1185 1185 1701.2 Coke Oven Blast Furnace Gas in the original INTEX-B NMVOC Emissions /Gg Power Coal 1178 1178 1130.7 Biofuel Tsai et al. (2003), Liu et al, 4421, 5561 (Andreae and Merlet, 2001) Tsai et al.(2003) 16.8 Industry Non-combustion Coke 11, 217 11

Meskhidze, Nicholas

262

The isolation of an unidentified factor from yeast extract for the formate-pyruvate exchange reaction in streptococcus faecalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'pines qy ~ Qyngqos gozquoo eqq go jff so paq 4f 0 go ~ ~ ou punq ynq "j0~0 go gg s qggn Egybygos gvsguvo st+ jv ~~7 psq (0l oa) paoq o~ggos qsom eq~ 'yoJW??Y4 Jv g0p v'4 OC vq Waels~Tnbs +oqssqrozdds +gaygoc psq spasq ~? ~ (g oZqsZ) ?le~ (5Et&0540~7) &s...

Chen, Chi-sin

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Updated Higgs cross section at approximate N$^3$LO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We update our estimate of the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^3$LO) in $\\alpha_s$ in view of the recent full computation of the result in the soft limit for infinite top mass, which determines a previously unknown constant. We briefly discuss the phenomenological implications. Results are available through the updated version of the ggHiggs code.

Marco Bonvini; Richard D. Ball; Stefano Forte; Simone Marzani; Giovanni Ridolfi

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Phenomenology of turbulent dynamo growth and saturation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With a non local shell model of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence we investigate numerically the turbulent dynamo action for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers ($Pm$). The results obtained in the kinematic regime and along the way to dynamo saturation are understood in terms of a phenomenological approach based on the local ($Pm\\ll 1$) or non local ($Pm\\gg 1$) nature of the energy transfers. In both cases the magnetic energy grows at small scale and saturates as an inverse `` cascade ''.

Rodion Stepanov; Franck Plunian

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

R u t c o r R e p o r t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

induced subgraphs (FIS) for P m (m ?? 2) and P \\Lambda provided that the FIS characterization for P 1 with FIS(Z) = fG : H 62 Z for every induced subgraph H of Gg. The following problems arise naturally, find sets Z(m) and Z \\Lambda such that P m = FIS(Z(m)) and P \\Lambda = FIS(Z \\Lambda ). To solve

266

vo Ris Report No. 266 & Danish Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vo Risø Report No. 266 v© i o & Danish Atomic Energy Commission $ 2 Research Establishment Risø Environmental Radioactivity in the Faroes in 1971 by A. Aarkrog and J. Lippert July 1972 Sola ditirlbuiors: Jul Energy Commiuion, Risø, DK-4000 Roikilde, Denmark #12;U.D.C. 614.73(489) July 1 972 Risp Report No. 2GG

267

Charm-sea Contribution to High-p_T ?Production at the Fermilab Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct production of $J/\\psi(\\psi')$ at large transverse momentum, $p_T \\gg M_{J/\\psi}$, at the Fermilab Tevatron is revisited. It is found that the sea-quark initiated processes dominate in the high-$p_T$ region within the framework of color-singlet model, which is not widely realized. We think this finding is enlightening for further investigation on the charmonium production mechanism.

Cong-Feng Qiao

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ontology-based cross-species integration and analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenotypes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenotype class. For example, S000000649 is annotated with Ionic stress resistance: decreased and the additional class Sodium chloride (CHEBI:26710). The intended meaning of this phenotype description is that the resistance of the yeast cell to respond... -7 October 2011 * Correspondence: gg295@cam.ac. uk 1Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK Abstract Ontologies are widely used in the biomedical community for annotation and integration of databases...

Gkoutos, Georgios V; Hoehndorf, Robert

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Optimization of a petroleum producing assets portfolio: development of an advanced computer model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rate qEL Economic Limit Np Ultimate Production EOR Enhanced Oil Recovery Min Minimum Max Maximum CAPEX Capital Expenditures OPEX Operating Expenses G&G Geological and Geophysical PI Profitability Index NPV Net Present Value NCFt After Tax Net... outflows are categorized on two broad categories: capitalized and afterwards depreciated capital expenditures (CAPEX), and immediately expensed as occurred operating expenses (OPEX), whereas project?s cash inflows consist of only one category: revenues...

Aibassov, Gizatulla

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

Pradhan, Amit Aravind

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

I 8.C.2 Nuclear Physics 78 (1966) 657--662; ~) North-Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam Not to be reproduced by photoprint or microfilm without written permission from the publisher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this connection, potassium, thorium and uranium are of interest. Generally it is assumed that these dements the concentrations of potassium, thorium and uranium become on the average 9.2 mgK/g, 2.8 #gTh/g, 0.82 #gg/g. (1) 657 gradually and mainly by conversion of serpentine into olivine and water. The increase of the temperature

Mcdonough, William F.

273

J. Group Theory a (2008), 16 DOI 10.1515/JGT.2008.aaa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1950 JGT, PMU: D(A1) 10/04/2008 pp. 1­6 1950_02 (p. 1) (002) #12;The second part of this note concerns of ^GG; is there an algorithm that, given this data, can determine whether or not A is a direct factor of a subgroup of finite index in G? Theorem 0.1. There does not exist an algorithm that, given the above data

Bridson, Martin

274

The rate of germination and growth of certain range grasses under experimental conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 1. 45 Root allot Ratio 5+32 4. 15 1, 26 2, 78 2. 96 No, of Qeed Heads 4 80 1AO 60 8 8 ~8c-C9~ SQSSRRSQSS WNW44 WWWC Ol&WWM K4 45~o88 )gRggi~gqg ~ e P4 PI 8QQSS QQagg@Q8QQ WA -tt CIO&C CV g b0 5 eI 4 0 gPee gg ~ g QP5? OOOO...

Oxnam, Herbert Richard

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Zirconium up to 2.5 keV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

up to 2.5 keV G. Leinweber,* J. Burke, C. R. Lubitz, H. D. Knox, and N. J. Drindak Lockheed Martin resonances up to 2.5 keV. The zirconium reso- nance parameters Gg and Gn, determined in the present- rameter extraction. Recent work at RPI using the up- graded equipment is given by Danon et al.5 for rare

Danon, Yaron

276

Egg activation, in vitro fertilization, and development of the gut and reproductive system of the parasitoid Campoletis sonorensis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~lt' ' ( ) (ll P ( h" ' ) gg could be dissected from females and activated by several techniques. A mechanical stress which imitates the oviposition process induced egg activation but was difficult to do. Low temperature shock (4 C) also induced activation..., each of which could be subdivided into 3 to 8 stages. The development of the gut and the reproductive system was investigated by dissecting each stage of the larva and the pupa. The dissections indicated that sex of the insect can be distinguishable...

Jang, Hye-Soon

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972... Major Subject: Oceanography URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) , 1 (Head of Department)' p (Member ) (Member) August, 1972 gg...

Exner, Mary Elizabeth

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ecology of the aflatoxin-producing strains of Aspergillus flavus species infecting crops in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, I I 0 0 0 0 Aflatoxin Bi Ci7 Hi206 OCH3 0 Af la toxin B2 0 0 I I OCH3 Aflatoxin Gi 0 Ci7Hi406 0 0 0 I 1 I I 0 I OCH3 0 Aflatoxin Gg Ci7Ht40v Fif;. 2. Structures of the four prirsry sflatoxins. A. flavvs is not the onlv producer...

Ulloa-Sosa, Miguel Armando

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Precipitation of the ions of the heavy metals with aqueous triethylamine hydrosulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- , - Pb+2. Bi4S I+2' . PNSM HO NtsNPSH a' A sSer On+2 GG+G~d~dl . ~~GCI ~ II ~ (N~HAc ( H~SO : cd+2 '""' I' ' I" Bi OH INsHSnOS IBi4 Cu(NHs~+a~ 4 ' ' 0 (GN) II Cll Gd(GH. jg . IGIIEIII Cdd'- ' Su+2 ' Sn~' S~nS ' SbSgB SnSs EtOB 'Sb+3...

Hill, John Howard

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isotopes with the AMS techniques.

K. J. Dong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isoto...

Dong, K J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AP PENDIX A Ha p l e t t e r L oc al i t y E S C S p e c i e s 20 0- 30 0k m > 90 0k m H o s t S u bs pe c i e s S ubge ne r a S e c t i o n AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a e JV P . po nd er o s a s c o p u... l o r u m P i n us P o n d e r os ae AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a e JV P . po nd er o s a s c o p u l o r u m P i n us P o n d e r os ae AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a...

Menard, Katrina Louise

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Introduction to direct neutrino mass measurements and KATRIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of neutrinos and especially their rest mass play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. On the other hand experiments such as MARE, KATRIN and the recently proposed Project 8 will investigate the spectral shape of beta-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Here, because of neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. It combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type. It will investigate the neutrino rest mass with 0.2 eV/c (90% C.L.) sensitivity and allow beta spectroscopy close to the tritium endpoint at 18.6 keV with unprecedented precision.

Thomas Thmmler; for the KATRIN Collaboration

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

From nothing to something: discrete integrable systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chinese ancient sage Laozi said that everything comes from `nothing'. Einstein believes the principle of nature is simple. Quantum physics proves that the world is discrete. And computer science takes continuous systems as discrete ones. This report is devoted to deriving a number of discrete models, including well-known integrable systems such as the KdV, KP, Toda, BKP, CKP, and special Viallet equations, from `nothing' via simple principles. It is conjectured that the discrete models generated from nothing may be integrable because they are identities of simple algebra, model-independent nonlinear superpositions of a trivial integrable system (Riccati equation), index homogeneous decompositions of the simplest geometric theorem (the angle bisector theorem), as well as the M\\"obious transformation invariants.

S Y Lou; Yu-qi Li; Xiao-yan Tang

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Two-dimensional cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in ultrarelativistic plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves is investigated in a two-dimensional ultrarelativistic degenerate warm dense plasma. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical KadomtsevPetviashvili (KP) equation is derived, which can be further transformed into a Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, the KdV equation can be transferred to a nonlinear Schrdinger equation to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets. The propagation characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are strongly influenced by the variation of different plasma parameters in an ultrarelativistic degenerate dense plasma. The present results might be helpful to understand the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasmas.

Ata-ur-Rahman [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan) [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Mushtaq, A. [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Kaon Absorption from Kaonic Atoms and Formation Spectra of Kaonic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We considered the kaon absorption from atomic states into nucleus. We found that the nuclear density probed by the atomic kaon significantly depends on the kaon orbit. Then, we reexamined the meanings of the observed strengths of one-body and two-body kaon absorption, and investigated the effects to the formation spectra of kaon bound states by in-flight ($K^-,p$) reactions. As a natural consequence, if the atomic kaon probes the smaller nuclear density, the ratio of the two-body absorption at nuclear center is larger than the observed value, and the depth of the imaginary potential is deeper even at smaller kaon energies as in kaonic nuclear states because of the large phase space for the two-body processes.

Junko Yamagata; Satoru Hirenzaki

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

The structure of countable primary abelian groups and primary abelian groups without elements of infinite height  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

octet'-C- ? '=k-'p=- w = 'able Thon 4 C A3 . N 3, ;, -;. 'an4;@web 4 . ' $s . e'sebgtbep af Ci, (1) '- -(2) ":='. :- '' ' ' . - (n)- . ?oaeye-. eaob'. ieiA. :. ;-. hie='ot6eb 3eee 5bau ot- ejbe3. 'bs y bp . (eS-'. -";. =: "-': - - ' . . -:-: -. :. ri...-': . -':, . - . . : - -". c: , anoh that p g S ZZ, Let $' e 8 (g ) We mJ, Sh. 'tc Shoe that this snZz. ie direct. , Assume the contrary, Thea iZ~ np . s e x mhers nip. 'g. o ?Racb into jer ni may 'he represented in' the foxm. ni. m qiy z mhez e 0 & q . w y 'and' 0' 4 ri m...

Heatherly, Henry Edward

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

ISO-SWS calibration and the accurate modelling of cool-star atmospheres - II. General results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fine calibration of the ISO-SWS detectors (Infrared Space Observatory - Short Wavelength Spectrometer) has proven to be a delicate problem. We therefore present a detailed spectroscopic study in the 2.38 -- 12 micron wavelength range of a sample of 16 A0 -- M2 stars used for the calibration of ISO-SWS. By investigating the discrepancies between the ISO-SWS data of these sources, the theoretical predictions of their spectra, the high-resolution FTS-KP (Kitt Peak) spectrum of Alpha Boo and the solar FTS-ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) spectrum, both calibration problems and problems in computing the theoretical models and the synthetic spectra are revealed. The underlying reasons for these problems are sought for and the impact on the further calibration of ISO-SWS and on the theoretical modelling is discussed extensively.

L. Decin; B. Vandenbussche; C. Waelkens; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; B. Plez; A. J. Sauval; K. Hinkle

2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing kp perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

Matsui, Hiroaki, E-mail: hiroaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tabata, Hitoshi [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi [Department of Electronics and Information Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

Training Hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System to Infer Permeability in Wells on Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high accuracy on inferrring of rocks properties, such as permeability ($k$), is a very useful study in the analysis of wells. This has led to development and use of empirical equations like Tixier, Timur, among others. In order to improve the inference of permeability we used a hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System (NFS). The NFS allowed us to infer permeability of well, from data of porosity ($\\phi$) and water saturation ($Sw$). The work was performed with data from wells VCL-1021 (P21) and VCL-950 (P50), Block III, Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. We evaluated the NFS equations ($k_{P50,i}(\\phi_i,Sw_i)$) with neighboring well data ($P21$), in order to verify the validity of the equations in the area. We have used ANFIS in MatLab.

Hurtado, Nuri; Torres, Julio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Regions of influence for two iterative methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 0 & 9 & 1. Now combine (3) and (4) to obtain (k+1) 1 y f (k) P (k) ) p (k) 1 1 d (J k ) '=1 ' ? 2 r J il 15 Because a determinant with two identical columns is zero, we have (k+1) 1 V R (k)p (k) det(J The above relation is as yet only formally... true. Now proceed inductively; assume the truth of (2) (it is obviously true for k = 0). Since then ~x. ? y. ~ & 9/u, the point (x (k) (k) i i ll x , ''', x ) is in R . Also ~x + S, (V x ) y. l (k) (k) i (k) r (k) I 2 n 2 'l j 1 ? 6. )~x. ? y...

Leifeste, Arlee Ross

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.050 0.100 0.150 0.200 0.250 0.300 0.350 0.400 0.450 0.500 650 700 750 800 850KPH M M BT U / KP H 0% Worst Performance 25% 50% Average 75% 100% Best Performance EM R S R e duc e s V a r i a b ilit y Im pr ov e U n it E f f i cen cy Reduce Steam Usage... Survey - Characterized by Single Loop Analog Instrument System, relay or individual PLC?s and tenor drum programmers. Determine the number of controllers not in automatic control. Review of recorder charts for effectiveness of control - any...

Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Resonant formation of Lambda(1405) by stopped-K- absorption in deuteron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To solve the current debate on the position of the quasi-bound K^-p state, namely, "Lambda(1405) or Lambda*(1420)", we propose to measure the T_{21} = T_{Sigma-pi \\leftarrow Kbar-N} Sigma-pi invariant-mass spectrum in stopped-K- absorption in deuteron, since the spectrum, reflecting the soft and hard deuteron momentum distribution, is expected to have a narrow quasi-free component with an upper edge of M = 1430 MeV/c^2, followed by a significant "high-momentum" tail toward the lower mass region, where a resonant formation of Lambda(1405) of any mass and width in a wide range is revealed. We introduce a "deviation" spectrum as defined by DEV = OBS (observed or calculated) / QF (non-resonant quasi-free), in which the resonant component can be seen as an isolated peak free from the QF shape.

J. Esmaili; Y. Akaishi; T. Yamazaki

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are obtained from different equations of state (EOS). In nuclear matter, the Walecka EOS may lead to a KdV equation. We explore equations of state such as those extracted from the MIT Bag Model and from QCD in the mean field theory approach. Some of these equations are integrable and have analytical solitonic solutions. We derive these equations also in spherical and cylindrical coordinates. We extend the analysis to two and three dimensions to obtain the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, which is the generalization of the KdV. The KP is also integrable and presents analytical solitonic solutions. In viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we have second order patial derivatives which physically represent dissipation terms. We present numerical solutions and their corresponding algorithms for the cases where the equations are not integrable.

D. A. Fogaa; F. S. Navarra; L. G. Ferreira Filho

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ?2 or ?3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ?3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ?3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

Pang, Qingsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wei, Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Yuan, Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona (Spain)] [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona (Spain); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Wang, Li-E. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mercury Methylation at Mercury Mines In The Humboldt River Basin, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total Hg and methylmercury concentrations were measured in mine-waste calcines (retorted ore), sediment, and water samples collected in and around abandoned mercury mines in western Nevada to evaluate Hg methylation at the mines and in the Humboldt River basin. Mine-waste calcines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 14 000?g/g. Stream-sediment samples collected within 1 km of the mercury mines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 170?g/g, whereas stream sediments collected>5 km from the mines, and those collected from the Humboldt River and regional baseline sites, contain total Hg concentrations<0.5?g/g. Similarly, methylmercury concentrations in mine-waste calcines are locally as high as 96 ng/g, but methylmercury contents in stream-sediments collected downstream from the mines and from the Humboldt River are lower, ranging from<0.05 to 0.95 ng/g. Stream-water samples collected below two mines studied contain total Hg concentrations ranging from 6 to 2000 ng/L, whereas total Hg in Humboldt River water was generally lower ranging from 2.1 to 9.0 ng/L. Methylmercury concentrations in the Humboldt River water were the lowest in this study (<0.02-0.27 ng/L). Although total Hg and methylmercury concentrations are locally high in mine-waste calcines, there is significant dilution of Hg and lower Hg methylation down gradient from the mines, especially in the sediments and water collected from the Humboldt River, which is> 8 km from any mercury mines. Our data indicate little transference of Hg and methylmercury from the sediment to the water column due to the lack of mine runoff in this desert climate.

Gray, John E. (U.S. Geological Survey); Crock, James G. (U.S. Geological Survey); Lasorsa, Brenda K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Intake and digestibility of grazed bermudagrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? . 940 -. 0339 165. 3 11. 010 9. 592 307 274 -. 939 -. 0321 246. 3 7. 390 6. 092 245 226 477 266 -. 979 -. 0558 367. 2 4. 957 7. 107 320 246 -. 901 -. 0341 124. 4 14. 634 12. 835 2. 688 3. 539 2. 223 2. 672 5. 217 Correlation coefficient between... Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INTAKE AND DIGESTIBILITY OF GRAZED BERMUDAGRASS A Thesis by WILLIAM HERBERT LOWRY PEREZ Approv to s le an content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of D artment) (Memb ~gg~ z~+ (Member) December 1978 124i043...

Lowry Perez, William Herbert

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Independent modal space control and modal filters for active vibration control of rotors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as shown in equation (3. 7): ((t) = At(t) + Z(t) (3. 7) where Z is the modal force vector, and is given by: Z(t) = V BQ(t) = Vr M 'Q(t) (3 g) in which the right hand side of the equation results from the fact that only the lower n rows of the B matrix... gg Alan B. Pal o (Chair of Committee) James S. Noel (Member) Richard . Alexander (Member) Walter L. B ley (Head of Department) August 1992 ABSTRACT Independent Modal Space Control and Modal Filters for Active Vibration Control of Rotors...

Roever, Douglas Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Properties and stability of a Texas barrier beach inlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, breakthroughs from the bay side on both wide and narrow islands have been attributed to the gradual buildup of water in the lagoon, followed by a sudden shift in wind to an offshore direction (gg). Thus, large quantities of water are piled up on the island... of central Texas coastal inlets (44), attributes these characteristics of stable inlets to four factors: 1) the position of bays north of the barrier island, 2) strong north winds which funnel water through the inlets, 3) the direction of longshore drift...

Mason, Curtis

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The geology of the area bordering the Brazos River in southeastern Milam and northeastern Burleson counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

named for exposures around the small towns of Hewby and 3Narques in Xson County? Texas? IS%BY GLkUC9%ZTIC BASS lSRHLR gg~~~ and Xeeet~ati The uppermost beds of the Newby member underli'e a series of gently rolling hills? which gradually rise above... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ?? 16 Har4, Calcareous San4stone at Base of Carriso Formation, Locality 1 ? ~ . . " ?? 16 Calcareous Siltstone? Base of Carriso Formation? Locality 1, , . . . . , . . . . . . . . , 18 Newby Cuesta, Looking North from Highway 79...

Dunlap, John Bettes

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Validation of an improved computer algorithm for precipitation echo classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-40-90 0istttttt:e (t. 'm3 10 00 Xt +0 00 50 70 10 20 00 00 50 59 70 9t0 20 Fig. 7. R0fk0ttvltg (0i tg0 3, 1 king 'tlt1tflt10 ffvtB N!0 f(34A BfNI Af)RAD t8dQt8 0stBg fhV tBHxlmUttt t'0000ttvttg 08fit0 tB0800I'0d gg th0 fWO ttKI0ts, Cttttt(tttiS Sl'0 000...

Amrhein, Edward Thomas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An econometric analysis of prices for Texas grapefruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" Price F. o. b. Price. Prcccssed Grapefruit Price Fouat'on. I". ethod of Statisticei Analysis. Data. . 76 I m f L jo / '-'2 Zquatior G. "-, fruit Texas. "rash Grape ru m J. exes ~ !I Qy F. o. I" orida. "Gn F. o. ~r ce it Pci. ce Ejlu... + . 00370y (. 191) (. 00083) Xf = 6. 441 Means: Xz Where: Xz. q y . 437q + . 00000y 11 3067 X? 9 2067 Xf ? 2 1000 q 9 o333 y 1666 GG G. S. azu:ual average retail pr'ce for orapefruit (cents per pound) U. S. annual averag fam-retail price spread...

Gutierrez-Villarreal, Jorge

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Bioassay of toxaphene, parathion and DDT residues on alfalfa by use of mosquito larvae, Aedes aegypti (L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LI BRA R& A A M COLLEar. Or 7f J(oo BIOASSAY OF TOXAPHKNK~ PAIIATHION AND DDT IIKSIDUES ON ALFALFA BY USK OF MOSQUITO LARVAK, jIm, QQQJQ, (L ~ ) By IIONDAL LKK CHKVKS A Theolo Subsltted to the graduate School, of the Agrloultural aad... Moehaaleal College of Texao la partial fulfllseat of the requlroseato for the degree of MASTKR OF SCIKNCK M y I9$8 Major Sub joot c Kntoso I ogy Ll&gg, gr & Aa c011 EGE Df TEZ~ BIOASSAY OF TOXAPHKNK, PARATHION AND DDT RKSIDUKS ON ALFALFA SY USK...

Cheves, Rondal Lee

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modern Chinese-English Dictionary for Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ?g| to rely on, to lean on (b) To suffer. '|g scolded -^J beaten gg...

Huang, Chi-Chou

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Morphological variation in the giant isopod Bathynomus giganteus (suborder Flabellifera: family Cirolanidae) with notes on the genus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the iv systematics of the genus. Detailed descriptions and notes for each P 1 faugh 1 ldd ~ 11 dh f 1' 1 g p 1 f B. faf h h ' p 1 1 y d ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my sincerest thanks to Dr. Mary Wicksten, chairman of my graduate... dealing with this genus. Similar observat1ons, never published, were made by others working with the collection Because of these b I', f l h ~hh dag gg g group composed of more than one form (variety) (W. Pequenat, personal communication) ~ This idea...

Cocke, Brian Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Engineering properties of shallow sediments in West Delta and South Pass Outer Continental Shelf Lease Areas, offshore Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF SHALLOW SEDIMENTS IN WEST DELTA AND SOUTH PASS OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF LEASE AREAS& OFFSHORE LOUISIANA A Thesis by STERLING J. HELWICK, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... by STERLING J. HELWICK, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of C mmit e) (Head of Depart t) Member / gg&wrt r~ Fc' Qg~s/~ (Member) ( her) May 1977 44", 672 ABSTRACT Engineering Properties of Shallow Sediments in West Delta and South...

Helwick, Sterling J

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-20). Analysis of products consists of determining the point at which no free lithium alkyl remains. Thus if a butyl lithium initiated polymerization were terminated with water, butane would be evolved as long as the initiator were present. The butane...? agent were evaporated under a hood. Finally the polymer. was dried in a vacuum oven at about 50'C and under a vacuum of 30 inches of gg for about 30 hours. The weight of polymer formed was determined by final weighing. 25 The monomer conversion...

Hasan, Sayeed

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effect of soil temperature on resistance of rice to seedling blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I":". . -"';-'. , ;::::, RP9?C2 '|GZ - GGt'W "ZR%Zh&'~I'Tgfi *" zo?: 3~Gh'&IPWI|tG! Eh QZ 'BXCAK. - TQ '-, ';: ?' ! ', -':;, i", , ;. :;?-i;'!:G :. BGGZZIIG BBIZGGG, ':G"G", Kl'GZ' h il 'ZZZIIGXIIXGLGZGBZZ;::"BGG. ''::, . :":G ';"', . '?'i... ''' ' ', ' '' ? ' ', , ' ZZ " I AVP~' . ' I. , X Z?Z" '' 1 ?''. .. l~;t, , I. h 3R'kCK6I;"'VIh'. Z-hg~Z, ' ', '?" l;, I, ', 'hhh ~~i Z'. zZ, , *, ~~;". ?', BGIGI. ' 'I, . ; =, '-. ?::-";, ':. "?::. . ":-, :, :;. ";, . "', '-'-. -'::;:, :. ; T5@-', : jjyft8i:-. W4%es, , :pi...

Weerapat, Praphas

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Transverse wave loading on partially buried marine pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement Test. ~ 9 . e Test 1 +/- Q. 3 in. Initial H/D I Q. IQ fn. Final H/D e Q. gg fn. Gs = 1. 32 . 7 . 6 . 5 . 4 ~ 3 ~ 2 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 CYCLES Figure 13. Typical Embedment Versus Cycles Data ? Low Displacement Test... Displacement Data ? High Displacement Test. . 9 0 . e ~ 7 . 6 . 4 . 3 ~ 2 0 1 10 100 Test 2 +/- 3. 0 in. Initial H/D = 0. 10 in. Final H/D = 1. 02 in. Gs 1. 32 1000 10000 CYCLES Figure 15. Typical Embedment Versus Cycles Data ? High...

Webb, Richard Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Specimen Catalog, Numbers 6092-9501 (1961-1975)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3~ ?l - Zg.___ /0 .O ? r - 1- l g %*? ? - q - H /g,g>? - 2 - -? -/ ? TrfJi ? - 7 - 17 *7.3' > - * ) - / % ?h jz J j j j l r_z3 _sJA 7 .2 " - - 9 - / 8 M l z3. - IS__ ? 3 ,f| . Ur. j y 'F.'8 .?aJ*,. L i 13 g (a n d S t bleC*b ? J t3 / Parb.JL. c a tjZ J k s. Uuditk? ?JLt?CJL ___________ 3?/^/gr...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ecology and geographic variation in Pieris protodice Boisduval and LeCont (Lepidoptera, Pieridae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tha Oeaos ~ Si storioal Raviss ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Methods of Stadp . . Looal ietseology aad Behavior of ~ ygB~/gg with Coapsrisons to ~C Looal Popvlatioa Studios oa gQgQ ~gyes . Ooographio Variatioa io ~ Zg... Rorster an& Wehlfshrt (19'), werldng only en a&&&le Rarupean Lopi&optera, listed tho gasps ~ Schrank, with spentas )RR&R~R L. , ZgIR L. , ~ Mayer, RSRSRR Rhbner and Sayer, gag, L. ~ an& gRRNggg Oberth&r~ tho genus ~ yabricius, with the species Q~R L...

Abbott, Walter Patton

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Atmospheric and Solar neutrinos in the light of the SuperKamiokande results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hierarchy $\\Delta m^2_{atm} \\gg \\Delta m^2_\\odot$ and the large $\\theta_{23}$ mixing angle, as suggested by neutrino oscillation experiments, can be accounted for by a variety of lepton flavour models. A dichotomy emerges: i) Models were all neutrino masses are bounded by $m_{atm}\\equiv (\\Delta m^2_{atm})^{1/2}\\approx 0.03 eV$; ii) Models of quasi-degenerate neutrinos. It is shown how these different patterns of neutrino masses may arise from different lepton flavour symmetries. Physical implications are discussed in the various cases.

Riccardo Barbieri

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

A study of mid-latitude tropopause characteristics over eastern North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- parable latitudes in other parts of the worldf Some correlation 34 0. 7 4J n e W W c 0 al w n 0 0. 6 0. 5 0. 4 0. 3 0. 2 0. 1 BUF PIT Gg0 C@S 60 55 50 45 40 35 Latitude (degrees north) Figure 7. Average of the absolute values... tropopauses during summer 2. Profile of mean zonal wind during summer 3. Occurrence of multiple tropopauses during winter 4. Profile of mean zonal wind during winter 20 21 5. Mean and standard deviation of primary tropopause height during summer 25 6...

Houston, Ben Howard

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Exchange effects in magnetized quantum plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics including the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We consider a number of wave phenomenon under influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves we focus our attention to the Langmuir waves, Trivelpiece-Gould waves, ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves and low-frequencies electromagnetic waves at $T_{e}\\gg T_{i}$ . We obtained the numerical simulation of the dispersion properties of different types of waves.

Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A study of the deep water benthos of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mollusks Nine species oi' scaphopods were found from 100 to 1500 fathoms. Henderson's monograph (1920) of the east American scaphopods proved to be invaluable in working with these specimens. All the shells collected fall into the genus ~De ~l H, and..., for convenience in this study, they have been grouped into the subgenera presented by Henderson. Neither Parker (1860) nor springer and Bullis (1956) mention scaphopods in their deep eater bottoa saaples froa the Gulf of Mexico. / ~D+~gg H~QIN Dell, 1878~ ~d...

Rowe, Gilbert T

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Activity and reproduction of the black-tailed jackrabbit in the Coastal Cordgrass Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County and the study area. Fig. ] BOUNDARY OF ARANSAS COUNTY gg STUDY AREA in the Coastal Bend Area of Texas. This area of Texas is noted for its prairie grassland association as well as its cattle, oil, and gas production. Tne ranch consists of 55.... The 'term "form sitting" is used with the same con- notation as that described by Vorhies and Taylor (l)5)) . In thi- position the hare employed cover such as brush, grass or cactus as some sort of protection (Fig. 18) ~C g Fig. 17. "Open sitti ng...

Haug, Joseph Carroll

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The effect of soil pH and placement on the bioactivity of sulfonamide herbicides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=S. 3 90 96 85 67 62 51 69 67 58 42 gQ ()Q qH gg gS QgW ~Q WS 0 pg @ 95~ ~9K& c ~gO FIGURE 2 EFFECT OF PLACEMENT ON SULFONAMIDE HERBICIDE ACTIVITY AS MEASURED BY SORGHUM HEIGHT 22 SHIPS CLAY SOIL ~ AB OVE ~ BELOW LSD. 05=12. 3 98...)phenoxy] -+-(methylsulfonyl)-2-nitrobenzamide), oryzalin [4-(dipropylamino)-3, 5- dinitrobenzenesulfonamide], and perfluidone (1, 1, 1-trifluoro-+-[2-methyl-4- (phenylsulfonyl)phenyl]methane sulfonamide) were applied to 500 g pots of Vamont clay (pH 4. 8, 6. 6, or 7. 9...

Miller, Raymond Charles

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A comparative study of certain biological phenomena of a resistant and a susceptible strain of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laid slightly more eggs and were larger than susosptible females. There vere no noted differenoes in siss or feoundity of ths F3 generation of resistant and susceptible individuals. Genetic studies by King (1954) point out that seleotion itself is a...A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CERTAIN BIOLOGICAL'PHENOMENA CF A RESISTANT AND A SUSCEPTIBLE STRAIN OF THE BOLL @EVIL, ~@ggQ~ ~S BOHEMAN A Thesis by JOHN GORDON THOMAS Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultu"al and Mechanioal College...

Thomas, John G

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The toxicity and control of peavine, Astragalus emoryanus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ . . o 51 8% 'fCXZCXff AND COgfRg. lF Plkvlgg~ kKQQHR XlQIQIR Ths predestine of range livootook ie the ~)or indwtry of the ~Q4$ds area of QMC 'tones, Nskh of 'tbo Kighlands area is vithin yroeidio County~ nbioh 1e ono of tbo larger eonntios..., ~AIM, prllWlyLll1 UjaII~ ~ 1 texlo Co eatage, sheep, and geste in looal areas, and eas ohoson as tbe sob)oat fer this invostigati~ Tbs speoiosy Q ~ggmmmmk, ~ separated frca Je gg~~ in 1927 awhile tho fever spooies oonstltntod the balk af tho...

Gray, Robert G

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The relative resistance of commercial cantaloupe varieties to aphid infestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~5, i Glc:era he longs to the order Hcsoptera an, ' tc the fsnily iphididae, Xt was first reporte& in Texas in QW~ The nolan aphid is a sm33. soAAxdied 1nsect a, ' ost Xf?5 of an inch leaf Xt'a color varies free a psla yellowish-&reen to slsost... of four ecasasroial cantaloupe veriatiesa Aaith~e Farfeota Texas Hesistant Pla Haloes Sert Ho, 36? Sda Sweet and ~orris 47 which is a btseding line f nm Geo~a hprioultural:trisect Station+ The @sion Aphid According tc Paddock(11~ ths nolan aphid ~k gg...

Correa, Rumaldo Trevino

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Variation in the human Cannabinoid Receptor (CNR1) gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) population is shown (using the publicly available HapMap version 3, release R2, database available at http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/. Chakrabarti and Baron-Cohen Molecular Autism 2011, 2:10 http://www.molecularautism.com/content/2/1/10 Page 3 of 7 [46... -Cohen Molecular Autism 2011, 2:10 http://www.molecularautism.com/content/2/1/10 Page 4 of 7 response is also associated with the longest gaze dura- tion for happy faces. For rs806380, the allelic group associated with the highest striatal response (GG) is also...

Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Viso do Paraguai no Brasil ^=s==  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Visão do Paraguai no Brasil 131 ^=sáë©ç=?ç= m~ê~?ì~á=åç= _ê~ëáäG= póäî~áå=pçì??~ì?GG= fåíêç?ì´©ç= ls estrangeiros que viajam pelo Brasil podem se surpreender com o lugar que o Paraguai ocupa mesmo tempo do Brasil e do Paraguai, são percebidos na sua atualida- de e quase integralidade de seu

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Log of a young author's thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot".  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . t 1974 Major Subject: English LOG OF A YOUNG AUTHOR'S THINKING: GEORGE W CABLE'S "DROP SHOT" A Thesis by AUTRY JAMES SINITIERE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committe Hea of Department M er ember) August 1974 & s ~~. )$, gg... APSTRACT Log of a Young Author's Thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot" (August 1974) Autry James Sinitiere, B. A. , College of Santa Fe Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr Richard H. Ballinger In February 1870 George W. Cable began writing a * p p...

Sinitiere, Autry James

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Two-loop helicity amplitudes for the production of two off-shell electroweak bosons in gluon fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the part of the two-loop virtual amplitude for the process $gg \\to V_1 V_2 \\to (l_1 \\bar l'_{1}) (l_2 \\bar l'_2)$, where $V_{1,2}$ are arbitrary electroweak gauge bosons, that receives contributions from loops of massless quarks. Invariant masses of electroweak bosons are allowed to be different from each other. Our result provides an important ingredient for improving the description of gluon fusion contribution to the production of four-lepton final states at the LHC.

Caola, Fabrizio; Melnikov, Kirill; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Vladimir A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE G 442.1-1  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FYG 242.1-1 DOE G 242.1-1 FormsGG

332

An experimental investigation of aluminum honeycomb as an energy absorber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thickness of specimen Mass PE Potential energy Summation Stroke Lead distance Time t tr V VI W t Trigger time Initial velocity Impact velocity Final velocity Trigger velocity Weight viii CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Various types of systems...: V = V + 2g(h ? 4) 2 2 I o V2 = 0 0 V = 2g(h ? 4) 2 I v = J2g (h-l) I To determine the time of the crushing stroke: V = V ? ? F I V = 0 F at = V I t =V I a =V gG To determine the lead distance for the triggering circuit: S V + 1 2 tr tr...

Bland, William Joseph

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Polarization Test of Higgs Spin and Parity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A polarization test is applied to determine the spin and the parity of the observed resonance at LHC, which is believed to be the expected "Higgs" particle. The test is based on very general principles and is completely independent of dynamical assumptions. We have also identified a set of observables that discriminate resonances with $J^P=0^+,0^-, 2^-$ and $2^+$. Furthermore, the same set can be used to gain useful and important information on the magnitude of each helicity amplitude contributing to the $gg\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ process .

Firooz Arash

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

G Subject: Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdf Flash2010-72.pdfAccomplishmentsFuture Power Systems 21 Subject:GG Subject:B,

335

Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

Shinn, J.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A SEARCH FOR L/T TRANSITION DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 AND WISE: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEARBY OBJECTS INCLUDING TWO CANDIDATE SPECTROSCOPIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present initial results from a wide-field (30,000 deg{sup 2}) search for L/T transition brown dwarfs within 25 pc using the Pan-STARRS1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) surveys. Previous large-area searches have been incomplete for L/T transition dwarfs, because these objects are faint in optical bands and have near-infrared (near-IR) colors that are difficult to distinguish from background stars. To overcome these obstacles, we have cross-matched the Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-IR) catalogs to produce a unique multi-wavelength database for finding ultracool dwarfs. As part of our initial discoveries, we have identified seven brown dwarfs in the L/T transition within 9-15 pc of the Sun. The L9.5 dwarf PSO J140.2308+45.6487 and the T1.5 dwarf PSO J307.6784+07.8263 (both independently discovered by Mace et al.) show possible spectroscopic variability at the Y and J bands. Two more objects in our sample show evidence of photometric J-band variability, and two others are candidate unresolved binaries based on their spectra. We expect our full search to yield a well-defined, volume-limited sample of L/T transition dwarfs that will include many new targets for study of this complex regime. PSO J307.6784+07.8263 in particular may be an excellent candidate for in-depth study of variability, given its brightness (J = 14.2 mag) and proximity (11 pc)

Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deacon, Niall R. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dupuy, Trent J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Redstone, Joshua [Facebook, 335 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10017-4677 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

338

Light Quarkonium - Glueball Mixing from a Holographic QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the mixing structure of isospin-singlet scalars, the light quarkonium $(\\bar{q}q)$ and glueball $(gg)$ in two-flavor QCD, based on a holographic model of bottom-up hard-wall type. In the model the pure quarkonium and glueball states are unambiguously defined in terms of the different $U(1)_A$ charges in the restoration limit of the chiral $U(2)_L \\times U(2)_R$ symmetry, in which the quarkonium gets massless as the chiral partner of the pion. Hence the $\\bar{q}q$-$gg$ mixing arises in the presence of the nonzero chiral condensate or pion decay constant. At the realistic point where the pion decay constant and other hadron masses reach the observed amount, we predict the tiny mixing between the lightest quarkonia and glueball: The smallness of the mixing is understood by the slightly small ratio of the chiral and gluon condensate scales. The low-lying two scalar masses are calculated to be $\\simeq 1.25$ GeV and $\\simeq 1.77$ GeV, which are compared with masses of $f_0(1370)$ and $f_0(1710)$. Our resul...

Yamaguchi, Takashi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 4, 9-22 November 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M 5'6\\sf/f lnO/x]sf] 5 . 8fo:kf]/faf6 rf8jf8 dfGg :jb]z kms]{sfx? klg cj ljbfjf/L eP/ cfcfkm\\gf] sd{If]qlt/ nfUg yfn]sf 5g\\ . dfcf]jfbLsf] o'4lj/fdsf sf/0f zx/af6 bz}ltxf/ dfGg ufpFlt/ nfu]sfx? klg zx/lt/ kms{g] qmd hf/L 5 . z/b Ct'sf] ;'Gb/ a... 'b} hfFbf pgLx?sf] o; sdhf]/Laf6 kmfObf p7fpg ljb]zL zlQmsf] if8oGq z'? eO;s]sf] 5 . o;}n] d"nssf] lxtsf] nflu slQ klg l9nf] gu/L /fhf, bn / ljb|f

Shrestha, Kashish Das

340

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 15, 7 June 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the movement. Funds for the injured Diaspora Nepali Aawaz | June 07.2006 #24; g]kfn ls/ft /fO{ P;f]l;P;g ckm o'P;P sf] cfof]hgfdf d] @! , @))^ sf lbg Go'of]s{df ls/f+t /fO{ x?sf] kj{ r08Lgfr eJo ?kdf ;DkGg eof] . Go'of]s{sf] SjLG; af]/f] a... |Lh kfs{ / HofS;g xfO6df ul/ b'O r/0fdf ul/Psf] pSt sfo{s|ddf ljleGg jStfx?n] dGtJo z[esfdgf cfbfg k|bfg k|z+;f kq ljt/0f ug{' ePsf] lyof] . pSt kj{df ls/ft /fO{ x? dfq g eP/ cGo w]/} g]kfnLx?n] klg dgf]/+hg lnPsf lyP . sfo{s|dsf k|d'v cltly Unf...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multielement ultratrace analysis of molybdenum with high performance secondary ion mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron beam melting has been used to obtain ultrapure refractory metals that are gaining importance in metal oxide semiconductor--very large scale integration (MOS--VLSI) processing technology, fusion reactor technology, or as superconducting materials. Although the technology of electron beam melting is well established in the field of production of very clean refractory metals, little is known about the limitations of the method because the impurity level of the final products is frequently below the detection power of common methods for trace analysis. Characterization of these materials can be accomplished primarily by in situ methods like neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometric methods (glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)). A suitable method for quantitative multielement ultratrace bulk analysis of molybdenum with SIMS has been developed. Detection limits of the analyzed elements from 10/sup -7/ g/g down to 10/sup -12/ g/g have been found. Additional information about the distribution of the trace elements has been accumulated.

Virag, A.; Friedbacher, G.; Grasserbauer, M.; Ortner, H.M.; Wilhartitz, P.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 ?g/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 ?g. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 ?g. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The influence of certain management practices upon market quality and profit made in broiler production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

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Moore, William J

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Autonomous Pseudomonoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

// A A2 ?X p??1?1qqqq 88qqqq #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; ???= A2 1?f // c ?= A2 p =={{{{{{{{ ?= (2.3) A?X ?= c f // j?1?1 KKK K %%KK KK A j?1 HHH H $$HH HH 1 ?= A?X 1 00 ?= p??1 // A2 ?X j??1?1ssss 99ssss #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A2 ?X 1?f // A2 p... -cells denote the obvious counits). X j?1 #15;#15; 1 ''#31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A?X j?1?1 KKK K %%KK KK j??1 // X f // j?1 KKK K %%KK KK?= A j?1 GGG G ##GG GG 1 #31;#31; ?=?= A?X p??1 // 1 00 ?= A2 ?X j??1?1ssss 99ssss #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A2 ?X1...

Lopez Franco, Ignacio

2009-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Production of single top-quark final states at the LHC from supersymmetric FCNC interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the production of single top-quark final states by direct supersymmetric flavor-changing interactions at the LHC. The total cross section pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c is computed at the 1-loop order within the unconstrained MSSM. We prove that SUSY-QCD effects may furnish sizeable production rates amounting up to barely 10^5 t\\bar{c}(c\\bar{t}) events per 100 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity, in full compliance with the stringent low-energy constraints from b->s gamma. Furthermore, we show that the cooperative SUSY-EW effects can be sizeable on their own, regardless of the SUSY-QCD contribution, with maximum production rates of the order of 10^3 events per 100 fb^{-1}. Owing to the fact that FCNC production of electrically neutral heavy-quark pairs is virtually absent within the SM, we conclude that the observation of such pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c processes at the LHC could lead to evidence of new physics - of likely supersymmetric nature.

David Lopez-Val; Jaume Guasch; Joan Sola

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Willa Cather's European immigrants: the conflict of old and new world values.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'v 2 F~DQ19. %3 6' I ilV, . i ~. CATHGR~H EWiQj'RAN Zi'i'NIQfikgT84 -~&', ": CK'F&'AT 0"' GLD A?~ ?. "EKi VCR& VM448 ' 1' A XL~GG3. 8 Re~ae~ ken h"~~scip App'GVGN ~&G C8 8&QBQ P&8 CQG~~QQC 4$'e ' @&FAN R QQBK1' 488 g, i j-~1", p z gg L, 6... 45722B I 'I \\ I 1. k%C+sLX3ei'%96l "LL4. ~3 1 . X v'eaLJ. . 5$)u, to expz'cps vyq apgxMia@kon e&xl fiats'@b@g tQ 'PX'Qf@5~&O+ HG~~96l1 F~e V!KCF5~'i f/'', , big'C~COQt. ' gQil~~NB GX'4-458 ?++'~@gA888 CC' RQS285 K"8 Sh '823. 5~$%3$? '-'X -M3-K...

Hursey, Roberta Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Extracting bb Higgs Decay Signals using Multivariate Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For low-mass Higgs boson production at ATLAS at {radical}s = 7 TeV, the hard subprocess gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} dominates but is in turn drowned out by background. We seek to exploit the intrinsic few-MeV mass width of the Higgs boson to observe it above the background in b{bar b}-dijet mass plots. The mass resolution of existing mass-reconstruction algorithms is insufficient for this purpose due to jet combinatorics, that is, the algorithms cannot identify every jet that results from b{bar b} Higgs decay. We combine these algorithms using the neural net (NN) and boosted regression tree (BDT) multivariate methods in attempt to improve the mass resolution. Events involving gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} are generated using Monte Carlo methods with Pythia and then the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) is used to train and test NNs and BDTs. For a 120 GeV Standard Model Higgs boson, the m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstruction width is reduced from 8.6 to 6.5 GeV. Most importantly, however, the methods used here allow for more advanced m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstructions to be created in the future using multivariate methods.

Smith, W Clarke; /George Washington U. /SLAC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Projection and Galaxy Clustering Fourier Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Second order perturbation theory predicts a specific dependence of the bispectrum, or three-point correlation function in the Fourier transform domain, on the shape of the configuration of its three wave vector arguments, which can be taken as a signature of structure formed by gravitational instability. Comparing this known dependence on configuration shape with the weak shape dependence of the galaxy bispectrum has been suggested as an indication of bias in the galaxy distribution. However, to interpret results obtained from projected catalogs, we must first understand the effects of projection on this shape dependence. We present expressions for the projected power spectrum and bispectrum in both Cartesian and spherical geometries, and we examine the effects of projection on the predicted bispectrum with particular attention to the dependence on configuration shape. Except for an overall numerical factor, for Cartesian projection with characteristic depth $ \\Dstar $ there is little effect on the shape dependence of the bispectrum for wavelengths small compared to $ \\Dstar $ or projected wavenumbers $ q \\Dstar \\gg 1 $. For angular projection, a scaling law is found for spherical harmonic index $ \\ell \\gg 1 $, but there is always a mixing of scales over the range of the selection function. For large $ \\ell $ it is sufficient to examine a small portion of the sky.

J. N. Fry; David Thomas

1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Calculation of HELAS amplitudes for QCD processes using graphics processing unit (GPU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast calculations of helicity amplitudes of quark and gluon scattering processes in massless QCD. New HEGET ({\\bf H}ELAS {\\bf E}valuation with {\\bf G}PU {\\bf E}nhanced {\\bf T}echnology) codes for gluon self-interactions are introduced, and a C++ program to convert the MadGraph generated FORTRAN codes into HEGET codes in CUDA (a C-platform for general purpose computing on GPU) is created. Because of the proliferation of the number of Feynman diagrams and the number of independent color amplitudes, the maximum number of final state jets we can evaluate on a GPU is limited to 4 for pure gluon processes ($gg\\to 4g$), or 5 for processes with one or more quark lines such as $q\\bar{q}\\to 5g$ and $qq\\to qq+3g$. Compared with the usual CPU-based programs, we obtain 60-100 times better performance on the GPU, except for 5-jet production processes and the $gg\\to 4g$ processes for which the GPU gain over the CPU is about 20.

K. Hagiwara; J. Kanzaki; N. Okamura; D. Rainwater; T. Stelzer

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparison between continuous stirred tank reactor extractor and soxhlet extractor for extraction of El-Lajjun oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction on El-Lajjun oil shale in a continuous stirred tank reactor extractor (CSTRE) and a Soxhlet extractor was carried out using toluene and chloroform as solvents. Solvents were recovered using two distillation stages, a simple distillation followed by a fractional distillation. Gas chromotography was used to test for the existence of trapped solvent in the yield. It was found that extraction using a CSTRE gave a 12% increase in yield on average compared with the Soxhlet extractor, and an optimum shale size of 1.0mm offered a better yield and solvent recovery for both techniques. It was also found that an optimum ratio of solvent to oil shale of 2:1 gave the best oil yield. The Soxhlet extractor was found to offer an extraction rate of 1 hour to complete extraction compared with 4 hours in a CSTRE. The yield in a CSTRE was found to increase on increase of stirring. When extraction was carried out at the boiling point of the solvents in a CSTRE, the yield was found to increase by 30% on average compared to that of extraction when the solvent was at room temperature. When toluene was used for extraction, the average amount of bitumen extracted was 0.032 g/g of oil shale and 76.4% of the solvent recovered, compared with 0.037 g/g of oil shale and 84.1% of the solvent recovered using a Soxhlet extractor.

Anabtawi, M.Z. [Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Engineering peptides to promote stabilizing interactions in the solid state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 0.0 07 0.6 6 ? 0.0 05 Ac VY GN GA Ac VY GN GA + PV P Ac VY GG GN GA Ac VY GG GN GA + PV P So lid (h rs) So lut ion (h rs) Pe pti de s De am ida tio n h alf -liv es 0.43 0.37 0.62 3.53 0.64 6.0 8 38. 5 62. 1 010203040506070 H a l f - l i f e...En gin ee rin g p ep tid es to pr om ot e s tab iliz ing int er ac tio ns in th e s oli d s tat e Sa nd ipa n S inh a1, Sa ra h T ho mp so n2 , K yle C am ar da 2, El iza be th To pp 1 De pa rtm en t o f P ha rm ac eu tic al Ch em ist ry...

Sinha, Sandipan; Thompson, S.; Camarda, K.; Topp, E.

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

Dudhia, Jimy

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report : thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete at a system pressure of 4 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their relative importance in the crust fracture mechanism at plant scale. The second half of this report describes the apparatus for measuring crust strength. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength).

Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 final data report, Rev. 1 February 10, 2003.; Report, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure; and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

OECM MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 final data report, Rev. 0 February 12, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% siliceous concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The EUV Spectrum of the Quasi-Coherent Oscillations of the Dwarf Nova SS Cygni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data obtained by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite are used to determine the EUV spectrum of the quasi-coherent oscillations of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. It is found that the spectrum of the oscillations is neither blue nor red nor grey relative to the net (oscillation-phase integrated) spectrum, and hence that the oscillations cannot be explained by variations in the effective temperature, absorbing column density, or effective area, respectively. Instead, it is found that the amplitude of the oscillations is high at the relative maxima of the net spectrum, and low to zero at the relative minima of the net spectrum. This behavior can be explained by either variations in the emission line flux atop a constant underlying continuum, or variations in the optical depth of a haze of overlapping absorption lines, in which case the optical depths must be $\\tau<1$ at the relative maxima of the net spectrum, and $\\tau\\gg 1$ at the relative minima.

Christopher W. Mauche

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

R-parity violating effects in top quark flavor-changing neutral-current production at LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the minimal supersymmetric model the R-parity violating top quark interactions, which are so far weakly constrained, can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) productions for the top quark at the large hadron collider (LHC). In this work we assume the presence of the B-violating couplings and examine their contributions to the FCNC productions proceeding through the parton processes cg{yields}t, gg{yields}tc, cg{yields}t{gamma}, cg{yields}tZ and cg{yields}th. We find that all these processes can be greatly enhanced relative to the R-parity preserving predictions. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, all the production channels except cg{yields}th can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity, in contrast to the R-parity preserving case in which only cg{yields}t can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity.

Cao Junjie [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, K1S 5B6 (Canada); Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu Lei [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Matter power spectrum for the generalized Chaplygin gas model: The relativistic case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model is the prototype of a unified model of dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM). It is characterized by equation-of-state (EoS) parameters $A$ and $\\alpha$. We use a statistical analysis of the 2dFGRS data to constrain these parameters. In particular, we find that very small (close to zero) and very large values ($\\alpha\\gg 1$) of the equation-of-state parameter $\\alpha$ are preferred. To test the validity of this type of unification of the dark sector we admit the existence of a separate DM component in addition to the Chaplygin gas and calculate the probability distribution for the fractional contributions of both components to the total energy density. This analysis favors a model for which the Universe is nearly entirely made up of the separate DM component with an almost negligible Chaplygin gas part. This confirms the results of a previous Newtonian analysis.

J. C. Fabris; H. E. S. Velten; W. Zimdahl

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 14, 10 May 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qm ^) xhf/ lnP/ k7fPsf df]/sf oL tLg hgf b'O{ dlxgfb]lv stf/df cnkq k/]sf x'g\\ . pgLx?nfO{ vfg / a:g ;d]t sl7g ePsf] 5 . United we stand snfsf/x?sf] lab]z df]x 1974 AD: On Air bnfnn] em'SofP/ stf/df g]kfnL cnkq 21 #25; Nepali Aawaz... achieved something through this revolution. - Prem#25;Shrestha, Abukhaireni, Tanahun, in a letter to the editor of Kantipur. ut d+l;/ & ut] ;ft /fhg}lts bn tyf xfd|f] kf6L{aLr ;DkGg !@a'Fb] P]ltxfl;s ;dembf/Lk|lt k"0f{ k|lta4 x'Fb} ;+ljwfg...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

367

Measurement of the branching ratios for the decays of D(+)(s) to ??(+), ???(+), ??(+), and ???(+)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the form factor for D0!K2e1ne , for which *Permanent address: University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712. Permanent address: BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. Permanent address: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551.A. Bellerive, R....5260.0360.04 h3pp 154622 4.560.1 1.1 0.3560.0560.06 h 8 (h gg )p 479626 6.760.1 1.1 1.0960.0660.07 h 8 (h3p)p 5869 1.960.1 0.2 0.7360.1160.122-4 MEASUREMENT OF THE BRANCHING RATIOS FOR THE . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW D 58 052002yields for different channels...

Baringer, Philip S.

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

New environmental regulation for the aerospace industry: The aerospace NESHAP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

40 CFR Part 63, Subpart GG, the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities, commonly referred to as the Aerospace NESHAP, was issued on September 1, 1995 and requires compliance by September 1, 1998. The regulation affects any facility that manufactures or reworks commercial, civil, or military aircraft vehicles or components and is a major source of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs). The regulation targets reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) and Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) emissions to the atmosphere. Processes affected by the new regulation include aircraft painting, paint stripping, chemical milling masking, solvent cleaning, and spray gun cleaning. Regulatory requirements affecting these processes are summarized, and different compliance options compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and industry acceptance. Strategies to reduce compliance costs and minimize recordkeeping burdens are also presented.

Bauer, J.P.; Gampper, B.P. [Brusn and McDonnell Waste Consultants, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baker, J.M. [Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Borexino: A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

Lino Miramonti

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 9, 24 January - 7 February 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while his speech was being broadcast on state TV, when this ridicule was played the first time. Back then many said for better or for worse, but now its quite clear how that move turned out. Not only did the King do it (shut down phone lines... { klg cfkm\\gf] sJhfdf ePsf] b]vfpg vf]lh/ x]sf lyP . o:tf] b]Vbf klg ;]gf ToxfF hfg grfxg' Jof/]seGbf jflx/ ;'/lIft eOGg eGg] vt/f g} xf] . clxn] g]kfnuGh nufot klZrd g]kfnsf ;a} zx/df k|zf;gn] skm\\o'{ cfb]z hf/L u/]sf] 5 . ;/sf/n] bfjL u/]em}+ zx...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

371

Measurements of the meson-photon transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons at large momentum transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gollin, R. M. Hans, E. Johnson, I. Karliner, M. A. Marsh, M. Palmer, M. Selen, and J. J. Thaler University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 61801 K. W. Edwards Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6 and the Institute of Particle... is defined in terms of the transition form factors F g*gR(Q2). In the case of pseudoscalar mesons there is only one form factor. At zero momentum transfer this form factor is expressed as uF g*gR~0 !u 2 5 1 ~ 4pa!2 64pG ~ R!gg! MR 3 , ~4! where a is the QED...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The relationship of air temperature and air volume to the rate of drying rice in sacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation to a stoiiture content, ef 19 to, 14 per eemt. "She eaoJee w~e ~~;. ;ogpu;Ih dtiring. the '&yield, epeMMen for each test, At the end of the drying peribd, s composite simple 5 r n'ne, 'tegen fron. each ~i4r:, for;~ii~, . determ4nsMem ~8 later... ~ 0 XQO. I 1'15. h +1, 8 1%4. 5 1/0, 5 1~9&JI 1OV~ XMQ gp, ss N. , '7G gg, 65 g). , 4Q Q6. 48 QO;51 $6, 41 19. 75 (VS sLin ) 19. VT ('l. 5 'min. ) 14 62 (Ts min. ) XQ 44 , X5? x1AS a '. gutsy. Isagles fojt'~i'etige detereinstiona...

Mayfield, William Lloyd

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Female characters in Thomas Wolfe's four major novels: Look Homeward, Angel; Of Time and the River; The Web and the Rock; and You Can't Go Home Again.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ aqszeq aauy us 'BuTSSsu 'yes 'saTyp ~ Zq. Tsze~Tug eqq oq. m~ e~q. pygmy quqq. uTszq agq uo xgO au85~ mund egg Wyaas azs ueyea zeqsTs s~ pus zeqgom ttt!Tt; go tlT Sl!St: OZtt Ztt;g tttt OZBgattt'I. tlt etitttlA Za . Be l'tt' tttl1 exjujf'txoa ggf...ZgggueyT ylxs 89900'GB EzszegTT zan $$9Tlb 8rq QQTCey 8$9Aou za f sin zxioj 8 t 9+Qajtj uo'f &~ss QusSzp '8TGAalx zo f. sB zTLQ+ Gl[$ lx'f szegaszsqa 8 DiG~Gg eqg ~ 9 0". l ssx:0 o zeezsp eq. Tg GqtTt l GIMP/ $0 Aoyu j(X 9'lpga Zyeuueg g yzsqarjj 'p96j...

Sheffield, Jewell Frieda

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

A study of the determination of the end-point in volumetric analysis by means of the dielectric constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XX4 5gO SS Thgl ONLQAF CENO% l%4s0%04lll40 ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ 11144% 4 A STUART Oy TX)g SRTRRMZSATIO1 Oy TH% SNQ~POIWT XN VOLORlTIIO AKALTSXS SI %SAWS Oy TES OZSLROTRX0 O O RS TANT X?TROSUOTXIR Tbs aeaouroaoai of the 41eleetrlo eoasieai of suhstsssos... ~ lf e 0 ~ Q 50 0 ?10 w g ~ gg ~ Q ~ Q 't L' ' t 1 1 I 1 , r L. . I / y F I jl g 9' j l / / / t ' I L T +-? l + . l ll 4 T J- L r '1 1. + t V A $I%RXC ACX$ SOLOTX(R laster Rea4ia5 JNXeseaye le l0 54i0...

Mosesman, Max Abe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Experimental study of rotordynamic coefficients of squeeze film dampers of an aircraft gas turbine engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mlls 6 0 Fig. 15 Calibration of proximity probes(TX, TY) of GG?4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 -10 SY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 -10 mls RX lO 4 -6 0 -8 -10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 RY 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 -10 Fig. 16 Calibration of proximity probes (SX, SY... the graphs of flow rate versus oil supply pressure. 24 I 22 3~ e 18 16 14 12 10 70 80 90 1CO 110 120 180 140 180 160 170 180 190 2C0 210 220 280 240 Temp t F) Fig. 17 Oil viscosity (ISO 32) 27 Thrust bearing 0. 6 0. 5 m 04 ~ 03 o 0. 2 0...

Na, Uhn Joo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Two-Photon Correlations in Atomic Transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and m is the magnetic quantum number in the F repre- sentation. The two photons are represented as plane waves whose directions of travel are k, and k, , respectively, and whose helicities, +1, are denoted by a, and o, , respectively, Detector 1... effects, is S &X dO, dQ, 2 &o," l~(1)lo, &&c2 l~(2)lorn&l IQg ~ Qy 02 02 Pf ~ 7tl~~ y gf y Nlf gg SIQ 75I (-1) '"P(F, , m, )(2F +1)' && C(F1F, ; m, m, -m)C(FlF, ; m', m, ?m')C(F1F&, m, mz ?m) && C (FlF&, m ', m& ?m') W (J& JF& F; 1 I ) W (J&JF&F; 1I...

Fry, Edward

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lokaratna, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,segpeigpur ei g thmgfpseg fpu-mtb0gThmvg8mlrecg trg thmg8pesvpgapytmgapllmig ? ?na?t 0gThmvgpumgpg8 ysemyygarff estv0gThmvgpumgmecpcmigsegpcusa lt umg8 tgfrytlvg arffmuasplskmigpcusa lt um0gThmvgrLegusamgfslly0ggThmvgpumgy aamyyO lg8 ysemyyfmegpeig hp... Thmg Upeihp g y ddrymilv g thmg ruscsepl g sehp8stpety g rOg thmymg sllpcmy g simetsOv g thmfymlmy g pyg 4gBolangir District Gazetteer,1968 zpispysq0 g Thm g umlscsre g rO g thm g Upeihp g umrlmy g pur ei g mputh g Kriimyy g pei g rthmug umdumymetptsreyg...

Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Partial characterization of [alpha]-D-mannosidase deficient mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aqaLdwoo qsowLe uy '?stsoptdtLopnasd?paoeLdau azogauaqq uotq. eubtsap stqq '. stsoptsouuew aseastp uewn4 aqua paLqwasau nLaso(o uotg tpuoo aqua spueL6 qdwEL aqua go sLLao LetLaqgopuao(notgau pue suounau go saLonoett aqua. ut Letuaqew abeuoqs aqua...Leguoo -asouuew e po a6euogs aqua ul anblun gnq 'amoupuEs s, uaLunH 6ullqwas -au aseaslp a6e~ops pazL[ewaua6 e paqcuosap aH (gg6L) uewuaqop Eq ~apaosip oLg uoads e se pasoubeLp q. s~ 0 see sLsopisouuem uewnH 'goagap oLZemEzua aqq ~op sno6 -Ezoaagaq s(emcue ui...

Harper, Linda Louise

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environmental factors in relation to seedling necroses of cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COE LI O 1A ro q ?n LI H _st B AG LI Ov i CO ?*> CM CM e ? ? ? ?CJ Ia oFTRLI B XGLI OOCM L I BR AL Y &M &** -StLI GAAG LI vQO \\ NO NO t A B YSR B CM LI LH LI CM OK n CM o ? oo I -Ot n1 oo ^ &H eOOtr\\ ?ncM 0\\ LI _ a... nA sG B F?R _E B CO Y t A I A O LI LI ?+?? oStLI I 3 O COo o LI LI GG LI G LI LI P-'i LI B f t 1A* CO _=T l>- B B CM B B Os B F * LI B LI B? ? L I LI B sS> L I IL Y Y CO -vA LI EG YB LI LI B AG LG LI LI IA...

Das, Gopinath

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dark Energy in the Dark Ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

Eric V. Linder

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about 25% fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

Varun Sahni; Yuri Shtanov

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Iterative cellular array multiplier using overlapped four-bit scanning technique and its application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Qg Bs Q4 l4 Gs Hz G4 Hs G, Gp Hp Bp 0 FA8 FA4 FA1 FAO 1 Qrs Qw Brz Product 0 Hzs Hl 1 Gg Hs 0 FA16 FA12 FA9 Fig. 16. Logic Diagram of the Control Signals and the First Level CSA. 38 Z X V T R M K I H Y W U S N L I(+&& Q CSA CSA CSA...-tCSA + /sCLA (2. 38) (2+ 2 x 2+ 11)hg = 176g. Hence, the total delay time of the nonoverlapped two-bit scanning multiplier is /3T = +D-F/F + 8 X (17 + +D ? F/F) (4+ 21 x 8)A = 1726 . (2. 39) The occupied area is proportional to the (m + 1) operand...

Kim, Wu Woan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Grazing practices as a major factor in fire occurrence in the longleaf pine region of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . &o 9. n l3)II) bio ilrl' o. ' 0 lrregz PC3JZ Col nu3 Gccolinsi~'. fon CBG BG C PQ'pu3 'is Ic' n do I. B z 3 i I on 'I' 118 PGK dG orrdB BB ns sus dn tiG z -3vsal 'ci'IlQC Chs SBBGCGGC popu3 "Cion Csin i. GG 1m~de in lmndin Gnd I'olI& Conan. iss...;ii I ZOIIllc'GS SZQ BCCQSSX919 iield WQJ. l Ored ce j bi. e . ieve ouen ~pox'te?i i'c 'xxiprove 183. 3' pzccBQtiono a'ie IilIB3. 8?. 1 Iced. GBX'i &~ A. l 4118 prcc3. 61il BXQB xs Fiobo ioo83. 3 pOOX o derSQ j BXIO rehIXBB BX bile OXQI GIXin'lbing b...

Anderson, David Adair

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Biology, economic importance and chemical control of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. (J. E. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 40 ZHTgoDUCTXON Tho fall arcigcwsrn, 8gg~g ging~g (J ~ E. ChrLth), is f?ccnd in tbo tcscp?rate and tr?pi?el ~ of the &~?st?rn hcwcL~. This hueA pest ?as first de~ by lcd, th in ~ fron a specdncsc tahsn in GoorgLa (Beagisoni 1%9). Tho fa... ooonesie ~ te the Ratter oooo % dotoenino th? foa~~tr of ayylging Lnsoetioidos, the ooet of tsaatnent wast bo hei Jenmtedt and Seafood (19/8) found that the aswosgo east for aylA, "pbbs insootLsidos to yenaawnA ~ bp tho nso ef ~ aaehbiesy" +as g. . yes...

Wagner, Phil MacArthur

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

Allison, Kyle [University of Oxford; Hill, Christopher T. [FNAL; Ross, Graham G. [University of Oxford

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermally induced photon splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate thermal corrections to the non-linear QED effective action for low-energy photon interactions in a background electromagnetic field. The high-temperature expansion shows that at $T \\gg m$ the vacuum contribution is exactly cancelled to all orders in the external field except for a non-trivial two-point function contribution. The high-temperature expansion derived reveals a remarkable cancellation of infrared sensitive contributions. As a result photon-splitting in the presence of a magnetic field is suppressed in the presence of an electron-positron QED-plasma at very high temperatures. In a cold and dense plasma a similar suppression takes place. At the same time Compton scattering dominates for weak fields and the suppression is rarely important in physical situations.

Per Elmfors; Bo-Sture Skagerstam

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Quantum Control of Qubits and Atomic Motion Using Ultrafast Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pulsed lasers offer significant advantages over CW lasers in the coherent control of qubits. Here we review the theoretical and experimental aspects of controlling the internal and external states of individual trapped atoms with pulse trains. Two distinct regimes of laser intensity are identified. When the pulses are sufficiently weak that the Rabi frequency $\\Omega$ is much smaller than the trap frequency $\\otrap$, sideband transitions can be addressed and atom-atom entanglement can be accomplished in much the same way as with CW lasers. By contrast, if the pulses are very strong ($\\Omega \\gg \\otrap$), impulsive spin-dependent kicks can be combined to create entangling gates which are much faster than a trap period. These fast entangling gates should work outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime and be insensitive to thermal atomic motion.

J. Mizrahi; B. Neyenhuis; K. Johnson; W. C. Campbell; C. Senko; D. Hayes; C. Monroe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Infrared Singularities and Soft Gluon Resummation with Massive Partons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared divergences of QCD scattering amplitudes can be derived from an anomalous dimension matrix, which is also an essential ingredient for the resummation of large logarithms due to soft gluon emissions. We report a recent analytical calculation of the anomalous dimension matrix with both massless and massive partons at two-loop level, which describes the two-loop infrared singularities of any scattering amplitudes with an arbitrary number of massless and massive partons, and also enables soft gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic order. As an application, we calculate the infrared poles in the q qbar -> t tbar and gg -> t tbar scattering amplitudes at two-loop order.

A. Ferroglia; M. Neubert; B. D. Pecjak; L. L. Yang

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

A study of diffusion in binary solutions using spin echoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ )) 22)] sin 22 cos [a co (t. - 2; ) / I) 2] , (2-8) W(x, t) / cos el = -sin Bi sin 22 cos [D CO 2 / (() 22] cos 82 ~ (2-9) 13 If g(x)dx is the fraction of nuclei in the sample between x and x j dx and N is the equilibrium magnetization...'fusion coefficient, D, is given by Cx (t)) D 2t Substituting (2-20) into (2-18) and integrating, (gg) - 4+2Q2D(T'3 - P 2t j t3/6). (2 20) (2-21) 16 Letting t "- 2V in (2-21), (g)4. +GD 3 (2-22) Let h(2T ) denote the maximum height of the observed echo...

Rousseau, Cecil Clyde

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Charged-Higgs-boson production at the LHC: Next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dominant production process for heavy charged-Higgs bosons at the LHC is the associated production with heavy quarks. We have calculated the next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections to charged-Higgs production through the parton processes qq,gg{yields}tbH{sup {+-}} and present results for total cross sections and differential distributions. The QCD corrections reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence and thus stabilize the theoretical predictions. We present a comparison of the next-to-leading-order results for the inclusive cross section with a calculation based on bottom-gluon fusion gb{yields}tH{sup {+-}} and discuss the impact of the next-to-leading-order corrections on charged-Higgs searches at the LHC.

Dittmaier, Stefan; Kraemer, Michael; Spira, Michael; Walser, Manuel [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

Kyle Allison; Christopher T. Hill; Graham G. Ross

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Procedures employed in the verification of postings, footings, and ledger balances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

app??oint ion 989 &414& 55 115&54f &5? $5&lid& ae 15 & fs'F. BO 108 & $15& 04 1& $08& 48 $&944, 15 ?5&4$4, 05 e&?95&000&00 I&140&gg, oo? f 05 & 000& 00 I, 180 & 000& 00 4 8&9$5&455&95 4 sde&ff1&vo 4 sgesa&aod. ds l&odf &8$9&59 114&fde&04... Sd&i'd, oa 4{1) 159&40? 59, 4dl. ee 4&155&000&00 8&8?5&000, 00 (5) 958&dls&50 l&odf &889&58 je) 58, 44f, dd 114&fde&04 (F) 58&9?0. 00 $5 &905& BI s9. 411. 55 &e) sd, eef. s9? 4&154&000&00 I & 885 & 000& 00 10&954& 00 948&515& 50 1 & 155...

Sain, Carl

1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Search for supersymmetry in events with opposite-sign dileptons and missing transverse energy using an artificial neural network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decaying as ~g ! ~X02jj ! ~ X 0 1 #1;jj and the other as ~g ! ~X02jj. Here ~X 0 2 is the second-lightest neutralino, ~X01 is the lightest neutralino, and the LSP, and e, #2;, or #3; with equal probability. This SMS thus always leads to a pair....25 0.3 -1 = 7 TeV, L = 4.98 fbsCMS )g~q (m>>)~ LSP; m(-l+ l?o?,o? 2j+? g~ 2q+LSP,? g~g ,~g~?pp Ac ce pt an ce x e ffi cie nc y (GeV)g~m 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 (G eV ) o X~ m 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 -210 -110 1 10 -1 = 7 Te...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Transition from soft- to hard-Pomeron in the structure functions of hadrons at small-$x$ from holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the nucleon and pion structure functions at small Bjorken-$x$ region in the framework of holographic QCD with a special emphasis on the roles of AdS space wave functions. Using the BPST kernel for the Pomeron exchange and calculating its coupling to target hadrons in the AdS space, we obtain $F_2$ structure functions at the small-$x$. Results for the proton $F^p_2$ as well as the pion $F^\\pi_2$ are consistent with experimental data of the deep inelastic scattering and the forward electroproduction of a neutron. Observed $Q^2$ dependence of the Pomeron intercept is well reproduced from soft non-perturbatibve $(Q^2 \\sim 0)$ to hard perturbative $(Q^2 \\gg 1 GeV^2)$ region. We find the interplay between soft and hard Pomerons is closely related with behavior of AdS wave functions of hadrons and the virtual photon.

Akira Watanabe; Katsuhiko Suzuki

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The osteology of Bufo woodhousi, with comparison to Bufo terrestris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. UP FikTR'VQXt ~ Oa ~ 4'is' ~ 1 ~ 4 ~ ~ aa 4 ~ ' ~te isa:4 44 , 68 gPVjMATXO GP PXAL' XXa ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ aa ~ eie ~ ~ 44 ~ 4 ~ o' ~ 411 ~ 1st 'PO KK4'aTZQH 'QP. , PCS X 4 ~ ~ 4 4 ~ 4 a ~ ' ~ 4 4 4 ~ i 4 4' s ~ ~ 1 ~ i1 ta'4 14 4 4 i ~ ' AT/N 4j.... gg~ (p1. 76) ss coaaeoteg frees Sage+, ets eke ~ieger, . (M9lL) ~bo chs onLy Qx~icm ~ bo %ho snthox ef Vis, -~ of ~o ~lie - +~g cacI~~~g-. ~ ~ ) (p1. ZQ~ ~. gQ- sng 43). ? ciai?sy ~ Qo g~ge ~ontancv (~ en@ %OX) offices ~e, ~csea of the ~an ana...

Baldauf, Richard John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Repellents to prevent cattle browsing of pine seedlings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is little other green forage available. There have be n numerous theory co cnd. Opinions advas ed ac to why c"tule browse pinon?erhal. s the mst comon being that xhc cattle c 'o asm~lug gre. n feed end. there ls little other green vegetation availablo... jjv 0(x-, . oocrpv Gqx Jox (9TT+J~w 3UT. 'OJq-vov eqx Uaqn 9uepr(co GT 0 jtU, 'Gpujipao- etp. Co 90agga GGJG((pt( xo -6=:&p ei os jsq XTguapjrta GgUGTTG~TJ TTG '(Ig(I go UoyqcTaorca eqx tjtg[", 'sagJoguarcUZ 63smt(p atjt UT Jatj(63' pa(InoJ3 GJc9x E...

Duncan, Don Arlen

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al C01..1.litC.uvnl. ll L.irL:. uGo!J:putsr, t~liG is CnptlxLn JDllCB .,~irk ~Jf t~lC: uGG Lntcrpr-lsc ? .c)oe,in thirty SGC0YlU c,Ju(ltclo't,m.Cocio zoro~ zoro ?'oro,duGtruct zoro. 1! COL?p. 11'lll1.irty :J(. CUllI.1Bo ?? 00 ??? 1 Ki~$pock .? Ki...,lor tho bonofi t of our over scc,s ~,:.()r.ibvrs9 BooD is Dri tish DrvadcuBtinL Corporo.tion? affcctiolllcltcly l:no\\,Til as "Auntyl! ,'Tholl sJ.J.c? D been Lood. Thln~,s nrc looking v.p for tho club! ll.t tllC last count'lHc had. 43 Ueu()crs 1r.:.nc1...

399

Comparison of the effects of pressure and axial load on tapered connections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. OO RX1RL FQHii [LBS. ) (XI Qs } 120. 00 ll1II. 00 Figure 41. Axial Force versus Hoop Stress-Test 1 4. 65 2 7/0 iN. RPI EL~E LUNG-. 362 I', sLL-NBQ 10. 4 & C/) ~el to 3N Th * ' 1, 3, 8 X~~ +Theoretical, 1, 10, 5, 6 18, 10 68, 6 o o G N..., 6 e 58 6 18, 10 0. 0 I ? ?- 21. 00 02. 00 20. 00 04 GG F00, 00 120. 00 RX1RL EQREi iLBS. 1 &Xloa ) Figure 43. Axial Force versus Longitudinal Stress-Test T2. 67 o o 4 I/2 IN. BUTTRESS-. 430 NHLL-NBO 19. Q e o o o Ill rv- ID &o co V) o...

Till, Larry Percy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

The acoustic environment of a Gulf Stream cyclonic ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The SS curves have a normal succession of strong convergence and shadow zones that are usually present for a near-surface source in deep water. In the near field, transmission loss reaches 88 db at a distance of 5 km from the source and decreases 8..., and the receiver is at 260 m. 70 go cn /Oo C) I I I I I I I I I ll I ly II I J i I G CQ ~ //o /30 2O m qO SO CO 7G '80 PG /GG //G /A /JG R'0 /Sd /2 //G /ZG DI STili', CE (km} 57 Fig. 18 Transmission loss versus range for sound...

Owens, George Edward

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gg mace kp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of chirally motivated low-energy $K^-$ optical potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $K^-$ optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space $K^-N$ $t$ matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy $\\bar K N$ data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data {\\it plus} the $K^-$ atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive $K^-$ optical potentials are relatively `shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with $\\chi^2 / N \\approx 2.2$. Relatively `deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with $\\chi^2 / N \\approx 1.5$, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep $K^-$ optical potentials. The ($K^{-}_{\\rm stop},\\pi$) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potentials. Finally, forward ($K^-,p$) differential cross sections for the production of relatively narrow deeply bound $K^-$ {\\it nuclear} states are evaluated for deep $K^-$ optical potentials, yielding values considerably lower than those estimated before.

A. Cieply; E. Friedman; A. Gal; J. Mares

2001-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Interplay between MacDonald and Hall-Littlewood expansions of extended torus superpolynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In arXiv:1106.4305 extended superpolynomials were introduced for the torus links T[m,mk+r], which are functions on the entire space of time variables and, at expense of reducing the topological invariance, possess additional algebraic properties, resembling those of the matrix model partition functions and the KP/Toda tau-functions. Not surprisingly, being a suitable extension it actually allows one to calculate the superpolynomials. These functions are defined as expansions into MacDonald polynomials, and their dependence on k is entirely captured by the action of the cut-and-join operator, like in the HOMFLY case. We suggest a simple description of the coefficients in these character expansions, by expanding the initial (at k=0) conditions for the k-evolution into the new auxiliary basis, this time provided by the Hall-Littlewood polynomials, which, hence, play a role in the description of the dual m-evolution. For illustration we list manifest expressions for a few first series, mk\\pm 1, mk\\pm 2, mk\\pm 3, mk\\pm 4. Actually all formulas were explicitly tested up to m=17 strands in the braid.

A. Mironov; A. Morozov; Sh. Shakirov; A. Sleptsov

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Could the GRB-Supernovae GRB 031203 and XRF 060218 be Cosmic Twins?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gamma-ray burst (GRB) / X-ray flash (XRF) events GRB 031203, discovered by INTEGRAL, and XRF 060218, discovered by Swift, represent two of only five GRB-SNe with optical spectroscopic confirmation of their SN components. Yet their observed high-energy properties offer a sharp contrast: While GRB 031203 was detected as a short 40-s burst with a spectrum peaking at E_peak > 190 keV, XRF 060218 was a T_90 ~ 2100-s long, smoothly-evolving burst with peak energy E_peak = 4.9 keV. At the same time, the properties of the two expanding dust-scattered X-ray halos observed in a fast-response XMM-Newton observation of GRB 031203 reveal that this event was accompanied by an "X-ray blast" with fluence comparable to or greater than that of the prompt gamma-ray event. Taking this observation as our starting point, we investigate the likely properties of the X-ray blast from GRB 031203 via detailed modeling of the XMM data, discovering a third halo due to scattering off a more distant dust sheet at d_3 = 9.94 +/- 0.39 kp...

Feng, Lu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dynamics and variability of the plasmasphere observed from synchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of the cold ions in the outer plasmasphere is studied using data obtained with the magnetospheric plasma analyzers from multiple geosynchronous satellites. Dense (10-100 cm{sup {minus}3}), cold ({approx}1 eV) regions of plasma are often observed at geosynchronous orbit; in this study the authors refer to these as plasmaspheric intervals. The duration, local time of observation, density variability, and temperature behavior within these regions often depend in a systematic way on geomagnetic and substorm activity. With increasing geomagnetic activity (as indicated by Kp) the plasmaspheric regions are generally observed over shorter durations and at earlier local times. With increasing substorm activity (as indicated by geosynchronous energetic electron injections) the density becomes increasingly variable in these regions. Occasionally, up to order-of-magnitude density variations are observed over several minute timescales corresponding to regions with physical dimensions on the order of 1000 km or less. The appearance of these short-duration, cold-plasma intervals is strongly correlated with energetic ion and electron signatures both at the spacecraft making the plasmaspheric observations and at other spacecraft observing simultaneously in the midnight region. Such energetic particle signatures are indicative of the growth and expansive phase of geomagnetic substorms. The authors conclude that the appearance of these short-duration, plasmaspheric intervals is due to a reconfiguration of the duskside magnetosphere during geomagnetic substorms.

Moldwin, M.B.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director`s Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Investigation on transition behavior and electrical properties of (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 1-x}Li{sub x}Nb{sub 0.84}Ta{sub 0.1}Sb{sub 0.06}O{sub 3} around polymorphic phase transition region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 1-x}Li{sub x}Nb{sub 0.84}Ta{sub 0.1}Sb{sub 0.06}O{sub 3} (KNLNTS) lead free ceramics with different Li concentration were fabricated by conventional solid-state reaction method. By increasing Li ions in KNLNTS, the grains grow up and the crystal structure changes from orthorhombic to tetragonal. When 0.03 ? x ? 0.05, the ceramics structure lays in PPT region. Polarization versus electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops at room temperature show good ferroelectric properties and the remnant polarization decreases by increasing Li content while coercive electric keeps almost unchanged. In PPT region, taking x = 0.04 as an example, the sample shows excellent dielectric properties: the dielectric constant is 1159 and loss tangent is 0.04, while the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} is 245 pC/N and kp is 0.44 at room temperature, it is promising for (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 1-x}Li{sub x}Nb{sub 0.84}Ta{sub 0.1}Sb{sub 0.06}O{sub 3} with 4 at. % Li to substitute PZT.

Zhu, Chen; Wang, Wenchao; Shi, Honglin; Wang, Fangyu; Cao, Yongge [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, P R China (China) [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, P R China (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Huang, Jiquan; Wang, Chong [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Tang, Fei; Yuan, Xuanyi, E-mail: yuanxuanyi@ruc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, P R China (China)] [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, P R China (China); Liu, Yang [School of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Shaoguan University, Shaoguan 512005 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Shaoguan University, Shaoguan 512005 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m{sub Kp} = 11.6, T{sub eff} = 5576 K, M{sub *} = 0.98 M{sub ?}). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 0.2 R{sub ?}, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M{sub ?} (3?). The host star has a high obliquity (? = 104), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.

Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lund, Mikkel N. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); and others

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

A study of the influence of vitamins, antibiotics and amino acids in the diet on the amino acid content of the plasma of chicks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' s.tGvcatvr hdrr.). du E.7vl ac ?v^}avr ufruarrA.c} du }G. ^.wfa^.A.c}l ud^ }G. '.)^.. du NChECg CV nMBKCHCnML TUDO badtG.Aal}^o vc' Pf}^a}adc FhyPCo?K,Nk,s,PEH EG. vf}Gd^ 1alG.l }d .7?^.ll Gal v??^.tav}adc vc' }Gvc(l }d Kp gp gatGv^'ldc ud^ Gal... v'3at. vc' G.r? 1a}G }G. 1d^( dc }Gal ^ vc' 1a}G }Gal Avcflt^a?}i }d N^p hp sp KoAvc ud^ Gal G.r? vc' v' ac l.}}ac) f? }G. Aat^dmadrd)atvr vllvoli vc' }d Gal 1au. ud^ G. ?v}a.ct. vc' fc'.^l}vc'ac) 1Gar. }Gal 1d^( 1vl ac ?^d)^.llp >T-*<6 EFbKn CV...

Blaylock, Lynn

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Measurement of the strong interaction induced shift and width of the 1s state of kaonic deuterium at J-PARC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The antikaon-nucleon interaction close to threshold provides crucial information on the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. In this context the importance of kaonic deuterium X-ray spectroscopy has been well recognized, but no experimental results have yet been obtained due to the difficulty of the measurement. We propose to measure the shift and width of the kaonic deuterium 1s state with an accuracy of 60 eV and 140 eV respectively at J-PARC. These results together with the kaonic hydrogen data (KpX at KEK, DEAR and SIDDHARTA at DAFNE) will then permit the determination of values of both the isospin I=0 and I=1 antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths and will provide the most stringent constraints on the antikaon-nucleon interaction, promising a breakthrough. Refined Monte Carlo studies were performed, including the investigation of background suppression factors for the described setup. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of determining the shift and width of the kaonic deuterium atom 1s state with the desired accuracy of 60 eV and 140 eV.

J. Zmeskal; M. Sato; S. Ajimura; M. Bazzi; G. Beer; C. Berucci; H. Bhang; D. Bosnar; M. Bragadireanu; P. Buehler; L. Busso; M. Cargnelli; S. Choi; A. Clozza; C. Curceanu; A. D'uffizi; S. Enomoto; L. Fabbietti; D. Faso; C. Fiorini; H. Fujioka; F. Ghio; R. Golser; C. Guaraldo; T. Hashimoto; R. S. Hayano; T. Hiraiwa; M. Iio; M. Iliescu; K. Inoue; S. Ishimoto; T. Ishiwatari; K. Itahashi; M. Iwai; M. Iwasaki; S. Kawasaki; J. Lachner; P. Levi Sandri; Y. Ma; J. Marton; Y. Matsuda; Y. Mizoi; O. Morra; P. Moskal; T. Nagae; H. Noumi; H. Ohnishi; S. Okada; H. Outa; D. Pietreanu; K. Piscicchia; M. Poli Lener; A. Romero Vidal; Y. Sada; A. Sakaguchi; F. Sakuma; E. Sbardella; A. Scordo; M. Sekimoto; H. Shi; M. Silarski; D. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; T. Suzuki; K. Tanida; H. Tatsuno; M. Tokuda; A. Toyoda; I. Tucakovic; K. Tsukada; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; T. Yamaga; T. Yamazaki; Q. Zhang

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Search for b--> u transitions in B- -> [K+pi-pi0]_D K-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K+pi-pi0. This final state can be reached through the b --> c transition B- -> D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi-pi0, or the b --> u transition B- --> D0bar K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+ pi-pi 0. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. We present preliminary results based on 226 10^{6} e+e- --> Y(4s) --> BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no significant evidence for these decays and we set a limit R_ADS =(BR(B- -->[K+pi-pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K-pi+pi0]_D K+))/(BR(B- -->[K-p i+pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K+pi-pi0]_D K+)) D0bar K-)|/|A(B- --> D0bar K-)| < 0.185 at 95% confidence level.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The basic K nuclear cluster K- pp and its enhanced formation in the p + p -> K+ + X reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the structure of K- pp nuclear cluster comprehensively by solving this three-body system exactly in a variational method starting from the Ansatz that the Lambda(1405) resonance (Lambda*) is a K-p bound state. We have found that our original prediction for the presence of K-pp as a compact bound system with M = 2322$ MeV/c2, B = 48 MeV and Gamma = 60 MeV remains unchanged by varying the Kba-rN and NN interactions widely as far as they reproduce Lambda(1405). The structure of K- pp reveals a molecular feature, namely, the K- in Lambda* as an "atomic center" plays a key role in producing strong covalent bonding with the other proton. We have shown that the elementary process, p + p -> K+ + Lambda* + p, which occurs in a short impact parameter and with a large momentum transfer (Q ~ 1.6$ GeV/c), leads to unusually large self-trapping of Lambda* by the participating proton, since the Lambda*-p system exists as a compact doorway state propagating to K- pp (R{Lambda*-p} ~ 1.67 fm).

Toshimitsu Yamazaki; Yoshinori Akaishi

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Composition dependent valence band order in c-oriented wurtzite AlGaN layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The valence band order of polar wurtzite aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers is analyzed for a dense series of samples, grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire substrates, covering the complete composition range. The excitonic transition energies, found by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, were corrected to the unstrained state using input from X-ray diffraction. k?p theory yields a critical relative aluminum concentration x{sub c}=(0.090.05) for the crossing of the uppermost two valence bands for strain free material, shifting to higher values for compressively strained samples, as supported by polarization dependent PL. The analysis of the strain dependent valence band crossing reconciles the findings of other research groups, where sample strain was neglected. We found a bowing for the energy band gap to the valence band with ?{sub 9} symmetry of b{sub ?{sub 9}}=0.85eV, and propose a possible bowing for the crystal field energy of b{sub cf}=?0.12eV. A comparison of the light extraction efficiency perpendicular and parallel to the c axis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N quantum well structures is discussed for different compositions.

Neuschl, B., E-mail: benjamin.neuschl@uni-ulm.de; Helbing, J.; Knab, M.; Lauer, H.; Madel, M.; Thonke, K. [Institute of Quantum Matter / Semiconductor Physics Group, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Meisch, T.; Forghani, K.; Scholz, F. [Institute of Optoelectronics, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Feneberg, M. [Institut fr Experimentelle Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitt Magdeburg, Universittsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

A theoretical analysis of the optical absorption properties in one-dimensional InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present theoretical investigations of miniband structures and optical properties of InAs/GaAs one-dimensional quantum dot superlattices (1D-QDSLs). The calculation is based on the multi-band kp theory, including the conduction and valence band mixing effects, the strain effect, and the piezoelectric effect; all three effects have periodic boundary conditions. We find that both the electronic and optical properties of the 1D-QDSLs show unique states which are different from those of well known single quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wires. We predict that the optical absorption spectra of the 1D-QDSLs strongly depend on the inter-dot spacing because of the inter-dot carrier coupling and changing strain states, which strongly influence the conduction and valence band potentials. The inter-miniband transitions form the absorption bands. Those absorption bands can be tuned from almost continuous (closely stacked QD case) to spike-like shape (almost isolated QD case) by changing the inter-dot spacing. The polarization of the lowest absorption peak for the 1D-QDSLs changes from being parallel to the stacking direction to being perpendicular to the stacking direction as the inter-dot spacing increases. In the case of closely stacked QDs, in-plane anisotropy, especially [110] and [11{sup }0] directions also depend on the inter-dot spacing. Our findings and predictions will provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of QD-based optoelectronic devices.

Kotani, Teruhisa, E-mail: kotani.teruhisa@sharp.co.jp [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, 2613-1 Ichinomoto-cho, Tenri, Nara 632-8567 (Japan); Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Arcisstr. 21, 80333 Munich (Germany); Birner, Stefan [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Arcisstr. 21, 80333 Munich (Germany); Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lugli, Paolo [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Arcisstr. 21, 80333 Munich (Germany); Hamaguchi, Chihiro [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, 2613-1 Ichinomoto-cho, Tenri, Nara 632-8567 (Japan)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

416

Measurement of the strong interaction induced shift and width of the 1s state of kaonic deuterium at J-PARC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The antikaon-nucleon interaction close to threshold provides crucial information on the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. In this context the importance of kaonic deuterium X-ray spectroscopy has been well recognized, but no experimental results have yet been obtained due to the difficulty of the measurement. We propose to measure the shift and width of the kaonic deuterium 1s state with an accuracy of 60 eV and 140 eV respectively at J-PARC. These results together with the kaonic hydrogen data (KpX at KEK, DEAR and SIDDHARTA at DAFNE) will then permit the determination of values of both the isospin I=0 and I=1 antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths and will provide the most stringent constraints on the antikaon-nucleon interaction, promising a breakthrough. Refined Monte Carlo studies were performed, including the investigation of background suppression factors for the described setup. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of determining the shift a...

Zmeskal, J; Ajimura, S; Bazzi, M; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bhang, H; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, M; Buehler, P; Busso, L; Cargnelli, M; Choi, S; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; D'uffizi, A; Enomoto, S; Fabbietti, L; Faso, D; Fiorini, C; Fujioka, H; Ghio, F; Golser, R; Guaraldo, C; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hiraiwa, T; Iio, M; Iliescu, M; Inoue, K; Ishimoto, S; Ishiwatari, T; Itahashi, K; Iwai, M; Iwasaki, M; Kawasaki, S; Lachner, J; Sandri, P Levi; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Matsuda, Y; Mizoi, Y; Morra, O; Moskal, P; Nagae, T; Noumi, H; Ohnishi, H; Okada, S; Outa, H; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Lener, M Poli; Vidal, A Romero; Sada, Y; Sakaguchi, A; Sakuma, F; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sekimoto, M; Shi, H; Silarski, M; Sirghi, D; Sirghi, F; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, T; Tanida, K; Tatsuno, H; Tokuda, M; Toyoda, A; Tucakovic, I; Tsukada, K; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Yamaga, T; Yamazaki, T; Zhang, Q

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gamma-ray halo around the M31 galaxy as seen by the Fermi LAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories of galaxy formation predict the existence of extended gas halo around spiral galaxies. If there are 10-100 nG magnetic fields at several ten kpc distances from the galaxies, extended galactic cosmic ray (CR) haloes could also exist. Galactic CRs could interact with the tenuous hot halo gas to produce observable $\\gamma$-rays. In this paper we have performed search for such a halo around the M31 galaxy -- the closest large spiral galaxy. Our analysis of 5.5 years of the Fermi LAT data revealed the presence of a spatially extended emission excess around M31. The data can be fitted using the simplest morphology of a uniformly bright circle. The best fit gave a 4.4$\\sigma$ significance for a $3^{\\circ}$ (40 kpc) halo with photon flux of $\\sim (1.9\\pm1.1)\\times 10^{-9} ~\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ and luminosity $(8.4\\pm4.6)\\times 10^{38} ~\\mathrm{erg~s^{-1}}$ in the energy range 0.3--100 GeV. The presence of such a halo compellingly shows that a 10-100 nG magnetic field should extend around M31 up to a 40 kp...

Pshirkov, M S; Postnov, K A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediateband  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using widegap matrix material, InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs, for realizing intermediateband solar cells (IBSCs) with twostep photonabsorption. The planewave expanded BurtForeman operator ordered 8band kp theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of twostep photonabsorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, which is latticematched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of twostep photonabsorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

Yoshikawa, H., E-mail: yoshikawa-hirofumi@sharp.co.jp; Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C. [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation Tenri, Nara 632-8567 (Japan)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

419

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effective growth of matter density fluctuations in the running LCDM and LXCDM models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the matter density fluctuations \\delta\\rho/\\rho for two dark energy (DE) models in the literature in which the cosmological term \\Lambda is a running parameter. In the first model, the running LCDM model, matter and DE exchange energy, whereas in the second model, the LXCDM model, the total DE and matter components are conserved separately. The LXCDM model was proposed as an interesting solution to the cosmic coincidence problem. It includes an extra dynamical component, the "cosmon" X, which interacts with the running \\Lambda, but not with matter. In our analysis we make use of the current value of the linear bias parameter, b^2(0)= P_{GG}/P_{MM}, where P_{MM} ~ (\\delta\\rho/\\rho)^2 is the present matter power spectrum and P_{GG} is the galaxy fluctuation power spectrum. The former can be computed within a given model, and the latter is found from the observed LSS data (at small z) obtained by the 2dF galaxy redshift survey. It is found that b^2(0)=1 within a 10% accuracy for the standard LCDM model. Adopting this limit for any DE model and using a method based on the effective equation of state for the DE, we can set a limit on the growth of matter density perturbations for the running LCDM model, the solution of which is known. This provides a good test of the procedure, which we then apply to the LXCDM model in order to determine the physical region of parameter space, compatible with the LSS data. In this region, the LXCDM model is consistent with known observations and provides at the same time a viable solution to the cosmic coincidence problem.

Javier Grande; Reuven Opher; Ana Pelinson; Joan Sola

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Single top-quark production by strong and electroweak supersymmetric flavor-changing interactions at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) We report on a complete study of the single top-quark production by direct supersymmetric flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) processes at the LHC. The total cross section for pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c is computed at the 1-loop order within the unconstrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The present study extends the results of the supersymmetric strong effects (SUSY-QCD), which were advanced by some of us in a previous work, and includes the computation of the full supersymmetric electroweak corrections (SUSY-EW). Our analysis of pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c in the MSSM has been performed in correspondence with the stringent low-energy constraints from b->s gamma. In the most favorable scenarios, the SUSY-QCD contribution can give rise to production rates of around 10^5 events per 100 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. Furthermore, we show that there exist regions of the MSSM parameter space where the SUSY-EW correction becomes sizeable. In the SUSY-EW favored regions, one obtains lower, but still appreciable, event production rates that can reach the 10^3 level for the same range of integrated luminosity. We study also the possible reduction in the maximum event rate obtained from the full MSSM contribution if we additionally include the constraints from B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s. In view of the fact that the FCNC production of heavy quark pairs of different flavors is extremely suppressed in the SM, the detection of a significant number of these events could lead to evidence of new physics -- of likely supersymmetric origin.

David Lopez-Val; Jaume Guasch; Joan Sola

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170C and 405C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

On formation rate of close binaries consisting of a super-massive black hole and a white dwarf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation rate of a close binary consisting of a super-massive black hole and a compact object (presumably a white dwarf) in galactic cusps is calculated with help of the so-called loss cone approximation. For a power low cusp of radius $r_{a}$, the black hole mass $M\\sim 10^{6}M_{\\odot}$, this rate $\\dot N_{wd}\\sim 4\\cdot 10^{-5}K(p}\\sqrt{{GM\\over r_{a}^{3}}}\\approx 3\\cdot 10^{-9}K(p){({M\\over 10^{6}M_{\\odot}})}^{1/2}{({r_{a}\\over 1pc})}^{-3/2}yr^{-1}$. The function $K(p)$ depends on parameter $p$ determining the cusp profile, and for the standard cusp profiles with $p=1/4$ $K(p)\\sim 2$. We estimate the probability ${\\it Pr}$ of finding of a compact object orbiting around a black hole with period $P$ in one particular galaxy to be ${\\it Pr}\\sim 10^{-7}{({P/10^{3}s\\over M/10^{6}M_{\\odot}})}^{8/3} {({M/10^{6}M_{\\odot}\\over r_{a}/ 1pc})}^{3/2}$. The object with the period $P\\sim 10^{3} s$ emits gravitational waves with amplitude sufficient to be detected by LISA type gravitational wave anatenna from the distance $\\sim 10^{3}Mpc$. Based on estimates of masses of super-massive black holes in nearby galaxies, we speculate that LISA would detect several such events during its mission.

P. B. Ivanov

2002-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Determining the ecological viability of constructed wetlands for the treatment of oil sands wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the conditions for optimal degradation of naphthenic acids (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+z}O{sub 2}), the most toxic component of oil sands wastewater, the authors have monitored the mineralization of 2 representative naphthenic acids (NA), U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid (linear, Z = 0) and 8-{sup 14}C-decahydro-2-naphthoic acid (bicyclic, Z = {minus}4) under varying conditions of temperature, phosphate and oxygen. The radiolabeled NA was added to biometer flasks containing wastewater {+-} amendments and evolved {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} was trapped in a side arm and counted by LSC. The results indicate that low temperature (5 C) and anaerobiasis greatly inhibited NA degradation over the four week incubation period. Addition of phosphate (as buffered KP{sub i}) significantly increased {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} production for both Z = 0 and Z = {minus}4 compounds; however, the subsequent high microbial growth rates also decreased PO{sub 2} which limited NA mineralization. Effluent toxicity was monitored at week 0 and week 4 using Microtox and fathead minnow tests. Although there was increased survival of fathead minnows in the phosphate-amended effluent, the IC{sub 20} values of the Microtox assay showed no improvement in either the phosphate-treated or untreated effluents. These results show that naphthenic acid analogues are readily degraded by indigenous microorganisms in oil sands wastewater and that phosphate addition accelerated the mineralization of these compounds if PO{sub 2} remained high.

Lai, J.; Kiehlmann, E.; Pinto, L.; Bendell-Young, L.; Moore, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Nix, P. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geologic/geochemical investigation in the vicinity of UPR-200-E-82 was performed using pairs of cone-penetrometer probe holes. A total of 41 direct-push cone-penetrometer borings (19 pairs to investigate different high moisture zones in the same sampling location and 3 individual) were advanced to characterize vadose zone moisture and the distribution of contaminants. A total of twenty sample sets, containing up to two split-spoon liners and one grab sample, were delivered to the laboratory for characterization and analysis. The samples were collected around the documented location of the C-152 pipeline leak, and created an approximately 120-ft diameter circle around the waste site. UPR-200-E-82 was a loss of approximately 2,600 gallons of Cs-137 Recovery Process feed solution containing an estimated 11,300 Ci of cesium-137 and 5 Ci of technetium-99. Several key parameters that are used to identify subsurface contamination were measured, including: water extract pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, technetium-99, sodium, and uranium concentrations and technetium-99 and uranium concentrations in acid extracts. All of the parameters, with the exception of electrical conductivity, were elevated in at least some of the samples analyzed as part of this study. Specifically, soil pH was elevated (from 8.69 to 9.99) in five samples collected northeast and southwest of the C-152 pipeline leak. Similarly, samples collected from these same cone-pentrometer holes contained significantly more water-extractable sodium (more than 50 ?g/g of dry sediment), uranium (as much as 7.66E-01 ?g/g of dry sediment), nitrate (up to 30 ?g/g of dry sediment), and technetium-99 (up to 3.34 pCi/g of dry sediment). Most of the samples containing elevated concentrations of water-extractable sodium also had decreased levels of water extractable calcium and or magnesium, indicating that tank-related fluids that were high in sodium did seep into the vadose zone near these probe holes. Several of the samples containing high concentrations of water-leachable uranium also contained high pore water corrected alkalinity (3.26E+03 mg/L as CaCO3), indicating that the elevated water-leachable uranium could be an artifact of uranyl-carbonate complexation of naturally occurring labile uranium. However, a mass scan of the water extract containing the highest concentration of uranium was performed via inductively coupled mass spectrometry over the range of 230 to 240 atomic mass units, and a discernable peak was observed at mass 236. Although the data is considered qualitative, the presence of uranium-236 in the 1:1 sediment:water extract is a clear indication that the sample contains contaminant uranium [Hanford reprocessed fuel waste]. After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone surrounding the C-152 pipeline leak site has been contaminated by waste generally sent to tanks. The two zones or regions that contained the largest amount of contaminants, either in concentration or by occurrence of several key constituents/contaminants of concern, were located: 1) between the 241-C-151 and 241-C-152 Diversion Boxes (near the location of UPR-200-E-82) and 2) directly across the C-152 waste site near the C-153 Diversion Box (near where a pipeline, which connects the two diversion boxes, is shown on old blue prints . Without the use of more sophisticated analytical techniques, such as isotope signature analysis of ruthenium fission product isotopes, it is impossible to determine if the contamination observed at these two locations are from the same waste source or are a result of different leak events.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

427

Final Report for Project DE-FC02-06ER25755 [Pmodels2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we describe the research accomplished by the OSU team under the Pmodels2 project. The team has worked on various angles: designing high performance MPI implementations on modern networking technologies (Mellanox InfiniBand (including the new ConnectX2 architecture and Quad Data Rate), QLogic InfiniPath, the emerging 10GigE/iWARP and RDMA over Converged Enhanced Ethernet (RoCE) and Obsidian IB-WAN), studying MPI scalability issues for multi-thousand node clusters using XRC transport, scalable job start-up, dynamic process management support, efficient one-sided communication, protocol offloading and designing scalable collective communication libraries for emerging multi-core architectures. New designs conforming to the Argonnes Nemesis interface have also been carried out. All of these above solutions have been integrated into the open-source MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 software. This software is currently being used by more than 2,100 organizations worldwide (in 71 countries). As of January 14, more than 200,000 downloads have taken place from the OSU Web site. In addition, many InfiniBand vendors, server vendors, system integrators and Linux distributors have been incorporating MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 into their software stacks and distributing it. Several InfiniBand systems using MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 have obtained positions in the TOP500 ranking of supercomputers in the world. The latest November 13 ranking include the following systems: 7th ranked Stampede system at TACC with 462,462 cores; 11th ranked Tsubame 2.5 system at Tokyo Institute of Technology with 74,358 cores; 16th ranked Pleiades system at NASA with 81,920 cores; Work on PGAS models has proceeded on multiple directions. The Scioto framework, which supports taskparallelism in one-sided and global-view parallel programming, has been extended to allow multi-processor tasks that are executed by processor groups. A quantum Monte Carlo application is being ported onto the extended Scioto framework. A public release of Global Trees (GT) has been made, along with the Global Chunks (GC) framework on which GT is built. The Global Chunks (GC) layer is also being used as the basis for the development of a higher level Global Graphs (GG) layer. The Global Graphs (GG) system will provide a global address space view of distributed graph data structures on distributed memory systems.

Panda, Dhabaleswar; Sadayappan, P

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2?microglobulin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 ?g/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 ?g/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 ?g/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary ?2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (? = 1.2, 95% CI 0.721.6) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.30, 95% CI 0.150.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (? = 0.55, 95% CI 0.270.84) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.018, 95% CI ? 0.790.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ? Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ? The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ? A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ? Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ? The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

Lei, Lijian [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi (China); Chang, Xiuli [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Rentschler, Gerda [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden); Tian, Liting [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jin, Taiyi, E-mail: tyjinster@gmail.com [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Broberg, Karin, E-mail: karin.broberg_palmgren@med.lu.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

On unique parametrization of the linear group GL(4.C) and its subgroups by using the Dirac matrix algebra basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A unifying overview of the ways to parameterize the linear group GL(4.C) and its subgroups is given. As parameters for this group there are taken 16 coefficients G = G(A,B,A_{k}, B_{k}, F_{kl}) in resolving matrix G in terms of 16 basic elements of the Dirac matrix algebra. Alternatively to the use of 16 tensor quantities, the possibility to parameterize the group GL(4.C) with the help of four 4-dimensional complex vectors (k, m, n, l) is investigated. The multiplication rules G'G are formulated in the form of a bilinear function of two sets of 16 variables. The detailed investigation is restricted to 6-parameter case G(A, B, F_{kl}), which provides us with spinor covering for the complex orthogonal group SO(3.1.C). The complex Euler's angles parametrization for the last group is also given. Many different parametrizations of the group based on the curvilinear coordinates for complex extension of the 3-space of constant curvature are discussed. The use of the Newmann-Penrose formalism and applying quaternion techniques in the theory of complex Lorentz group are considered. Connections between Einstein-Mayer study on semi-vectors and Fedorov's treatment of the Lorentz group theory are stated in detail. Classification of fermions in intrinsic parities is given on the base of the theory of representations for spinor covering of the complex Lorentz group.

A. A. Bogush; V. M. Red'kov

2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

430

Physical Constraints on, and a Model for, the Active Regions in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss several physical constraints on the nature of the Active Regions (AR) in Seyfert 1 Galaxies, and show that a plausible model consistent with these constraints is one in which the ARs are magnetically confined and ``fed''. The unique X-ray index of these sources points to a large compactness parameter ($l\\gg 1$). This, together with the conditions required to account for the observed optical depth being close to unity, suggests that the magnetic energy density in the AR should be comparable to the equipartition value in the accretion disk, and that it should be released in a flare-like event above the surface of the cold accretion disk. We consider the various issues pertaining to magnetic flares and attempt to construct a coherent picture, including a reason for the optical depth in the AR being $\\sim 1$, and an understanding of the characteristics of the X-ray reflection component and the power density spectra associated with this high-energy emission.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Combined upper limit for SM Higgs at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels (WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b}) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95%C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Penning, Bjorn; /Fermilab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

Kunze, Kerstin E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Black Hole Evaporation in the Presence of a Short Distance Cutoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A derivation of the Hawking effect is given which avoids reference to field modes above some cutoff frequency $\\omega_c\\gg M^{-1}$ in the free-fall frame of the black hole. To avoid reference to arbitrarily high frequencies, it is necessary to impose a boundary condition on the quantum field in a timelike region near the horizon, rather than on a (spacelike) Cauchy surface either outside the horizon or at early times before the horizon forms. Due to the nature of the horizon as an infinite redshift surface, the correct boundary condition at late times outside the horizon cannot be deduced, within the confines of a theory that applies only below the cutoff, from initial conditions prior to the formation of the hole. A boundary condition is formulated which leads to the Hawking effect in a cutoff theory. It is argued that it is possible the boundary condition is {\\it not} satisfied, so that the spectrum of black hole radiation may be significantly different from that predicted by Hawking, even without the back-reaction near the horizon becoming of order unity relative to the curvature.

Ted Jacobson

1993-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

Pi-Josephson Junction and Spontaneous Superflow in Rings from Ultracold Fermionic Atomic Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The BCS-like pairing in ultracold fermionic atomic ($UCFAG$) gases is studied in the model of "isotopic-spin" pairing proposed in 1991 \\cite% {Ku-Hof-SSC}. This model assumes a mismatch ($\\delta $) in chemical potentials of pairing fermionic atoms. It is shown that a $\\pi $-Josephson junction can be realized in $UCFAG$ systems, where the left and right banks $% S$ are the $UCFAG$ superfluids. The weak link $M$ consists from the normal $% UCFAG$ with the finite mismatch $\\delta $. If the $\\pi $-junction is a part of a closed ring the superfluid mass-current flows spontaneously in the ring, i.e., the time-reversal symmetry is broken spontaneously. This is realized if the radius of the ring $R$ is larger than the critical one $% R_{c} $. All these effects exist also in the case when $\\delta \\gg \\Delta $, where $\\Delta $ is the superfluid gap, but with the reduced thickness of the weak link. It is also discussed, that if junctions $SM_{1}M_{2}S$ and trilayers $% M_{1}SM_{2}$ from $UCFAG$ are realizable this renders a possibility for a novel electronics - \\textit{hypertronics}.

Miodrag L. Kulic

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Space-like Dp branes: accelerating cosmologies versus conformally de Sitter space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the space-like D$p$ brane solutions of type II string theories having isometries ISO$(p+1)$ $\\times$ SO$(8-p,1)$. These are asymptotically flat solutions or in other words, the metrics become flat at the time scale $\\tau \\gg \\tau_0$. On the other hand, when $\\tau \\sim \\tau_0$, we get $(p+1)+1$ dimensional flat FLRWmetrics upon compactification on a $(8-p)$ dimensional hyperbolic space with time dependent radii. We show that the resultant $(p+1)+1$ dimensional metrics describe transient accelerating cosmologies for all $p$ from 1 to 6, i.e., from $(2+1)$ to $(7+1)$ space-time dimensions. We show how the acceleration changes with the interplay of the various parameters characterizing the solutions in $(3+1)$ dimensions. Finally, for $\\tau \\ll \\tau_0$, after compactification on $(8-p)$ dimensional hyperbolic space, the resultant metrics are shown to take the form of $(p+1)+1$ dimensional de Sitter spaces upto a conformal transformation. Cosmologies here are decelerating, but, only in a particular conformal frame we get eternal acceleration.

Kuntal Nayek; Shibaji Roy

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Electric charge in the field of a magnetic event in three-dimensional spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the motion of an electric charge in the field of a magnetically charged event in three-dimensional spacetime. We start by exhibiting a first integral of the equations of motion in terms of the three conserved components of the spacetime angular momentum, and then proceed numerically. After crossing the light cone of the event, an electric charge initially at rest starts rotating and slowing down. There are two lengths appearing in the problem: (i) the characteristic length $\\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, where $q$ and $m$ are the electric charge and mass of the particle, and $g$ is the magnetic charge of the event; and (ii) the spacetime impact parameter $r_0$. For $r_0 \\gg \\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, after a time of order $r_0$, the particle makes sharply a quarter of a turn and comes to rest at the same spatial position at which the event happened in the past. This jump is the main signature of the presence of the magnetic event as felt by an electric charge. A derivation of the expression for the angular momentum that uses Noether's theorem in the magnetic representation is given in the Appendix.

Claudio Bunster; Cristian Martinez

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

Xylose fermentation to ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson ($V$ = $W$ or $Z$) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain $VH$ production followed by $H$ decaying to invisible particles for the Higgs mass range $115gg\\rightarrow H$ contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78% at 95% confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons dec...

Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damin; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jrg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Non-locality and viscous drag effects on the shear localisation in soft-glassy materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Couette flow of a quasi-2d soft-glassy material in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The material is chosen to be above the jamming point, where a yield stress $\\sigma_Y$ emerges, below which the material deforms elastically and above which it flows like a complex fluid according to a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. Simultaneously, the effect of the confining plates is modelled as an effective linear friction law, while the walls aside the Hele-Shaw cell are sufficiently close to each other to allow visible cooperativity effects in the velocity profiles (Goyon et al., Nature 454, 84-87 (2008)). The effects of cooperativity are parametrized with a steady-state diffusion-relaxation equation for the fluidity field $f = \\dot{\\gamma}/\\sigma$, defined as the ratio between shear rate $\\dot{\\gamma}$ and shear stress $\\sigma$. For particular rheological flow-curves (Bingham fluids), the problem is tackled analytically: we explore the two regimes $\\sigma \\gg \\sigma_Y$ and $\\sigma \\approx \\sigma_Y$ and quantify the effect of the extra localisation induced by the wall friction. Other rheo-thinning fluids are explored with the help of numerical simulations based on lattice Boltzmann models, revealing a robustness of the analytical findings. Synergies and comparisons with other existing works in the literature (Barry et al., Phil. Mag. Lett. 91, 432-440 (2011)) are also discussed.

Andrea Scagliarini; Benjamin Dollet; Mauro Sbragaglia

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

The treatment of love in four George Eliot novels: Adam Bede, The mill on the Floss, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ea~ e5e ~~me eZ %ewe fern ~m mv'e3. 8 '5y ~~ SX, f. eg 1@ eW~~ W e~s lee C~W~X8 QQCXSZ@Q~~BIO'4D Qf. 45&0 ~5TNRSq CIVQA NOW ~2% X'8868X'S~ 544CiRP~ f9~ VXC49~y 958 C~4 ming age . the veWe ~~ gn4, ~ mz' 6egcgk'lw ~z ggX~S M& 448 ~~kQ~K~, ~~ 4I... Zi9? MG k~ Skmk OZ NR4 B@VCX K5 pQXi44~~$ ~ 5&X"J 44' eh@ 3. eve eZ lR@4&ce' L~ m6 Pq3. M 8@2@ @gk eke% eg ~ 4i5484~8Q QBC g~~ CZ S~? V~~y Ci4Q ~X@@ g /@4@'Q ~@& &0 QCOIPp @p~ 5CL'8 40@@5 %V @O@p ~14& ev e, ~ vM ~ we @et 5@~5&, ~ ~4 ~m4~ ~ M...

Underwood, Gary Neal

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

First Search for Multijet Resonances in sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} Collisions  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV p{anti p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Running coupling effects in the evolution of jet quenching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the consequences of including the running of the QCD coupling in the equation describing the evolution of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q$ in the double logarithmic approximation. To start with, we revisit the case of a fixed coupling, for which we obtain exact solutions valid for generic values of the transverse momentum (above the medium saturation scale) and corresponding to various initial conditions. In the case of a running coupling, we construct approximate solutions in the form of truncated series obtained via successive iterations, whose convergence is well under control. We thus deduce the dominant asymptotic behavior of the renormalized $\\hat q$ in the limit of a large evolution time $Y\\equiv\\ln(L/\\lambda)$, with $L$ the size of the medium and $\\lambda$ the typical wavelength of a medium constituent. We show that the asymptotic expansion is universal with respect to the choice of the initial condition at $Y=0$ and, moreover, it is remarkably similar to the corresponding expansion for the saturation momentum of a shockwave (a large nucleus). As expected, the running of the coupling significantly slows down the increase of $\\hat q$ with $Y$ in the asymptotic regime at $Y\\gg 1$. For the phenomenologically interesting value $Y\\simeq 3$, we find an enhancement factor close to 3, independently of the initial condition and for both fixed and running coupling.

E. Iancu; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Long-lived quasi-stationary coherences in V-type system driven by incoherent light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theoretical study of noise-induced quantum coherences in a model three-level V-type system interacting with incoherent radiation, an important prototype for a wide range of physical systems ranging from trapped ions to biomolecules and quantum dots. By solving the quantum optical equations of motion for the V-type system, we obtain analytical expressions for the noise-induced coherences and show that they exhibit an oscillating behavior in the limit of large excited level spacing $\\Delta$ ($\\Delta /\\gamma \\gg 1$, where $\\gamma$ is the radiative decay rate). Most remarkably, we find that in the opposite limit of small level spacing $\\Delta/\\gamma \\ll 1$, appropriate for large molecules, (a) the coherences can survive for an arbitrarily long time $\\tau=(2/\\gamma) (\\Delta/\\gamma)^{-2}$ before eventually decaying to zero, and (b) coherences at short times can be substantial. We further show that the long-lived coherences can be robust against environmental relaxation and decoherence, and discuss implications to the design of quantum heat engines and incoherent light excitation of biological systems.

Timur V. Tscherbul; Paul Brumer

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

450

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

Jet Vetoes Interfering with H->WW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far off-shell Higgs production in $H \\rightarrow WW,ZZ$, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements require an understanding of the cross section in the far off-shell region in the presence of realistic experimental cuts. We analytically study the effect of a $p_T$ jet veto on far off-shell cross sections, including signal-background interference, by utilizing hard functions in the soft collinear effective theory that are differential in the decay products of the $W/Z$. Summing large logarithms of $\\sqrt{\\hat s}/p_T^{veto}$, we find that the jet veto induces a strong dependence on the partonic centre of mass energy, $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$, and modifies distributions in $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$ or $M_T$. The example of $gg\\rightarrow H \\rightarrow WW$ is used to demonstrate these effects at next to leading log order. We also discuss the importance of jet vetoes and jet binning for the recent program to extract Higgs couplings and widths from far off-shell cross sections.

Ian Moult; Iain W. Stewart

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Rearing of boll weevils on artificial diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OGKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK W? fRxrerOb RE HReeSn OR iRnn Mss8rn s N N G KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK ?) tEEseO RE GIiosCGrRa ra nrzIrqG Ra Ogs 8rSirnrOb RE iRnn Mss8rn s N N G KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK 63 URopSCrGRa RE 8rSirnrOb RE HReeSnyOCsSOsq sNNG raeIiSOsq Ra n...SC8Sn qrsO Saq Ra ErnOsC pSpsCKKKKKKKKKKKK 69 hrzIrq OCSaGEsC RE sNNG ra CsSCraN iRnn M s s 8 r n G KKKKKKKK ?? tEEseO RE GORCSNs Ra Ogs 8rSirnrOb RE iRnn Mss8rn sNNG ? ? ?? tEEseOr8sasGG Saq ORxrerOb RE SaOroreCRirSn SNsaOG raeRCpRCSOsq ra i...

Raven B., Klaus Gustav

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

Buzatu Adrian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measuring the bulk Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts with Fermi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered by ultra-relativistic jets. Usually a minimum value of the Lorentz factor of the relativistic bulk motion is obtained based on the argument that the observed high energy photons ($\\gg {\\rm MeV}$) can escape without suffering from absorption due to pair production. The exact value, rather than a lower limit, of the Lorentz factor can be obtained if the spectral cutoff due to such absorption is detected. With the good spectral coverage of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on {\\em Fermi}, measurements of such cutoff become possible, and two cases (GRB 090926A and GRB 100724B) have been reported to have high-energy cutoffs or breaks. We systematically search for such high energy spectral cutoffs/breaks from LAT and GBM observations of the prompt emission of GRBs detected since August 2011. Seven more GRBs are found to have cutoff-like spectral feature at energies of $\\sim20-300$ MeV. Assuming that these cutoffs are caused by pair-production absorption within the source, the bulk L...

Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Color-singlet J/{psi} production at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 6}) in {Upsilon} decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To clarify the conflict between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay, we consider the {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order color-singlet (CS) contributions of processes {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gggg. Both the branching ratio and the J/{psi} momentum spectrum are calculated, and the branching ratio (4.7x10{sup -4}) is larger than the leading-order contribution ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}, {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+ccg). Together with the QCD and QED leading-order contributions considered in our previous work, the CS prediction of the branching ratio for the direct J/{psi} production is Br({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}{sub direct}+X)=0.90{sub -0.31}{sup +0.49}x10{sup -4}, which is still about 3.8 times less than the CLEO measurement. We also obtain a preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc}=(B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) and find that the value 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} is much larger than the color-octet prediction, and suggest to measure this quality in future experimental analysis.

He Zhiguo [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China); Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona Diagonal, 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Wang Jianxiong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Technicolor corrections on $B_{s,d} \\to ??$ decays in QCD factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of the Top-color-assisted Technicolor (TC2) model, we calculate the new physics contributions to the branching ratios $\\calb(B_{s,d} \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ and CP violating asymmetries $\\rcpm(B_{s,d} \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ in the QCD factorization based on the heavy-quark limit $m_b \\gg \\Lambda_{QCD}$. Using the considered parameter space, we find that (a) for both $B_s\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $B_d \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decays, the new physics contribution can provide a factor of two to six enhancement to their branching ratios, (b) for the $B_s \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decay, its direct CP violation is very small in both the SM and TC2 model, and (c) the CP violating asymmetry $\\rcpm(B_d \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ is around the ten percent level in both the SM and TC2 model, but the sign of CP asymmetry in the TC2 model is different from that in the SM.

Zhenjun Xiao; Cai-Dian L; Wujun Huo

2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Search for a CP-odd Higgs boson decaying to $Zh$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for a heavy, CP-odd Higgs boson, $A$, decaying into a $Z$ boson and a 125 GeV Higgs boson, $h$, with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The search uses proton--proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. Decays of CP-even $h$ bosons to $\\tau\\tau$ or $bb$ pairs with the $Z$ boson decaying to electron or muon pairs are considered, as well as $h \\rightarrow bb$ decays with the $Z$ boson decaying to neutrinos. No evidence for the production of an $A$ boson in these channels is found and the 95% confidence level upper limits derived for $\\sigma (gg\\rightarrow A) \\times \\mbox{BR}(A\\rightarrow Zh) \\times \\mbox{BR}(h\\rightarrow f\\bar{f})$ are 0.098--0.013 pb for $f=\\tau$ and 0.57--0.014 pb for $f=b$ in a range of $m_A =$ 220--1000 GeV. The results are combined and interpreted in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models.

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, Joo; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jrg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Circumbinary Molecular Rings Around Young Stars in Orion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm continuum, methyl cyanide molecular line, and 7 mm continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array, toward the most highly obscured and southern part of the massive star forming region OMC1S located behind the Orion Nebula. We find two flattened and rotating molecular structures with sizes of a few hundred astronomical units suggestive of circumbinary molecular rings produced by the presence of two stars with very compact circumstellar disks with sizes and separations of about 50 AU, associated with the young stellar objects 139-409 and 134-411. Furthermore, these two circumbinary rotating rings are related to two compact and bright {\\it hot molecular cores}. The dynamic mass of the binary systems obtained from our data are $\\geq$ 4 M$_\\odot$ for 139-409 and $\\geq$ 0.5 M$_\\odot$ for 134-411. This result supports the idea that intermediate-mass stars will form through {\\it circumstellar disks} and jets/outflows, as the low mass stars do. Furthermore, when intermediate-mass stars are in multiple systems they seem to form a circumbinary ring similar to those seen in young, multiple low-mass systems (e.g., GG Tau and UY Aur).

Luis A. Zapata; Paul T. P. Ho; Luis F. Rodriguez; Peter Schilke; Stan Kurtz

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

460

Limitations and Opportunities of Off-Shell Coupling Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect constraints on the total Higgs width $\\Gamma_h$ from correlating Higgs signal strengths with cross section measurements in the off-shell region for $p(g)p(g)\\to 4\\ell$ production have received considerable attention recently, and the CMS collaboration have published a first measurement. We revisit this analysis from a new physics and unitarity constraints perspective and conclude that limits on $\\Gamma_h$ obtained in this fashion are not reliable unless we make model-specific assumptions, which cannot be justified at the current stage of the LHC programme. Relaxing the $\\Gamma_h$ interpretation, we discuss the merits of high invariant mass cross section measurements in the context of Higgs CP analyses, higher dimensional operator testing, and resolved new physics in the light of electroweak precision constraints beyond effective theory limitations. Furthermore, we show that a rather model-independent LHC constraint can be obtained from adapting the $gg\\to 4\\ell$ analysis to the weak boson fusion channels at lower statistical yield.

Christoph Englert; Michael Spannowsky

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quark and gluon jets traversing through a quark-gluon plasma not only lose their energies but also can undergo flavor conversions. The conversion rates via the elastic $q(\\bar q)g\\to gq(\\bar q)$ and the inelastic $q\\bar q\\leftrightarrow gg$ scatterings are evaluated in the lowest order in QCD. Including both jet energy loss and conversions in the expanding quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, we have found a net conversion of quark to gluon jets. This reduces the difference between the nuclear modification factors for quark and gluon jets in central heavy ion collisions and thus enhances the $p/\\pi^+$ and ${\\bar p}/\\pi^-$ ratios at high transverse momentum. However, a much larger net quark to gluon jet conversion rate than the one given by the lowest-order QCD is needed to account for the observed similar ratios in central Au+Au and p+p collisions at same energy. Implications of our results are discussed.

W. Liu; C. M. Ko; B. W. Zhang

2007-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fusion hierarchies, T-systems and Y-systems of logarithmic minimal models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Temperley-Lieb (TL) loop model is a Yang-Baxter integrable lattice model with nonlocal degrees of freedom. On a strip of width N, the evolution operator is the double-row transfer tangle D(u), an element of the TL algebra TL_N(beta) with loop fugacity beta=2cos(lambda). Similarly on a cylinder, the single-row transfer tangle T(u) is an element of the enlarged periodic TL algebra. The logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') comprise a subfamily of the TL loop models for which the crossing parameter lambda=(p'-p)pi/p' is parameterised by coprime integers 0LM(1,2), D(u) and T(u) are known to satisfy inversion identities that allow us to obtain exact eigenvalues in any representation and for all system sizes N. The generalisation for p'>2 takes the form of functional relations for D(u) and T(u) of polynomial degree p'. These derive from fusion hierarchies of commuting transfer tangles D^{m,n}(u) and T^{m,n}(u) where D(u)=D^{1,1}(u) and T(u)=T^{1,1}(u). The fused transfer tangles are constructed from (m,n)-fused face operators involving Wenzl-Jones projectors P_k on k=m or k=n nodes. Some projectors P_k are singular for k>p'-1, but we argue that D^{m,n}(u) and T^{m,n}(u) are well defined for all m,n. For generic lambda, we derive the fusion hierarchies and the associated T- and Y-systems. For the logarithmic theories, the closure of the fusion hierarchies at n=p' translates into functional relations of polynomial degree p' for D^{m,1}(u) and T^{m,1}(u). We also derive the closure of the Y-systems for the logarithmic theories. The T- and Y-systems are the key to exact integrability and we observe that the underlying structure of these functional equations relate to Dynkin diagrams of affine Lie algebras.

Alexi Morin-Duchesne; Paul A. Pearce; Jorgen Rasmussen

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Bioeconomy Initiative at MBI International  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Di-carboxylic acids have the potential to replace petrochemicals used in the polymer industry (Werpy and Petersen, 2004). MBI developed a process for the production of succinic acid using a proprietary organism. During this work MBI assessed the feasibility to produce other carboxylic acids either using A. succinogenes or other organisms. The development of recombinant A. succinogenes strain derivatives for a mono-carboxylic acid through over-expression of enzymatic activities was successful. Fermentations achieved titers of 58 g/L for this organic acid. Recombinant strains that produced the same acid, but a different stereoisomer, reached titers of 10 g/L. Attempts to increase the titers for this isomer as well as other organic acids were unsuccessful. MBI is looking for commercial partners to pursue the development of recombinant A. succinogenes strains for the production of other organic acids. Attempts to develop recombinant strains of A. succinogenes for fumaric acid production through introduction of various antisense RNA constructs were unsuccessful. Alternative suitable organisms were evaluated and Rhizopus oryzae, a natural fumaric acid producer with potential for process improvements, was selected. A novel fermentation and one-step recovery process was developed that allowed capture of IP, produced titers of >80 g/L with a productivity of 1.8 g/L-h and 57% (g/g glucose) yield. The process was scaled to 2000 L pilot scale. The economic analysis projected a production cost of 72 c/lb. Recycling and re-use of the base was demonstrated and incorporated into the process. The ability of the organism to produce fumaric acid from other carbon sources and biomass hydrolysate was demonstrated. The production of other organic acids was evaluated and techno-economic de-risking roadmap documents were prepared.

Kleff, Susanne, Ph.D.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Connecting the Physical Properties of Galaxies with the Overdensity and Tidal Shear of the Large-Scale Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the correlations between the large-scale environment of galaxies and their physical properties, using a sample of 28,354 nearby galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the large-scale tidal field reconstructed in real space from the 2Mass Redshift Survey and smoothed over a radius of $\\sim 6 h^{-1}$Mpc. The large-scale environment is expressed in terms of the overdensity, the ellipticity of the shear and the type of the large-scale structure. The physical properties analyzed include $r$-band absolute magnitude $M_{^{0.1}r}$, stellar mass $M_\\ast$, $g-r$ colour, concentration parameter $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and surface stellar mass density $\\mu_\\ast$. Both luminosity and stellar mass are found to be statistically linked to the large-scale environment, regardless of how the environment is quantified. More luminous (massive) galaxies reside preferentially in the regions with higher densities, lower ellipticities and halo-like structures. At fixed luminosity, the large-scale overdensity depends strongly on parameters related to the recent star formation history, that is colour and D(4000), but is almost independent of the structural parameters $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and $\\mu_\\ast$. All the physical properties are statistically linked to the shear of the large-scale environment even when the large-scale density is constrained to a narrow range. This statistical link has been found to be most significant in the quasi-linear regions where the large-scale density approximates to an order of unity, but no longer significant in highly nonlinear regimes with $\\delta_{\\rm LS}\\gg 1$.

Jounghun Lee; Cheng Li

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Spectroscopic Survey of Subarcsecond Binaries in the Taurus-Auriga Dark Cloud with the Hubble Space Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of a spectroscopic survey of 20 close T Tauri binaries in the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud where the separations between primaries and their secondaries are less than the typical size of a circumstellar disk around a young star. Analysis of low-resolution and medium-resolution STIS spectra yields the stellar luminosities, reddenings, ages, masses, mass accretion rates, IR excesses, and emission line luminosities for each star in each pair. We examine the ability of IR color excesses, H-alpha equivalent widths, [O I] emission, and veiling to distinguish between weak emission and classical T Tauri stars. Four pairs have one cTTs and one wTTs; the cTTs is the primary in three of these systems. This frequency of mixed pairs among the close T Tauri binaries is similar to the frequency of mixed pairs in wider young binaries. Extinctions within pairs are usually similar; however, the secondary is more heavily reddened than the primary in some systems, where it may be viewed through the primary's disk. Mass accretion rates of primaries and secondaries are strongly correlated, and H-alpha luminosities, IR excesses, and ages also correlate within pairs. Primaries tend to have somewhat larger accretion rates than their secondaries do, and are typically slightly older than their secondaries according to three different sets of modern pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks. Age differences for XZ Tau and FS Tau, systems embedded in reflection nebulae, are striking; the secondary in each pair is less massive but more luminous than the primary. The stellar masses of the UY Aur and GG Tau binaries measured from their rotating molecular disks are about 30% larger than the masses inferred from the spectra and evolutionary tracks.

Patrick Hartigan; Scott Kenyon

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 5.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be $\\mu = 1.17 \\pm 0.27$ at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, $m_{H}$ = 125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at this value of $m_{H}$. They are found to be $\\mu_{\\mathrm{ggF}} = 1.32 \\pm 0.38$, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{VBF}} = 0.8 \\pm 0.7$, $\\mu_{{WH}} = 1.0 \\pm 1.6 $, $\\mu_{{ZH}} = 0.1 ^{+3.7}_{-0.1} $, $\\mu_{{t\\bar{t}H}} = 1.6 ^{+2.7}_{-1.8} $, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson or a top-quark pair, respectively. Compared with the previously published ATLAS analysis, the results reported here also benefit from a new energy calibration procedure for photons and the subsequent reduction of the systematic uncertainty on the diphoton mass resolution. No significant deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model are found.

ATLAS Collaboration

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Potential benefits of a resource-recovery facility coupled with district heating in Detroit, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Detroit, Michigan, announced plans for a 2.7-Gg/d (3000-ton/d) Resource Recovery Facility to be located in the central part of the city. The facility will process and burn waste collected by the municipal forces. Steam generated in the facility's boilers will be used to produce electricity; the surplus electricity will be sold to the Detroit Edison Company. When needed by the Central Heating System (CHS), large portions of the steam can be extracted from the turbine and sold to the Detroit Edison Company. The facility will meet its primary purpose of greatly relieving Detroit's solid waste disposal problem. A second very important benefit is that it will be a source of reasonably priced steam for the CHS, which serves the downtown area. Detroit is now in a local depression, and the downtown areas have suffered urban decay. The city is focusing on the redevelopment of these areas, and a viable, cost-effective district heating system would be a major asset. Currently, the CHS is losing money, although it charges relatively high rates for steam, because it uses primarily natural gas to generate steam. The economic feasibility of converting the CHS's relatively oil boiler units to burn coal, a much cheaper fuel, is doubtful. The Resource Recovery Facility can provide CHS with a major part of its steam needs at competitive prices in the near future. This would do much to relieve the CHS's financial problems and help it to become a viable system. This, in turn, would assist the city in the redevelopment of the downtown areas. An overall strategy for district heating in Detroit is being developed. It is suggested that a comprehensive study of a regional district heating system in the city be made.

McLain, H.A.; Brinker, M.J.; Gatton, D.W.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Stationary components of HeI in strong magnetic fields - a tool to identify magnetic DB white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In only three of the 61 known magnetic white dwarfs helium has been identified unambiguously while about 20% of all non-magnetic stars of this class are known to contain HeI or HeII. Until recently, data for HeI data were available only for magnetic fields below 20MG. This changed with the publication of extensive data by the group in Heidelberg. The corresponding calculations have now been completed for the energetically lowest five states of singlet and triplet symmetry for the subspaces with |m| <= 3; selected calculations have been performed for even higher excitations. In strongly magnetized white dwarfs only line components are visible whose wavelengths vary slowly with respect to the magnetic field, particularly stationary components which have a wavelength minimum or maximum in the range of the magnetic fields strengths on the stellar surface. In view of the many ongoing surveys finding white dwarfs we want to provide the astronomical community with a tool to identify helium in white dwarfs for fields up to 5.3GG. To this end we present all calculated helium line components whose wavelengths in the UV, optical, and near IR vary slowly enough with respect to the field strength to produce visible absorption features. We also list all stationary line components in this spectral range. Finally, we find series of minima and maxima which occur as a result of series of extremal transitions to increasingly higher excitations. We estimated the limits for 8 series which can possibly give rise to additional absorption in white dwarf spectra; one strong absorption feature in GD229 which is yet unexplained by stationary components is very close to two estimated series limits.

S. Jordan; P. Schmelcher; W. Becken

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

Top-Quark Initiated Processes at High-Energy Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In hadronic collisions at high energies, the top-quark may be treated as a parton inside a hadron. Top-quark initiated processes become increasingly important since the top-quark luminosity can reach a few percent of the bottom-quark luminosity. In the production of a heavy particle $H$ with mass $m_H > m_t$, treating the top-quark as a parton allows us to resum large logarithms $\\log(m_{H}^{2}/m_{t}^{2}$) arising from collinear splitting in the initial state. We quantify the effect of collinear resummation at the 14-TeV LHC and a future 100-TeV hadron collider, focusing on the top-quark open-flavor process $gg\\to t\\bar t H$ in comparison with $t\\bar t \\to H$ and $tg\\rightarrow tH$ at the leading order (LO) in QCD. We employ top-quark parton distribution functions with appropriate collinear subtraction and power counting. We find that (1) Collinear resummation enhances the inclusive production of a heavy particle with $m_H\\approx$ 5 TeV (0.5 TeV) by more than a factor of two compared to the open-flavor process at a 100-TeV (14-TeV) collider; (2) Top-quark mass effects are important for scales $m_H$ near the top-quark threshold, where the cross section is largest. We advocate a modification of the ACOT factorization scheme, dubbed m-ACOT, to consistently treat heavy-quark masses in hadronic collisions; (3) The scale uncertainty of the total cross section in m-ACOT is of about 20 percent at the LO. While a higher-order calculation is indispensable for a precise prediction, the LO cross section is well described by the process $t\\bar t\\to H$ using an effective factorization scale significantly lower than $m_H$. We illustrate our results by the example of a heavy spin-0 particle. Our main results also apply to the production of particles with spin-1 and 2.

Tao Han; Joshua Sayre; Susanne Westhoff

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f8nK 2f8nH 2f8nF 2f8nB 2f8nD 1p3iG 1p3aC 1p3aF 1p3aD 1p3oB 1p3bG 1p3pG 1p3fD 1p34B 1p3oF 1p3iD 1p3gD 1p3oD 1p3bH 1p3iC 1p3lH 1p34C 1p3bD 1p3kB 1p3pF 1p3mH 1p3lB 1p34H 1p3mC 1p3gG 1p3mD 1p34D 1p3kD 1p3oG 1p3lF 1p3bC 1p3kH 1p3pH 1p3iH 1p3pB 1p3gH 1p3kC... 02N 2o61A 2o61B 2as5N 2as5M 1gjiA 1gjiB 1nfkA 1nfkB 1s9kC 1owrP 1owrQ 1owrM 1owrN 1svcP 1le5A 1leiB 1le5E 1le9E 1le5B 1le9F 1le5F 1le9B 1le9A 1leiA DNA_pol_lambd_f 3c5fB 3c5gB 3c5fA 3c5gA 1huoB 1huoA 1huzA 1huzB 2i9gA 1tv9A 1tvaA 2fmsA 2fmpA 2fmqA 1...

Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Cindy Zhang, Xiao Y; Dickman, Christopher TD; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa C; Millen, Kathleen J; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Ramos, Oscar HP; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda SC; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Brnice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma DC; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrire, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam WZ; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter J; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Hligon, Christophe

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or AP1), auxin response factor gene (ETTIN), the gene encoding transcriptional factor of WD40 family (TRANSPARENTTESTAGLABRA1 or TTG1), and the auxin efflux carrier (PIN-FORMED2 or PIN2) gene. More than 220 transgenic lines of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations were analyzed for RNAi suppression phenotypes (Filichkin et. al., manuscript submitted). A total of 108 constructs were supplied by ORNL, UF and OSU and used to generate over 1,881 PCR verified transgenic Populus and over 300 PCR verified transgenic Arabidopsis events. The Populus transgenics alone required Agrobacterium co-cultivations of 124.406 explants.

Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

473

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

474

Application of the Principle of Maximum Conformality to Top-Pair Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major contribution to the uncertainty of finite-order perturbative QCD predictions is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}. For example, by using the conventional way of setting {mu}{sub r} {element_of} [m{sub t}/2, 2m{sub t}], one obtains the total t{bar t} production cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with the uncertainty {Delta}{sigma}{sub t{bar t}}/{sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {approx} (+3%/-4%) at the Tevatron and LHC even for the present NNLO level. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the renormalization scale ambiguity in precision tests of Abelian QED and non-Abelian QCD theories. By using the PMC, all nonconformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling constant, and the resulting scale-fixed predictions are independent of the renormalization scheme. The correct scale-displacement between the arguments of different renormalization schemes is automatically set, and the number of active flavors n{sub f} in the {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-function is correctly determined. The PMC is consistent with the renormalization group property that a physical result is independent of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}{sup init}. The PMC scale {mu}{sub r}{sup PMC} is unambiguous at finite order. Any residual dependence on {mu}{sub r}{sup init} for a finite-order calculation will be highly suppressed since the unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms will be absorbed into the PMC scales higher-order perturbative terms. We find that such renormalization group invariance can be satisfied to high accuracy for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the NNLO level. In this paper we apply PMC scale-setting to predict the t{bar t} cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. It is found that {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} remains almost unchanged by varying {mu}{sub r}{sup init} within the region of [m{sub t}/4, 4m{sub t}]. The convergence of the expansion series is greatly improved. For the (q{bar q})-channel, which is dominant at the Tevatron, its NLO PMC scale is much smaller than the top-quark mass in the small x-region, and thus its NLO cross-section is increased by about a factor of two. In the case of the (gg)-channel, which is dominant at the LHC, its NLO PMC scale slightly increases with the subprocess collision energy {radical}s, but it is still smaller than m{sub t} for {radical} {approx}< 1 TeV, and the resulting NLO cross-section is increased by {approx}20%. As a result, a larger {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is obtained in comparison to the conventional scale-setting method, which agrees well with the present Tevatron and LHC data. More explicitly, by setting m{sub t} = 172.9 {+-} 1.1 GeV, we predict {sigma}{sub Tevatron, 1.96 TeV} = 7.626{sub -0.257}{sup +0.265} pb, {sigma}{sub LHC, 7 TeV} = 171.8{sub -5.6}{sup +5.8} pb and {sigma}{sub LHC, 14 TeV} = 941.3{sub -26.5}{sup +28.4} pb.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /SLAC /Chongqing U.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

475

LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site in eastern Washington produced plutonium for several decades and in the process generated billions of gallons of radioactive waste. Included in this complex mixture of waste was 50 Ci of iodine-129 ({sup 129}I). Iodine-129s high abundance, due to its high fission yield, and extreme toxicity result in iodine-129 becoming a key risk driver at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The mobility of radioiodine in arid environments, such as the Hanford Site, depends largely on its chemical speciation and is also greatly affected by many other environmental factors, especially natural sediment organic matter (SOM). Groundwater radioiodine speciation has not been measured in arid regions with major plumes or large disposed {sup 129}I inventories, including the Hanford Site, Idaho National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. In this study, stable iodine-127 and radioiodine-129 speciation, pH, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of groundwater samples collected from seven wells located in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were investigated. The most striking finding was that iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) was the most abundant species. Unexpectedly, iodide (I{sup -}), which was likely the form of iodine in the source materials and the expected dominant groundwater species based on thermodynamic considerations, only accounted for 1-2% of the total iodine concentration. It is likely that the relatively high pH and the low abundance of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) that is present at the site slowed down or even inhibited the reduction of iodate, as SOM abiotically reduce iodate into iodide. Moreover, a study on the kinetics of iodide and iodate uptake and aqueous speciation transformation by three representative subsurface Hanford sediments was performed over a period of about one month. This study was carried out by using iodide-125 or iodate-125 at the ambient iodine-127concentration found at the site. Iodate K{sub d} values were on average 89% greater than iodide K{sub d} values, and the K{sub d} values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied {sup 129}I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe{sup 2+}. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O{sub 2}/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 8 ?g/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO{sub 2} as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ {sup 129}I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural attenuation, or long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal sites.

Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Search for Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed a search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with W boson (p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses the data collected between February 2002 and February 2006 at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1}. The experimental final state of WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} process is lepton (e{sup {+-}}/{mu}{sup {+-}}), missing transverse energy and two jets. The largest background in lepton+jets events is W+light flavor process, therefore the identification of jets as b-jets reduces this kind of background significantly. We used displaced SECondary VerTeX b-tagging (SECVTX) technique, which utilizes the signature that b-jets have secondary vertex displaced away from primary vertex because of the long life time of B-mesons. However, there is still much contamination in SECVTX b-tagged jets. Finite resolution of secondary vertex tracking measurements results in false tags, and c-jets are also identified as b-jets due to the long life time of D-mesons frequently. For the purpose of increasing the purity of the SECVTX b-tagged jets, we applied Neural Network to SECVTX tagged jets for the first time by using secondary vertex variables and some variables independent of it. Neural Network filter rejects 65% of light flavor jets and 50% of c-jets from the SECVTX tagged jets. We improved the sensitivity of the Higgs boson signal search by 10% with Neural Network b-tagging technique. Events with one high p{sub T} electron or muon, large missing transverse energy and either single SECVTX b-tagged jet which passes the Neural Network filter or at least two SECVTX b-tagged jets are selected. The number of selected events and dijet mass distributions are consistent with the Standard Model background expectations. Therefore we set an upper limit on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) {center_dot} Br(H {yields} b{bar b}) as 3.9 to 1.3 for Higgs boson mass from 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level (C.L.). The upper limit obtained from WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} process with 1 fb{sup -1} is far away from the Standard Model Higgs boson production expectation by a factor of 20 to 100 as a function of Higgs boson mass. To obtain stronger constraint on the Higgs boson production, we combined the upper limits obtained in processes of ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}, ZH {yields} {ell}{bar {ell}}b{bar b} and gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {ell}{bar {ell}}{nu}{bar {nu}} at CDF. The combination of different channels gives a constraint on the ratio of 95% confidence level upper limit divided by the Standard Model prediction (({sigma} {center_dot} Br){sub 95}/({sigma} {center_dot} Br){sub SM}), which results in the ratio as 10 to 40 for Higgs boson mass between 110 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. Finally, the combination of Higgs boson searches between CDF and D0 is also performed. The resulting constraint on ({sigma} {center_dot} Br){sub 95}/({sigma} {center_dot} Br){sub SM} is about 4 to 10 for Higgs boson mass between 110 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Kusakabe, Yoshiaki; /Waseda U.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earths climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.

Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

478

The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005 and added to in 2007. This list includes cross sections which are experimentally important, and which are theoretically feasible (if difficult) to calculate. Basically all 2-3 cross sections of interest have been calculated, with the frontier now extending to 2 {yields} 4 calculations. Often these calculations exist only as private codes. Since 2007, two additional calculations have been completed: t{bar t}b{bar b} and W+3 jets, reflecting the advance of the NLO technology to 2 {yields} 4 processes. In addition, the cross section for b{bar b}b{bar b} has been calculated for the q{bar q} initial state with the gg initial state calculation in progress. Final states of such complexity usually lead to multi-scale problems, and the correct choice of scales to use can be problematic not only at LO, but also at NLO. The size of the higher order corrections and of the residual scale dependence at NLOcan depend strongly on whether the considered cross section is inclusive, or whether a jet veto cut has been applied. Depending on the process, dramatically different behavior can be observed upon the application of a jet veto. There is a trade-off between suppressing the NLO cross section and increasing the perturbative uncertainty, with application of a jet veto sometimes destroying the cancellation between infra-red logs of real and virtual origin, and sometimes just suppressing large (and very scale-sensitive) tree-level contributions. So far, there is no general rule predicting the type of behavior to be expected, but this is an important matter for further investigation. From the experimental side, an addition to the above wish-list that will be crucial is the determination of the accuracy to which each of the calculations needs to be known. This is clearly related to the experimental accuracy at which the cross sections can be measured at the LHC, and can determine, for example, for what processes it may be necessary to calculate electo-weak corrections, in addition to the higher order QCD corrections. On the theoretical side, it would also be interesting to categorize

Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z