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1

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The authors have analyzed the splitting of shear waves from microearthquakes recorded by a 16-station three-component seismic network at the Northwest Geysers geothermal field, Geysers, California, to determine the preferred orientation of subsurface fractures and cracks. Average polarization crack directions with standard deviation were computed for each station. Also, graphical fracture characterizations in the form of equal-area projections and rose diagrams were created to depict the

3

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

A Reservoir Assessment of the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Upon moderately dipping, fracture network. Condensed steam at the steep reservoir flank drains back to the hot water table. These flanks are defined roughly by marginally-producing geothermal wells. Field extensions are expected to be on the southeast and northwest. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably represent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resitivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. Monitoring gravity and geodetic changes with time and mapping microearthquake activity are methods that show promise for determining reservoir size, possible recharge, production lifetime, and other characteristics of the known stream field. Seismic reflection data may contribute to the efficient exploitation of the field by identifying fracture zones that serve as conduits for the steam. (DJE-2005)

Thomas, Richard P.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Dykstra, Herman; Stockton, A.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geysers reservoir studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By...

8

Characterization of Fracture Patterns in the Geysers Geothermal Reservoir by Shear-wave Splitting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have analyzed the splitting of shear waves from microearthquakes recorded by a 16-station three-component seismic network at the Northwest Geysers geothermal field, Geysers, California, to determine the preferred orientation of subsurface fractures and cracks. Average polarization crack directions with standard deviation were computed for each station. Also, graphical fracture characterizations in the form of equal-area projections and rose diagrams were created to depict the results. The main crack orientations within the steam field are predominantly in the N10{degree}E to N50{degree}E direction, consistent with expected fracture directions in a pull-apart basin created by sub-parallel right-lateral strike-slip faults related to the San Andreas fault system. Time delays range from 15--60 ms, similar to the time delays from previous studies at geothermal reservoirs. They have detected a significant increase in time delays between 1988 and 1994, which they attribute to widening of the cracks or filling of the cracks with fluid. Increase in production activities during this time also could have influenced this widening.

D. Erten; J. A. Rial

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysersanalysis of the geothermal steam production and cold waterAs a result of high rate of steam withdrawal, the reservoir

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Segall, P. 1997. Subsidence at The Geysers geothermalA.P. 2001. Seismicity, subsidence and strain at The Geysersrespectively, as well as subsidence of about 0.5 to 1 meter.

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Determining the 3-D fracture structure in the Geysers geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulk of the steam at the Geysers geothermal field is produced from fractures in a relatively impermeable graywacke massif which has been heated by an underlying felsite intrusion. The largest of these fractures are steeply dipping right lateral strike-slip faults which are subparallel to the NW striking Collayomi and Mercuryville faults which form the NE and SW boundaries of the known reservoir. Where the graywacke source rock outcrops at the surface it is highly sheared and fractured over a wide range of scale lengths. Boreholes drilled into the reservoir rock encounter distinct ''steam entries'' at which the well head pressure jumps from a few to more than one hundred psi. This observation that steam is produced from a relatively small number of major fractures has persuaded some analysts to use the Warren and Root (1963) dual porosity model for reservoir simulation purposes. The largest fractures in this model are arranged in a regular 3-D array which partitions the reservoir into cubic ''matrix'' blocks. The net storage and transport contribution of all the smaller fractures in the reservoir are lumped into average values for the porosity and permeability of these matrix blocks which then feed the large fractures. Recent improvements of this model largely focus on a more accurate representation of the transport from matrix to fractures (e.g. Pruess et al., 1983; Ziminerman et al., 1992), but the basic geometry is rarely questioned. However, it has long been recognized that steam entries often occur in clusters separated by large intervals of unproductive rock (Thomas et al., 1981). Such clustering of fixtures at all scale lengths is one characteristic of self-similar distributions in which the fracture distribution is scale-independent. Recent studies of the geometry of fracture networks both in the laboratory and in the field are finding that such patterns are self-similar and can be best described using fractal geometry. Theoretical simulations of fracture development in heterogeneous media also produce fractal patterns. However, a physical interpretation of the mechanics which produce the observed fractal geometry remains an active area of current research. Two hypotheses for the physical cause of self-similarity are the Laplacian growth of fractures in a self-organized critical stress field, and the evolution of percolation clusters in a random medium. Each predicts a different, fractal dimension. The more important questions from a reservoir engineering point of view are: (1) is the network of fractures in the Geysers reservoir fractal and if so over what range of fracture sizes is the self-similarity observed and what is its fractal dimension, and (2) do the conventional dual porosity numerical simulation schemes provide an adequate description of flow and heat mining at the Geysers? Other papers in this volume by Acuna, Ershaghi, and Yortsos (1992) and Mukhopodhyoy and Sahimi (1992) address the second question. The primary objective of this paper is to try to answer the first. Toward this goal we have mapped fracture patterns in surface exposures of the graywacke source rock at the outcrop scale (meters), at the road-cut scale (tens of meters) and at the regional scale (kilometers). We have also examined cores collected at depth from the graywacke reservoir rocks, and analyzed drilling logs making use of the pattern of steam entries as well as the fluctuations in drilling rate.

Sammis, Charles G.; Linji An; Iraj Ershaghi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chemical stimulation treatment, The Geysers: Ottoboni State 22. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiment No. 6 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed at The Geysers Field in Sonoma County, California. This well had low productivity (46,000 lb/hr), probably because it did not intersect the primary natural fracture system of the reservoir. Surrounding production wells are considered to be good wells with an average flow rate of about 100,000 lb/hr. The stimulation technique selected was an acid etching treatment (Halliburton Services' MY-T-ACID). A small water prepad was used to provide tubular cooling and fluid loss control. Following the water prepad were 500 to 750 bbl of high viscosity crosslinked gel fluid and 400 to 500 bbl of a hydrofluoric-hydrochloric (HF-HCl) acid solution. The frac fluids were expected to enter only a single or limited fracture zone within the open interval. Frac rates of 20 to 40 BPM and surface pressures of 3000 psig were estimated for this treatment. During the job, however, no significant surface pressure was recorded, and all fluids flowed easily into the interval. Subsequent evaluation of the well performance showed that no noticeable stimulation had been achieved even though the frac fluids were properly injected. Temperature and gamma ray surveys along with tracer studies indicated that the frac fluids entered natural fracture channels over a 650-foot zone of the open interval, which probably prevented the staged acid etching treatment from functioning as designed.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noble gas isotope abundances in steam from the Coldwater Creek field of the Northwest Geysers, California, show mixing between a nearly pure mid-ocean ridge (MOR) type magmatic gas with high 3He/4He and low radiogenic 40*Ar (R/Ra > 8.3 and 40*Ar/4He < 0.07), and a magmatic gas diluted with crustal gas (R/Ra 0.25). The

14

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

15

A comprehensive study of fracture patterns and densities in the Geysers geothermal reservoir using microearthquake shear-wave splitting tomography. Quarterly report for Sep-Dec 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We start organizing the computer programs needed for crack density inversion into an easy to follow scripts. These programs were collection of bits and pieces from many sources and we want to organize those separate programs into coherent product. We also gave a presentation (enclosed) in the Twenty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Stanford University on our Geyser and Mammoth results.

Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO2 rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165° and 200°C,

17

Geysers Geothermal Association GGA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GGA GGA Jump to: navigation, search Name Geysers Geothermal Association (GGA) Place Santa Rosa, California Zip 95404 Sector Geothermal energy Product Trade association focused on addressing issues relating to the geothermal industry. References Geysers Geothermal Association (GGA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Geysers Geothermal Association (GGA) is a company located in Santa Rosa, California . References ↑ "Geysers Geothermal Association (GGA)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geysers_Geothermal_Association_GGA&oldid=345852" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

18

A Comprehensive Study of Fracture Patterns and Densities in The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the targeting of high production geothermal wells. (3) The results of the project having been transferred to both US based and international geothermal research and exploration agencies and concerns by several published papers and meeting presentations, and through the distribution of the data handling and other software codes we developed.

Peter E. Malin; Eylon Shalev; Min Lou; Silas M. Simiyu; Anastasia Stroujkova; Windy McCausland

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cuttings Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1976) 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Geysers_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473908

20

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in The Geysers. GeothermalResourcesCouncilA planned Enhanced Geothermal System demonstrationproject. Geothermal Resources Council Transactions33,

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SEISMOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS AT THE GEYSERS GEOTHERMAL FIELD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Muffler, 1972. The Geysers Geothermal Area, California.B. C. Hearn, 1977. ~n Geothermal Prospecting Geology, TheC. , 1968. of the Salton Sea Geothermal System. pp. 129-166.

Majer, E. L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production wells, thermal- elastic cooling shrinkage is theinjection wells, both thermal-elastic cooling shrinkage andGeysers is cooling and associated thermal-elastic shrinkage

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Geysers, California, geothermal area, U.S. Geol. Surv.seismicity at The Geysers geothermal reservoir, Californiaseismic image of a geothermal reservoir: The Geysers,

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. ,2010. GeyserspowerplantH 2 Sabatement update. operationsatTheGeyserspowerplant,GeothermalResourcesTable1:GeothermalPowerPlantsOperatingatTheGeysers(

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geysers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Heat Source 8 Geofluid Geochemistry 9 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 10 Exploration Activities (22) 11 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.21666667,"lon":-168.4666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Crump Geyser Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 42.226388888889°, -119.88222222222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.226388888889,"lon":-119.88222222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Big Geysers Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Big Geysers Geothermal Facility General Information Name Big Geysers Geothermal Facility Facility Big Geysers Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Clear Lake, California Coordinates 38.772688555979°, -122.72887229919° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.772688555979,"lon":-122.72887229919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Microearthquake source mechanism studies at the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the authors discuss moment tensors obtained from inversion of MEQ waveform data recorded at the Southeast (SE) and Northwest (NW) Geysers geothermal areas by the high-resolution seismic networks operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Coldwater Creek Geothermal Company (now CCPA). The network in the SE Geysers consists of 13 high-frequency (4.5 Hz), digital (480 samples), three-component, telemetered stations deployed on the surface in portions of the Calpine, Unocal-NEC-Thermal (U-N-T), and Northern California Power Agency (NCPA) leases. The network in the NW Geysers is a 16-station borehole array of three-component geophones (4.5 Hz), digital at 400 samples/sec, and telemetered to a central site. One of the main objectives of Berkeley Lab`s program at the Geysers is to assess the utility of MEQ monitoring as a reservoir management tool. Discrimination of the mechanisms of these events may aid in the interpretation of MEQ occurrence patterns and their significance to reservoir processes and conditions of interest to reservoir managers. Better understanding of the types of failure deduced from source mechanism studies, and their relations to production parameters, should also lead to a better understanding of the effects of injection and withdrawal.

Kirkpatrick, A.; Romero, A. Jr.; Peterson, J. Jr.; Johnson, L.; Majer, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reservoir technology research at LBL addressing geysers issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the Department of Energy is redirecting a significant part of its Reservoir Technology funding to study problems now being experienced at The Geysers. These include excessive pressure drawdown and associated decline in well flow rates, corrosion due to high chloride concentration in the produced steam and high concentration of noncondensible gases in some parts of the field. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is addressing some of these problems through field, laboratory and theoretical studies. 11 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510811

34

Gas geochemistry of the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in gas concentrations in Central and Southeast Geysers steam are related to the decreases in pressure caused by heavy exploitation in the 1980s. When reservoir pressures in the central parts of the field decreased, high-gas steam from undrilled reservoir margins (and possibly from underlying high-temperature zones) flowed into exploited central areas. The Northwest Geysers reservoir probably lacks high-gas marginal steam and a decline in pressure may not cause a significant increase of gas concentrations in produced steam.

Truesdell, A.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geysers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area (Redirected from Geysers Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Heat Source 8 Geofluid Geochemistry 9 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 10 Exploration Activities (22) 11 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Fracture patterns in graywacke outcrops at The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers geothermal field covers an area of more than 35,000 acres and represents one of the most significant steam fields in the world. The heterogeneous nature of the reservoir, its fracture network and non-sedimentary rock distinguish it from ordinary sandstone reservoirs in terms of reservoir definition and evaluation (Stockton et al. 1984). Analysis of cuttings, record of steam entries, temperature and pressure surveys and spinner logs have contributed to an understanding of the subsurface geology and rock characteristics of the Geysers. Few conventional electrical log data are available for the main body of the reservoir. It is generally believed that while the fractures are the main conducts for fluid transport through the reservoirs, tight rocks between the major fractures contain the bulk of the fluid reserves. No independent measurement of liquid and vapor saturation can be made from the existing downhole tools. Pressure depletion in The Geysers geothermal field has become a major concern to the operators and utility companies in recent years. Plans for further development activities and future field management are contingent upon accurate computer modeling and definition of the field. The primary issues in reliable characterization of The Geysers field are the role of the rock matrix in holding liquid reserves and providing pressure support, the nature of fracture network, extent of liquid saturation in the reservoirs and injection pattern strategies to maximize heat recovery. Current modeling of The Geysers field is done through the use of general purpose geothermal reservoir simulators. Approaches employed include treating the reservoir as a single porosity equivalent or a dual porosity system. These simulators include formulation to represent transport of heat, steam and water. Heterogeneities are represented by spatial variations in formation or fracture permeability-thickness product, porosity or fluid saturations. Conceptual models based on dual porosity representations have been shown to duplicate the history. Prediction of future performance is, however, not reliable because of uncertainties in assumptions of the initial state of the reservoir, Specifically, several different initial state conditions have led to a fairly good match of the historical data. Selection of the exact initial conditions is a major dilemma. In dual porosity models, the complex nature of fracture network is formulated by a systematic, well-organized set of orthogonal fractures. Also, the exact nature of matrix-fracture interaction, and the role of adsorption and capillarity in pressure support are not well-defined.

Sammis, Charles G.; Lin Ji An; Ershaghi, I.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Analysis of cause and mechanism for injection-induced seismicity at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock from the Geysers Geothermal Field, California. Int. J.strain at The Geysers geothermal field. Ph.D. dissertation,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. The resource consists of primarily dry steam which is produced from a low, porosity fractured graywacke. Over the last several years steam pressure at the Geysers has been dropping. Concern over decline of the resource has prompted research to understand its fundamental nature. A key issue is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and attenuation data at the Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of approximately 300 earthquakes that are of magnitude 1.2 and are distributed in depth between sea level and 2.5 km. Using compressional-wave arrival times, we invert for earthquake location, origin time, and velocity along a three-dimensional grid. Using the initial pulse width of the compressional-wave, we invert for the initial pulse width associated with the source, and the one-dimensional Q structure. We find that the velocity structure correlates with known mapped geologic units, including a velocity high that is correlated with a felsite body at depth that is known from drilling. The dry steam reservoir, which is also known from drilling, is mostly correlated with low velocity. The Q increases with depth to the top of the dry steam reservoir and decreases with depth within the reservoir. The decrease of Q with depth probably indicates that the saturation of the matrix of the reservoir rock increases with depth.

Zucca, J. J.; Hutchings, L. J.; Kasameyer, P. W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geysers Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Geysers Project Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.790555555556°, -122.75583333333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.790555555556,"lon":-122.75583333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (2011) Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can

43

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

44

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and after SEGEP injection. Geothermal Resources Council,tectonics at the Geysers Geothermal Area, California, J.seismicity in The Geysers Geothermal Area, California, J.

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Berkeley, California 94720 e-mail: Kboyle@lbl.gov ABSTRACT The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir experiences, and processing system. INTRODUCTION Geological Setting The Geysers geothermal reservoir is located just south

Stanford University

46

A database for The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1985-1986 the Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) began a multi-year project for SLC to organize and analyze the field data from The Geysers. In the first year, most of the work concentrated on the development of a comprehensive database for The Geysers, and conventional reservoir engineering analysis of the data. Essentially, all non-proprietary data for wells at The Geysers have been incorporated into the database, as well as proprietary data from wells located on State leases. In following years, a more detailed analysis of The Geysers data has been carried out. This report is a summary of the non- proprietary work performed in FY 1985--1986. It describes various aspects of the database and also includes: review sections on Field Development, Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Reservoir Engineering. It should be emphasized that these background chapters were written in 1986, and therefore only summarize the information available at that time. The appendices contain individual plots of wellhead pressures, degree of superheat, steam flow rates, cumulative mass flows, injection rates and cumulative injection through 1988 for approximately 250 wells. All of the data contained in this report are non-proprietary, from State and non-State leases. The production/injection and heat flow data from the wells were obtained from the California State Division of Oil and gas (DOG) (courtesy of Dick Thomas). Most of the other data were obtained from SLC files in Sacramento (courtesy of Charles Priddy), or DOG files in Santa Rosa (courtesy of Ken Stelling). 159 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.; Fuller, P.; Ripperda, M.; Tulinius, H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Goldstein, N.; Flexser, S.; Pruess, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

48

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Fracture Characterization Technologies Project Description The proposed program will focus on predicting characteristics of fractures and their orientation prior to drilling new wells. It will also focus on determining the location of the fractures, spacing and orientation during drilling, as well as characterizing open fractures after stimulation to help identify the location of fluid flow pathway within the EGS reservoir. These systems are created by passively injecting cold water, and stimulating the permeation of the injected water through existing fractures into hot wet and hot dry rocks by thermo-elastic cooling shrinkage. The stimulated, existing fractures thus enhance the permeability of the hot rock formations, hence enabling better circulation of water for the purpose of producing the geothermal resource. The main focus of the project will be on developing better understanding of the mechanisms for the stimulation of existing fractures, and to use the information for better exploitation of the high temperature geothermal resources located in the northwest portion of the Geysers field and similar fields.

49

Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlin sector ofThe Geysers geothermal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

felsite unit), Geysers geothermal field, California: a 40California A summary. Geothermal Resources Councilsystematics of a continental geothermal system: results from

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest, Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these

51

Monitoring crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geodetic surveys since 1972-1973 reveal significant crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake region. Resurveys of precise control networks are measuring both vertical and horizontal ground movement, with most of the change continuing in the area of geothermal fluid withdrawal. Preliminary evidence suggests right-lateral horizontal movement on northwest-trending fault systems and vertical and horizontal compression of the deep geothermal reservoir system. A direct correlaton is suggested between ground-surface deformation and subsurface pressure changes in the reservoir system. Although surface changes appear too small to be of environmental concern in The Geysers-Clear Lake region, they indicate hydrodynamic changes in the reservoir of significant import.

Lofgren, B.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we have presented data in four sections: (1) THE GEYSERS HISTORICAL UPDATE 1990-2010 - A historical update of the primary developments at The Geysers between 1990 and 2010 which uses as its start point Section IIA of the Monograph - 'Historical Setting and History of Development' that included articles by James Koenig and Susan Hodgson. (2) THE GEYSERS COMPREHENSIVE REFERENCE LIST 1990-2010 - In this section we present a rather complete list of technical articles and technical related to The Geysers that were issued during the period 1990-2010. The list was compiled from many sources including, but not limited to scientific journals and conference proceedings. While the list was prepared with care and considerable assistance from many geothermal colleagues, it is very possible that some papers could have been missed and we apologize to their authors in advance. The list was subdivided according to the following topics: (1) Field characterization; (2) Drilling; (3) Field development and management; (4) Induced seismicity; (5) Enhanced Geothermal Systems; (6) Power production and related issues; (7) Environment-related issues; and (8) Other topics. (3) GRC 2010 ANNUAL MEETING GEYSERS PAPERS - Included in this section are the papers presented at the GRC 2010 Annual Meeting that relate to The Geysers. (4) ADDITIONAL GEYSERS PAPERS 1990-2010 - Eighteen additional technical papers were included in this publication in order to give a broad background to the development at The Geysers after 1990. The articles issued during the 1990-2010 period were selected by colleagues considered knowledgeable in their areas of expertise. We forwarded the list of references given in Section 2 to them asking to send us with their selections with a preference, because of limited time, to focus on those papers that would not require lengthy copyright approval. We then chose the articles presented in this section with the purpose of providing the broadest possible view across all technical fields, as related to The Geysers steam-dominated geothermal system. The Geysers has seen many fundamental changes between 1990-2010 and yet the geothermal resource seems still to be robust to the extent that, long after its anticipated life span, we are seeing new geothermal projects being developed on the north and west peripheries of the field. It is hoped that this report provides a focused data source particularly for those just starting their geothermal careers, as well as those who have been involved in the interesting and challenging field of geothermal energy for many years. Despite many hurdles The Geysers has continued to generate electrical power for 50 years and its sustainability has exceeded many early researchers expectations. It also seems probable that, with the new projects described above, generation will continue for many years to come. The success of The Geysers is due to the technical skills and the financial acumen of many people, not only over the period covered by this report (1990-2010), but since the first kilowatt of power was generated in 1960. This Special Report celebrates those 50 years of geothermal development at The Geysers and attempts to document the activities that have brought success to the project so that a permanent record can be maintained. It is strongly hoped and believed that a publication similar to this one will be necessary in another 20 years to document further activities in the field.

Brophy, P.; Lippmann, M.; Dobson, P.F.; Poux, B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

Steven Enedy

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir studies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induced seismicity at The Geysers steam reservoir, NorthernMonitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysersgas concentrations in steam produced from The Geysers,

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

Thomas, R.P.

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Second workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 focused national attention on energy problems. A national focus on development of energy sources alternative to consumption of hydrocarbons led to the initiation of research studies of reservoir engineering of geothermal systems, funded by the National Science Foundation. At that time it appeared that only two significant reservoir engineering studies of geothermal reservoirs had been completed. Many meetings concerning development of geothermal resources were held from 1973 through the date of the first Stanford Geothermal Reservoir Engineering workshop December 15-17, 1975. These meetings were similar in that many reports dealt with the objectives of planned research projects rather than with results. The first reservoir engineering workshop held under the Stanford Geothermal Program was singular in that for the first time most participants were reporting on progress inactive research programs rather than on work planned. This was true for both laboratory experimental studies and for field experiments in producing geothermal systems. The Proceedings of the December 1975 workshop (SGP-TR-12) is a remarkable document in that results of both field operations and laboratory studies were freely presented and exchanged by all participants. With this in mind the second reservoir engineering workshop was planned for December 1976. The objectives were again two-fold. First, the workshop was designed as a forum to bring together researchers active in various physical and mathematical branches of the developing field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give participants a current and updated view of progress being made in the field. The second purpose was to prepare this Proceedings of Summaries documenting the state of the art as of December 1976. The proceedings will be distributed to all interested members of the geothermal community involved in the development and utilization of the geothermal resources in the world. Many notable occurrences took place between the first workshop in December 1975 and this present workshop in December 1976. For one thing, the newly formed Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has assumed the lead role in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The second workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from ERDA. In addition, two significant meetings on geothermal energy were held in Rotarua, New Zealand and Taupo, New Zealand. These meetings concerned geothermal reservoir engineering, and the reinjection of cooled geothermal fluids back into a geothermal system. It was clear to attendees of both the New Zealand and the December workshop meetings that a great deal of new information had been developed between August and December 1976. Another exciting report made at the meeting was a successful completion of a new geothermal well on the big island of Hawaii which produces a geothermal fluid that is mainly steam at a temperature in excess of 600 degrees F. Although the total developed electrical power generating capacity due to all geothermal field developments in 1976 is on the order of 1200 megawatts, it was reported that rapid development in geothermal field expansion is taking place in many parts of the world. Approximately 400 megawatts of geothermal power were being developed in the Philippine Islands, and planning for expansion in production in Cerro Prieto, Mexico was also announced. The Geysers in the United States continued the planned expansion toward the level of more than 1000 megawatts. The Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford December 1976 with 93 attendees from 4 nations, and resulted in the presentation of 44 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. The major areas included in the program consisted of reservoir physics, well testing, field development, well stimulation, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The planning forth is year's workshop and the preparation of the proceedings was carried out mainly by my associate Paul

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reservoir response to injection in the Southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20 megawatt (MW) increase in steam flow potential resulted within five months of the start-up of new injection wells in the Southeast Geysers. Flow rate increases were observed in 25 wells offset to the injectors, C-11 and 956A-1. This increased flowrate was sustained during nine months of continuous injection with no measurable decrease in offset well temperature until C-11 was shut-in due to wellbore bridging. The responding steam wells are located in an area of reduced reservoir steam pressure known as the Low Pressure Area (LPA). The cause of the flowrate increases was twofold (1) an increase in static reservoir pressure and (2) a decrease in interwell communication. Thermodynamic and microseismic evidence suggests that most of the water is boiling near the injector and migrating to offset wells located ''down'' the static pressure gradient. However, wells showing the largest increase in steam flowrate are not located at the heart of the pressure sink. This indicates that localized fracture distribution controls the preferred path of fluid migration from the injection well. A decrease in non-condensible gas concentrations was also observed in certain wells producing injection derived steam within the LPA. The LPA project has proven that steam suppliers can work together and benefit economically from joint efforts with the goal of optimizing the use of heat from The Geysers reservoir. The sharing of costs and information led directly to the success of the project and introduces a new era of increased cooperation at The Geysers.

Enedy, Steve; Enedy, Kathy; Maney, John

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret...

65

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Steamboat Springs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Steamboat Springs Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids from Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River, Steamboat Springs and Hawaii. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, R,sub>a; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and

68

Reservoir Fracturing in the Geysers Hydrothermal System: Fact or Fallacy?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proper application of proven worldwide fracture determination analyses adequately aids in the detection and enhanced exploitation of reservoir fractures in The Geysers steam field. Obsolete, superficial ideas concerning fracturing in this resource have guided various malformed judgements of the actual elusive trends. Utilizing regional/local tectonics with theoretical rack mechanics and drilling statistics, offers the most favorable method of fracture comprehension. Exploitation philosophies should favor lateral drilling trends along local tensional components and under specific profound drainage/faulting manifestations to enhance high productivities. Drill core observations demonstrate various degrees of fracture filling, brecciation, strain responses, and rock fracture properties, giving the most favorable impression of subsurface reservoir conditions. Considerably more work utilizing current fracturing principles and geologic thought is required to adequately comprehend and economically exploit this huge complex resource.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

70

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at the Aidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling of mineral-water-gas Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakthrough observed in geothermal systems (e.g. , Shook,recharge project, Geysers geothermal field, California, USA,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Environmental analysis for geothermal energy development in the Geysers Region: executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are summarized for the Geysers--Calistoga KGRA: geothermal resource development, highlights of the master environmental assessment, control technology for hydrogen sulfide emissions, meteorological/climatological data base for hydrogen sulfide predictions, and future research needs. (MHR)

Dorset, P.F.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

74

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In December of 2003 a large amount of water from the Santa Rosa wastewater project began being pumped to The Geysers for injection. Millions of dollars are being spent on this injection project in the anticipation that the additional fluid will not only extend the life of The Geysers but also greatly increase the net amount of energy extracted. Optimal use of the injected water, however, will require that the water be injected at the right place, in the right amount and at the proper rate. It has been shown that Microearthquake (MEQ) generation is a direct indicator of the effect of fluid injection at The Geysers (Majer and McEvilly 1979; Eberhart-Phillips and Oppenheimer 1984; Enedy et al. 1992; Stark 1992; Kirkpatrick et al. 1999; Smith et al. 2000). It is one of the few, if not only methods, practical to monitor the volumetric effect of water injection at The Geysers. At the beginning of this project there was not a detailed MEQ response, Geysers-wide, to a large influx of water such as will be the case from the Santa Rosa injection project. New technology in MEQ acquisition and analysis, while used in parts of The Geysers for short periods of time had not been applied reservoir-wide to obtain an integrated analysis of the reservoir. Also needed was a detailed correlation with the production and injection data on a site wide basis. Last but not least, needed was an assurance to the community that the induced seismicity is documented and understood such that if necessary, mitigation actions can be undertaken in a timely manner. This project was necessary not only for optimizing the heat recovery from the resource, but for assuring the community that there is no hazard associated with the increased injection activities. Therefore, the primary purpose of this project was to develop and apply high-resolution micro earthquake methodology for the entire Geysers geothermal field such that at the end of this project a monitoring and process definition methodology will be available to: (1) Optimize the economic development of The Geysers (as well as other areas) by providing improved information on fluid flow and reservoir dynamics. (2) Aid in the mitigation of environmental impacts of increased fluid injection by improving the understanding between fluid injection and seismicity. (3) Provide a cost-effective blueprint such that the technology can be applied on a routine basis in the future.

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen chloride in superheated steam and chloride in deep brine at The Geysers geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Chloride (Cl) concentrations of 10-120 ppm{sub w} have been measured in superheated steam produced by wells at The Geysers, a vapor-dominated geothermal field in northern California. Corrosion of the well casing and steam-gathering system has been recognized in some parts of The Geysers, and is apparently related to the presence of Cl. Cl in the steam is in a volatile form, generated with the steam at reservoir temperatures, and probably travels to the wellhead as HCl gas. Published experimental data for partial pressures of HCl in steam over aqueous HCl solutions and for dissociation constants of HCl were used to calculate distribution coefficients for HCl. Reservoir liquid Cl concentrations capable of generating steam with the observed Cl concentrations were then calculated as a function of pH and temperatures from 250 to 350 C. Equilibrium mineral/liquid reactions with the K-mica and K-feldspar assemblage found in the wells limit the reservoir liquid pH values at various Cl concentrations to about 5 to 6 (near neutral at 250 to 350 C). Within this pH range, liquid at 250 C could not produce steam containing the high Cl concentrations observed. However, liquid at higher temperatures (300 to 350 C) with chloride concentrations greater than 10,000 ppm{sub w} could generate steam with 10 to over 200 ppm{sub w} Cl. There is a positive correlation between pH and the chloride concentrations required to generate a given Cl concentration in steam. The concentration of Cl in superheated steam constrains not only the reservoir liquid composition, but the temperature at which the steam last equilibrated with liquid.

Haizlip, J.R.; Truesdell, A.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

82

Geothermal reservoir categorization and stimulation study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of the fraction of geothermal wells that are dry (dry-hole fraction) indicate that geothermal reservoirs can be fitted into four basic categories: (i) Quaternary to late Tertiary sediments (almost no dry holes); (ii) Quaternary to late Tertiary extrusives (approximately 20 percent dry holes); (iii) Mesozoic or older metamorphic rocks (approximately 25-30 percent dry holes); and (iv) Precambrian or younger rocks (data limited to Roosevelt Springs where 33 percent of the wells were dry). Failure of geothermal wells to flow economically is due mainly to low-permeability formations in unfractured regions. Generally the permeability correlates inversely with the temperature-age product and directly with the original rock porosity and pore size. However, this correlation fails whenever high-stress fields provide vertical fracturing or faulting, and it is the high-stress/low-permeability category that is most amenable to artificial stimulation by hydraulic fracturing, propellant fracturing, or chemical explosive fracturing. Category (i) geothermal fields (e.g., Cerro Prieto, Mexico; Niland, CA; East Mesa, CA) are not recommended for artificial stimulation because these younger sediments almost always produce warm or hot water. Most geothermal fields fit into category (ii) (e.g., Wairakei, New Zealand; Matsukawa, Japan; Ahuachapan, El Salvador) and in the case of Mt. Home, ID, and Chandler, AZ, possess some potential for stimulation. The Geysers is a category (iii) field, and its highly stressed brittle rocks should make this site amenable to stimulation by explosive fracturing techniques. Roosevelt Springs, UT, well 9-1 is in category (iv) and is a flow failure. It represents a prime candidate for stimulation by hydraulic fracturing because it has a measured temperature of 227/sup 0/C, is cased and available for experimentation, and is within 900 m of an excellent geothermal producing well.

Overton, H.L.; Hanold, R.J.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

84

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goff & Decker, 1983) Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510809

86

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

88

Geothermal reservoir engineering, second workshop summaries, December 1-3, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Workshop proceedings included the following: (1) During the Overview Session some papers, among others, discussed 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research' and 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Industry'; (2) Session I, Reservoir Physics, included papers on 'Steam Zone Temperature Gradients at the Geysers' and 'Water Influx in a Steam Producing Well'; (3) Session II, Well Testing, included papers on 'Borehole Geophysics in Geothermal Wells--Problems and Progress' and 'Herber-Pressure Interference Study'; (4) Session III, Field Development, included papers on 'A Reservoir Engineering Study of the East Mesa KGRA' and 'Determining the Optimal Rate of Geothermal Energy Extraction'; (5) Session IV, Well Stimulation, included papers on 'Fluid Flow Through a Large Vertical Crack in the Earth's Crust' and 'Explosive Stimulation of Geothermal Wells'; and (6) Session V, Modeling, included papers on 'Steam Transport in Porous Media' and 'Large-Scale Geothermal Field Parameters and Convection Theory.'

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two distinct clusters of microearthquakes have been identified at The Geysers, possibly relating to two independent pressure sinks resulting from steam production described by Lipman, and others (1977). Unlike earthquakes in the Maacama-Rodgers Creek fault zone to the south and west, earthquakes at The Geysers are confined to depths of less than 5 km. The present level of seismicity at The Geysers appears to be higher than the preproduction level and is higher and more continuous than the seismicity in the surrounding region. Earthquakes in the steam production zone at The Geysers resemble earthquakes in the surrounding region with regard to focal plane solutions, source characteristics and magnitude distribution (b slope). Subtle differences in earthquake characteristics may be resolved by analysis of more extensive data now being gathered in the region.

Marks, S.M.; Ludwin, R.S.; Louie, K.B.; Bufe, C.G.

1983-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82) 82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft

91

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Session 4: Geothermal Reservoir Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of geothermal reservoir behavior is presently in a state of change brought about by the discovery that reservoir heterogeneity--fractures in particular--is responsible for large scale effects during production. On the other hand, some parts of a reservoir, or some portions of its behavior. may be unaffected by fractures and behave, instead, as if the reservoir were a homogeneous porous medium. Drilling has for many years been guided by geologists prospecting for fractures (which have been recognized as the source of production), but until recently reservoir engineers have not studied the behavior of fractured systems under production. In the last three years research efforts, funded by the Department of Energy and others, have made significant progress in the study of fractures. The investigations into simulation of fracture flow, tracer analysis of fractured systems, and well test analysis of double porosity reservoirs are all advancing. However, presently we are at something of a conceptual impasse in defining a reservoir as fractured or porous. It seems likely that future directions will not continue to attempt to distinguish two separate reservoir types, but will focus instead on defining behavior types. That is, certain aspects of reservoir behavior may be considered to be generally of the porous medium type (for example, field wide decline), while others may be more frequently fracture type (for example, breakthrough of reinjected water). In short, our overall view of geothermal reservoir definition is becoming a little more complex, thereby better accommodating the complexities of the reservoirs themselves. Recent research results already enable us to understand some previously contradictory results, and recognition of the difficulties is encouraging for future progress in the correct direction.

Horne, Roland N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

95

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geothermal energy and the land resource: conflicts and constraints in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of potential land-related impacts of geothermal power development in The Geysers region focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. First, the land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems. Based on those factors, the potential land-use conflicts and constraints that geothermal development may encounter in the region are identified and the availability and relative suitability of land for such development is determined. A brief review of laws and powers germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Evaluation of a superheater enhanced geothermal steam power plant in the Geysers area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the attainable generation increase and to evaluate the economic merits of superheating the steam that could be used in future geothermal steam power plants in the Geyser-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). It was determined that using a direct gas-fired superheater offers no economic advantages over the existing geothermal power plants. If the geothermal steam is heated to 900/sup 0/F by using the exhaust energy from a gas turbine of currently available performance, the net reference plant output would increase from 65 MW to 159 MW (net). Such hybrid plants are cost effective under certain conditions identified in this document. The power output from the residual Geyser area steam resource, now equivalent to 1437 MW, would be more than doubled by employing in the future gas turbine enhancement. The fossil fuel consumed in these plants would be used more efficiently than in any other fossil-fueled power plant in California. Due to an increase in evaporative losses in the cooling towers, the viability of the superheating concept is contingent on development of some of the water resources in the Geysers-Calistoga area to provide the necessary makeup water.

Janes, J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

DISCUSSIONS ON A TYPE OF RESERVOIR CELL BOUNDARY IN THE GEYSERS STEAM FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The boundaries of reservoir fluid convection cells are discreet and intricate zones, commonly sealed or reduced in permeabilities, which are often quite readily identifiable in many hydrothermal systems. Cell boundaries in the Geysers Steam Field are more vague; however, they are gradually being revealed by cumulative and extensive wellbore data. A profound example of a type of boundary has been revealed by drilling in one area of the steam field. A proposed model utilizes a sericitic alteration scheme to establish cell self-sealing. Mineralogical, permeability, and temperature properties all coincide so as to allow formation of a boundary model. This reinforces previously held views that the reservoir cell rock and hydrothermal system are greatly out of equilibrium. Such similar phenomena are suggested from drilling experiences in other parts of the steam field. Considerably, more work is required to better define and comprehend the nature and location of reservoir cell boundaries within the Geysers Steam Field.

Hebein, J.L.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

Resistivity During Boiling in the SB-15-D Core from the Geysers Geothermal Field: The Effects of Capillarity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145 C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental overview of geothermal development: the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA. Volume 3. Noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noise from geothermal resource development at The Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) will cause community annoyance unless noise-level standards are set and adhered to. Venting of steam is the loudest source of noise and can reach 100 to 125 dBA at 20 to 100 ft; most of the other noise sources fall below 100 dBA and are those usually associated with construction and industrial projects. Enough data exist for assessment and decision making, but it is scattered and must be compiled. In addition, communities must decide on their criteria for noise levels. Residential areas in the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA will require more stringent controls on noise than will the open space of which KGRA is primarily composed. Existing tecnnology can reduce noise levels somewhat, but more effective silencing devices are needed, particularly on steam venting systems.

Leitner, P.

1978-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

103

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

104

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

105

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

106

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Comprehensive Study Of Fracture Patterns And Densities In The Geysers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Fracture Patterns And Densities In The Geysers Study Of Fracture Patterns And Densities In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: A Comprehensive Study Of Fracture Patterns And Densities In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be

108

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of...

109

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Ranalli & Rybach...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

110

Engineering geology of the Geysers Geothermal Resource Area, Lake, Mendocino, and Sonoma Counties, California. Special report 122  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guidelines for the engineering geology assessment of The Geysers Geothermal Resource Area (GRA) are presented. Approximately 50 percent of the geothermal wells and some of the power plants are presently located on landslide areas. Several geothermal wells have failed, causing additional land instability, loss of energy resource, and unnecessary expense. Hazardous geologic conditions in the area are identified, and measures for mitigating those hazardous conditions are recommended. Such measures or other equally adequate measures should be considered for any proposed development activity in The Geysers area.

Bacon, C.F.; Amimoto, P.Y.; Sherburne, R.W.; Slosson, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Environmental geology workshop for the Geysers--Calistoga known geothermal resources area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is studying ways in which the environmental quality of The Geysers-Calistoga known geothermal resources area may be protected from any significant harmful consequences of future geothermal development. The LLL study includes the effects of development on air and water quality, geology, the ecosystem, socioeconomics, and noise. The Geothermal Resource Impact Projection Study (GRIPS) has grants to undertake similar work. On 28 and 29 November 1977, LLL and GRIPS jointly sponsored a workshop at Sonoma State College at which knowledgeable earth scientists presented their views on the potential geological hazards of geothermal development. The workshop produced recommendations for studies in geological mapping, slope stability, subsidence, seismicity, and groundwater hydrology. These recommendations will be evaluated along with other considerations and in conjunction with the other subjects of the LLL study. The results of the study will be contained in a preplanning report of final recommendations to the Department of Energy.

Ledbetter, G.; Crow, N.B.

1978-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

The LBL geothermal reservoir technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the DOE/GD-funded Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is the development and testing of new and improved methods and tools needed by industry in its effort to delineate, characterize, evaluate, and exploit hydrothermal systems for geothermal energy. This paper summarizes the recent and ongoing field, laboratory, and theoretical research activities being conducted as part of the Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A comprehensive study of fracture patterns and densities in the Geysers geothermal reservoir using microearthquake shear-wave splitting tomography. [Quarterly progress report 03/16/1998 - 06/15/1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We completed the process of identifying shear-wave splitting in the Geyser area. A total of 2700 observations were recorded with about 1700 observations from the 1988 data and about 1000 observations from 1994. Fast polarization direction map in Figure 1 shows that most of the stations in the Geyser area display consistent direction throughout the main field, between 0{degree} azimuth to 40{degree} azimuth. Some exemptions to the consistent crack alignment (fast polarization direction) can be seen in stations 9 and station 3, and also in stations 13 and 14 outside the field. Since the stations are in boreholes it is possible that some of the station orientations, calculated using P-wave arrivals from located events, are erroneous. If we treat measurements of polarization direction as a statistical process, same as deep of layer measurement, we can say that in the small area of the station we have aligned cracks. Figures 2 and 3 show results of the crack density inversion assuming regional crack azimuth of 20{degree}. Almost 2400 raypaths were used to perform this tomographic inversion. There is weak dependency of the results on the regional crack direction, but the main areas of high and low crack density are the same. The changes are mainly in the size of the anomalies. Since the amplitudes of those anomalies depend mainly on the damping parameter we use in the inversion, exact regional crack direction is not a critical parameter of the inversion. The map in figure 2 and cross-sections in Figure 3 show two areas of high crack density at the top 1 km one at station 8 and the other between stations 6 and 5. At greater depth of 1 to 2 km those two area converge to one high crack density anomaly between stations 3, 4, 11, and 10.

Malin, P.E.; Shalev, E.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geochemical studies of reservoir processes in the NCPA field of The Geysers, a preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Methods of tracing reservoir processes will be discussed and applied to the NCPA Geysers steam field. The gas and isotope chemistry of produced steam is far from uniform even in a restricted volume of the reservoir. The composition is affected by many factors. Differences in permeability, local existence of gas pockets or perched liquid and the pattern of fracture connection can cause neighboring wells to produce steam of different compositions. This study attempts to separate local effects from general influences by viewing the data across the field and over a period of time. The fits of the trend lines to the data are far from perfect but present a reasonably consistent picture.

Truesdell, Alfred; Enedy, Steve; Smith, Bill

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are diffuse and appear unsuitable for defining the areal extent of the reservoir. However, from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these regions a general discriminant was constructed that combines several physical parameters for identifying the presence of a geothermal system.

Hadley, D.M.; Cavit, D.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geysers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geysers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geysers Dictionary.png Geysers: A type of hot spring that intermittently erupts a column of hot water and steam into the air. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Beehive Geyser in Yellowstone National Park(reference: http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanenglish/2824228526/) Geysers occur where geothermally heated waters develop pressure near surface conduits. When the pressure passes a certain threshold the water erupts at the surface, often in tall bursts. Half of the world's geysers

119

LBL research on The Geysers: Conceptual models, simulation and monitoring studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of The Geysers research activities of DOE's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, LBL, in close co-operation with industry, is performing fundamental and applied studies of vapor- dominated geothermal systems. These studies include the development of new methods for evaluating cold water injection, monitoring of the seismic activity in The Geysers associated with injection and production, interpretation of pressure and geochemical changes measured during well tests and long-term production and injection operations, and improvement of existing models of the geothermal system. A review is given of the latest results of DOE-sponsored LBL reservoir engineering and seismic studies relevant to The Geysers.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Majer, E.L.; Pruess, K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of The Geysers research activities of DOE's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, LBL, in close cooperation with industry, is performing fundamental and applied studies of vapor-dominated geothermal systems. These studies include the development of new methods for evaluating cold water injection, monitoring of the seismic activity in The Geysers associated with injection and production, interpretation of pressure and geochemical changes measured during well tests and long-term production and injection operations, and improvement of existing models of the geothermal system. A review is given of the latest results of DOE-sponsored LBL reservoir engineering and seismic studies relevant to The Geysers.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Majer, E.L.; Pruess, K.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

LBL research on The Geysers: Conceptual models, simulation and monitoring studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of The Geysers research activities of DOE`s Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, LBL, in close co-operation with industry, is performing fundamental and applied studies of vapor- dominated geothermal systems. These studies include the development of new methods for evaluating cold water injection, monitoring of the seismic activity in The Geysers associated with injection and production, interpretation of pressure and geochemical changes measured during well tests and long-term production and injection operations, and improvement of existing models of the geothermal system. A review is given of the latest results of DOE-sponsored LBL reservoir engineering and seismic studies relevant to The Geysers.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Majer, E.L.; Pruess, K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geothermal field case studies that document the usefulness of models in predicting reservoir and well behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant art of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Falls in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources. 14 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geothermal Field Case Studies that Document the Usefulness of Models in Predicting Reservoir and Well Behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant part of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Fall in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Slimholes for geothermal reservoir evaluation - An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topics covered in this session include: slimhole testing and data acquisition, theoretical and numerical models for slimholes, and an overview of the analysis of slimhole data acquired by the Japanese. The fundamental issues discussed are concerned with assessing the efficacy of slimhole testing for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. the term reservoir evaluation is here taken to mean the assessment of the potential of the geothermal reservoir for the profitable production of electrical power. As an introduction to the subsequent presentations and discussions, a brief summary of the more important aspects of the use of slimholes in reservoir evaluation is given.

Hickox, C.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

127

Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

Not Available

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings:...

129

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pruess, K. , Analysis of injection testing of geothermalreservoirs: Geothermal Resoures Council, Vol. 4. , (into a fractured geothermal reservoir: Transactions, Vol. 4,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation...

131

Resource, technology, and environment at the geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general review, description, and history of geothermal development at the Geysers is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on environmental impacts of development of the area. The discussion is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction; energy, enthalpy and the First Law; vapor-producing geothermal reservoirs--review and models; geothermal; entropy and the Second Law; power plants--basics; H/sub 2/S emissions; hydrogen sulfide--possible health effects and odor; other emissions; power plant hydrogen sulfide abatement; hot water based geothermal development; phytotoxicity of geothermal emissions; appendices; and bibliography. (JGB)

Weres, O.; Tsao, K.; Wood, B.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Third workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 14, 1977, with 104 attendees from six nations. In keeping with the recommendations expressed by the participants at the Second Workshop, the format of the Workshop was retained, with three days of technical sessions devoted to reservoir physics, well and reservoir testing, field development, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The program presented 33 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. Although the format of the Workshop has remained constant, it is clear from a perusal of the Table of Contents that considerable advances have occurred in all phases of geothermal reservoir engineering over the past three years. Greater understanding of reservoir physics and mathematical representations of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated reservoirs are evident; new techniques for their analysis are being developed, and significant field data from a number of newer reservoirs are analyzed. The objectives of these workshops have been to bring together researchers active in the various physical and mathematical disciplines comprising the field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give the participants a forum for review of progress and exchange of new ideas in this rapidly developing field, and to summarize the effective state of the art of geothermal reservoir engineering in a form readily useful to the many government and private agencies involved in the development of geothermal energy. To these objectives, the Third Workshop and these Proceedings have been successfully directed. Several important events in this field have occurred since the Second Workshop in December 1976. The first among these was the incorporation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) into the newly formed Department of Energy (DOE) which continues as the leading Federal agency in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The Third Workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from DOE through a subcontract with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. A second significant event was the first conference under the ERDA (DOE)-ENEL cooperative program where many of the results of well testing in both nations were discussed. The Proceedings of that conference should be an important contribution to the literature. These Proceedings of the Third Workshop should also make an important contribution to the literature on geothermal reservoir engineering. Much of the data presented at the Workshop were given for the first time, and full technical papers on these subjects will appear in the professional journals. The results of these studies will assist markedly in developing the research programs to be supported by the Federal agencies, and in reducing the costs of research for individual developers and utilities. It is expected that future workshops of the Stanford Geothermal Program will be as successful as this third one. Planning and execution of the Workshop... [see file; ljd, 10/3/2005] The Program Committee recommended two novel sessions for the Third Workshop, both of which were included in the program. The first was the three overviews given at the Workshop by George Pinder (Princeton) on the Academic aspect, James Bresee (DOE-DGE) on the Government aspect, and Charles Morris (Phillips Petroleum) on the Industry aspect. These constituted the invited slate of presentations from the several sectors of the geothermal community. The Program Committee acknowledges their contributions with gratitude. Recognition of the importance of reservoir assurance in opting for geothermal resources as an alternate energy source for electric energy generation resulted in a Panel Session on Various Definitions of Geothermal Reservoirs. Special acknowledgments are offered to Jack Howard and Werner Schwarz (LBL) and to Jack Howard as moderator; to the panelists: James Leigh (Lloyd's Bank of California), Stephen Lipman (Union Oil), Mark Mathisen (PG&E), Patrick M

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1977-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Seismic velocity structure and microearthquake source properties at The Geysers, California, geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The method of progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion has been extended to incorporate S-wave arrival time data and to estimate S-wave velocities in addition to P-wave velocities. S-wave data to progressive inversion does not completely eliminate hypocenter-velocity tradeoffs, but they are substantially reduced. Results of a P and S-wave progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion at The Geysers show that the top of the steam reservoir is clearly defined by a large decrease of V/sub p//V/sub s/ at the condensation zone-production zone contact. The depth interval of maximum steam production coincides with minimum observed V/sub p//V/sub s/, and V/sub p//V/sub s/ increses below the shallow primary production zone suggesting that reservoir rock becomes more fluid saturated. The moment tensor inversion method was applied to three microearthquakes at The Geysers. Estimated principal stress orientations were comparable to those estimated using P-wave firstmotions as constraints. Well constrained principal stress orientations were obtained for one event for which the 17 P-first motions could not distinguish between normal-slip and strike-slip mechanisms. The moment tensor estimates of principal stress orientations were obtained using far fewer stations than required for first-motion focal mechanism solutions. The three focal mechanisms obtained here support the hypothesis that focal mechanisms are a function of depth at The Geysers. Progressive inversion as developed here and the moment tensor inversion method provide a complete approach for determining earthquake locations, P and S-wave velocity structure, and earthquake source mechanisms.

O'Connell, D.R.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

137

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

138

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Impact of injection on reservoir performance in the NCPA steam field at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

A managed injection program implemented by the NCPA in The Southeast Geysers reservoir continues to positively impact reservoir performance. Injection effects are determined by the application of geochemical and geophysical techniques to track the movement of injectate. This information, when integrated with reservoir pressure, flowrate, and thermodynamic data, is used to quantify the overall performance and efficiency of the injection program. Data analysis indicates that injected water is boiling near the injection wells, without deeper migration, and is recovered as superheated steam from nearby production wells. Injection derived steam (IDS) currently accounts for 25 to 35 percent of total production in the NCPA steamfield. Most importantly, 80 to 100% of the injectate is flashing and being recovered as steam. The amount of IDS has increased since 1988 due to both a change in injection strategy and a drying out of the reservoir. However, significant areas of the reservoir still remain relatively unaffected by injection because of the limited amount of injectate presently available. That the reservoir has been positively impacted in the injection areas is evidenced by a decrease in the rate of pressure decline from 1989 through 1992. Correspondingly, there has been a reduction in the rate of steam flow decline in the areas' production wells. Conversely, little evidence of reservoir cooling or thermal breakthrough is shown even in areas where IDS accounts for 80 percent or more of production. Finally, since injection water is a relatively low-gas source of steam, noncondensible gas concentrations have been reduced in some steam wells located within the injection dominated areas.

Enedy, S.L.; Smith, J.L.; Yarter, R.E.; Jones, S.M.; Cavote, P.E.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Physical processes of subsidence in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to acquire core and fluid from producing geothermal reservoirs (East Mesa, United States, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico); to test specimens of this core for their short-term and long-term (creep) compaction response; and to develop a compaction constitutive model that would allow future analysis of reservoir compaction and a surface subsidence. A total of approximately two hundred feet of core was obtained from eleven wells in the two geothermal fields. Depths and porosities ranged from 3500 to 11,000 feet and 15 to 40 percent, respectively. Several samples of geothermal fluids were also obtained. After geologically and geochemically describing the materials obtained, selected specimens were tested for their response to the pressures and temperatures of the geothermal environment and to simulated changes in those conditions that would be caused by production. Short-term tests (for example, tests for compressibility extending over a time interval of an hour or less in the laboratory) indicated that these sedimentary materials behaved normally with respect to the expected behavior of reservoir sandstones of these depths and porosities. Compressibilities were of the order 1 x 10/sup 6/ psi. Long-term tests, extending up to several weeks in duration, indicated that pore pressure reduction, simulating reservoir production, tended to cause creep compaction at an initial rate of about 1 x 10/sup -7/ percent porosity reduction per second.

Schatz, J.F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization of 3D Fracture Patterns at The Geysers and Coso Geothermal Reservoirs by Shear-wave Splitting, Rial, Elkibbi, Yang and Pereyra. The raw data for the project consists of seismographic recordings of microearthquakes (MEQ) detected over many years by arrays of sensors at both The Geysers and Coso. References Patrick Laney (2005) Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Micro-Earthquake_At_Geysers_Area_(Laney,_2005)&oldid=389456

146

Thermodynamic behaviour of simplified geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Starting from the basic laws of conservation of mass and energy, the differential equations that represent the thermodynamic behavior of a simplified geothermal reservoir are derived. Its application is limited to a reservoir of high permeability as it usually occurs in the central zone of a geothermal field. A very practical method to solve numerically the equations is presented, based on the direct use of the steam tables. The method, based in one general equation, is extended and illustrated with a numerical example to the case of segregated mass extraction, variable influx and heat exchange between rock and fluid. As it is explained, the method can be easily coupled to several influx models already developed somewhere else. The proposed model can become an important tool to solve practical problems, where like in Los Azufres Mexico, the geothermal field can be divided in an inner part where flashing occurs and an exterior field where storage of water plays the main role.

Hiriart, G.; Sanchez, E.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Analysis of Production Decline in Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and analysis methods were gathered from the petroleum, geothermal, and hydrological literature. The data sets examined include: Wairakei, New Zealand -141 wells; Cerro Prieto, Mexico - 18 wells; The Geysers, USA - 27 wells; Larderello, Italy - 9 wells and groups; Matsukawa and Otake, Japan - 8 wells; and Olkaria, Kenya - 1 well. The analysis methods tested were; Arps's equations, Fetkovich type curves, Slider's method for Arps, Gentry's method for Arps, Gentry's and McCray's method, other type curves, P/z vs. Q method, Coats' influence function method, and Bodvarsson's Linearized Free Surface Green's Function method. The conclusions are: (1) The exponential equation fit is satisfactory for geothermal data. (2) The hyperbolic equation should be used only if the data fit well on a hyperbolic type curve. (3) The type curve methods are useful if the data are not too scattered. They work well for vapor dominated systems and poorly for liquid dominated systems. (4) Coats' influence function method can be used even with very scattered data. (5) Bodvarsson's method is still experimental but it shows much promise as a useful tool.

Byrns, R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

150

DESCRIPTION OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL TWO-PHASE SIMULATOR SHAFT78 FOR USE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, I' Report No. 76-G. : Three- . Dimensional Geothermal Reservoir Simulation,f1161. Coats, K. H. : "Geothermal Reservoir Modeling," paper

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation methods are used to study how the exploitation of different horizons affects the behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir. The reservoir model is a schematic representation of the Olkaria field in Kenya. The model consists of a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlying the main liquid dominated reservoir. Four different cases were studied, with fluid produced from: 1) the vapor zone only, 2) the liquid zone only, 3) both zones and 4) both zones, but assuming lower values for vertical permeability and porosity. The results indicate that production from the shallow two-phase zone, although resulting in higher enthalpy fluids, may not be advantageous in the long run. Shallow production gives rise to a rather localized depletion of the reservoir, whereas production from deeper horizons may yield a more uniform depletion proces, if vertical permeability is sufficiently large.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.; Bjoernsson, S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Session: Reservoir Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Injection into a fractured geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study is made on the movement of the thermal fronts in the fracture and in the porous medium when 100{sup 0}C water is injected into a 300{sup 0}C geothermal reservoir with equally spaced horizontal fractures. Numerical modeling calculations were made for a number of thermal conductivity values, as well as different values of the ratio of fracture and rock medium permeabilities. One important result is an indication that although initially, the thermal front in the fracture moves very fast relative to the front in the porous medium as commonly expected, its speed rapidly decreases. At some distance from the injection well the thermal fronts in the fracture and the porous medium coincide, and from that point they advance together. The implication of this result on the effects of fractures on reinjection into geothermal reservoirs is discussed.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Erten & Rial, 1999) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Erten & Rial, 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers...

159

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

160

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The evidence provided by the noble gases for a magmatic gas component in the Northwest Geysers adds new constraints to genetic models of the system and its evolution. The high proportion of magmatic gas and high total NCG in HTR steam are inconsistent with an origin of the vapor-dominated Northwest Geysers reservoir from deep boiling of a connate or metamorphic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Isotopic Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The evidence provided by the noble gases for a magmatic gas component in the Northwest Geysers adds new constraints to genetic models of the system and its evolution. The high proportion of magmatic gas and high total NCG in HTR steam are inconsistent with an origin of the vapor-dominated Northwest Geysers reservoir from deep boiling of a connate or metamorphic water. Instead, the strong magmatic component suggests that the HTR and the

162

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range...

164

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

165

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

167

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

168

Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

Kutasov, I.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Challenging Water Dominated Geothermal System: the CerroSixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Simulation, Uenotai Geothermal Field, Akita Prefecture,

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in jointed and layered rocks in geothermal fields.of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 116, 257- 278.fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Application of stress corrosion to geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are several alternative equations which describe slow crack growth by stress corrosion. Presently available data suggest that an alternative form may be preferable to the form which is most often used, but the issue cannot be clearly decided. Presently available stress corrosion data on glasses and ceramics suggest that rocks in a proposed geothermal reservoir will crack readily over long time periods, thus seriously limiting the operation of this type of power source. However, in situ hydrofracturing measurements together with a theoretical treatment suggest that such a reservoir will contain a relatively high pressure over a long period of time without further cracking. Further experimentation is desirable to measure directly the critical stresses for crack growth rates on the order of 10/sup -7/ m/sec.

Demarest, H.H. Jr.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

175

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

176

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

177

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of cause and mechanism for injection-induced seismicity at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.P. 2001. Seismicity, subsidence and strain at The Geysersand Segall, P. , 1997. Subsidence at The Geysers geothermalrespectively, as well as subsidence of about 0.5 to 1 meter.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California, Menlo Park, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two distinct clusters of microearthquakes have been identified at The Geysers, possibly relating to two independent pressure sinks resulting from steam production described by Lipman, and others (1977). Unlike earthquakes in the Maacama--Rodgers Creek fault zone to the south and west, earthquakes at The Geysers are confined to depths of less than 5 km. The present level of seismicity at The Geysers appears to be higher than the preproduction level and is higher and more continuous than the seismicity in the surrounding reigon. Earthquakes in the steam production zone at The Geysers resemmble earthquakes in the surrounding region with regard to focal plane solutions, source characteristics and magnitude distribution (b slope). Subtle differences in earthquake characteristics may be resolved by analysis of more extensive data now being gathered in the region.

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

History match simulation of Serrazzano geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The simulator SHAFT79 of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been applied to field-wide distributed parameter simulation of the vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at Serrazzano, Italy. Using a three-dimensional geologically accurate mesh and detailed flow rate data from 19 producing wells, a period of 15.5 years (from 1959 to 1975) has been simulated. The reservoir model used is based on field measurements of temperatures and pressures, laboratory data for core samples, and available geological and hydrological information. The main parameters determined (adjusted) during development of the simulation are permeabilities and much of the initial conditions. Simulated patterns of pressure decline show semi-quantitative agreement with field observations. The simulation suggests that there is cold water recharge and/or incomplete heat transfer from he rock due to fractures in the margins of the reservoir, and some steam flowing to the main well field originates from deep fractures rather than from boiling in the two-phase zones modeled. Simulation methodology and ambiguity of parameter determination is discussed.

Pruess, K.; Weres, O.; Schroeder, R.; Marconcini, R.; Neri, G.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radon as an In Situ Tracer in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By measuring trace amounts of radon in geothermal steam, utilities can estimate changes in the properties of the fluid produced from a reservoir. These measurements provide a method to monitor the transition from a liquid-dominated reservoir to a boiling reservoir.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

184

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Abstract The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource's connectivity, therefore making fracture characterization highly important. This study aims to develop methodologies to use resistivity measurements to infer fracture properties in geothermal fields. The resistivity distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points and the data can then be used to infer fracture properties due to the contrast in resistivity between water and rock.

185

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

186

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with the geology of the area, which is well known. An east-west trending Bouguer gravity profile was constructed through the center of the heat flow anomaly described by Combs (1976). The best fit model for the observed gravity at

187

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews the use of earthquake studies in the field of geothermal exploration. Local, regional and teleseismic events can all provide useful information about a geothermal area on various scales. It is imperative that data collection is conducted in properly designed, realistic experiments. Ground noise is still of limited usefulness as a prospecting tool. The utility of the method cannot yet be assessed because of its undeveloped methodology and the paucity of case histories.

188

Geothermal reservoir technology research at the DOE Idaho Operations Office  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal reservoir technology research projects managed at the Department of Energy Idaho Falls Operations office (DOE-ID) account for a large portion of the Department of Energy funding for reservoir technology research (approximately 7 million dollars in FY-95). DOE-ID managed projects include industry coupled geothermal exploration drilling, cooperative research projects initiated through the Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO), and other geothermal reservoir technology research projects. A solicitation for cost-shared industry coupled drilling has been completed and one zward has been made in FY-95. Another solicitation for industry coupled drilling may be conducted in the spring of 1996. A separate geothermal research technology research, development and demonstration solicitation will result in multiple year awards over the next 2 years. The goals of these solicitations are to ensure competition for federal money and to get the Government and the geothermal industry the most useful information for their research dollars.

Creed, Bob

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be close to the produced reservoir water without surfaceinjection. Mixing the produced geothermal water with large

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

193

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

195

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

196

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

197

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

198

Recent geothermal reservoir engineering activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the most recent activities in reservoir engineering for the geothermal group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The primary emphasis of the geothermal program of LBL is dedicated to reservoir engineering including theoretical investigations, the development and application of mathematical models, and field studies. The objectives of these activities are to develop and validate methods and instruments which will be utilized in the determination of the parameters of geothermal systems, and the identification and evaluation of the importance of the distinct processes which occur in reservoirs. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of state of the art technologies which characterize geothermal reservoirs and evaluate their productive capacity and longevity.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Pruess, K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These are appendices A thru E of the Ahuachapan geothermal field reservoir analysis. The volume contains: mineralogy contours, ionic chlorine and silicon dioxide contours, well summaries, and temperature and pressure effects. (JEF)

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlin sector ofThe Geysers geothermal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam production at Aidlin began in 1989 and has been accompanied by varying amounts of injection, using condensate,condensate water at The Geysers has increased ammonia concentrations and D/H ratios of the produced fluids, with injection-derived steam

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest, Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

202

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

Olsen, G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents the results of analysis of a state of the art set of wireline petrophysical and wellbore image logs recorded in the Alum 25-29 well, southwestern Nevada. The Alum well penetrated nearly 2000 ft (610 m) of volcano-clastic rocks and more than 1000 ft of basement, separated from the sediments by a shallowly dipping detachment fault. The logs were acquired both to characterize the site and also to select the

206

Methods for geothermal reservoir detection emphasizing submerged environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared for the California State Lands Commission to aid them in evaluating exploration programs for geothermal reservoirs, particularly in submerged land environments. Three charts show: (1) a logical progression of specific geologic, geochemical, and geophysical exploration techniques for detecting geothermal reservoirs in various geologic environments with emphasis on submerged lands, (2) various exploration techniques which can be used to develop specific information in geothermal areas, and (3) if various techniques will apply to geothermal exploration according to a detailed geologic classification. A narrative in semi-outline form supplements these charts, providing for each technique; a brief description, advantages, disadvantages, special geologic considerations, and specific references. The specific geologic situation will control the exploration criterion to be used for reservoir detection. General guidelines are established which may be of use in evaluating such a program, but the optimum approach will vary with each situation.

Case, C.W.; Wilde, P.

1976-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

State of Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment - Summary E.L Majer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the

208

Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE...

210

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Permeability-thickness determination from transient production response at the southeast geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fetkovich production decline curve analysis method was extended for application to vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs for the purpose of estimating the permeability-thickness product (kh) from the transient production response. The analytic dimensionless terms for pressure, production rate, decline rate, and decline time were derived for saturated steam using the real gas potential and customary geothermal production units of pounds-mass per hour. The derived terms were numerically validating using ``Geysers-line`` reservoir properties at initial water saturation of 0 and at permeabilities of 1, 10, and 100 mD. The production data for 48 wells in the Southeast Geysers were analyzed and the permeability-thickness products determined from the transient production response using the Fetkovich production decline type curve. The kh results were in very good agreement with the published range at the Southeast Geysers and show regions of high permeability-thickness.

Faulder, D.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Water injection as a means for reducing non-condensible and corrosive gases in steam produced from vapor-dominated reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chloride in Superheated Steam and Chloride in Deep Brine atGas and Chloride in Steam at The Geysers, Trans. , Geoth.Decline Trends in Geothermal Steam Reservoirs, Proceedings,

Pruess, Karsten; Spycher, Nicolas; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

Aydelotte, S.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN  

SciTech Connect

The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 10c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm. Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fractured geothermal reservoir growth induced by heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field testing of a hydraulically-stimulated, hot dry rock geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico has indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for documenting the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations which caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock systems may be possible.

Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Robinson, B.A.; Potter, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Abstract Modern portable gravimeters can routinely achieve a5 ugal uncertainty with careful measurementprocedures involving multiple station occupations inthe same day, and stacking of readings over at least15 minutes during each occupation. Although furtherimprovements in gravimeter accuracy are feasible,other practical factors relating to repeat surveys ofgeothermal fields make such improvements oflimited value. The two most important factors arebenchmark elevation variations (3 ugal/cm) andgroundwater level fluctuations (5-10 ugal/m). Dualfrequency GPS receivers can give elevations

219

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of commercial power generation at The Geysers geothermal field in California as six distinct and consecutive the largest source of commercial geothermal power tapped to date in the world, and its history presents geothermal field in California has been supplying commercial electric power continuously for the last half

Stanford University

220

Status of geothermal reservoir engineering research projects supported by USDOE/Division of Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the fall of 1977, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) assume lead responsibility, on DGE's behalf, for geothermal reservoir engineering. This summary discusses briefly the DOE/DGE-sponsored geothermal reservoir engineering research program which includes LBL in-house research and research done by others through LBL. LBL in-house research has emphasized improvement of well test analysis methods and the development of geothermal reservoir performance simulators. Work by others has included 18 separate contracts on a variety of technical and scientific projects. Altogether, 29 distinguishable research topics have been addressed. Fourteen institutions, including eight private companies, have interacted with the program. Table 1, along with figures 2 and 3 summarized the status of the work.

Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

222

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

223

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microearthquake monitoring and seismic imaging at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

We are monitoring two high-frequency, high-resolution microearthquake networks at The Geysers. The first network consists of 16 stations and is located in the northwest portion of the Geysers. This array is in an area that is representative of a high-temperature, deep, reservoir environment. The second network consists of 13 stations located in the southeast Geysers around the location of the cooperative injection experiment. We are using the data from the networks to compute velocity and attenuation images and earthquake parameters such as precise location and rate and manner of energy release. Our goal is to evaluate the use of this information to manage steam release from geothermal reservoirs. We are supporting this effort with laboratory measurements of velocity and attenuation on Geysers core samples under varying degrees of saturation to help us better interpret our seismic images. To date we find that microearthquake activity follows injection activity, and the dry, low-pressure portions of the reservoir are characterized by low velocity and high attenuation.

Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Romero, A.; Kirkpatrick, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.19166667,"lon":-120.385,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Tiwi geothermal reservoir: Geology, geochemistry, and response to production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tiwi geothermal field is located on the Bicol Peninsula of Southern Luzon in the Philippines. The field is associated with the extinct Quaternary stratovolcano Mt. Malinao, one of a chain of volcanos formed as a result of crustal subduction along the Philippine Trench to the east. The geothermal reservoir is contained within a sequence of interlayered andesite flows and pyroclastic deposits that unconformably overlie a basement complex of marine sediments, metamorphic, and intrusive rocks. In its initial state, the Tiwi reservoir was an overpressured liquid-filled system containing near-neutral sodium chloride water at temperatures exceeding 260{degree}C. The reservoir is partially sealed at its top and sides by hydrothermal argillic alteration products and calcite deposition. Isolated portions of the reservoir contain a corrosive acid chloride-sulfate water associated with a distinctive advanced argillic mineral assemblage. Withdrawal of fluid for electricity generation has caused widespread boiling in the reservoir and the formation of steam zones. The resultant solids deposition in wellbores and near-wellbore formation has been mitigated by a combination of mechanical and chemical well stimulation. Mass withdrawal from the reservoir has also caused invasion of cold groundwater into the reservoir through former fluid outflow channels. During 1983-1987, several wells were flooded with cold water and ceased flowing. In response, PGI moved development drilling west to largely unaffected areas and undertook recompletion and stimulation programs. These programs effectively halted the decline in generation by 1988.

Hoagland, J.R.; Bodell, J.M. (Unocal Geothermal Div., Santa Rosa, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

AN ASSESSMENT OF PRECISE SURFACE GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING THE RESPONSE OF A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR TO EXPLOITATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Response of a Geothermal Reservoir to Exploitation R. B,THE RESPONSE OF A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR T EXPLOITATION O R.D i v i s i o n o f Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies o

Grannell, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fracture network modeling of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluid flow and tracer transport in a fractured Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir are modeled using fracture network modeling techniques. The steady state pressure and flow fields are solved for a two-dimensional, interconnected network of fractures with no-flow outer boundaries and constant-pressure source and sink points to simulate wellbore-fracture intersections. The tracer response is simulated by particle tracking, which follows the progress of a representative sample of individual tracer molecules traveling through the network. Solute retardation due to matrix diffusion and sorption is handled easily with these particle tracking methods. Matrix diffusion is shown to have an important effect in many fractured geothermal reservoirs, including those in crystalline formations of relatively low matrix porosity. Pressure drop and tracer behavior are matched for a fractured HDR reservoir tested at Fenton Hill, NM.

Robinson, B.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A STUDY ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGlNEERING APPROACH COMBINED WITH GEOLOGICAL INFORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the combined approaches of reservoir geology and engineering to a geothermal field where geological characteristics are highly complex and heterogeneous.Especially,the concrete approaches are discussed for the case of geothermal reservoir performance studies with a developed numerical model, by showing example cases accompanied with reinjection of produced disposal hot water into underground in an object geothermal reservoir. This combined approach will be a great help in solving complicated problems encountered during the development of a geothermal field.

Hirakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshinobu, F.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparison of two hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of granite at 2.7 to 3.0 km (9000 to 10,000 ft) at the Fenton Hill site, near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Both reservoirs are research reservoirs, in the sense that both are fairly small, generally yielding 5 MWt or less, and are intended to serve as the basic building blocks of commercial-sized reservoirs, consisting of 10 to 15 similar fractures that would yield approximately 35 MWt over a 10 to 20 yr period. Both research reservoirs were created in the same well-pair, with energy extraction well number 1 (EE-1) serving as the injection well, and geothermal test well number 2 (GT-2) serving as the extraction, or production, well. The first reservoir was created in the low permeability host rock by fracturing EE-1 at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous temperature was 185/sup 0/C (364/sup 0/F). A second, larger reservoir was formed by extending a small, existing fracture at 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the injection well about 100 m deeper and 10/sup 0/C hotter than the first reservoir. The resulting large fracture propagated upward to about 2.6 km (8600 ft) and appeared to Rave an inlet-to-outlet spacing of 300m (1000 ft), more then three times that of the first fracture. Comparisons are made with the first reservoir. Evaluation of the new reservoir was accomplished in two steps: (1) with a 23-day heat extraction experiment that began October 23, 1979, and (2) a second, longer-term heat extraction experiment still in progress, which as of November 25, 1980 has been in effect for 260 days. The results of this current experiment are compared with earlier experiments.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

PROCEEDINGS TWENTIETH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a global reservoir value of the amount of adsorbed liquid water per kg of rock (called ADS in the present paper). We simulated the natural state with different values of ADS,...

237

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics,...

238

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing: 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. This report traces reservoir growth as demonstrated during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m/sup 3/. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D.; Cremer, G.M. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t h e v a p r phase. I n a vapor-dominated geothermal r e s e r v o i r , t h e only "non-vapor" f l u when adsorbed water is the only "non-vapor" f l u i d present. There is a f u r t h e r consideration

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

State-of-the-art review of geothermal reservoir modelling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art in geothermal reservoir modelling is summarized and evaluated. Only those models which have been developed exclusively for geothermal simulation are considered. Attention is focused primarily on the two and three dimensional distributed parameter models. The general porous flow theory is formulated. For each model, the governing equations, method of approximation, treatment of the convection term, treatment of the nonlinear coefficients, solution of the resulting algebraic equations, and representation of the well-bore are presented. Example problems that have been treated are discussed briefly. (MHR)

Pinder, G.F.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrogen sulfide, trace element and sulfur hexafluoride tracer treatment from the Geysers-Calistoga Geothermal Resource Area based on aircraft and surface sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This four-day study has provided initial data regarding the short-range transport of pollutants from The Geysers geothermal operations. The initial analysis of the data has shown that a measureable plume of gaseous sulfur (H{sub 2}S) is emitted from the Geysers and transported by surface and upper-level winds to distances beyond 20 km. Only one day had concentrations above 30 ppB and on this day H{sub 2}S was detected as a distinct odor at 1500 m (m.s.1.) at 4 km or more from the Geysers. The initial data analysis of the H{sub 2}S and SF{sub 6} plume data have revealed the important role that vertical wind shear plays in changing plume trajectories with height and enhancing diffusion of pollutants. Surface and aircraft sampling of aerosols indicate that small quantities of trace elements such as As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr and Br may be transported from the area.

Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Nickola, P.W.; Schreck, R.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

245

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating nuclear wastes, and in the drying of porous materials. Geothermally oriented studies were presented by Chicoine et al. (1977), Hsieh and Ramey (1978, 1981), Herkelrath et al. (1983), and Nghiem and Ramey (1991). Nuclear waste-related work includes papers by Herkelrath and O'Neal (1985), Pollock (1986), Eaton and Bixler (1987), Pruess et al. (1990), Nitao (1990), and Doughty and E'ruess (1991). Applications to industrial drying of porous materials have been discussed by Hamiathy (1969) arid Whitaker (1977). This paper is primarily concerned with evaluating the impact of vapor pressure lowering (VPL) effects on the depletion behavior of vapor-dominated reservoirs. We have examined experimental data on vapor adsorption and capillary pressures in an effort to identify constitutive relationships that would be applicable to the tight matrix rocks of vapor-dominated systems. Numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the impact of these effects on the depletion of vapor-dominated reservoirs.

Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

248

Numerical simulation of reservoir compaction in liquid dominated geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical model is introduced which simulates the effects of fluid production as well as reinjection on the vertical deformation of water dominated geothermal reservoirs. This program, based on an Integrated Finite Difference technique and Terzaghi's one-dimensional consolidation model, computes the transport of heat and water through porous media, and resulting pore volume changes. Examples are presented to show the effects of reservoir heterogeneities on the compaction of these hot water systems, as well as the effects of different production-injection schemes. The use of isothermal models to simulate the deformation of non-isothermal systems was also investigated.

Lippmann, M.J.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reservoir studies of the Seltjarnarnes geothermal field, Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Seltjarnarnes geothermal field in Iceland has been exploited for space heating for the last 16 years. A model of the field has been developed that integrates all available data. The model has been calibrated against the flow rate and pressure decline histories of the wells and the temperature and chemical changes of the produced fluids. This has allowed for the estimation of the permeability and porosity distribution of the system, and the volume of the hot reservoir. Predictions of future reservoir behavior using the model suggest small pressure and temperature changes, but a continuous increase in the salinity of the fluids produced.

Tulinius, H.; Spencer, A.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kristmannsdottir, H.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. Final program summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight field experiments and the associated theoretical and laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Overall results have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formation zones. Seven of the eight stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments at Raft River and the two at Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or reservoir transmissivity. The Beowawe chemical stimulation treatment appears to have significantly improved the well's injectivity, but production data were not obtained because of well mechanical problems. The acid etching treatment in the well at the Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate. Evaluations of the field experiments to date have suggested improvements in treatment design and treatment interval selection which offer substantial encouragement for future stimulation work.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

Pruess, K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Simple numerical simulation for liquid dominated geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model for geothermal reservoir has been developed. The model used is based on an idealized, two-dimensional case, where the porous medium is isotropic, nonhomogeneous, filled with saturated liquid. The fluids are assumed to have constant and temperature dependent viscosity. A Boussinesq approximation and Darcys law are used. The model will utilize a simple hypothetical geothermal system, i.e. graben within horsts structure, with three layers of different permeabilities. Vorticity plays an importance roles in the natural convection process, and its generation and development do not depend only on the buoyancy, but also on the magnitude and direction relation between the flow velocity and the local gradient of permeability to viscosity ratio. This model is currently used together with a physical, scaled-down reservoir model to help conceptual modeling.

Wintolo, Djoko; Sutrisno; Sudjatmiko; Sudarman, S.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Application of inverse modeling to geothermal reservoir simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the non-isothermal, multiphase, multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during testing and exploitation of geothermal fields.The ITOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding simulation output can be calculated. Furthermore, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. Automatic history matching using ITOUGH2 is robust and efficient so that model parameters affecting geothermal field performance can reliably be estimated based on a variety of field measurements such as pressures, temperatures, flow rates, and enthalpies. The paper describes the methodology of inverse modeling and provides a detailed discussion of sample problems to demonstrate the application of the method to data from geothermal reservoirs.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Bullivant, D.P.; O`Sullivan, M.J. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Engineering Science

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

258

The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal reservoir engineering is an important aspect f the Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Division, geothermal research and development program. Reservoir engineering-related research, a component of all geosciences activities, is of particular importance in the context of Hydrothermal Reservoir Research. Three closely related research activities (Brine Injection, Reservoir Definition, and Caldera Reservoir Investigations) are now combined under the more general heading of Reservoir Technology. Scientific investigations, as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program, also contribute greatly to the understanding of the behavior of high-temperature hydrothermal convection systems. With the creation of the Geothermal Technology Organization, where geothermal research will be cost-shard with industry, it is anticipated that a number of research topics will be brought to the point where the geothermal industry can rapidly put new technology into use. 2 tabs., 2 figs.

Mock, John E.; Blackett, Robert E.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Reservoir and injection technology: Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford: Third annual report for the period October 1, 1986 through September 30, 1987: (Final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of geothermal reservoir engineering. General topics covered are: reinjection technology, reservoir technology, and heat extraction. (LSP)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Review of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Republic Geothermal, Inc., and its subcontractors have planned and executed four experimental fracture stimulation treatments under the Department of Energy-funded Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The 2-year program, begun in February 1979, is Ultimately to include six full-scale field hydraulic and chemical stimulation experiments in geothermal wells. This paper describes the overall program and the four treatments completed to date. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of literature and theoretical studies, laboratory investigations, and numerical work. The main purpose of this work is to establish the technological bases for geothermal well stimulation design. Phase I1 will include the planning, execution, and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in late 1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature 149 C {+-} (300 F{+-}). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a ''Kiel'' dendritic, or reverse flow, technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature, 177 C {+-} (350 F{+-}), reservoir with matrix-type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low-permeability zone and a mini-frac ''Kiel'' treatment of a shallow, high-permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys and numerical models. This combination of evaluation techniques yielded an interpretation of fracture geometry and productivity enhancement. However, the evaluation of artificially induced fractures in naturally fractured formations was found to lead to possibly non-unique solutions. In all the field experiments, artificial fractures were created and well productivity was increased. A discussion of the prestimulation and poststimulation data and their evaluation are provided for each experiment in this report.

Campbell, D. A.; Hanold, R. J.; Sinclair, A. R.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

262

Formation evaluation in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies relative to some formation evaluation aspects of geothermal reservoirs are reported. The particular reservoirs considered were the liquid dominated type with a lithology of the sedimentary nature. Specific problems of interest included the resistivity behavior of brines and rocks at elevated temperatures and studies on the feasibility of using the well log resistivity data to obtain estimates of reservoir permeability. Several papers summarizing the results of these studies were presented at various technical meetings for rapid dissemination of the results to potential users. These papers together with a summary of data most recently generated are included. A brief review of the research findings precedes the technical papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for four papers. Five papers were abstracted previously for EDB.

Ershaghi, I.; Dougherty, E.E.; Handy, L.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Modeling of geothermal reservoirs: Fundamental processes, computer simulation, and field applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. Then we examine applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation technology on geothermal energy development are pointed out. We conclude with considerations on possible future developments in the mathematical modeling of geothermal fields. 45 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Pruess, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Review of the geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

SciTech Connect

The overall program and the four experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date are described. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of studies (literature and theoretical), laboratory investigations, and numerical work. Phase II will include the planning, execution and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in late-1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature (300/sup 0/F). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a Kiel dendritic (or reverse flow) technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature (350/sup 0/F/sup +/) reservoir with matrix type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low permeability zone and a minifrac Kiel treatment of a shallow, high permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys, and numerical models.

Campbell, D.A.; Hanold, R.J.; Sinclair, A.R.; Vetter, O.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh downhole environment. Two deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures are in excess of 600/sup 0/F (315/sup 0/C). The wells were drilled during 1979 to 1981, inclined at 35 degrees, one above the other, and directionally drilled in an azimuthal direction orthogonal to the least principal in-situ crustal stress field. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the two wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in insolation liners and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of three-dimensional fracture growth that requires very large volumes of injected water. Two fractured zones have been formed by hydraulic fracturing and defined by close-in, borehole deployed, microseismic detectors. Initial operations were focused in the injection wellbore near total depth, where water injection treatments totalling 51,000 bbls (8100 m/sup 3/) were accomplished by pumping through a cemented-in 4-1/2 in. liner/PBR assembly. Retrievable casing packers were used to inject 26,000 bbls (4100 m/sup 3/) in the upper section of the open hole. Surface injection pressures (ISIP) varied from 4000 to 5900 psi (27 to 41 MPa) and the fracture gradient ranged from 0.7 to 0.96 psi/ft.

Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Hendron, R.H.; Sinclair, A.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A two-dimensional numerical model of coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and rock mechanics in naturally fractured rock is developed. The model is applicable to assessments of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir characterisation experiments, and to the study of hydraulic stimulations and the heat extraction potential of HDR reservoirs. Modelling assumptions are based on the characteristics of the experimental HDR reservoir in the Carnmenellis granite in Cornwall, S. W. England. In

272

Geothermal probabilistic cost model with an application to a geothermal reservoir at Heber, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A financial accounting model that incorporates physical and institutional uncertainties has been developed for geothermal projects. Among the uncertainties it can handle are well depth, flow rate, fluid temperature, and permit and construction times. The outputs of the model are cumulative probability distributions of financial measures such as capital cost, levelized cost, and profit. These outputs are well suited for use in an investment decision incorporating risk. The model has the powerful feature that conditional probability distribution can be used to account for correlations among any of the input variables. The model has been applied to a geothermal reservoir at Heber, California, for a 45-MW binary electric plant. Under the assumptions made, the reservoir appears to be economically viable.

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California,monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California,~~W. and Faust, C. R. , 1979, Geothermal resource simulation:

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooper Basin, Australia. Geothermal Resources Council Trans.a hot fractured rock geothermal project. Engineering Geologyseismicity in The Geysers geothermal area, California. J.

Majer, Ernest L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Development of downhole tools capable of reliable operation in supercritical environments is a significant challenge with a number of technical and operational hurdles related to both the hardware and electronics design. Hardware designs require the elimination of all elastomer seals and the use of advanced materials. Electronics must be hardened to the extent practicable since no electronics system can survive supercritical temperatures. To develop systems capable of logging in these environments will require a number of developments. More robust packaging of electronics is needed. Sandia will design and develop innovated, highly integrated, high-temperature (HT) data loggers. These data loggers will be designed and developed using silicon-on-insulator/silicon carbide (SOI/SiC) technologies integrated into a MultiChip Module (MCM); greatly increasing the reliability of the overall system (eliminating hundreds of board-level innerconnects) and decreasing the size of the electronics package. Tools employing these electronics will be capable of operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 °C and by using advanced Dewar flasks, will operate in a supercritical reservoir with temperatures over 450 °C and pressures above 70 MPa. Dewar flasks are needed to protect the electronic components, but those currently available are only reliable in temperature regimes in the range of 350 °C; promising advances in materials will be investigated to improve Dewar technologies. HT wireline currently used for logging operations is compromised at temperatures above 300 °C; along with exploring the development of a HT wireline for logging purposes, alternative approaches that employ HT batteries (e.g., those awarded a recent R&D 100) will also be investigated, and if available will enable deployment using slickline, which is not subject to the same temperature limitations as wireline. To demonstrate the capability provided by these improvements, tools will be developed and fielded. The developed base technologies and working tool designs will be available to industry throughout the project period. The developed techniques and subsystems will help to further the advancement of HT tools needed in the geothermal industry.

276

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ASSESSMENT OF LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL Fujimitsu and Sachio Ehara Geothermic Laboratory, Earth Resources Engineering Department, Kyushu University

Stanford University

277

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

278

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 1: Analytical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 2: Application in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRZVIOUS PIETHODS OF CALCLXATING STEAM/TtJATER RELATIVE PERPlEX3ILITIES IN GEOTHE?XAL XZSERVOIFG

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

New Heat Flow Models in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed new analytical models for predicting the temperature distribution within a geothermal reservoir following reinjection of water having a temperature different from that of the reservoir. The study consisted of two parts: developing new analytical models for the heat conduction rate into multi-dimensional, parallelepiped matrix blocks and developing new analytical models for the advance of the thermal front through the geothermal reservoir. In the first part of the study, a number of semi-empirical models for the multi-dimensional heat conduction were developed to overcome the limitations to the exact solutions. The exact solution based on a similarity solution to the heat diffusion equation is the best model for the early-time period, but fails when thermal conduction fronts from opposing sides of the matrix block merge. The exact solution based on an infinite series solution was found not to be useful because it required tens of thousands of terms to be include d for accuracy. The best overall model for the entire conduction time was a semi-empirical model based on an exponential conduction rate. In the second part of the study, the early-time period exact solution based on similarity methods and the semi-empirical exponential model were used to develop new analytical models for the location of the thermal front within the reservoir during injection. These equations were based on an energy balance on the water in the fractured network. These convective models allowed for both dual and triple porosity reservoirs, i.e., one or two independent matrix domains. A method for incorporating measured fracture spacing distributions into these convective models was developed. It was found that there were only minor differences in the predicted areal extent of the heated zone between the dual and triple porosity models. Because of its simplicity, the dual porosity model is recommended. These new models can be used for preliminary reservoir studies. Although they are not as accurate as numerical simulators, they are simple, easy and inexpensive to use. These new models can be used to get general information about reservoir behavior before committing to the considerable greater expense of numerical simulation.

Reis, John

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

Pritchett, J.W.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Reservoir simulation studies: Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical reservoir simulation techniques were used to perform a history-match of the Wairakei geothermal system in New Zealand. First, a one-dimensional (vertical) model was chosen; realistic stratigraphy was incorporated and the known production history was imposed. The effects of surface and deep recharge were included. Good matches were obtained, both for the reservoir pressure decline history and changes in average discharge enthalpy with time. Next, multidimensional effects were incorporated by treating with a two-dimensional vertical section. Again, good history matches were obtained, although computed late-time discharge enthalpies were slightly high. It is believed that this disparity arises from inherently three-dimensional effects. Predictive calculations using the two-dimensional model suggest that continued future production will cause little additional reservoir pressure drop, but that thermal degradation will occur. Finally, ground subsidence data at Wairakei was examined. It was concluded that traditional elastic pore-collapse models based on classical soil-mechanics concepts are inadequate to explain the observed surface deformation. It is speculated that the measured subsidence may be due to structural effects such as aseismic slippage of a buried reservoir boundary fault.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi Stevinweg 1 Delft, 2628 CN, The Netherlands e-mail: h.salimi@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT The Delft Geothermal

Stanford University

285

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Resource were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each of the three existing wells at Raft River were also constructed to describe the

286

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal System (EGS) were coupled with wellbore flow simulations. The 3D reservoir simulations used at par with H2O based EGS. The total exergy that can be generated in 1 km2 area of a geothermal reservoir

Stanford University

287

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Germany iulia.ghergut@geo.uni-goettingen.de ABSTRACT In fluid-based geothermal reservoirs, thermal between "heat exchange area" and RTD features of a geothermal reservoir feel natural, but act highly

Stanford University

288

Methodology for ranking geothermal reservoirs in non-electric industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of geothermal reservoirs exist and to perform a thorough study of each of these reservoirs to determine those most desirable for demonstration projects can be costly and time consuming. A methodology for assigning rankings to these reservoirs, given a limited amount of data, is presented. The top ranked reservoirs would then be studied more thoroughly. In addition, a methodology for ranking the large number of industries that could possibly utilize geothermal energy in nonelectric applications is given to determine those industries which will have the most impact on national energy demand if converted to geothermal use.

Farah, O.G.; Williams, F.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Measurement requirements and methods for geothermal reservoir system parameters: an appraisal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is the availability of adequate measurements to aid the reservoir and production engineer in the development and operation of geothermal reservoirs, wells and the overall process plant. This report documents the geothermal parameters and their measurement requirements and provides an appraisal of measurement methods and instruments capable of meeting the requirements together with recommendations on identified deficiencies.

Lamers, M.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Strategies for steam handling and H/sub 2/S abatement at geothermal power plants in The Geysers area of northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Strict limitations on the emission of H/sub 2/S from new geothermal power plants in The Geysers area of northern California have been imposed by Lake and Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control Districts. Lake County, under new source review rules, has stipulated that specific technologies shall be utilized to limit H/sub 2/S emissions to 5 lb/h as a condition for determination of compliance. The status of these technologies as well as other ongoing technology development efforts to conserve steam and abate H/sub 2/S are evaluated. Although projections indicate that it may be possible to meet the 5 lb/h limit, there is no firm assurance of achievement at this time because of the unproven, full-scale performance status of some key technologies specified by the air pollution control districts.

Morris, W.F.; Stephens, F.B.

1981-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Basics Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep within the Earth and produces minimal emissions. Photo credit: Pacific Gas & Electric Heat from the earth-geothermal energy-heats water that has seeped into underground reservoirs. These reservoirs can be tapped for a variety of uses, depending on the temperature of the water. The energy from high-temperature reservoirs (225°-600°F) can be used to produce electricity. In the United States, geothermal energy has been used to generate electricity on a large scale since 1960. Through research and development, geothermal power is becoming more cost-effective and competitive with

293

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Injection and energy recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies of the effects of injection on the behavior of production wells completed in fractured two-phase geothermal reservoirs are presented. In these studies the multiple-interacting-continua (MINC) method is employed for the modeling of idealized fractured reservoirs. Simulations are carried out for a five-spot well pattern with various well spacings, fracture spacings, and injection fractions. The production rates from the wells are calculated using a deliverability model. The results of the studies show that injection into two-phase fractured reservoirs increases flow rates and decreases enthalpies of producing wells. These two effects offset each other so that injection tends to have small effects on the usable energy output of production wells in the short term. However, if a sufficiently large fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the fracture system may become liquid-filled and an increased steam rate is obtained. Our studies show that injection greatly increases the long-term energy output from wells, as it helps extract heat from the resrvoir rocks. If a high fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the ultimate energy recovery will increase manyfold.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; O'Sullivan, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Environment Geothermal/Environment < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

296

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

297

Use of slim holes for geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment: A preliminary report on Japanese experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The publicly available Japanese data on the use of slim holes in geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment are reviewed in this report. Slim holes have been used for (1) obtaining core for geological studies, (2) delineating the stratigraphic structure, (3) characterizing reservoir fluid state (pressure, temperature, etc.), and (4) defining the permeability structure for reservoir assessment. Examples of these uses of slim hole data are presented from the Hohi Geothermal Area and the Sumikawa Geothermal Field. Discharge data from slim holes and production wells from the Oguni Geothermal Field indicate that it may be possible to infer the discharge rate of production wells based on slim hole measurements. The Japanese experience suggests that slim holes can provide useful data for cost-effective geothermal reservoir assessment. Therefore, plans for a full scale evaluation of Japanese slim hole data are outlined.

Garg, S.K. [S-Cubed, La Jolla, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

Joe Beall; Mark Walters

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei geothermal field, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an abbreviated summary of the final project report on an extensive collection of fundamental field information concerning the history of the Wairakei geothermal field in New Zealand. The purpose of the effort was to accumulate any and all pertinent data so that various theoretical reservoir simulation studies may be carried out in the future in a meaningful way. Categories of data considered include electrical resistivity measurements, magnetic force surveys, surface heat flow data and a catalog of surface manifestations of geothermal activity, geological and stratigraphic information, residual gravity anomaly surveys, laboratory measurements of formation properties, seismic velocity data, measurements of fluid chemical composition, monthly well-by-well mass and heat production histories for 1953 through 1976, reservoir pressure and temperature data, and measurements of subsidence and horizontal ground deformation. The information is presented in three forms. A review of all the data is contained in the final project report. The present report summarizes that information. In addition, a magnetic tape suitable for use on a computer has been prepared. The magnetic tape contains a bank of information for each well in the field, on a well-by-well basis. For each well, the tape contains the completion date, the surface altitude, the bottomhole depth, the geographic location, the slotted and perforated interval locations, the bottomhole diameter, locations of known casing breaks, the geologic drilling log, fault intersections, shut-in pressure measurements, and month-by-month production totals of both mass and heat for each month from January 1953 through December 1976.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Numerical investigations into the formation of a high temperature reservoir''  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an ongoing numerical modeling effort aimed at describing some of the thermodynamic conditions observed in vapor- dominated reservoirs, including the formation of a high temperature reservoir (HTR) beneath the typical'' reservoir. The modeled system begins as a hot water geothermal reservoir, and evolves through time into a vapor-dominated reservoir with a HTR at depth. This approach taken here to develop a vapor-dominated system is similar to that of Pruess (1985), and involves induced boiling through venting. The reservoir description is intentionally generic, but serves to describe a means of evolution of conditions observed (in particular) The Geysers.

Shook, M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Numerical investigations into the formation of a ``high temperature reservoir``  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an ongoing numerical modeling effort aimed at describing some of the thermodynamic conditions observed in vapor- dominated reservoirs, including the formation of a high temperature reservoir (HTR) beneath the ``typical`` reservoir. The modeled system begins as a hot water geothermal reservoir, and evolves through time into a vapor-dominated reservoir with a HTR at depth. This approach taken here to develop a vapor-dominated system is similar to that of Pruess (1985), and involves induced boiling through venting. The reservoir description is intentionally generic, but serves to describe a means of evolution of conditions observed (in particular) The Geysers.

Shook, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Aerometric measurement and modeling of the mass of CO2 emissions from Crystal Geyser, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crystal Geyser in eastern Utah is a rare, non-geothermal geyser that emits carbon dioxide gas in periodic eruptions. This geyser is the largest single source of CO{sub 2} originating from a deep reservoir. For this study, the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted from Crystal Geyser is estimated through measurements of downwind CO{sub 2} air concentration applied to an analytical model for atmospheric dispersion. Five eruptions occurred during the 48-hour field study, for a total of almost 3 hours of eruption. Pre-eruption emissions were also timed and sampled. Slow wind during three of the active eruptions conveyed the plume over a grid of samplers arranged in arcs from 25 to 100 m away from the geyser. An analytical, straight-line Gaussian model matched the pattern of concentration measurements. Plume width was determined from least-squares fit of the CO{sub 2} concentrations integrated over time. The CO{sub 2} emission rate was found to be between 2.6 and 5.8 kg/s during the eruption events, and about 0.17 kg/s during the active pre-eruptive events. Our limited field study can be extrapolated to an annual CO{sub 2} emission of 12 kilotonnes from this geyser. As this is the first application of Gaussian dispersion modeling and objective timing to CO{sub 2} emissions from a geyser of any type, the present study demonstrates the feasibility of applying this method more completely in the future.

Gouveia, F J; Johnson, M R; Leif, R N; Friedmann, S J

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

List of Geothermal Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilities Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Facility Location Owner Aidlin Geothermal Facility Geysers Geothermal Area Calpine Amedee Geothermal Facility Honey Lake, California Amedee Geothermal Venture BLM Geothermal Facility Coso Junction, California, Coso Operating Co. Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility Clear Lake, California, Calpine Beowawe Geothermal Facility Beowawe, Nevada Beowawe Power LLC Big Geysers Geothermal Facility Clear Lake, California Calpine Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility Milford, Utah PacificCorp Energy Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility Milford, Utah PacificCorp Brady Hot Springs I Geothermal Facility Churchill, Nevada Ormat Technologies Inc CE Turbo Geothermal Facility Calipatria, California CalEnergy Generation Calistoga Geothermal Facility The Geysers, California Calpine

310

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy@egi.utah.edu ABSTRACT Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be developed in reservoirs otherwise lacking sufficient

Stanford University

311

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University electrical generation capacity of a geothermal system. The methodology consists of combining probability of a geothermal reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place

Stanford University

312

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1@kyudai.jp ABSTRACT The natural state model was developed in the Takigami geothermal field, using TOUGH2 simulator

Stanford University

313

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University ON OPTIMAL LOCATION AND SIZE OF A HEAT SINK IN A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Y. Feng, M. Tyagi and C.D. White Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, 70802, USA E-mail: yfeng1@tigers.lsu.edu ABSTRACT Geothermal

Stanford University

314

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated

Stanford University

315

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Water Use Geothermal/Water Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

316

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data

317

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT OF THE RESULTS IN THE DESIGN OF THE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS. G. Partasides1 , A. Lizides1 , S. Kassinis1 , G. Florides

Stanford University

318

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University THE SOLUTION OF GEOTHERMAL HEAT-CARRIER Belova .P. Research Geotechnological Centre, Far Eastern Branch of geothermal power plants operation. Silica extraction from the solution of geothermal plants and its cleaning

Stanford University

319

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail:john.lund@nrel.gov ABSTRACT A geothermal direct-use project utilizes a natural resource, a flow of geothermal fluid, aquaculture ponds, and industrial processes. Geothermal utilization requires matching the varied needs

Stanford University

320

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University BINARY POWER PLANTS IN REMOTE GEOTHERMAL AREAS OF INDONESIA Huenges E., K. Erbas, M. Jaya, and A. Saadat in remote areas. Geothermal is one of these and has huge resources in Indonesia. Today, geothermal provides

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ERDA sponsored non-electric uses of geothermal energy in the Geysers/Clear Lake area. April progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic impact, and engineering studies undertaken to identify the different uses to which geothermal heat and fluids could be applied as a direct utilization of resource or as heat utilization are reviewed. Six potential sites are identified.

Not Available

1977-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

323

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

324

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method of using in situ porosity measurements to place an upper bound on geothermal reservoir compaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Placing an upper bound on reservoir compaction requires placing a lower bound on the reservoir effective compaction modulus. Porosity-depth data can be used to find that lower-bound modulus in a young sedimentary basin. Well-log and sample porosity data from a geothermal field in the Imperial Valley, CA, give a lower-bound modulus of 7.7 x 10{sup 3} psi. This modulus is used with pressure drops calculated for a reservoir to determine an upper bound on reservoir compaction. The effects of partial reinjection and aquifer leakage on upper-bound subsidence estimated from the compaction are illustrated for a hypothetical reservoir and well array.

Schatz, J.F.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Cheney, J.A.

1979-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in...

327

Geothermal Electricity Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Geothermal Electricity Production August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California....

328

Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

None

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Environment < Geothermal(Redirected from Environment) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

330

Vertical arrays for fracture mapping in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In collaboration with UNOCAL Geothermal Operations, Los Alamos National Laboratory assessed the feasibility of using vertical arrays of borehole seismic sensors for mapping of microseismicity in The Geysers geothermal field. Seismicity which arises from minute displacements along fracture or fault surfaces has been shown in studies of seismically active oil reservoirs to be useful in identifying fractures affected by and possibly contributing to production. Use of retrievable borehole seismic packages at The Geysers was found to reduce the threshold for detection of microearthquakes by an estimated 2--3 orders of magnitude in comparison to surface-based sensors. These studies led to the design, materials selection, fabrication, and installation of a permanent array of geophones intended for long term seismic monitoring and mapping of fractures in the vicinity of the array at The Geysers.

Albright, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D. [Nambe Geophysics, Inc. (United States); Thomson, J.C. [Lithos Inc. (United States); Stevenson, M.A. [Petroleum Geo-Services (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Study of Water Reinjection on the Kamojang Geothermal Reservoir Performance, Indonesia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reservoir simulation model study was developed to investigate effects of water reinjection into the performance of Kamojang geothermal field. Several cases including the existing injection wells and rates, the effect of injection rates, location and depth of proposed injection wells were run to study the temperature, pressure and fluid distribution in the reservoir and its effect into the reservoir and production performance for 30 years of prediction. The results show that the reservoir pressure and temperature drops are very small (4 bar and 5 C, respectively) at the end of the prediction time; therefore, the production target of 140 MW for 30 years can still be accomplished.

Darwis, R.S.; Tampubolon, T.; Simatupang, R.; Asdassah, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Recommendations of the industry advisory panel on geothermal reservoir definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the August 1984 meeting of the advisory panel are listed. The panel's comments on DOE's Geothermal Program and industry's needs and priorities are presented. (MHR)

Gulati, M.S.; Lippmann, M.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir in southern Raft River valley is fairly extensive and significantly permeable and merits further exploration.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

Lippmann, M.J. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW MONITORING BY THE REPEAT GRAVITY MEASUREMENT AT THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAPAN -APPLICATION OF HYBRID GRAVITY

Stanford University

339

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Kelly Blake and Nicholas C. Davatzes Temple University 1901 North 13th Street structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF), CA record variation in the azimuth

Stanford University

340

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Talang geothermal field lies in Solok Regency- West Sumatra Province. Low gravity anomaly (bouguer source of the geothermal system in the area. The gravity anomaly leneament trending NW-SE coincident

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez In Kizildere Geothermal Field, there were 25 drilled wells until 2009, 9 of which are currently being produced

Stanford University

342

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL FIELD - A RECENTLY DESIGNED DIGITAL BOREHOLE LOG DATA SHEET USING MICROSOFT EXCEL of the borehole log data compiled at the Pailas Geothermal Borehole Field (rate of penetration, weight on bit, mud

Stanford University

343

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University problems associated with geothermal utilization. Hellisheiði Power Plant annually emits around 13000 tons of 2011. H2S will be separated from other geothermal gases at a pilot gas separation plant, dissolved

Stanford University

344

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University APPRAISAL SYSTEM FOR DEEP GEOTHERMAL ENERGY SYSTEMS IN AQUIFERS W.A. van Leeuwen, C.N.P.J. Maaijwee and N.a.vanleeuwen@geo.uu.nl ABSTRACT Pursuit and use of geothermal energy in the Netherlands is developing steadily. However, in order

Stanford University

345

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT OLKARIA I, KENYA Cornel O. Ofwona Geothermal Development Company Ltd., P. O. Box 100746 - 00101 Nairobi, Kenya e-mail: cofwona@gdc.co.ke ABSTRACT Exploitation of Olkaria geothermal field started in 1981 when

Stanford University

346

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-THERMAL INFRARED BAND AND MAGNETOTELLURIC METHOD TO SIMULATE A GEOTHERMAL SITTING AT MT. CIREMAI, WEST JAVA at surface is crucial for geothermal exploration. Since field observations to map surface manifestation

Stanford University

347

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail: sass@geo.tu-darmstadt.de ABSTRACT The investigation and exploration of potential deep geothermal important in the exploration of potentially engineered geothermal systems and of mid to low enthalpy

Stanford University

348

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1 and Randy Nye2 1 Idaho National Laboratory PO Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2107 2 US Geothermal Inc 1505

Stanford University

349

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TEMPERATURE DATA OBTAINED AT AND AROUND THE LAS PAILAS GEOTHERMAL PROJECT AND IN RINC?N DE LA VIEJA NATIONAL the existence of subsoil thermal anomalies that may be correlated with local faults in the Pailas Geothermal

Stanford University

350

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University out in Salavatli geothermal field, Turkey. Since reinjection returns as relatively colder water seismometers at the Salavatli, Kök, Aydin, Turkey geothermal area was deployed in May 2010 in connection

Stanford University

351

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION AT JEMEZ PUEBLO IN NEW MEXICO Lianjie Huang1 and Michael Albrecht2 1 Los Alamos Geothermal Technology Center 4200 West Jemez Road, Suite 301-13 Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA e-mail: michael

Stanford University

352

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Group Zorlu Plaza, Avcilar stanbul, 34310, TURKEY e-mail: aygun.guney@zorlu.com ABSTRACT Geothermal well that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

Stanford University

353

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

Stanford University

354

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS-in the natural energy flow will slowly replenish the geothermal system and it will again be available

Stanford University

355

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University CASING IN A HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL Gunnar Skúlason Kaldal1 *, Magnús ?. Jónsson1 , Halldór@hi.is ABSTRACT The production casing of a high temperature geothermal well is subjected to multiple thermo

Stanford University

356

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL FIELD, SW-ICELAND Samuel W. Scott1 , Ingvi Gunnarsson2 , Andri Stefánsson1 , Stefán Arnórsson1 sampling campaign has recently been carried out at the Hellisheiði geothermal field in southwest Iceland

Stanford University

357

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 CONVERTING GEOTHERMAL PLAYS TO PROJECTS and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia e

Stanford University

358

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SOFTWARE S. Alcaraz1 , R. Lane2 , K. Spragg2 , S. Milicich1,3 , F. Sepulveda4 and G. Bignall1 1 Geothermal is an innovative 3-D modelling visualisation software and resource management tool, developed

Stanford University

359

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS FROM SABALAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD, N-W IRAN Haeri A.,1 Strelbitskaya S., Porkhial S2 ., Ashayeri, A1 . 1

Stanford University

360

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN KOTAMOBAGU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NORTH SULAWESI, INDONESIA Riogilang, H.1, 3 , Itoi, R.1 , Taguchi, S2 from thermal spring, river, and shallow well in Kotamobagu geothermal field. Temperature of waters

Stanford University

362

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Stanford University

363

Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report highlights the work that was done to characterize fractured geothermal reservoirs using production data. That includes methods that were developed to infer characteristic functions from production data and models that were designed to optimize reinjection scheduling into geothermal reservoirs, based on these characteristic functions. The characterization method provides a robust way of interpreting tracer and flow rate data from fractured reservoirs. The flow-rate data are used to infer the interwell connectivity, which describes how injected fluids are divided between producers in the reservoir. The tracer data are used to find the tracer kernel for each injector-producer connection. The tracer kernel describes the volume and dispersive properties of the interwell flow path. A combination of parametric and nonparametric regression methods were developed to estimate the tracer kernels for situations where data is collected at variable flow-rate or variable injected concentration conditions. The characteristic functions can be used to calibrate thermal transport models, which can in turn be used to predict the productivity of geothermal systems. This predictive model can be used to optimize injection scheduling in a geothermal reservoir, as is illustrated in this report.

Roland N. Horne, Kewen Li, Mohammed Alaskar, Morgan Ames, Carla Co, Egill Juliusson, Lilja Magnusdottir

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hydrothermal factors in porosity evolution and caprock formation at the Geysers steam field, California--insight from the Geysers Coring Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)/geothermal industry-sponsored Geysers Coring Project (GCP) has yielded 236.8 m of continuous core apparently spanning the transition between the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its caprock. Both zones in the corehole are developed in superficially similar, fractured, complexly veined and locally sericitized, Franciscan (late Mesozoic) graywacke-argillite sequences. However, whereas the reservoir rocks host two major fluid conduits (potential steam entries), the caprock is only sparingly permeable. This discrepancy appears to reflect principally vein texture and mineralogy. Two types of veins are common in the core--randomly-oriented, Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins; and high-angle, late Cenozoic veins deposited by The Geysers hydrothermal system. The older veins locally contain hydrothermal carbonate-dissolution vugs, which, although concentrated at the larger fluid conduit, are scattered throughout the core. The younger veins, commonly with intercrystalline vugs, consist dominantly of euhedral quartz, calcite, K-feldspar, wairakite, and pyrite--those in the reservoir rock also contain minor epidote and illite. The corresponding caprock veins are devoid of epidote but contain abundant, late-stage, mixed-layer illite/smecite (5-18% smectite interlayers) with minor chlorite/smectite (40-45% smectite interlayers). We suggest that clots of these two expandable clays in the caprock clog otherwise permeable veins and carbonate-dissolution networks at strategic sites to produce or enhance the seal on the underlying steam reservoir. Illite/smectite geothermometry indicates that the SB-15-D caprock clays were precipitated in the approximate temperature range 180-218 C, and those in the reservoir at about 218-238 C. These temperatures, along with occurrence of the clays on commonly etched calcite, K-feldspar, or wairakite, suggest that the clays were precipitated from mildly acidic steam condensate under conditions similar to those now prevailing.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geological control on the reservoir characteristics of Olkaria West Geothermal Field, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir of the West Olkaria Geothermal Field is hosted within tuffs and the reservoir fluid is characterized by higher concentrations of reservoir CO{sub 2} (10,000-100,000 mg/kg) but lower chloride concentrations of about 200 mg/kg than the East and North East Fields. The West Field is in the outflow and main recharge area of the Olkaria geothermal system. Permeability is generally low in the West Field and its distribution is strongly controlled by the structures. Fault zones show higher permeability with wells drilled within the structures havin larger total mass outputs. However, N-S and NW-SE faults are mainly channels for cold water downflow into the reservoir. Well feeder zones occur mostly at lava-tuff contacts; within fractured lava flows and at the contacts of intrusives and host rocks.

Omenda, Peter A.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Interaction of cold-water aquifers with exploited reservoirs of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoirs tend to exhibit good hydraulic communication with adjacent cool groundwater aquifers. Under natural state conditions the hot fluids mix with the surrounding colder waters along the margins of the geothermal system, or discharge to shallow levels by flowing up fault L. In response to exploitation reservoir pressures decrease, leading to changes in the fluid flow pattern in the system and to groundwater influx. The various Cerro Prieto reservoirs have responded differently to production, showing localized near-well or generalized boiling, depending on their access to cool-water recharge. Significant cooling by dilution with groundwater has only been observed in wells located near the edges of the field. In general, entry of cool water at Cerro Prieto is beneficial because it tends to maintain reservoir pressures, restrict boiling, and lengthen the life and productivity of wells. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Use Water Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Water Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

371

Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Coso Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization of 3D Fracture Patterns at The Geysers and Coso Geothermal Reservoirs by Shear-wave Splitting, Rial, Elkibbi, Yang and Pereyra. The raw data for the project consists of seismographic recordings of microearthquakes (MEQ) detected over many years by arrays of sensors at both The Geysers and Coso. References Patrick Laney (2005) Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Micro-Earthquake_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(2005)&oldid=475476"

372

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reservoir enhancement on the impermeable margins of productive geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the performance of Los Alamos technology in selected geothermal fields, to adapt the technology to the existing industry infrastructure where necessary, and to facilitate its application through demonstration and communication. The primary specific objective was to identify, collaborate, and partner with geothermal energy- producing companies in an evaluation of the application of Los Alamos microseismic mapping technology for locating fracture permeability in producing geothermal fields.

Goff, S.; Gardner, J.; Dreesen, D.; Whitney, E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modeling, design, and life performance prediction for energy production from geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

System modeling supports the design and long-term, commercially successful operation of geothermal reservoirs. Modeling guides in the placement of the injection and production wells, in the stimulation of the reservoir, and in the operational strategies used to ensure continuing production. Without an understanding of the reservoir, it is possible to harm the reservoir by inappropriate operation (especially break-through of cold injection fluid) and the desired profitable lifetimes will not be reached. In this project the authors have continued to develop models for predicting the life of geothermal reservoirs. One of the goals has been to maintain and transfer existing Hot Dry Rock two-dimensional fractured reservoir analysis capability to the geothermal industry and to begin the extension of the analysis concepts to three dimensions. Primary focus has been on interaction with industry, maintenance of Geocrack2D, and development of the Geocrack3D model. It is important to emphasize that the modeling is complementary to current industry modeling, in that they focus on flow in fractured rock and on the coupled effect of thermal cooling. In the following sections the authors document activities as part of this research project: industry interaction; national and international collaboration; and model development.

Swenson, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Prediction of thermal front breakthrough due to fluid reinjection in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemically reactive tracers can be used to measure reservoir temperature distributions because of their extreme sensitivity to temperature. If a reactive tracer flows through a reservoir from an injection well to a production well, then early in the production history the tracer will contact mostly high temperatures and experience a high percentage of decomposition. As more energy is extracted from the reservoir, subsequent reactive tracer tests will show less decomposition. Tracers must be chosen which have reaction kinetics appropriate to the temperature patterns expected in the reservoir under consideration. If kinetics are too slow, no significant reaction occurs. If kinetics are too fast, essentially all of the tracer will react. In neither case can useful information be obtained. Seventeen chemically reactive tracers have been identified which are appropriate for geothermal reservoirs in the 70 to 275/sup 0/C range. Of the 17 tracer reactions investigated, 5 are hydrolysis of esters, 3 are hydrolysis of amines, and 9 are hydrolysis of aryl halides. A method for choice of the appropriate reactive tracer for a given reservoir is also presented. The method requires measurement of the residence time distribution (from a conservative tracer test), an estimate of reservoir temperature, and some simple geochemistry measurements and calculations. Several examples of choosing reactive tracers for existing geothermal reservoirs are given.

Birdsell, S.A.; Robinson, B.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geothermal-Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program. Program status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date and the laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Six of the seven stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments in Raft River and the two in Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or flow rate. The acid etching treatment in the well at The Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The...

379

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mathematical models of land subsidence in geothermal areas:2nd Int. Symp. Land Subsidence, Anaheim, Ca. , Dec. 13-17,Symposium on Land Subsidence, Anaheim, CA, December 10-17,

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 x 104 kg/day of water were produced and 3.2 x 104 kg/dayand water through a porous geothermal system, including the vertical deformations produced

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

APPLICATIONS OF GEOTHERMALLY- PRODUCED COLLOIDAL SILICA IN RESERVOIR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Acknowledgment This work was sponsored by the Geothermal Technologies Office in the Department of Energy. 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Project...

382

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

383

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks. First quarterly report, January--March 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms for induced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Segall, 1997. Subsidence at The Geysers geothermalF. Rocca, 2000. Nonlinear subsidence rate estimation usingrespectively, as well as subsidence of about 1 meter that

Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The phases of the 1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California are documented. The following tests are included: separator, steam scrubber, steam turbine, heat exchanger, packed heat exchanger, corrosion, chemical cleaning, and control and instrumentation. (MHR)

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

Morgan Ames

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Full moment tensor and source...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Full moment tensor and source location inversion based on full waveform adjoint inversion: application at the Geysers geothermal field Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

389

Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. ? Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. ? The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

Walters, Mark A.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to identify thermal characteristics in deep geothermal reservoirs during the long-term operation of a power at several stages during operation of the power plant to identify changes in the reservoir properties temperature changes in the reservoir during power plant operation. Based on the positive results

Stanford University

391

US Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation. Final report (Year 3)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several reservoir model improvements incorporated into the UTA model are described. The most significant modification to the model was the inclusion of semiimplicit treatment of transmissibilities so as to better handle two-phase flow problems associated with flow near the wellbore. A description of the reservoir mechanics presumed operative in geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is included. A mathematical model describing two-dimensional flow in compacting porous media is developed from the Lagrangian point of view. A description of the way the differential equations are approximated by finite differences and subsequently solved by means of numerical procedures is presented. Various sensitivity studies made with the reservoir model are described. Particular emphasis was given to the study of potential shale dewatering effects on reservoir depletion and the effects of compaction on fluid recovery. To study shale dewatering, the shale thickness and the shale vertical permeability were treated as variables in several simulation experiments. The effects of compaction were modeled with optimistic and pessimistic values for the uniaxial compaction coefficient in an attempt to define a region of expected reservoir performance. Laboratory analysis of core samples obtained from the geopressured-geothermal test well was completed by the end of year 3. These data indicate that the uniaxial compaction coefficient is of the same order of magnitude as the pessimistic value used on the sensitivity studies. Because of this the expected fluid recovery from geopressured reservoirs has been reduced to a nominal 5% of the in-place volumes rather than the previously reported 10%.

MacDonald, R.C.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Chang, M.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Electricity Production Photo of a geothermal power plant. This geothermal power plant generates electricity for the Imperial Valley in California. Geothermal power plants use steam produced from reservoirs of hot water found a few miles or more below the Earth's surface to produce electricity. The steam rotates a turbine that activates a generator, which produces electricity. There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash steam, and binary cycle. Dry Steam Dry steam power plants draw from underground resources of steam. The steam is piped directly from underground wells to the power plant where it is directed into a turbine/generator unit. There are only two known underground resources of steam in the United States: The Geysers in northern California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where there's

393

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

system and its evolution. The high proportion of magmatic gas and high total NCG in HTR steam are inconsistent with an origin of the vapor-dominated Northwest Geysers reservoir...

395

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the potential to supply vast amounts of clean energy. But continuing to produce geothermal power efficiently and inexpensively can require innovative adjustments to the technology used to process it. Located in the Mayacamas Mountains of northern California, The Geysers is the world's larg- est geothermal complex. Encompassing 45 square miles along the Sonoma and Lake County border, the complex harnesses natural steam reservoirs to create clean renewable energy that accounts for one-fifth of the green power produced in California. In the late 1990s, the pressure of geothermal steam at The Geysers was falling, reducing the output of its power plants. NREL teamed with Pacific

396

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with...

397

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between 850 and 100 m...

398

Summary of hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. Reservoir growth is traced. Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266/sup 3/m. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Inverse Modelling of the Kawerau Geothermal Reservoir, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we describe an existing model of the Kawerau geothermal field and attempts to improve this model using inverse modeling techniques. A match of model results to natural state temperatures and pressures at three reference depths are presented. These are used to form and ''objective function'' to be minimized by inverse modeling.

White, S.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hawaii Geothermal Project; HGP-A Reservoir Engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project well HGP-A has undergone a two-year testing program which included cold water pumpdown tests, flashing flows with measurements of temperature and pressure profiles, and noise surveys. These tests and the data obtained are discussed in detail.

Yuen, P.C.; Chen, B.H.; Kihara, D.H.; Seki, A.S.; Takahashi, P.K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Three-dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The source interval was 100 feet while the source line spacing was 400 feet. The sources were comprised of 4 vibrator trucks arranged in a box array. Seismic processing involved, among other steps, the picking of over 700,000 of the possible one million traces to determine first arrival travel times, normal moveout correction, 3-D stack, deconvolution, time migration, and depth conversion. The final data set represents a 3-D cube of the subsurface structure in the reservoir. Additionally, the travel times were used to perform tomographic inversions for velocity estimates to support the findings of the surface seismic imaging. The results suggest the presence of at least one dominant fault responsible for the migration of fluids in the reservoir. Furthermore, it is suggested that this feature might be part of a fault system that includes a graben structure.

Feighner, M.; Gritto, R.; Daley, T.M.; Keers, H.; Majer, E.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crucial step in developing enhanced geothermal system (EGS) for commercial production is "reservoir with a base-case temperature of 80o C, representing steam condensate, was used for injection. Conductive heat

Stanford University

406

Electromagnetic soundings over a geothermal reservoir in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electromagnetic (EM) sounding survey was performed over a region encompassing the Dixie Valley geothermal field with the purpose of mapping the subsurface resistivity in the geothermal field and its surroundings. The EM survey consisted of 19 frequency-domain depth soundings made with the EM-60 system using three separate horizontal-loop transmitters, and was designed to explore a narrow region adjacent to the Stillwater Range to a depth of 2 to 3 k. Most sounding curves could be fitted to three-layer resistivity models. The surface layer is moderately conductive (10 to 15 ohm-m), has a maximum thickness of 500 m, and consists mainly of alluvial fan and lake sediments. More conductive zones are associated with hydrothermally altered rocks; a resistivity high may be associated with siliceous hot spring deposits. The conductive second layer (2 to 5 ohm-m) varies in thickness from 400 to 800 m and thickens toward the center of the valley. This layer probably consists of lacustrine sediments saturated with saline waters. Local resistivity lows observed in the second layer may be related to elevated subsurface temperatures. This layer may act as a cap rock for the geothermal system. Resistivities of the third layer are high (50 to 100 ohm-m) except in a narrow 5-km band paralleling the range front. This low-resistivity zone, within volcanic rocks, correlates well in depth and location with reported zones of geothermal fluid production. It also seems to correlate with the western margin of a concealed graben structure previously inferred from other geophysical data.

Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer economics. Substantial heat that has accumulated within reservoir rock and its vicinity can be extracted by circulating water relatively colder than reservoir temperature. We use compositional reservoir simulation coupled with a semianalytical equation of the wellbore heat loss approximation to estimate surface heat recovery. Additionally, sensitivity analyses provide understanding of the effect of various parameters on heat recovery in the artificial geothermal resources. Using the current state-of-art technology, the cumulative electrical power generated from heat recovered is about 246 MWhr accounting for 90percent downtime. Characteristics of heat storage within the reservoir rock were identified. The factors with the largest impact on the energy recovery during the water injection phase are the duration of the steamflood (which dictates the amount of heat accumulated in the reservoir) and the original reservoir energy in place. Outlet reservoir-fluid temperatures are used to approximate heat loss along the wellbore and estimate surface fluid temperature using the semianalytical approaches. For the injection well with insulation, results indicate that differences in fluid temperature between surface and bottomhole are negligible. However, for the conventional production well, heat loss is estimated around 13 percent resulting in the average surface temperature of 72 degrees C. Producing heat can be used in two applications: direct uses and electricity generation. For the electricity generation application that is used in the economic consideration, the net electrical power generated by this arrival fluid temperature is approximately 3 kW per one producing pattern using Ener-G-Rotors.

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

In situ heat transfer in man-made geothermal energy reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock on the west flank of the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex, in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat was extracted in a closed-loop mode of operation, injecting water into one well and extracting the heated water from a separate production well. The first reservoir was produced by fracturing the injection well at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous rock temperature was 185/sup 0/C. The relatively rapid thermal drawdown of the water produced from the first reservoir, 100/sup 0/C in 74 days, indicated that its effective fracture radius was about 60 m (200 ft). Average thermal power extracted was 4 MW. A second, larger reservoir was created by refracturing the injection well 180 m (600 ft) deeper. Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet as well as temperatures inferred from chemical geothermometry showed that the thermal drawdown of this reservoir was negligible; the effective heat transfer area of the new reservoir must be at least 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), nearly six times larger than the first reservoir. In addition reservoir residence time studies employing visible dye tracers indicated that the mean volume of the second reservoir is nine times larger. Other measurements showed that flow impedances were low, downhole water losses from these reservoirs should be manageable, that the geochemistry of the produced water was essentially benign, with no scaling problems apparent, and that the level of induced seismic activity was insignificantly small.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 injection wells, varying locations of injection/production segments of wells, and exploiting years. In absence of production/injection wells and presence of a uniform geothermal gradient of 18 C injection well that sequesters CO2 into the geothermal reservoir. This allows assessment of the effect

Stanford University

413

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fourth annual report, January 1, 1988--December 1, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on small computer systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, was tested on three PCs (486-33, 486-66, Pentium-90), a MacIntosh Quadra 800, and a workstation IBM RISC 6000. A two-phase, single porosity, 3-D geothermal reservoir model with 1,411 irregular grid blocks, with production from and injection into the reservoir was used as the test model. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in each machine environment are described. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported for each of the machines used. It is concluded that the current PCs provide the best price/performance platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers and high-end workstations.

Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Isotopic Analysis At Geyser Bight Area (Motyka, Et Al., 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geyser Bight Area (Motyka, Et Al., 1993) Geyser Bight Area (Motyka, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Geyser Bight Area (Motyka, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Geyser Bight Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Roman J. Motyka, Christopher J. Nye, Donald L. Turner, Shirley A. Liss (1993) The Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_Geyser_Bight_Area_(Motyka,_Et_Al.,_1993)&oldid=687446" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

418

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

419

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geysers geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Numerical Analysis Of Three Component Induction Logging In Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is supporting the development of the ''Geo-Bilt'', geothermal electromagnetic-induction logging tool that is being built by ElectroManetic Instruments, Inc. The tool consists of three mutually orthogonal magnetic field antennas, and three-component magnetic field receivers located at different distances from the source. In its current configuration, the source that has a moment aligned along the borehole axis consists of a 1m long solenoid, while the two trans-axial sources consist of 1m by 8cm loops of wire. The receivers are located 2m and 5m away from the center of the sources, and five frequencies from 2 kHz to 40 kHz are being employed. This study is numerically investigating (1) the effect of the borehole on the measurements, and (2) the sensitivity of the tool to fracture zone-geometries that might be encountered in a geothermal field. The benefits of the results are that they will lead to a better understanding of the data that the tool produces during its testing phase and an idea of what the limitations of the tool are.

Dr. David L. Alumbaugh

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: background and some technical characteristics of geothermal resources; geology and geohydrology, geophysics, and, conclusions regarding availability of geothermal energy for nonelectric uses; agricultural assessment of Lake County, site assessment for potential agricultural development, analysis of potential agricultural applications, special application of low cost geothermal energy to algae harvesting, development of an integrated agribusiness, geothermal complex in Lake County, analysis of individual enterprises, and, recommendations for subsequent work; demographic characteristics, economic condition and perspective of Lake County, economic impact of geothermal in Lake County, social and economic factors related to geothermal resource development, socioeconomic impact of nonelectric uses of geothermal energy, and, identification of direct heat applications of geothermal energy for Lake County based on selected interviews; cost estimate procedure, example, justification of procedure, and, typical costs and conclusions; and, recommended prefeasibility and feasibility studies related to construction of facilities for nonelectric applications of geothermal resource utilization. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Interwell tracer analyses of a hydraulically fractured granitic geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field experiments using fluorescent dye and radioactive tracers (Br{sup 82} and I{sup 131}) have been employed to characterize a hot, low-matrix permeability, hydraulically-fractured granitic reservoir at depths of 2440 to 2960 m (8000 to 9700 ft). Tracer profiles and residence time distributions have been used to delineate changes in the fracture system, particularly in diagnosing pathological flow patterns and in identifying new injection and production zones. The effectiveness of one- and two-dimensional theoretical dispersion models utilizing single and multiple porous, fractured zones with velocity and formation dependent effects are discussed with respect to actual field data.

Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The effect of CO{sub 2} on reservoir behavior for geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose was to gain an understanding of the effects of non-condensible gases (CO/sub 2/) in fractured two-phase geothermal systems. A thorough review of previous work on non-condensible gases was carried out. In addition, since the flowing mass fraction of CO/sub 2/ is strongly controlled by the flowing saturation, the flowing enthalpy literature was also reviewed. Numerical techniques were employed to examine how non-condensible gases (CO/sub 2/) affect well transients and to determine the value of these effects as tools to evaluate in situ reservoir parameters. Simplified reservoir models were used to define the effects of CO/sub 2/ in the reservoir and the resulting transient behavior at the feedzones to the well. Furthermore, fracture-matrix interaction was studied in detail to identify the effects of CO/sub 2/ on recovery and flow patterns within the reservoir. The insight gained from the sensitivity studies for enthalpy and CO/sub 2/ transients was applied to interpret transient data from well BR21 at the Broadlands geothermal field of New Zealand.

Gaulke, S.W.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000 + grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Potential Impact of Reservoir Engineering R&D on Geothermal Energy Costs  

SciTech Connect

A tutorial program for use on personal computers is being developed to evaluate the sensitivity of geothermal energy costs to potential technological improvements. Reservoir engineering R&D will reduce risk to the funding organization and in turn reduce the risk premium paid on a loan. The use of a risk premium was described as an investment bankers option at the November 1986 Future of Geothermal Energy Conference in San Diego, California. In the sensitivity analysis, we propose to calculate an energy cost: (1) at the predicted production parameters of temperature, drawdown rate, etc., and (2) at the most likely worse case values. The differential higher cost of the worse case over the predicted case is the risk premium. Thus R&D that improves reservoir definition will reduce the worse-case-minus-predicted-case difference and the financial risk premium. Improvements in reservoir engineering can then be quantified in terms of reduced energy costs. This paper will discuss the proposed approach to obtain critique of the procedure and provide the best logic for use in evaluating the potential impact of reservoir engineering R&D.

Traeger, Richard K.; Entingh, Daniel

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preliminary reservoir and subsidence simulations for the Austin Bayou geopressured geothermal prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last several years, the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) has analyzed the geopressured tertiary sandstones along the Texas Gulf Coast with the objective of locating prospective reservoirs from which geothermal energy could be recovered. Of the ''geothermal fairways'' (areas with thick sandstone bodies and estimated temperatures in excess of 300 F), the Brazoria fairway appears most promising and the Austin Bayou Prospect has been developed within this fairway. A test well (DOE 1 Martin Ranch) is currently being drilled in this area. Pending the availability of actual well test data, estimated reservoir properties have been employed in numerical simulations to study the effects of variations in reservoir properties on the projected long-term behavior of the Austin Bayou Prospect. The simulations assess the sensitivity of the reservoir behavior to variations is estimated sandstone/shale distribution, shale compressibility, and vertical shale permeability. Further, hypothetical properties for the stress-deformation behavior of the rock formations were employed in a very preliminary study of the potential ground surface displacements that might accompany fluid production.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.; Brownell, D.H., Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

Antunez, Emilio; Moridis, George; Pruess, Karsten

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, L